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Found 105 results

  1. I keep thinking I must just be stupidly forgetting/overlooking something, but I haven’t been able to come up with it in a long time. There were birds during the Mesozoic(hesperonis, for example), long before theropods evolved into birds(after the Mesozoic, right? I thought all the already very bird-like Dino’s, like archaeopteryx, dead-ended at the end of the Mesozoic)....what am I missing, here? I’ve been looking at bird evolutionary charts, and none of them seem to make sense of that. I’m not all that learned on this topic, but there are things I at least THOUGHT I knew about it, but I’m now very confused because of it, and questioning how much I really DID know! This is is just another thing that’s caught my eye, that seems strange. I’ve always thought this wasn’t the case, but as I’ve said, I’ve never known very much about this whole subject. According to the charts I’ve seen that specify this aspect, songbirds and most birds in fact, are more closely related to the first Dino/birds than raptors are(hawks/eagles/falcons). Are raptor really some of the furthest related to dinos(seemingly in the furthest 15-20%, or so)? Lastly, I’m having a very hard time finding information on terror bird evolution, and where THEY fall within the bird tree. Is anyone familiar with that?
  2. I Like Him! -- What is his name?

    OK folks, Really have no idea on this one, so need some help please. Thanks all in advance with this riddle. Dan
  3. After numerous attempts to locate a certain elusive and geographically remote late Cenomanian bonebed in the Pasquia Hills of Saskatchewan, I was recently successful at finding some of the material and bringing it home. This bonebed was deposited approximately 94 million years ago near the north-eastern margins of the Western Interior Seaway during a period of sediment starvation, resulting in the accumulation and formation of a bioclastic conglomerate made mostly of teeth, bones, and coprolites. Most striking is the abundance of Hesperornithiform bird fossils from the site, namely Pasquiaornis. More information can be found in this study here. Individual bones and teeth are easy to extract from the relatively soft matrix which can usually be broken down either with hand tools, water, or vinegar. The most commonly occuring fossils are shark and fish teeth, including Hybodus, Ptychodus, Carcharias, Squalicorax and Enchodus. Other teeth include those of birds and reptiles, mostly plesiosaurs. Besides the teeth, bone fragments, coprolites, chunks of bentonite, pebbles, fish scales and fish vertebrae are also abundant. My question is whether the bones I have tentatively identified are from Pasquiaornis, and also if anyone has other opinions and conclusive IDs on some of the other miscellaneous fossils I've included. If necessary I can take more photos, and may keep this thread updated with further discoveries as more material is sifted. Photo 1: A sample of the bonebed before prepping. This particular chunk features relatively small fossils, others were made primarily of larger inclusions, Photos 2, 3: Some complete and fragmented long bones, suspected to be from Pasquiaornis, Photo 4: Teeth suspected to originate from Pasquiaornis, along with a suspected claw at the bottom left of the photo, Photo 5: Other miscellaneous fossils from the bonebed, including an assortment of shark, fish, and plesiosaur (?) teeth. Also a sample of some of the bone fragments, vertebrae and coprolites commonly found within the material, Thanks for your attention. Any additional information or questions are greatly appreciated.
  4. NJ Cretaceous Brook Bone - Fish or Bird?

    Really not sure what to make of this type of bone? Any ideas?
  5. Bird Toe Bone

    Sieved through some matrix the other day and found this little specimen that I thought worth sharing. The scale is in .5 mm so specimen is 4 mm long so fairly small This is a toe bone from a bird about 100 million years old. It is unusual but the bias towards toe bones from this area is high go figure. The matrix this came out of is marine. Enjoy Mike
  6. Hi all, please be careful whenever you purchase Chinese vertebrate fossils or dinosaur eggs, especially turtles and birds. While some of these may look laughably fake, a search on purchase history reveals that these fossils have been sold over and over again. No prize for guessing which auction site these fossils were sold. I notice three devious techniques used by these sellers: 1) Issuing a certificate, claiming it's been examined by experts etc - Certs mean nothing, unless they are provided by actual museums 2) Selling some real fossils - I've been monitoring this seller's listings for years. Every now and then, a real one shows up. His victims may have bought something genuine from him before, and assumed all his listings are good. 3) Selling replicas alongside his fake fossils - By outright proclaiming some of his listings as replicas, this seller creates the impression that he is a responsible seller who would inform people about the true nature of their purchases. "The best lies have an element of truth" Remember, if you aren't absolutely sure of your purchase, post some pics here on TFF. We have experts who would help you if they can. Also, if you need more info about this listings or the seller, feel free to PM me.
  7. Fossilized Egg?

    I found this sometime in the 1970’s State: New York, County: Suffolk, Township: Brookhaven, Hamlet: Rocky Point on Broadway Beach on the shore of Long Island Sound. The fossil weighs about one ounce. The hole was there when found, through it there is hollow space, but I can also see that there is some structure or substance inside.
  8. A few weeks ago, I posted asking for advice on splitting fish for Green River. Your advice helped me out A TON, so thank you for that . I ended up leaving with a shrimp, crawdad, 3 Pharo's, 8 Amphiplagas, both species of Hypsiprisca, and many more. But by sheer luck, we ended up finding a bird, which means, we're going back to Wyoming for a CT scan.(And for more splitting) According to Arvid, the bird appears to be a new species, slightly dis-articulated, but it still has it's skull. I'll post pictures of our finds when I get a chance, but I wanted to thank everyone that gave me advice.
  9. Im not sure what this is

  10. https://interestingengineering.com/color-blue-distinguished-for-the-first-time-ever-in-bird-fossils
  11. So I found this bone in miocene area where I normally hunt for sharks teeth, this was found in a big gravel bed where I was finding turtle shell pieces, dugong bones, a few sharks teeth here and there, part of a big vert that ill post later, as well as many bone parts that I can't identify. However this bone is the most interesting thing I have pulled from this spot. At first I thought it was dugong because that's most of what I find. But then I noticed it was hollow in the shaft of the bone making me question what it could be because as far as I know the only things with hollow bones are birds. Any and all help would be amazing because I am lost. Ps: I'm sorry the colors are so blown out. I raised the exposure on the images because the fossil is so dark it was hard to see details in the pictures.
  12. Weird Gator or not?

    Hi Everyone, I'm new here. My name is Michael. It's nice to meet all of you! I don't have any experience in Geology, But i was at the bottom of Masada in Israel, In a place believed to be the city of Gomorrah, from Sodom and Gomorrah, and i found what i thought was a petrified Boot. And only when i did a little more discovery did i see skeletal bones etc. It is very Heavy, about kg Anyone know what it is?
  13. Hi I'm looking for my first tooth for my "bird ancestor" collection. I'm interesting about this one from one dakotaraptor steini. It's very small: 0.6cm. What do you think about this tooth ?
  14. Last 2 McKittrick bird bones

    Here are the other two in the series. One is a long limb bone, but the other maybe a tarsometatarsal? The shorter of the two is approximately 2.25 in in length.
  15. hi all, I got these as part of a collection. The ID card simply said "bird bone" from the Rancho LaBrea Fm, McKittrick. Honestly, birds are not my forte, but I'm trying, given all the bird material that I have collected from Lee Creek. But I digress... I could use some help with the ID of 4 bones. The two here are long limb bones, approximately 3.5in to 4in in length. As for an ID, that's all I can guess. Help! thanks!
  16. Hell creek small theropod bone?

    I was recently going through some old finds from last summer when I came across this little bone, it is partially hollow and has very porous bone structure. that's why I assume this bone came from a very small theropod. It shares some resemblance to a bambiraptor coracoid as shown in the last picture and is almost exactly the same size. the bone measures 11mm wide in the first picture
  17. Here is a really interesting bone. Despite being pretty small and a partial bone, this would be an excellent addition because you can get a great look inside of it. This is the type of bone that lends itself to some serious teaching I think. It is from Garfield County in Montana, Hell Creek Formation. 1 7/8" x 5/8" x 5/8". It is small and partial but it appears to be in excellent condition. It is listed as a raptor bone and my limited knowledge says that is a possibility. It sure looks like a theropod of some sort (bird, troodontid maybe I do not know). I would love to hear any and all thoughts on this one !!
  18. Was having a look at a few Kem Kem bones for sale and i came across this. It is a long bone at 26.8cm in length, looks quite thin with both ends intact (though one end has a different colouration to the rest of the bone). Wanted to get some thoughts as i originally thought this could be from a Pterosaur or a small non-avian theropod, but it seems a bit different to the Pterosaur femurs i have seen (which is what the fossil is being sold as). I am thinking it could be a leg bone from a bird? but i am no expert on Cretaceous birds. Can i ask for some opinions on this bone? thanks in advance.
  19. primitive bird fossils

    I really really love primitive birds and would love to see your primitive bird fossils, with scale if possible I only got a couple myself but would love your opinions!
  20. Colleagues, I was collecting on the shoreline of Purse park in Maryland, a beautiful site along the Potomac river. I'm hoping you can help me with your thoughts as to the identification of a few small fossils. The ruler is in centimeters. 1. The first photo appears to be a scute. Is this from a crocodile? 2-4. The next three photos are of a very small fossil which appears to be a double crowned tooth. The base is flat and the crowns are cuboid in shape and flat on top without any ridges. ideas? 5. The final photo is a tiny bone. I'm comfortable that it is fossilized and not modern. It appears to have the shaft of a long bone, or potentially a phalange, but the terminal surface is almost similar to that of an ear bone or the zygomatic arch of a bird skull. I'm a veterinary pathologist and I'm at a loss. I would welcome your guidance.
  21. Fossil IDs (if possible)

    I like collecting fossils, but I usually am not sure what my finds are. Please, could you help me identify these fossils? I noted down some possibilities down below. 1 - could be a late Albian ammonite from central Serbia, but I am not entirely sure. Acquired in Serbia. 2 - Found at Southerndown, Wales. Could it be a tree root or something in the region of that? It has a cross-hatched pattern if you look closely. 3 & 4 - A shell I found at Penarth, Wales but I am not entirely sure what it is called. 5 - A bone I found in the mud at Tites Point, Severn, Gloucestershire. maybe a birds? 6 - Some shells I found in mudstone at Charmouth, England. Was found in the same stone as 7. 7 - wood I found at Charmouth? It was very crumbly and delicate. 8 - A Trilobite fragment possibly, Llanfawr quarries, Wales. 9 - A bivalve I found in Southerndown. Not sure what it is though.
  22. Micro Bones

    From the album Judith River fm. Fossil Finds

    I have no idea what these tiny bones belong to. They could be bird, mammal, small reptile or an amphibian. These were found at the same microsite as the Troodon tooth. If you have any indication as to what these could be let me know.
  23. Fun with 3D Printing Fossils

    So recently my father bought a 3D printer and we've been experimenting printing some cool fossils for a while now. It's a really cool technology. Though it can take a while to print a piece the results are really quite cool. A life size Archaeopteryx can take a few days to print if you don't keep printing during the night. Finishing up the prints afterwards can also take a bit of time. Cleaning off all the supports and sanding down rough surfaces can be quite the process. Then there's painting depending on the desired result of course. There are actually a lot of nice things that can be found for download on the internet. Though many of these models still require a bit of digital cleanup before they could be printed. So here are a number of the painted, unpainted and half painted results. Most of the printed stuff is dinosaur. Photo of the 3D printer and the just finished print of a juvenile Edmontosaurus lower jaw. And here's the same Edmontosaurus jaw print half painted again with the real fossil in mirror image next to it. I scanned the original bone that I then mirrored digitaly so that I could print out the other side of the jaw. Allosaurus hand claw. Clidastes Mosasaur quadrate bone. Skull of the "Prosauropod" Massospondylus. Holotype right lower jaw of Owenodon, an Iguanodontid. 1/5th scale Nanotyrannus skull. The Cleveland specimen. One of my favourites. The Eichstatt Archaeopteryx specimen. The right side skeleton of the baby Parasaurolophus "Joe". Printed at 1/5th scale. Right humerus and pedal phalanges printed at life size. Most of the fossil prints are for my collection. But my dad also wanted a few cool things which I painted for him. Skulls of Dodo and Australopithecus Taung Child. Most are painted roughly to look like their real counter parts.
  24. A claw from Hell Creek

    I bought this claw a little while ago, for close to nothing. Still waiting for the item to arrive. Not sure what it is from though. It was dug up in Hell Creek. The claw and bone measure about an inch in length in total. Anyone who would have a qualified guess?
  25. Possible bird skull?

    Hello everyone, this is my first thread on this forum. I found this community while doing some research about a possible bird skull fossil. The piece was found by me in the Sea of Lima, Peru, in the 2018 summer. I can take more pictures if needed. I see myself a peack and some eyes sockets ..
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