Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'bird'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
    Tags should be keywords or key phrases. e.g. carcharodon, pliocene, cypresshead formation, florida.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Fossil Discussion
    • General Fossil Discussion
    • Fossil Hunting Trips
    • Fossil ID
    • Is It Real? How to Recognize Fossil Fabrications
    • Partners in Paleontology - Member Contributions to Science
    • Questions & Answers
    • Fossil of the Month
    • Member Collections
    • A Trip to the Museum
    • Paleo Re-creations
    • Collecting Gear
    • Fossil Preparation
    • Member Fossil Trades Bulletin Board
    • Member-to-Member Fossil Sales
    • Fossil News
  • Gallery
  • Fossil Sites
    • Africa
    • Asia
    • Australia - New Zealand
    • Canada
    • Europe
    • Middle East
    • South America
    • United States
  • Fossil Media
    • Members Websites
    • Fossils On The Web
    • Fossil Photography
    • Fossil Literature
    • Documents

Blogs

  • Anson's Blog
  • Mudding Around
  • Nicholas' Blog
  • dinosaur50's Blog
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • Seldom's Blog
  • tracer's tidbits
  • Sacredsin's Blog
  • fossilfacetheprospector's Blog
  • jax world
  • echinoman's Blog
  • Ammonoidea
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • Adventures with a Paddle
  • Caveat emptor
  • -------
  • Fig Rocks' Blog
  • placoderms
  • mosasaurs
  • ozzyrules244's Blog
  • Sir Knightia's Blog
  • Terry Dactyll's Blog
  • shakinchevy2008's Blog
  • MaHa's Blog
  • Stratio's Blog
  • ROOKMANDON's Blog
  • Phoenixflood's Blog
  • Brett Breakin' Rocks' Blog
  • Seattleguy's Blog
  • jkfoam's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Lindsey's Blog
  • marksfossils' Blog
  • ibanda89's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Back of Beyond
  • St. Johns River Shark Teeth/Florida
  • Ameenah's Blog
  • gordon's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • Pennsylvania Perspectives
  • michigantim's Blog
  • michigantim's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • GPeach129's Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • Olenellus' Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • maybe a nest fossil?
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • bear-dog's Blog
  • javidal's Blog
  • Digging America
  • John Sun's Blog
  • John Sun's Blog
  • Ravsiden's Blog
  • Jurassic park
  • The Hunt for Fossils
  • The Fury's Grand Blog
  • julie's ??
  • Hunt'n 'odonts!
  • falcondob's Blog
  • Monkeyfuss' Blog
  • cyndy's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • nola's Blog
  • mercyrcfans88's Blog
  • Emily's PRI Adventure
  • trilobite guy's Blog
  • xenacanthus' Blog
  • barnes' Blog
  • myfossiltrips.blogspot.com
  • HeritageFossils' Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Emily's MotE Adventure
  • farfarawy's Blog
  • Microfossil Mania!
  • A Novice Geologist
  • Southern Comfort
  • Eli's Blog
  • andreas' Blog
  • Recent Collecting Trips
  • retired blog
  • Stocksdale's Blog
  • andreas' Blog test
  • fossilman7's Blog
  • Books I have enjoyed
  • Piranha Blog
  • xonenine's blog
  • xonenine's Blog
  • Fossil collecting and SAFETY
  • Detrius
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Kehbe's Kwips
  • RomanK's Blog
  • Prehistoric Planet Trilogy
  • mikeymig's Blog
  • Western NY Explorer's Blog
  • Regg Cato's Blog
  • VisionXray23's Blog
  • Carcharodontosaurus' Blog
  • What is the largest dragonfly fossil? What are the top contenders?
  • Hihimanu Hale
  • Test Blog
  • jsnrice's blog
  • Lise MacFadden's Poetry Blog
  • BluffCountryFossils Adventure Blog
  • meadow's Blog
  • Makeing The Unlikley Happen
  • KansasFossilHunter's Blog
  • DarrenElliot's Blog
  • jesus' Blog
  • A Mesozoic Mosaic
  • Dinosaur comic
  • Zookeeperfossils
  • Cameronballislife31's Blog
  • My Blog
  • TomKoss' Blog
  • A guide to calcanea and astragali
  • Group Blog Test
  • Paleo Rantings of a Blockhead
  • Dead Dino is Art
  • The Amber Blog
  • TyrannosaurusRex's Facts
  • PaleoWilliam's Blog
  • The Paleo-Tourist
  • The Community Post
  • Lyndon D Agate Johnson's Blog
  • BRobinson7's Blog
  • Eastern NC Trip Reports
  • Toofuntahh's Blog
  • Pterodactyl's Blog
  • A Beginner's Foray into Fossiling
  • Micropaleontology blog
  • Pondering on Dinosaurs
  • Fossil Preparation Blog
  • On Dinosaurs and Media
  • cheney416's fossil story
  • jpc
  • Red-Headed Red-Neck Rock-Hound w/ My Trusty HellHound Cerberus
  • Red Headed
  • Paleo-Profiles
  • Walt's Blog
  • Between A Rock And A Hard Place
  • Rudist digging at "Point 25", St. Bartholomä, Styria, Austria (Campanian, Gosau-group)
  • Prognathodon saturator 101

Calendars

  • Calendar

Categories

  • Annelids
  • Arthropods
    • Crustaceans
    • Insects
    • Trilobites
    • Other Arthropods
  • Brachiopods
  • Cnidarians (Corals, Jellyfish, Conulariids )
    • Corals
    • Jellyfish, Conulariids, etc.
  • Echinoderms
    • Crinoids & Blastoids
    • Echinoids
    • Other Echinoderms
    • Starfish and Brittlestars
  • Forams
  • Graptolites
  • Molluscs
    • Bivalves
    • Cephalopods (Ammonites, Belemnites, Nautiloids)
    • Gastropods
    • Other Molluscs
  • Sponges
  • Bryozoans
  • Other Invertebrates
  • Ichnofossils
  • Plants
  • Chordata
    • Amphibians & Reptiles
    • Birds
    • Dinosaurs
    • Fishes
    • Mammals
    • Sharks & Rays
    • Other Chordates
  • *Pseudofossils ( Inorganic objects , markings, or impressions that resemble fossils.)

Found 119 results

  1. Help Identifying Hell Creek Bones

    I've just cleaned up a big batch of Hell Creek bones and I'm struggling to ID a few of them. I have some ideas as to a few, but others I'm clueless (and I'm sure some won't be able to be ID'd beyond indeterminate dino/reptile bone). These four are all pretty big. The largest, second from the right, is just over 6.5 inches. I've attached a picture of that one before I repaired it as it has very thick walls. That bone and second from the left are very heavy for their size, so I'm assuming they're theropod (probably leg bones). I haven't a clue with the other two, but they're an odd shape.
  2. I've always been fascinated by the Cretaceous sea and its myriad of terrifying carnivores, many that would've made Jaws look meek. After watching BBC's Sea Monsters, I made it my goal to compile a box of sea monster fossils. I started this journey 10 years ago, and finally completed the box recently. Allow me to present my Predators of the Cretaceous Sea collection, and take you on a journey to the most dangerous sea of all times. The box measures 20.25 inches long. Inside are 24 unique predator fossils. I will introduce them from left to right, top to bottom: Rhombodus binkhorsti Age: 70.6 - 66 mya | late Cretaceous Formation: Severn Formation Locality: Bowie, Maryland, USA Size: 1 meters Diet: Molluscs and crustaceans art by Nobu Tamura --------------- Polyptychodon interruptus Age: 105.3 - 94.3 mya | Cretaceous Formation: Stoilensky Quarry stratigraphic unit Locality: Stary-Oskol, Belgorod Oblast, Russia Size: Maybe 7 meters (This is a tooth taxon so size is not confirmed) Diet: Anything it could catch Note: If you consider Polytychodon a nomen dubium, then this is a Pliosauridae indet. art by Mark Witton ----------------- Prognathodon giganteus Age: 70.6 - 66 mya | late Cretaceous Formation: Ouled Abdoun Basin Locality: Khouribga Phosphate Deposits, Morocco Size: 10-14 meters Diet: Everything art by SYSTEM(ZBrushCentral) --------------- Coloborhynchinae indet. Age: 99.7 - 94.3 mya | late Cretaceous Formation: Kem Kem Beds Locality: Southeast Morocco Size: 7 meters (high estimate) Diet: Fish and cephalopods
  3. Hey guys, I saw this listed as a dinosaur claw, I personally feel like this looks more like a bird claw. What do you guys think? its found at Morocco, 8mm long
  4. Peace River ungual

    Spending some time in the house picking through some micro-matrix I collected last time I was out on the Peace River. The fine gravel is more worn and polished than from other sites (like Cookiecutter Creek) but that is to be expected since the Peace is a much larger waterway with a greater flow (especially in the summer when the gravel is being deposited). Most of the small shark teeth tend to be worn as well but not as much as you'd find from specimens picked up from the surf zone of places like Caspersen Beach in Venice, FL which produce a lot of teeth that look like they've been through a rock tumbler. Few novelties seem to come from the Peace River micro-matrix (compared to other micro-matrix sites in Florida) but an interesting little ungual turned up yesterday. My suspicion is that this is likely a turtle claw core but I see so few of these that I can't distinguish avian from terrapin. Anybody have a thought on this little find? It measures 7.5 mm from end to end. Cheers. -Ken
  5. For sale is a large bone (50cm or 20 inches) from the Ouled Abdoun Basin in Morocco (phosphate mines). It is listed as a Pterosaur wing bone and i think the id is correct, however i have seen bones from the Ouled Abdoun Basin that have appeared labelled as from the psuedotooth birds (generally Odontopteryx Gigas), and i am not sure how to tell the difference. The biggest problem is that the seller who purchased it from someone else, has the locality listed as the Kem Kem - which is certainly incorrect and because of the incorrect fossil site, i can't know for sure if the fossil came from the Maastrichtian layers of the Ouled Abdoun Basin and i believe the Pterosaurs described from these layers are known primarily from Couche 3. So i guess based on the pictures provided, does anyone familiar with fossils from the locality know if it likely to be Pterosaur. Thanks in advance.
  6. Bird skull/ femur head

    Please help me with the identification You can ask me for more photos
  7. A new Eocene bird species has been discovered in the Uinta Formation in the Uinta Basin of Utah. Dubbed informally as the Uintan paraortygid (yet to be formally named), this bird species lived about 44 mya and belongs to a family of extinct birds known as Paraortygidae that are related to living Galliformes (like chickens, turkeys & quails) and fossils from this group have been found in Europe, Asia, Africa & North America. The species is know from a coracoid bone. The authors state that these small ground-dwelling birds may have been competing with early mammals for resources http://www.sci-news.com/paleontology/uintan-paraortygid-08189.html https://www.mdpi.com/1424-2818/12/3/90 (Stidham, Townsend & Holroyd., 2020)
  8. Feather bird.

    Feather bird. Green River, bought it in Tucson Are there publications? Thank you
  9. I think I found a bird bone?

    Myrtle Beach find, just this afternoon. Looks like it came off a chicken Also, it's hollow. Forgot to take a photo of that angle, but a hole all the way through the center. Ideas?
  10. Fossil Pelican horns?

    Hello again, I just read that the American white pelican ( Pelecanus erythrorhynchos ) grows a kind of horn during mating season that is shed when the eggs are laid. Has anyone ever heard of one of those being found fossil, or subfossil? I know that keratin is rarely preserved, I am just curious. Best Regards, J
  11. Fish or fowl?

    Found this specimen at the edge of the water while shelling this past Sunday, January 12, 2020, at Navarre Beach in Santa Rosa County, Florida. My first guess is that it is the top portion of the beak of a species of bird, but found nothing when I Goggled it. It measures 35 mm in length and 22 mm at it’s widest point. I really appreciate your help and apologize in advance for my “beginner” status and lack of knowledge in the field. Sincerely, DB
  12. Help On ID

    I found this hollow bone in an area on Northeast Texas that has a mix of Pleistocene and Cretaceous fossils. I sent the pics to two paleontologist and one thought cretaceous bird and one thought it was a raccoon distal left radius. I wanted to see what everyone thought. It's definitely a hollow fossil bone.
  13. Feather from the neogene

    Hi guys, Last week I was on a vacation in Balchik on the northern coast of the black sea and I visited a small fossil site there. It's a small shoreline littered with mudstone and limestone (I think). Previously there I have been finding bones of sea mammals but this time I found something even more interesting... From what I can tell it's a feather. I just wanted to ask you if you can confirm that it's a feather. I was also wandering if there is anyway that it is a modern birds feather somehow imprinted on the fallen rock. Happy New Year to everyone !!!
  14. Burmite amber with dinosaur feathers?

    Hello! I see this 3 amber Burmese pieces with feathers. The seller told my that the feathers are from dinosaur. I am looking for amber information but is difficult to find a good resource. What do you think? Amber 1
  15. Pleistocene bone Id

    I found this bone years ago on the Brazos River and never got around to asking for help with an I’d. Could this be from a bird? It seems hollow, but well mineralized.
  16. I keep thinking I must just be stupidly forgetting/overlooking something, but I haven’t been able to come up with it in a long time. There were birds during the Mesozoic(hesperonis, for example), long before theropods evolved into birds(after the Mesozoic, right? I thought all the already very bird-like Dino’s, like archaeopteryx, dead-ended at the end of the Mesozoic)....what am I missing, here? I’ve been looking at bird evolutionary charts, and none of them seem to make sense of that. I’m not all that learned on this topic, but there are things I at least THOUGHT I knew about it, but I’m now very confused because of it, and questioning how much I really DID know! This is is just another thing that’s caught my eye, that seems strange. I’ve always thought this wasn’t the case, but as I’ve said, I’ve never known very much about this whole subject. According to the charts I’ve seen that specify this aspect, songbirds and most birds in fact, are more closely related to the first Dino/birds than raptors are(hawks/eagles/falcons). Are raptor really some of the furthest related to dinos(seemingly in the furthest 15-20%, or so)? Lastly, I’m having a very hard time finding information on terror bird evolution, and where THEY fall within the bird tree. Is anyone familiar with that?
  17. I Like Him! -- What is his name?

    OK folks, Really have no idea on this one, so need some help please. Thanks all in advance with this riddle. Dan
  18. NJ Cretaceous Brook Bone - Fish or Bird?

    Really not sure what to make of this type of bone? Any ideas?
  19. Bird Toe Bone

    Sieved through some matrix the other day and found this little specimen that I thought worth sharing. The scale is in .5 mm so specimen is 4 mm long so fairly small This is a toe bone from a bird about 100 million years old. It is unusual but the bias towards toe bones from this area is high go figure. The matrix this came out of is marine. Enjoy Mike
  20. Hi all, please be careful whenever you purchase Chinese vertebrate fossils or dinosaur eggs, especially turtles and birds. While some of these may look laughably fake, a search on purchase history reveals that these fossils have been sold over and over again. No prize for guessing which auction site these fossils were sold. I notice three devious techniques used by these sellers: 1) Issuing a certificate, claiming it's been examined by experts etc - Certs mean nothing, unless they are provided by actual museums 2) Selling some real fossils - I've been monitoring this seller's listings for years. Every now and then, a real one shows up. His victims may have bought something genuine from him before, and assumed all his listings are good. 3) Selling replicas alongside his fake fossils - By outright proclaiming some of his listings as replicas, this seller creates the impression that he is a responsible seller who would inform people about the true nature of their purchases. "The best lies have an element of truth" Remember, if you aren't absolutely sure of your purchase, post some pics here on TFF. We have experts who would help you if they can. Also, if you need more info about this listings or the seller, feel free to PM me.
  21. Fossilized Egg?

    I found this sometime in the 1970’s State: New York, County: Suffolk, Township: Brookhaven, Hamlet: Rocky Point on Broadway Beach on the shore of Long Island Sound. The fossil weighs about one ounce. The hole was there when found, through it there is hollow space, but I can also see that there is some structure or substance inside.
  22. A few weeks ago, I posted asking for advice on splitting fish for Green River. Your advice helped me out A TON, so thank you for that . I ended up leaving with a shrimp, crawdad, 3 Pharo's, 8 Amphiplagas, both species of Hypsiprisca, and many more. But by sheer luck, we ended up finding a bird, which means, we're going back to Wyoming for a CT scan.(And for more splitting) According to Arvid, the bird appears to be a new species, slightly dis-articulated, but it still has it's skull. I'll post pictures of our finds when I get a chance, but I wanted to thank everyone that gave me advice.
  23. https://interestingengineering.com/color-blue-distinguished-for-the-first-time-ever-in-bird-fossils
  24. So I found this bone in miocene area where I normally hunt for sharks teeth, this was found in a big gravel bed where I was finding turtle shell pieces, dugong bones, a few sharks teeth here and there, part of a big vert that ill post later, as well as many bone parts that I can't identify. However this bone is the most interesting thing I have pulled from this spot. At first I thought it was dugong because that's most of what I find. But then I noticed it was hollow in the shaft of the bone making me question what it could be because as far as I know the only things with hollow bones are birds. Any and all help would be amazing because I am lost. Ps: I'm sorry the colors are so blown out. I raised the exposure on the images because the fossil is so dark it was hard to see details in the pictures.
×