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Found 167 results

  1. A bunch of different Glycymeris

    Hi all, So, here are a bunch of fossil bittersweet clams (Glycymeris) from different locations. So far they are all labeled as "Glycymeris" (which I'm pretty sure is correct). But I would really like to put a species name on each of them. Therefore I am reaching out to you all, because hopefully you will be able to help me sort this out! 1) Glycymeris from Westerschelde, Netherlands; from the late Pliocene (2.5 million years old). I'm thinking G. radiolyrata, but I'm not sure... 2) Glycymeris from Westerschelde, Netherlands; from the late Pliocene (2.5 million years old). G. obovata maybe? Or G. variabilis???
  2. Mineral Wells Texas, Nut or?

    A veterinarian friend of mine went on a cub scouts camping trip with his son. The group found this fossil at Mineral Wells State Park located in Texas. The cub scouts are curious if this is a plant or animal fossil? Any identification help would be appreciated. Thank you for any help!!! Jill
  3. Hi all, I have been having trouble finding a good guide to use in order to ID fossil seashells (mainly gastropods and bivalves) of the Neogene-Quaternary of Western Europe (mainly Belgium/Netherlands). So, I'm turning to you guys: does anyone of you have a nice up-to-date website/online paper that I could use in order to help me ID all of my different seashells? Preferable with clear photos/drawings of the different species. Thanks in advance! Max
  4. Bivalve ID

    I found these a while back at Mineral Wells, TX. I have been collecting fossils for years, but never bothered to ID any of them. To me it's about the fun of the hunt and discovery. But I'm trying to expand my knowledge of the field and the specimens I've collected. So I would appreciate any education as to what these are. They're all 2 cm or smaller. I've got more, but I think this is an adiquate sample of what I have to give an ID. The predominant fossils in the area are crinoids though.
  5. Bivalve "scallop" Peru

    Hi I recently obtained this specimen at a street market in Peru. Its 5cm x 4cm. Looks scallop or oyster like. Any ideas on id and age? Regards Dennis
  6. Trigonia-like bivalve Peru

    Hi I recently obtained this specimen at a street market in Peru. Its triangular 3cm x 2cm x1cm. Looks Trigonia-like. Any ideas on id and age? Regards Dennis
  7. Trigonia-like bivalve Peru

    One last photo
  8. Fossil Geoduck?

    I found this clam eroding from a concretion in the Carlile Shale (Turonian) outcrops which I hike regularly. After much debate (with myself ) about the i.d. of this clam, I want to label it as panopea sp. (the modern species is referred to as a geoduck) but wanted to post it here to get your thoughts as well. Is this a fossil geoduck? Thanks for pondering, -P.
  9. Samphire Hoe, Sussex, England

    Samphire Hoe, Sussex is not far from Dover and was created by dumping stuff from the digging of the Channel Tunnel. It is a wonderful nature reserve, has a small shop/café, access to the beach and chalk fossils are easy to find on the surface of the fallen blocks. Mobile phone service is a bit weird as my phone connected and said Welcome to France, but Dutch tourists there had English connection. Good job there is a pay phone. Here are just a few of the bits I took a photo of. Not completely prepped yet but you get the idea of what can be found. Some are micro fossils from the dust as chalk easy to break down or scoop up from the bottom of the cliff. 1 - common foram 2 - Ramulina foram 3 - Tiny tooth next to Tritaxia foram ( let me know if I have got my ID wrong) 4 - Fish scale 5 - Bivalve with encrusting bryozoa 6 & 7 -Onchotrochus serpentinus Corallite overhead view and of one end confirming not a serpula 7 to 9 - What I think is shed isopod skin, NHM could not ID it but then they sent it to the fish department.
  10. Staten Island shell fossil ID

    Hey everyone, many years ago my dad found these shell fossils on a beach in Staten Island New York. I was wondering if any of you shell experts would be able to identify them. Thank you! -Mike
  11. Bivalve steinkern from France

    Hi all, Anyone know what species/genus this bivalve steinkern is? It's from Rivière-sur-Tarn, a location in France that yields fossils from the Toarcian stage of the early Jurassic (approx 180 mya). Best regards, Max
  12. Another bivalve steinkern from France

    Hi all, Anyone know what species/genus this gastropod is? Never seen anything like this one before... It's from Rivière-sur-Tarn, a location in France that yields fossils from the Toarcian stage of the early Jurassic (approx 180 mya). Best regards, Max
  13. Fun with Flourescence

    A couple months ago, the Mollusk Collection Manager at at the museum where I volunteer introduced me to Architectonica shells under black light. This afternoon, the two of us rummaged through the spare shell cabinet to see what else might fluoresce nicely. What's in your closet? Architectonica sp., Pliocene/Pleistocene, Florida Arcinella cornuta, Pliocene/Pleistocene, Florida Cymatosyrinx acinica, Pliocene/Pleistocene, Florida Scaphella sp., Pliocene/Pleistocene, Florida Turritella plebia, Miocene, St. Leonard, Calvert County, Maryland
  14. Arcinella cornuta

    From the album Fossil Flourescence

    Arcinella cornuta Pliocene/Pleistocene Florida Viewed under short-wave ultraviolet light
  15. Hello, I recently found what I believe is a mollusk fossil in a western washington river. Is it possibly a freshwater mollusk fossil (as I found it in a river that currently has freshwater mussels that live there)? You can see size comparison to my average womens sized hands
  16. Unknown Bivalve From The Navesink

    I found this Bivalve in the Navesink Fm in a Monmouth County Brook and I'm not sure what to make of it. anybody here have any ideas about it ???? The shell measures 21mm long and 13mm at its widest .
  17. Found a shoreline on the Missouri River in southeastern South Dakota with some mollusc fossils. There were lots like the one on the left, but only one I could find like the one on the right. Can anyone identify these? They'd be from the Cretaceous period, right? The fossil on the right is the size of a quarter. The ones on the left range from softball to golf ball.
  18. Carditamera protracta

    Collected from a lump of matrix deposited in the Chesapeake Bay by landslide activity. It's one of only three I have been able to collect that were intact enough to identify. Donated to the Delaware Museum of Natural History.
  19. Corbula inaequalis

    This specimen and dozens like it were collected from matrix material deposited in the waters of the Chesapeake Bay by a landslide. It is one of only a few species that consistently survived intact in the matrix samples I collected. Most specimens were single, unbroken valves, but several had both valves together and intact. This specimen was donated to the Delaware Museum of Natural History. Formerly known as Corbula inequalis.
  20. Complete Bivalve Please ID

    Hi All, I grew up on the east Side of Fort Worth, Tx. literally on the banks of a creek that flowed into the West Fork of the Trinity River. My Dad always said the period of the deposits were Cretceous and I became quite the young fossil hunter, finding many full ammonites, pet wood and of course lots of oyster shells. Literally 40 years ago, I dug up this complete oyster. To my delight, my Stepmom had kept it all these years and gave it to me just a few days ago. It's huge, 4 inches toe to edge. That's my wife's hand holding it - no photo tricks. Please can you give me full ID?
  21. Big Bivalve Shell

    A mailbox find - got this one in a swap. No locality info. Any idea what this is?
  22. Maybe a bivalve?

    I think this is a bivalve. I'm curious as to whether or not I'm right, and what it's age might be.
  23. Fossil? Bivalves from Milnerton

    Hi all, I found those bivalves on Milnerton beach (Cape Town, South Africa). The beach is known to have fossil shark teeth and whale bones, but I don't know if they have fossil seashells. They do have modern ones. Those shells, because of many different features, do make me think that they are fossil. Anyways, I'm interested in 2, if not 3 things: • Species • Fossil or modern • (if fossil) how old If this species is (locally) extinct, then I think I can quite confidently put them down as fossil, but otherwise I'm not sure. The things that make me think that they are fossil are: • they are very thick • they are dull • they feel very hard (a lot like stone) Those features are applicable with shells found on the Zandmotor (NL), to see if they are modern or fossil; whether they are applicable in Cape Town I have no clue. Thanks in advance, Max
  24. More fossil? Bivalves from Milnerton

    Hi all, I found those bivalves on Milnerton beach (Cape Town, South Africa). The beach is known to have fossil shark teeth and whale bones, but I don't know if they have fossil seashells. They do have modern ones. Those shells, because of many different features, do make me think that they are fossil. Anyways, I'm interested in 2, if not 3 things: • Species • Fossil or modern • (if fossil) how old If this species is (locally) extinct, then I think I can quite confidently put them down as fossil, but otherwise I'm not sure. The things that make me think that they are fossil are: • they are very thick • they are dull • they feel very hard (a lot like stone) Those features are applicable with shells found on the Zandmotor (NL), to see if they are modern or fossil; whether they are applicable in Cape Town I have no clue. Thanks in advance, Max (PS to mods: this may seem like a duplicate copy of a previous topic I posted, but this one is for different fossils; the text applies to both cases)
  25. New find. Brachiopod ? or bivalve?

    This appears to be a section of the largest brachiopod or bivalve that I have seen here so far. The ridges are near parallel in each direction and there is a very slight arc to the surface suggesting (to me) a relatively large specimen. I did not see it in the link referenced earlier. Does anyone recognize this one ? The next post has a stranger in it as well. Almost looks like the hinge of a brachiopod, but not sure. Thanks again. Here is the other ...................
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