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Found 185 results

  1. Hi all, Another very specific bivalve question for you all, this time regarding the freshwater species Corbicula fluminalis. So on the Wikipedia page: LINK, it says that this species is originally from Asia, but was introduced to Europe (and USA). Meaning it was brought here by humans. But, what is weird is that I found 2 fossil specimens of this species (as well as modern ones sometimes) here in the Netherlands! From the late Pleistocene, some 400K years ago. Long before humans had the means to introduce bivalve species like this in new places (and also long before humans came to the Netherlands in the first place). Oh, also, something relevant to take into account is that this species is NOT present in Eemian sediments! (late Pleistocene, 120k years) So how come that this species was "there" 400K years ago, disappeared, and then "came back"? The only thing I would consider as a solution is that the species went locally extinct (while still thriving in Eastern Asia) and was then reintroduced, but what is surprising is that I don't think that one single species could be alive in several different places far away from each other (the distance from Amsterdam to Beijing is nearly 8000 km!)... I don't think a bivalve species could possibly be present in such faraway places. So my question to you all is: what happened? How could it be on/off/on for this species in the Netherlands? Thanks in advance! Max
  2. The Cockles: Common vs Lagoon

    Hi all, So the Cerastoderma genus has (in addition to a few other fossil species) two extant species: C. edule (common cockle0 and C. glaucum (lagoon cockle). Both of these species appear (both fossil and modern) here in the North Sea, and their Eemian fossils are common finds at the Zandmotor. Now I have always been told, and read in most of my books, that the difference between them is that: -> if you draw a vertical line from the umbo downwards, C. edule is pretty much symmetrical while C. glaucum will have one side more stretched out. As can be seen in the picture above. Pretty straightforward. Plus, this is what I explained in one of my old Instagram posts: But, while searching a bit around, I just now saw on the Wikipedia website a picture of a symmetrical cockle that they claim is C. glaucum. And WoRMS also has some pictures of some more or less symmetrical cockles for the lagoon cockle! So I am very confused... What is the difference then between the two species? Looking forward to your answers! Best regards, Max
  3. Sunset shell

    This very nice and rare sunset shell was found in an extension of the Rotterdam airport, known as the Maasvlakte 2. One of the favorite bivalves of my collection Another name of this species is Psammobia fervensis, but this name is no longer accepted.
  4. Anomia bivalve

    An Anomia ephippium, found in a sandbank in the city of The Hague. This is technically an ex-situ find, because the city itself isn't really a location for finding fossils. The real location would be the Zandmotor or the North Sea; the bivalve here was brought with sands imported from the North Sea. This species is recognizable from the three muscle scars, the pearly shine and the weird little white thing in the hinge area (3rd picture).
  5. Arcinella cornuta

    Self collected at a sand pit in Columbus County N.C. Most of the time these are found as single valves with the "spines" completely broken off.
  6. Jacksboro, Texas bivalve?

    Jacksboro, Texas Lost Creek Dam area, about 1 inch long, Pennsylvanian, Graham Formation, Finis Shale. Need help with ID. Thanks in advance for any help.
  7. Myophorella SP

    From the album Best of 2017 finds - a year in review

    Myophorella SP, a bivalve from Les Vaches Noires - Normandy - France - oxfordian - collected in june 2017
  8. Texigryphaea marcoui bivalve a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Texigryphaea marcoui bivalve SITE LOCATION: Mills County, Texas, USA TIME PERIOD: Lower Cretaceous (100-145 million years ago) Data: Gryphaea, common name Devil's toenails, is a genus of extinct oysters, marine bivalve mollusks in the family Gryphaeidae. These fossils range from the Triassic to the Tertiary periods, but are mostly restricted to the Triassic and Jurassic. Both periods belong to the era Mesozoic. They are particularly common in many parts of Britain. These oysters lived on the sea bed in shallow waters, possibly in large colonies. The complete fossils consist of two articulated valves: a larger gnarly-shaped shell (the "toenail") and a smaller, flattened shell, the "lid". The soft parts of the animal occupied the cavity between the two shells, just like modern oysters. The shells also feature prominent growth bands. The larger, curved shell sat within the mud on the sea floor. These shells are sometimes found in fossil plates along with Turritella, clams, and sometimes sharks' teeth and fossilized fish scales. Its distribution is common in areas of both Europe and North America. A classic location to find these fossils is Redcar, on the northeast coast of England. There used to be a common folk belief that carrying one of these fossils could prevent rheumatism. They are also found in abundance in the state of Kansas in riverbeds and cliffs as well as the Big Horn Canyon of Wyoming and Montana. The benthic, free-living oyster Texigryphaea was the dominant constituent of many late Albian marine communities in the Texas and southern Western Interior regions. Large topotypic assemblages of three common lower–middle Washita Group species (T. navia and T. pitcheri in Oklahoma and T. tucumcarii in New Mexico) each display considerable morphological variation in valve shape and the proportions and expression of various features. Variation within an assemblage is partly due to ontogenetic changes but is mainly ecophenotypic, with local variation in nature of substrate, water turbulence, length of attachment time, and other factors influencing the final morphology of the mature shell. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Bivalvia Order: Ostreoida Family: Gryphaeidae Genus: †Texigryphaea Species: †marcoui
  9. Texigryphaea marcoui bivalve a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Texigryphaea marcoui bivalve SITE LOCATION: Mills County, Texas, USA TIME PERIOD: Lower Cretaceous (100-145 million years ago) Data: Gryphaea, common name Devil's toenails, is a genus of extinct oysters, marine bivalve mollusks in the family Gryphaeidae. These fossils range from the Triassic to the Tertiary periods, but are mostly restricted to the Triassic and Jurassic. Both periods belong to the era Mesozoic. They are particularly common in many parts of Britain. These oysters lived on the sea bed in shallow waters, possibly in large colonies. The complete fossils consist of two articulated valves: a larger gnarly-shaped shell (the "toenail") and a smaller, flattened shell, the "lid". The soft parts of the animal occupied the cavity between the two shells, just like modern oysters. The shells also feature prominent growth bands. The larger, curved shell sat within the mud on the sea floor. These shells are sometimes found in fossil plates along with Turritella, clams, and sometimes sharks' teeth and fossilized fish scales. Its distribution is common in areas of both Europe and North America. A classic location to find these fossils is Redcar, on the northeast coast of England. There used to be a common folk belief that carrying one of these fossils could prevent rheumatism. They are also found in abundance in the state of Kansas in riverbeds and cliffs as well as the Big Horn Canyon of Wyoming and Montana. The benthic, free-living oyster Texigryphaea was the dominant constituent of many late Albian marine communities in the Texas and southern Western Interior regions. Large topotypic assemblages of three common lower–middle Washita Group species (T. navia and T. pitcheri in Oklahoma and T. tucumcarii in New Mexico) each display considerable morphological variation in valve shape and the proportions and expression of various features. Variation within an assemblage is partly due to ontogenetic changes but is mainly ecophenotypic, with local variation in nature of substrate, water turbulence, length of attachment time, and other factors influencing the final morphology of the mature shell. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Bivalvia Order: Ostreoida Family: Gryphaeidae Genus: †Texigryphaea Species: †marcoui
  10. Neithea or Pecten Fossil a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Neithea (Pecten) Fossil SITE LOCATION: Coryell County, Texas TIME PERIOD: Lower Cretacious (100-145 million years ago) Data: Neithea is an extinct genus of bivalve mollusks that lived from the Early Jurassic to the early Paleocene, with a worldwide distribution. Neithia sp. are inequivalve. That means that the two valves are not the same shape, the right valve being strongly concave and the left valve being flattened or concave. Sculpture consist of alternating strong and weaker radiating ribs. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Bivalvia Order: Pectinoida Family: Oxytomidae Genus: Neithea
  11. Neithea or Pecten Fossil a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Neithea (Pecten) Fossil SITE LOCATION: Coryell County, Texas TIME PERIOD: Lower Cretacious (100-145 million years ago) Data: Neithea is an extinct genus of bivalve mollusks that lived from the Early Jurassic to the early Paleocene, with a worldwide distribution. Neithia sp. are inequivalve. That means that the two valves are not the same shape, the right valve being strongly concave and the left valve being flattened or concave. Sculpture consist of alternating strong and weaker radiating ribs. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Bivalvia Order: Pectinoida Family: Oxytomidae Genus: Neithea
  12. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Ilymatogyra ram's horn oyster fossil SITE LOCATION: Del Rio, Texas TIME PERIOD: Lower Cretaceous (100-145 million years ago) Data: The Gryphaeidae, common name the foam oysters or honeycomb oysters, are a family of marine bivalve mollusks, and are a kind of true oyster. This family of bivalves is very well represented in the fossil record, however the number of living species is very few. All species have shells cemented to a substrate. Shells are considered brittle, inequivalve, with the left, lower (cemented) valve convex and the right (upper, non-cemented) valve flat or slightly concave. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Bivalvia Order: Ostreida Family: †Gryphaeidae Genus: †Ilymatogyra
  13. Hello! I've just swapped for some fossils, from eastern Nebraska, Cuming County. I suspect the shells are inoceramus - What do you think? There is also Petrified Wood - Any idea on age? It is agatized, it seems. These were from a dragline-type operation - Mammal fossils are also found.... I attach a photo of my Mammoth tooth, from the same area. I have searched for data to no avail! So, firstly, what are the shell fossils? I think perhaps inoceramus. But what era? Secondly - The petrified wood - a time period would be helpful if possible. Thirdly - The Mammoth Tooth - Is my ID correct? Mammoth Tooth - Mammuthus columbi 0.00 12/18/2017 Chris Stalp (trade) West Point, Cumings County, Nebraska Late Pleistocene - (About 25 thousand years old) The Columbian mammoth (Mammuthus columbi) is an extinct species of mammoth that inhabited North America as far north as the northern United States and as far south as Costa Rica during the Pleistocene epoch. It was one of the last in a line of mammoth species, beginning with M. subplanifrons in the early Pliocene. The Columbian mammoth evolved from the steppe mammoth, which entered North America from Asia about 1.5 million years ago. The pygmy mammoths of the Channel Islands of California evolved from Columbian mammoths. The closest extant relative of the Columbian and other mammoths is the Asian elephant. Columbian mammoths had four functional molar teeth at a time, two in the upper jaw and two in the lower. About 23 cm (9.1 in) of the crown was within the jaw, and 2.5 cm (1 in) was above. The crown was pushed forward and up as it wore down, comparable to a conveyor belt. The teeth had separated ridges of enamel, which were covered in "prisms" directed towards the chewing surface. Wear-resistant, they were held together with cementum and dentin. A mammoth's molars were replaced five times over the animal's lifetime. The first molars were about the size of those of a human, 1.3 cm (0.51 in); the third were 15 cm (5.9 in) long, and the sixth were about 30 cm (1 ft) long and weighed 1.8 kg (4 lb). With each replacement, the molars grew larger and gained more ridges; the number of plates varied between individuals. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Mammalia Order: Proboscidea Family: Elephantidae Tribe: Elephantini Genus: †Mammuthus Species: †columbi
  14. Bivalve?

    Hi, This is my first post and I'm very new to fossils and minerals but also very interested in learning, now that I've found this new interest. Last weekend I was hiking with a friend on a dinosaur footprint trail and found this. I thought it had an interesting shape. I'm guessing it's just bivalves attached to the rock, but would like some other opinions since I know very little about fossils. Thank you in advance
  15. Carpet shell

    This is a nice fossil of the carpet shell. At first, this species, Venerupis senescens, was used as a guide fossil for the Eemian, the last interglacial age (so whenever paleontologists would find this species in a new location, they would know that they all the other fossils of the location are also Eemian). But this was later proven to be wrong.
  16. Hi all, I have been having trouble finding a good guide to use in order to ID fossil seashells (mainly gastropods and bivalves) of the Neogene-Quaternary of Western Europe (mainly Belgium/Netherlands). So, I'm turning to you guys: does anyone of you have a nice up-to-date website/online paper that I could use in order to help me ID all of my different seashells? Preferable with clear photos/drawings of the different species. Thanks in advance! Max
  17. Lucinoma contracta

    An uncommon find for this site, to be double valved and in good condition. This specimen has the added feature of a bore hole from a boring clam most likely.
  18. Phestia Wortheni.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Clam Fossil, Phestia Wortheni Bangor Formation, Northern Alabama Mississippian Period (325,000,000 years ago) Nuculanoida is an order of very small saltwater clams, marine bivalve molluscs in the subclass Protobranchia. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Bivalvia Order: Nuculandia Family: Nuculanidae Genus: †Phestia Species: †wortheni
  19. A bunch of different Glycymeris

    Hi all, So, here are a bunch of fossil bittersweet clams (Glycymeris) from different locations. So far they are all labeled as "Glycymeris" (which I'm pretty sure is correct). But I would really like to put a species name on each of them. Therefore I am reaching out to you all, because hopefully you will be able to help me sort this out! 1) Glycymeris from Westerschelde, Netherlands; from the late Pliocene (2.5 million years old). I'm thinking G. radiolyrata, but I'm not sure... 2) Glycymeris from Westerschelde, Netherlands; from the late Pliocene (2.5 million years old). G. obovata maybe? Or G. variabilis???
  20. Mineral Wells Texas, Nut or?

    A veterinarian friend of mine went on a cub scouts camping trip with his son. The group found this fossil at Mineral Wells State Park located in Texas. The cub scouts are curious if this is a plant or animal fossil? Any identification help would be appreciated. Thank you for any help!!! Jill
  21. Bivalve ID

    I found these a while back at Mineral Wells, TX. I have been collecting fossils for years, but never bothered to ID any of them. To me it's about the fun of the hunt and discovery. But I'm trying to expand my knowledge of the field and the specimens I've collected. So I would appreciate any education as to what these are. They're all 2 cm or smaller. I've got more, but I think this is an adiquate sample of what I have to give an ID. The predominant fossils in the area are crinoids though.
  22. Bivalve "scallop" Peru

    Hi I recently obtained this specimen at a street market in Peru. Its 5cm x 4cm. Looks scallop or oyster like. Any ideas on id and age? Regards Dennis
  23. Trigonia-like bivalve Peru

    Hi I recently obtained this specimen at a street market in Peru. Its triangular 3cm x 2cm x1cm. Looks Trigonia-like. Any ideas on id and age? Regards Dennis
  24. Trigonia-like bivalve Peru

    One last photo
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