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Found 410 results

  1. What would you do?

    So I have found a significant "load" of mostly bivalves in a very deep water mudstone. This mudstone is very hard, when it fractures it is a lot like obsidian, extremely sharp and extremely hard. The specimen in this image is 3 x 5mm. The calcium shell has very little identifiable structures, yet the cast part seems "fair" crisp. If the shell was removed perhaps shell parts would be shown in the cast for ID. Would you remove the shell (if so how? acidic acid?). Any ideas on how to soften this mudstone, it is as hard but not as brittle as any shale I have seen. G picks don't see to do anything but an 8 pound sledge works:( Imaging done with a Panasonic G9 and Olympus 60mm macro lens using focus stacking.
  2. Large Jurassic bivalve ID

    Please can anyone identify this shell, from the Jurassic of Somerset, UK? It's a biggie. Sorry the photos aren't ideal.
  3. Georgia Dredge Mollusk ID Help

    These are some unidentified mollusk fossils I collected among the dredge spoils along the Savannah River in Savannah, Georgia a couple years back. Because of the mixed nature of the dredge sediments exact aging isn't possible but they represent Miocene, Pliocene, and Pleistocene sediments. Most of the stuff from this site has been identified and @MikeR's resources have been a great help for some other ones but I'd like some help on these. # 1, 2, and 3. Some Muricid? I'm not really sure where to start to try and narrow it down. #4 #5 Crepidula sp.?
  4. Show us your Inoceramus!

    Inoceramus are one of the most widespread and commonly found Mesozoic marine bivalves, ranging from the Early Jurassic to the Late Cretaceous. They are found in deposits all over the world, and can be small, or huge. So show us your Inos! Here are two I have found. The first is a plate with two of them from Holzmaden, where they are extremely common. The second is a larger weathered one from a local State Park tide pool. ( Of course, I didn’t collect it.)
  5. Bivalve ID??

    Good evening/morning/afternoon everyone. Today I picked up this partial bivalve and I'm having trouble positively identifying it. Collected from a beach at a site on the North Eastern coast of Northern Ireland, known as Minnis North. Now let me describe the site to you! The site comprised of a mudflow involving lower the Jurassic lias, the cretaceous hibernian greensand formation and the Ulster White limestone formation. Material from the mudflow has been dumped off the side of an adjacent road at the foot of the landslide and directly onto the beach next to the road. It was on this beach I pick up the bivalve in a large pile of jurassic lias mud. Perhaps it's too battered and incomplete for a positive ID but I'd love to hear your thoughts. :-) Hollie
  6. Unable to identify North Texas bivalve

    I found this bivalve yesterday while fossil hunting North Central Cooke County near Red River. These area has mixed Walnut Clay, Goodland and Antlers Sand formations. Closest similar one I found on the Internet was Gyrostrea from Commanche Peak formation in Hood county, but I doubt it.
  7. groovy bivalve?

    It's been awhile since I have posted here. Found on beach in San Francisco. Area has Merced deposit fossils, mostly marine sediments Pliocene-Pleistocene. I am assuming it's a bivalve of some sort. I have found similar fossils at this location. The unusual thing about this one is it has symmetrical grooves on both sides on one end. I will first post pictures to give an overview of the fossil and in the comments will post the area with the "grooves". I am having trouble attaching files. will try attaching in comments.
  8. Hello, I need help to identify this bivalve shell fossil I found out at a roadside works in Crete. It is 8 cm wide x 11 cm long, but if counting the broken edge part should be originally 13 cm long. Rgs MG
  9. Merry Christmas

    Merry Christmas everyone Solved the problem of what to do with the extra fossils and broken fragments that don't make the display. Hope you enjoy
  10. Pennsylvanian Bivalve Help Needed

    I recently visited an exposure of what is likely the Brush Creek section of the Glenshaw Formation, Conemaugh Group (Late Pennsylvanian) in Western Pennsylvania. I brought home a large block of material that I subsequently broke down. I was excited to find in the block a nice Worthenia tabulata, several smaller gastropods and even a fragment of the nautioid Metacoceras. I also found this large bivalve. I tried to cross reference this fossil against lists of fauna from the Brush Creek and while it strikes me as similar to Edmondia sp., I am not that confident, especially given the size. When searching in the Brush Creek I have typically only ever found the common, small bivalve Astarella concentrica, so this much larger bivalve has me stumped. Any help is greatly appreciated.
  11. Here is a picture of a Bivalve imprint I found whilst in a Creek in Western Wake County. I was in the Triassic Basin and they have fossils dating back around 230 Ma ± 2 ma. It was part of the Carnian Stage of the Triassic part of the bigger Newark Supergroup. I presume it is a freshwater genus but I don't hear much about freshwater Bivalves when it comes to Triassic fossils.
  12. Florida Fossil Bivalve Resources?

    Greetings all. I moved to Amelia Island, Florida in 2018 and fell in love with the fossil pectens I found on the beach. I find shark teeth too, but usually by accident as I'm looking for fossil shells. At first I thought they were Chesapecten jeffersonius but realized that they are a bunch of different species. I have bought every book and studied every blurry scanned PDF of a good old scientific paper, but I just haven't been able to find a definitive source on how to ID them. Does anyone know a good Chesepecten ID resource? It'd be really awesome to learn more about how I can ID them. I added a picture of the 17 that I found last Saturday on the grid (each square is an inch) as well as some of my favorites (on the wood tray). I think I have chesapecten middlesexensis bayshoreensis, Chesapecten middlesexensis hunterae, Carolinapecten murdockensis parawatsonensis, Chesapecten quinarius. I can do better photos of them if anyone is interested. These were all beach finds on Amelia Island which I think (still a newbie) is the Orange Bluff Unit, maybe Miocene. Thanks in advance for any info or pointing me to any resources. Cheers, Cheryl
  13. Post Oak Creek 10-15-2020

    This is from my most recent trip to Post Oak Creek. I found some pretty nice shark teeth and some other random items. I also found several bones sticking out of the creek bed. It is obviously not fossilized but I wasn't sure if it was a modern cow or something older like a bison. Pictures 17 and 18 show were I excavated it from. It was right on the waterline and probably 10-12 feet down from the top of the river. I am planning on going back to excavate the rest to see if I can find the skull, teeth, etc. Also I have a ton of microfossil matrix I am going through. I have already found numerous other micro shark teeth and other oddities I will be posting soon as well. It is amazing how many fossils you can find in just a little bid of small gravel. I would love to hear what you think about the bones as well as pictures 11-16 and anything else interesting you see here. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19.
  14. Shell Made its Own Pedistal

    From the album Delaware Fossils

    A Gryphea vomer bivalve made itself at home atop the internal mold of a tiny Baculites ovatus cephalopod. The whole thing is about 3 cm tall. Found in the Cretaceous spoils sands of the C&D Canal, Delaware
  15. I need help with this one. Ive been searching the internet; but there is precious little works on Lower Mississippian bivalves. So I thought Id turn to you guys either for an id or to point me in the direction of an expert in such things. Its from the lower Mississipian epoch of the Carboniferous. The Fort Payne Chert, the black shale member (not sure if that has a name.) Its fairly large for a bivalve from this time period. Im not sure if they are related but Ive also been finding these. I believe its also a bivalve but I havnt found more than one valve. They are a lot more common than the bigger one. With the similar concentric ribs, they may be younger versions; though the overall difference in shape makes me doubt it. I appreciate any help you can give me.
  16. Hello all! I recently found a new spot that turns out is Walnut Formation. Finding lots of nice stuff there...big Echinoids - Phymosomas, a Tetragrmma and some little Leptosalenia mexicanas. But I've found a few things that I can't ID. @erose - I relooked at the presentation on Albian crabs you did for the PSoA last month and thought this one was in there, but now I don't see it? I thought you had collected one like this.. Thanks for any help, y'all! This little Bivalve looks like a Plicatula but those are not found in the Walnut? (According to the Houston Gem and Mineral Society Bivalve Book) And this other bivalve - closest I can come up with is Lopha, but again, not listed in the Walnut
  17. So Many Minis!

    From the album Aurora/Lee Creek Mine Micro Matrix

    This assemblage came from one cup (about 340 ml) of micro matrix from Aurora Fossil Museum. Oddly, they are generally much larger than most of what I found in the rest of the matrix. They are all from either the Pliocene or Pleistocene. See album description.
  18. Silurian mollusk

    What type of mollusk is this? Oyster? Bivalve?Internal mold. Silurian Thanks for any help.
  19. Hello! I have collected quite many specimens with Trochactaeon snails from April to May 2020. They all come from the Upper Santonian to Lower Campanian upper Geistthal-formation or Lower Afling-formation of the Gosau of Kainach in western Styria. Some of the specimens contain abundant black, wavy, "folded", shell fragments. They seem to grow on the Trochactaeon snails in some places. They resemble small oysters in some ways. Unfortunately, I have not found anything conclusive about their identity. I found a pic in a paper of Kollmann (2014), with some somewhat similar, unidentified bivalves growing on an Upper Cretaceous snail (last pic). Other accompanying fossils are very rare fragments of phaceloid coral colonies (they to not grow on the snails, though). Any suggestions are highly welcomed! Thank you very much! Franz Bernhard First specimen is a double sided polished slab with abundant black shell fragments. Some of them seem to have grown on the Trochactaeon snails (epibiontic?). Here are some individual polished snails with bivalve fragments. Some of them seem to have grown on the snails (white polygons). The circular things in the middle left pic seem to be the same; there is a snail shell just a few mm below the polished surface at this spot (the specimen is very thin there). Rarely, also on weathered surfaces these bivalves(??) can be seen, growing on the snail shell. But I am not really sure, if this is the same thing as in the polished sections or if this is something else: This is the reference pic from Kollmann (2014), epibiontic bivalves on Nerinella grossouvrei. Thanks a lot!
  20. Rare complete bivalve from DSR

    From the album Middle Devonian in Central New York

    Pseudoaviculopecten princeps Middle Devonian Hamilton Group Moscow Formation Windom Shale Deep Springs Road Lebanon, New York Collected 7/18/20
  21. Hello all! This is a little photo project I've been working on for a while. When I first started Fossil Hunting I was content to collect whatever. Then I was excited about Identifying what I was finding. The education continued and now I work to identify the geological formations I am collecting in and am able to know what fossils to look for in what areas. The Pocket Texas Geology website is invaluable for finding out the formation of a specific area (while not 100 percent accurate, it's pretty good). So I wanted to create a post that would help with Central Texas Cretaceous Fossil Identification and this Species by Formation post. There are a couple of great websites for North Texas Fossil ID, but none (that I am aware of) for specifically Central Texas. I am considering Central Texas to be the counties of Hays, Travis, Comal, Blanco, Bexar, Kendell, Williamson, Hill, Burnet, Llano, Bell, Coryell, McLennon and Bosque. And bear in mind, this is not a comprehensive list of all species found in these formations...still working on THAT! But this is what I have found and ID'd so far. I believe it contains MOST of the more commonly found fossils, plus some uncommon fossils. If you see a mis-identification, please let me know! Also, there are more formations than I am presenting, but these have been the most accessible to me. I will list them by ascending order of time period. My time periods are approximate. (Be aware, I am not a geologist nor paleontologist, just an avid amateur, so take it for what it's worth! ) Cretaceous Formations: Glen Rose, Walnut, Comanche Peak, Edwards , Georgetown, Buda, and Austin Chalk. Glen Rose Formation 106-110 MYA (Upper and Lower Glen Rose combined here) ECHINOIDS Row 1. Row 2. Row 3. Row 4. Row 5. Row 6. 1. Hyposalenia phillipsae Echinothurid plates Plagiochasma texanum 2, Goniopygus sp. Pygopyrina hancockensis Paraorthopsis comalensis 3. Loriolia rosana Goniopygus whitneyi Pseudodiadema aguilerai 4. Polydiadema travisensis Leptosalenia texana Hetearaster texanus 5. Coenholectypus sp. Pliotoxaster comanchei Phymosoma texana 6. Cidarid sp. Heteraster obliquetus Paracidarid texanus ECHINODERMATA ETC. 1. 2. 1. Unknown Crinoid Isocrinus annulatus Echinoderm Madreporite 2. Balanocidarid Spine Echinoid Spine Balanocidarid Spine AMMONITES 1. . Engonoceras piedernales Hypacanthoplites mayfieldensis DECAPODS 1. 2. 1. Crab Claw Unknown Crab Claw Unknown Pagurus banderiensis 2. Pagurus banderiensis Pagurus banderiensis Pagurus banderiensis ETCETERA 1. 2. 3. 1. Porocystis globularis Fish Pycnodont Teeth Turtle Bone Fragment 2. Foramnifera Orbitolina (group) Foramnifera Orbitolina (single) Coral Heliopora labyrinthicum 3. Spirobus Worm Annelid Worm GASTROPODS 1. 2. 3. 4. 5, 6. 7. 1. Neritina sp Semineritina apparata Pleutomaria glenrosensis 2. Natica texana Nerinia texana Nerinia harrisi 3. Fusus haysensis Turbo cuyleri Anchura monolifera 4. Cerithium blancoesnsis Unknown Gastropod Unknown Gastropod 5. Nerinia incisa Pseudomelania pupoides Tylostoma traviensis 6. Natica traski Cerithium bullardi Nerinia aquilina 7.. Tylostoma turmidum Purpuroides harperi Lunatia praegrandis BIVALVES 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9 10. Other Bivalves : 11. 12. 13 . BIVALVES 1. Lima wacoensis Arca texana Ludbrookia arivechensis 2. Trigonia whitneyi Exogyra paupercula Plicatula parkerae 3. Brachidontes pedernalis Chlamys santoni Granocardium pseudopendens 4. Neithia occidentalis Cardium congestum Arctica comalensis 5. Pinna comancheana Granicardium pendens Fimbria hamiltonae 6. Trigonia gordoni Homomya comalensis Laternula simodsi 7. Psilomya walker Trigonia wendleri Homomya knowltoni 8. Tapes decepta Panopea henselli Arctica texana 9. Psilomya banderiensis Protocardia texana Arca medialis 10. Cyprimeria texana Idonearca terminalis Arctica roemeri 11. Lopha comalensis Ceratosterean texanum Exogyra guadalupae 12. Peilinia crenulimargo Liostrea ragsdalei 13. RUDISTS: Monopleura sp. Toucasia sp. Kimbleia capacis
  22. Pterinopecten undosus

    From the album Fossildude's Middle Devonian Hamilton Group Fossils

    Pterinopecten undosus Rare, dual valve specimen. Middle Devonian Windom Shale. Moscow Formation, Hamilton Group. Deep Springs Road Quarry, Lebanon, NY. Found August 9th, 2020 .

    © 2020 Tim Jones

  23. Anuone have an idea what is this? The size is about 2cm. Martin
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