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Found 310 results

  1. This next species is the second most common animal found in the Essex portion of the Mazon Creek deposit. While there are over a dozen described bivalves found in the Mazon Creek deposit, Mazonomya is by far the most abundant. It is restricted to the Essex (marine) portion of the deposit, where in some areas have been found to make as much as 70 percent of all bivalves collected. At one collecting site, these clams are so common the area has been nicknamed Chowder Flats. Despite the abundance of specimens, Mazonomya was not formally described until 2011. For years it had been misidentified as a type of bivalve named Edmondia. Current research has shown it is actually a Solemyid. Before formal description, Mazon collectors referred to these bivalves as clam-clams due to the fact that they are often preserved in a death position with both valves opened. Mazonomya is the largest clam found in the deposit . While quite rare, specimens have been found over 4 centimeters in length. preservation can be excellent and in some cases, soft tissue can be preserved. Specimens have been found with preserved “death trails”. Solemyids are still found today in oxygen poor and sulfide rich marshes. This first specimen is the largest in my collection. The valves measure almost 4 centimeters. There is also some evidence of the hinge ligament (soft tissue) between the valves.
  2. Unknown Bivalve

    I cannot prep this Lower Oxford Clay bivalve beyond what you see as its in quite a fragile state, I’ve identified it as a species of Meleagrinella would you agree @oxford clay keith
  3. Crassostrea??

    So I only have the faintest idea of what this could be. I vote for the oyster crassostrea since that's what I was told. But now someone told me it was a rudist and im a bit confused. Could it be cretaceous?
  4. Indiana Ordovician Bivalve ID

    Over the weekend I found this bivalve while collecting at the St. Leon, Indiana roadcut. I posted it in the Hunting Trip section, but received no ID on this piece, so I figured that I would put it here to see if some Member could give me an ID. I have never found one like this before nor can I find a similar one while checking various web pages. Thanks
  5. Fall Break Fossil Trips

    The next few days are fall break for me, so I'm home from school. I decided to take the day today to explore two sites in Northern Illinois. The first is an outcrop of the Upper Ordovician Maquoketa Group in Kendall County, IL. I learned about this site from a recent trip report posted here, and found it after a little detective work. I was hoping to find Tentaculites oswegoensis, a small conical fossil of unknown affinities which is only found in this area. It only took me a few minutes before I found a few. I only stayed for 20 minutes or so, as Tentaculites is really the only well preserved fossil in these exposures. There were some brachiopod and bryozoan fragments, but nothing noteworthy.
  6. ID for this bivalve from Morocco

    Anybody have any idea on the indentification and age for this bivalve? Purchased online ex china (was advertised as from the "Devonian of Yunnan", but is clearly from younger deposits of Morocco). I have found conflicting ages on the net: either Cretaceous or Eocene. Some say from the Dakhla region others from the Essouria region.
  7. Hornby Island fossil ID help

    Part 2, 2nd photo of bivalve found on Fossil Beach, Hornby Island, Sept 13, 2019
  8. Hornby Island fossil ID help

    Found on Hornby Island, Fossil Beach, September 13, 2019. Need help identifying this fossil. Looks like a bivalve to me but i am still pretty new to fossil identification. I will have to post a ‘part 2’ to upload the second photo.
  9. Is this a fossil or what is it

    Sorry I don't know where this comes from exactly. It was found at an estate sale in Texas. Was told it was a part of a collectors pieces from Southwest U.S. and was presented as Native American. So far Native American people think it is a fossil so here I am asking your opinion. It's heavy, fits in the palm of your hand, has a noticeable single ridge on the humped side, has a hole in the top and a hole in the flatter side; is black in color with many grey channels or etchings on the humped side. In your opinion is this a fossil and if so any idea what it is of? If it helps, it feels kind of cool to touch. Thank you for your interest and time.
  10. 4 large Florida fossil shells!

    Hello all! Last October, Ken @digit gifted me and Viola some large Florida fossil shells. I took ownership of 4 shells and Viola took the rest. Now that I'm almost done labeling all of my fossils, I would like to put a genus and perhaps even a species for each of my specimens - any and all help is much appreciated - perhaps @MikeR can provide some assistance? And, Ken, are these from "Cookiecutter Creek"? And what age should I put to them? Specimen #1: A bivalve - perhaps Mercenaria sp.? Specimen #2: Another bivalve - perhaps Dinocardium sp.? Specimen #3: A gastropod with the opening on the left, so I think it might be Sinistrofulgur contrarium - is this correct? Specimen #4: Another gastropod - perhaps Melongena corona? Thanks in advance! Monica
  11. Bivalve (Ambonychia)

    From the album Finds From the Ordovician -488 to 443 MYA-

    From the Georgian Bay Formation.
  12. Bivalve (Ambonychia)

    From the album Finds From the Ordovician -488 to 443 MYA-

    From the Georgian Bay Formation.
  13. Jurassic bivalve?

    Hi, I'm learning to prepare things on this specimen (its not finished :D). Can anyone ID this fossil? Found near Cracow, limestone, jurassic.
  14. Hi all, I have fossils from Singapore's Jurong Formation, aged from late Triassic to early Jurassic (235 - 175 mya). Some were found over 10 years ago by a fossil-digger while others were dug up recently by the two of us. Several specimens have been handed over to our local museum. However, no one really knows what family or genus these bivalves belong to. I was hoping you guys could help. Specimen 0A Specimen 0B Specimen 0B alt view Specimen 0B alt view
  15. ID gastropods

    These are 2 of the largest gastropods that I have come across while digging fossils out of these sandstone boulders. I'm not sure but I think the first one is maybe a solariella maculate. I can find photos of what looks like the second one but I can't seem to place a name to it. Location, near Palmdale, Ca., most likely from the Pliocene period.
  16. Hi Eveyrone! I know that ID'ing bivalve steinkerns is difficult if not impossible. But these are such an unusual shape. I have not found anything in my hunting - and I've found a LOT o bivalves. These are from Blanco TX - Glen Rose formation. They look like a bit like Trigonia (or pterotrigonia) in shape but not quite so "fortune cookie" curved , but have the really dramatic "underside" of something like an Artica. I do not have the Houston Gem and Mineral Society book on Bivalves, so if anyone does...would you mind seeing if you can find this one? It is really intriguing me! Thanks!!
  17. ID thck bivalve with spines

    I have been told by a scientist that this belongs to a cockle but I'm having a very hard time seeing it as one. I have found several bivalves on line that have spines but can't find an exact match for the pattern on this thing. The thick section is a little over 5mm and the thin section is about 2mm. It does not slope down to 2mm it has steps in it, which I can't find on any bivalves on line. Also, the spines on all bivalves I've seen appear to fan out as they move from the rear (hinge area) to the thinner forward area but these spines are coming together at what appears to be the thinner area and fanning out at the thick section. Has anyone ever seen anything like this???
  18. Hi all! I managed to go on 3 large fossil hunting trips this weekend and pulled in easily the BIGGEST haul so far with the most variety as well! The first two pictures were from Mimico creek and the rest were a mix of Humber river and a separate section of Mimico creek. I managed to pull in my second trilobite from the area so that was very exciting! Also pulled a bunch of stuff that I was not able to identify: /\ This was the haul from last Friday night /\ This is the trilobite I found!!! Very excited to have a second one - its been a while since the last one I found /\ This was the full haul for the weekend trip at Mimico and Humber /\ Some Orthoconic Nautiloids as usual. Although it seems that this isn't just the same species I usually find as some of the patterns were much smoother than what I usually find A couple decent looking Crinoid stalks /\ /\ Lots of different shells this time, with a nice range of lined shells as well as 'mussel' looking shells (don't know the scientific names for these ones yet - sorry :/) /\ A close-up of the real nicely defined deathbed of TONS of shells! Unfortunately the hammer I used for cracking bounced off this rock and mashed my thumb in so that wasn't very fun. But its healing up nicely so I'd say it was worth it haha /\ Variety different sizes of coral (if you guys could help me identify which type that would be sweet!) /\ These were the weird ones. I'm not even sure if these are even fossils but I figured I might as well take em just in case - better safe than sorry!! (I am posting these two in identification later!) I was very proud of this haul! Lots of diversity compared to the usual hunt which is nice because I'm kind of getting a little tired of the mountains of Nautiloids we have piling up in the collection Let me know what you guys think of these ones!!! -Em
  19. Runswick & Kettleness finds

    Had a walk from Runswick Bay to Kettleness and here’s a few of our finds
  20. Unknown from Penn Dixie

    Hi all, here is another find from Penn Dixie not sure what it is maybe a bivalve or brachiopod. Also the outer layer used to be a very thin calcite, most flaked off but a bit is still left. Thank you.
  21. Oyster

  22. Cole Hill Invertebrates

    I went with the Delaware Valley Paleontological Society to a few spots in Central New York last month. Cole Hill Rd. in Hubbardsville has several outcrops on private land where the owners are willing to share with fossil hunters. We scrabbled up and down the scree - Whee- and found our fill of trilo-bits, including one Dipleura cephalon covered with druse calcite, plus oodles of brachiopods, nautiloids, straight-shelled cephalopods, gastropods of all different shapes, and bivalves. I learned a tough lesson that afternoon. Always wrap your specimens as you go. Not only will they keep from breaking, but they are easier to find when your bucket tips and tumbles down the hillside across countless tons of scree There were lots of pained faces around me as I hunted down the things I'd already found.. It took me half an hour to recover everything I could, but the best ones managed to make it home. Dilpeura trilobite cephalon Another trilobite cephalon, found by someone else in the group. This one is covered in sparkling calcite. Crinoid holdfast? with Ptomatis rudis gastropod unknown, probably nautiloid Cornellites fasculata bivalve Palaeozygopleura sp. misc. unknown brachiopods If anyone has any ideas, I'd like to hear them. This spine-shaped object is about 6 inches long. I'd discount it as variations in the rock color, but the left end is curved outward from the matrix. Worm trace fossil. They made carpets of these on the sea floor.
  23. I have no idea whatsoever

    This is roughly 2 1/2 inch in length. At its widest point 1 1/2 in and a 1/4 in thick. Any help identifying it would be much appreciated
  24. SW Florida Pearl Fossils?

    Hi everybody. I'm hoping someone on here can identify these. Last Saturday I was digging in the yard here in Alva to plant some citrus trees. At about two feet down in this area it's all coral and i found this conglomeration wedged under a cypress root. the tree is over 4 ft in diameter. i thought these were lizard eggs but after gently brushing the shells out with a soft toothbrush and dawn soap, i think these might be pearls. two of them actually did separate as you can see they're on the desk. we're seventeen miles from the ocean and this property was a cypress swamp prior to our house being built in 1974. Any thoughts on these ? My wife wants me to encase them in resin because they're unusual looking . Thanks.
  25. Ooops, sorry, I meant to post my request for fossil ID in this forum but I’ve never been on a forum before and ended up posting it in the wrong one. Please can you have a look at my post in Member Introductions. Thanks everyone. Doh!
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