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Found 136 results

  1. This was found in the spoils from dredging the C&D Canal in the 1980s. Recent removal of spoils sand for road construction in the area exposed previously- inaccessible layers of sand. Formerly known as Ostrea panda. It remains in the same family. Being much less common than its cousin O. falcata, this species is not listed in the Delaware Geological Survey's bulletin about the fossils of the Canal. It is distinguished by its round shape.
  2. From the album New Jersey Cretaceous

  3. Hi all, Anyone know what species these bivalves are? They're from Contrisson, France, from which the fossils appear to be from the Albian stage. Thanks for the help, Max
  4. I went out last week on a nice day and walked through a nearby road cut. While there is never an abundance of fossils every once in a while one will weather out of the shale. This is a Devonian- Brailler Formation. There is some Pyritization and some layers have iron concretions that have fossils on the outside and spark and stink like sulfur when hit with an iron hammer! This fossil is about 3" long and about 2" thick. It shows no internal structure and appears to be a cast.
  5. Found in a creek bed in NNW San Antonio, TX. I find a lot of marine fossils there: nautiloids, exogyra ponderosas Thanks!
  6. Hey all, I need help identifying these. I don't have a good idea of what they are, so I could really use your guys' help identifying these. Thanks a lot!!!
  7. Hi all, I just need help on confirming this specimen. I think it is a composita (brachiopod) rather than a schizodus (bivalve). There is a depression on the shell's surface going down the middle, but it is hard to see. Thanks again! This was found in NE Kansas.
  8. Near Crosbyton, TX found what looks like a piece of chewed gum. I'm thinking the inner mold of a bivalve or maybe just an very interesting rock. Thought?
  9. Here a sampling of the clams I found at Fluvana last year. I believe the larger ones are referred to as Deer Hearts, correct? are there different and more specific varieties of them as that seems a very generic term?
  10. Found this on my farm on a pond bank. Looks like a bivalve shell, but it comes to a point on one end and I can't make out a central fissure. Any help is appreciated. Ste. Genevieve county, MO.
  11. A friend of mine told me last week that they'd started construction on a bypass around a small town in the Wutach area in the fall. They won't be really going at it until the springtime, but he visited the site last week and managed to find a couple of nice Hettangian ammonites on the scree pile, which was free of snow, since the temps are rising at the moment. So, since I was suffering from cabin fever, I figured I'd get out for some fresh air and give it a go. Well, there was lots of evidence of ammonites with a number of large body chamber pieces lying around, but it was obvious after a couple of hours of investigation, also directly at the exposure, that I had arrived quite a bit later than all the local collectors. I did however manage to find a well-preserved Plagiostoma gigantea, or giganteum (depending on which author you prefer) bivalve, which saved the day. I'll have to keep an eye on this site when they start working again anyway. Actually, it was just nice to get out a do some rummaging around.
  12. From the album Fossildude's Finds

    Actinopteria textilis a pteriomorphid bivalve. Also on the same matrix, ... an unknown orthocone cephalopod, and a trilobite pygidium from Phalangocephalus dentatus Lower Devonian Port Jervis/Glenerie Formation Tristates Group Trilobite Ridge Montague, NJ.

    © 2017 Tim Jones

  13. From the album @Max-fossils 's Zandmotor Finds

    A clam found on the Zandmotor. Species: Mactra plistoneerlandica (but it could be Spisula solida, I'm not sure). The whole beach is filled with those, and even complete ones are extremely common.
  14. From the album @Max-fossils 's Zandmotor Finds

    A nice cockle found on the Zandmotor. Species: Cerastoderma edule. A very common species, not really worth picking up if you already have some.
  15. From the Turonian - Senonian (-91 to -83 my) of Touraine, France, i found this pelecypod, that, i believe, might be a Cucullea beaumonti. It is about 3 cm wide and 2,5 hight.
  16. Upper valve only.
  17. Hello everyone, Hereby three shells. I would like to know whether they are fossil or not, because I can't tell... Pics 1 & 2: a gastropod from an unknown location (8cm long). Also, does anyone know the species? Pics 3 & 4: two rough piddocks (Zirfaea pilsbryi) (each about 7 cm). The white one is from an unknown location; the blue/grey one was found on the Zandmotor (Pleistocene fossils and modern material). Thanks in advance for your help, Max
  18. From the album Fossil in Matchboxes

    Brachiopod Goniorhynchia boueti These specimens were found in Langton Herring, Dorset, UK, from the Frome Clay (previously known as Fuller’s Earth). From the Jurassic period (206 - 144 million years ago) Period: Jurassic, Great Oolite Langton Herring

    © D&E

  19. From the album Fossil in Matchboxes

    Brachiopod Goniorhynchia boueti These specimens were found in Langton Herring, Dorset, UK, from the Frome Clay (previously known as Fuller’s Earth). From the Jurassic period (206 - 144 million years ago) Period: Jurassic, Great Oolite Langton Herring

    © D&E

  20. From the album Fossil in Matchboxes

    Brachiopod Goniorhynchia boueti These specimens were found in Langton Herring, Dorset, UK, from the Frome Clay (previously known as Fuller’s Earth). From the Jurassic period (206 - 144 million years ago) Period: Jurassic, Great Oolite Langton Herring

    © D&E

  21. From the album Fossil in Matchboxes

    Brachiopod Goniorhynchia boueti These specimens were found in Langton Herring, Dorset, UK, from the Frome Clay (previously known as Fuller’s Earth). From the Jurassic period (206 - 144 million years ago) Period: Jurassic, Great Oolite Langton Herring

    © D&E

  22. From the album Delaware Fossils

    Late Cretaceous Oyster Reedy Point (North Side) Spoils Pile MT Laurel Formation Delaware City, Delaware Based on "Cretaceous Fossils from the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal: A Guide for Students and Collectors" by Edward M. Lauginiger
  23. From the album Delaware Fossils

    Late Cretaceous Scallop Reedy Point (North Side) Spoils Pile MT Laurel Formation Delaware City, Delaware Based on "Cretaceous Fossils from the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal: A Guide for Students and Collectors" by Edward M. Lauginiger
  24. As stated in my previous topic. Here s the last part of my autumn trip to Champagne. After 2 days we were done with our albian spots. So we decided to take the car and drive 2 hours from there, to totally different layer / fossils The area of Epernay if reknown for the quality of its eocene shells, and specially its giant gastropod : campanile giganteum. Those, can only be found by digging which is forbidden in most place. (those measure had to be taken after random badly educated people dug huge pits everywhere without even carrying to fill them back once they were done) For some time we traveled the area looking for either work sites, road cuts or even sand piles. We managed to actually find a sand pile and forest roads freshly covered with fossiliferous sand. So we started to investigate. I wasn't looking for more than 10 minutes that i spotted an unusual shape in the sand. It was a (very) partial campanile giganteum (1 third of the beast maybe a bit more ), but still my best so far. Then after 5 more minutes, the other catch of the day for me : A croc tooth. I had never heard of croc in those layer / area. I knew it was a tooth, but took me quite some feed back tor realize who it belongs too! After some reading (the complete listing of eocene fauna), there are 3 mentions of crocodile in the lutetian. So here it is : (size between 1,5 and 2 cm) My girl friend catch of the day was a very nice conch : lapparia musicalis No picture of this year specimen but here s one i found in 2011 Friend that came with us found a partial Hypocrenes, but still a cool find. To finish for today another cool find for the day : Xenophora schroeteri, a fascinating gastropod which agglomerate random stuff around to protect itself (other shells, gravel or even shark teeth or coral) Edit : "Carrier shells" is the english expression apparently You can see more of that stuff either in TFF here : 2016 lutetian TFF galery or on my flickr : 2016 lutetian flickr galery Next post i ll present you some of the emblematic species !