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Found 367 results

  1. Age is Miocene-Pliocene. Bryozoan is an immediate thought, but I'm pretty sure that they're quite rare post Paleozoic, and this kind of encrustation is very common in the locality where the specimen was found. Here is a picture: Bonus thanks if anyone knows with some certainty what the bivalve itself might be from the photo, though I doubt it.
  2. Bivalve or brachiopod?

    Hello, I found this really nice shell today. I've seen you can tell bivalves and brachiopods apart by symmetry, but I'm not sure with this one, I thought bivalve, but I'm not certain. Also if anybody could tell me the genus or species, I'd really appreciate it. Thanks.
  3. Pennsylvanian bivalve, Dunbarella?

    Bivalves always challenge me. If the ear (is that the right word?) on the left wasn't present, I would have called this Dunbarella sp. But the rounded ear doesn't match any species of Dunbarella I've seen. Maybe another genus, like Aviculopecten? Not sure. From Pennsylvanian black shale in Illinois. Thanks for any help.
  4. Help ID radial pattern

    Hello, I found this rock this morning behind my house and I'm drawing a blank as to what it could be. There are lots of brachiopods, bivalves and gastropods in this particular area but nothing that matches this. It kinda looks like an end view of a coral but I only find those about a mile away and not preserved like this. Any ideas would be appreciated. Thanks for looking. Northern Arizona, Mississippian, Redwall Limestone, Mooney Member.
  5. Super large bivalve/clam ID

    It measures 6 x 5.5 inches and is fossilized in shale. Thanks a bundles.
  6. Hi everyone this is matt again today in the creek I found a nice bivalve fossil it has been a few years since I have found one of these in my book it says this about the fossil lunulicardium eriensis small to medium-sized ,ovate to rounded triangular shell. Posterior margin straight: anterior margin rounded. surface with 60 to 80 very fine radial lines, and concentric growth lines making low undulations on the surface
  7. Hi, From time to time I found in Upper Campanian strata of SE Pyrenees some big steinkerns looking much like the American "Deer heart clams". So, my initial guesses are genus Cucullaea/Pholadomya/Arca, especially Cucullaea/Pholadomya royana, but my knowledge of bivalves other than rudists is very limited. Can anybody help? @Ludwigia @fifbrindacier Size of the biggest are 92 x 80 x 68 mm Center one is the best preserved (75 x 67 x 53 mm) : is Finally a different, smaller, specimen from same area and strata. I have no guess about it:
  8. Last weekend I got a chance to do some fossil hunting in a creek in Greene, New York. I am a unsure if the exact formation I was in but I know it was upper Devonian. Brachiopods were quite abundant, especially spiriferid ones. I also found a couple nice bivalves and some bryozoans/corals.
  9. A Mood Lifting Hunt

    I was able to get some much needed "me time" yesterday. With all the worries of the world I have been in a foul mood lately, but I am happy to report that my mood has brightened significantly. . There is nothing like crawling around on a road cut, and hunting fossils, to really lift one's spirits! I spent a couple of hours at an upper Ordovician road cut that has been on my list to check out. It is an exposure of the Grant Lake Limestone. Shortly after I arrived, I realized that I was in for a real treat! This particular exposure is more fossil than limestone. Brachiopods are everywhere! Vinlandostrophia dominate the exposure; with Hebertella coming in a close second. Other brachs are also found, but less abundant. Orthoconic nautiloid fragments are frequently found and bryozoan encrusting is a common sight. I also found a few gastropods, and one trilobite piece that I am excited about. Unfortunately I did not take pictures in the field. It was a conscious decision. I just wanted to enjoy my time, relax, and focus on the hunt. I'll get some next time as I will definitely be going back. I did take a few pics of my better finds at home. Enjoy! First up are the Brachiopods. I found some nice whole Vinlandostrophia, and Hebertella, and what I think is Rafinesquina ( @Tidgy's Dad ) . I also took home a few single valves for study of the internal structure. I think with a little bit of clean up these will look great! I was happy to find some orthoconic nautiloids. They have been sorely lacking in my collection. I will have to research what species are found in this formation to come up with an ID. I have a few ideas, but need to confirm. Here are a few gastropods and bryozoans. I can't resist the alluring whirls of a gastropod. They seem to be uncommon in the areas that I hunt so I grab them whenever I see them. I believe these are new species of bryozoa that I will be adding to my collection. Which is exciting! Here is a tril-o-bit that I found. I'm very happy with it. Typical trilobite fragments from this area are not usually identifiable. Except to say they are possible trilobite pieces. This is a cephalic doublure of an Isotelus. Thanks to @piranha for help with the ID. All in all it was a great time. I got to relax a bit, forget my troubles, and brighten my mood. I also added some nice pieces to my collection. It was a good day!
  10. New Member - Fossil Finds?

    Hi guys, I've found the website while searching for information about some possible fossils I found around where I live in over several years. I pictured those and hopefully someone here is able to put a name / species / period to them. I am not a collector. I have always been fasciniated by geology, rocks and natural history. Knowing what they are will be very exciting for me. Number 1 : I cannot reemember where exactly I found it but should be some 100km's inland from Aegean sea, close by an ancient city called Pergamon in Modern Turkey. I was simply walking on the foothills of the city when this strange looking rock caught my eye Number 2 : These two are from Palermo in Western Siciliy coast. They're both from a pile of rocks next to the sea. I wasnt't able to look around much to see if there are more rocks like them. Maybe they're carried from somewhere close by. Number 3: Found around 500-800 meters elevation somewhere in Central Anatolia, more than 300km from any modern sea (former Tethys Ocean?) very heavy and rocky at hand. Thank you in advance for your time looking at those. Some more will come soon
  11. Alaskan Bivalve or Tooth?

    Hi everyone! First time posting here. I went out over the weekend to do something outdoors during the quarantine (easy to do in Alaska) and went to a spot known for marine fossils (especially sea lilies) on the Little Nelchina River here in Alaska. I was picking up fossils on an eroded cliff side above the river when I noticed this laying on top. My question is, is it a bivalve or tooth? I don't notice a hinge line or umbo if this is a bivalve, but this may be due to the deteriorated condition and the fact that I am a rookie at this. It appears to be broken in half, with the inside showing black sheeny layering. I appreciate everyone's help on this!
  12. Totally encrusted large bivalve?

    Good morning all! Hope everyone is healthy and starting to get back to normal, whatever that will be! Found this yesterday below a roadcut in Kansas City laying by itself. The shape instantly caught my attention, and when I looked at it, I believe it is a totally encrusted large bivalve/clam! Very similar to the large native freshwater clams we have around here. The encrusted material is limestone- there are crinoid parts/what appears to be sea urchin spines and "hash". You can see faintly concentric lines. So my questions are-Since it has the shape and appearance of a bivalve, but is totally covered by "matrix" is it a concretion, or simply an encrusted shell? Second-it's very cool in itself, but do I try to clean it up to see what species and have a cooler shell? Could it even be cleaned well enough? Just alternating baths/soaks in vinegar?I have also included a pic of the encrusted matrix. Thoughts all? Thanks! Bone
  13. Gressyla Bivalve.

  14. Chlamys.

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