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Found 278 results

  1. Hello, I found these, I'm guessing bivalves, and was just wondering if anybody could tell me a little about them? Sorry there's no scale, the larger one is about 2cm, and the smaller about half a centimetre. I found them in Northamptonshire, UK. Thanks.
  2. Whitby area sightings

    A couple of things that we saw on a beach near Whitby but didn’t bring home. The area was full of scallop type bivalves and a lot of belemnites. One section of the beach had a lot of what I have shown in the first picture, resembling tree roots or cables; am I right in thinking that these are trace fossils of some kind of burrows? And what Could the second item be? It was in a large boulder along side a few small belemnites and was about 5cm in diameter.
  3. Rhaetic fossil

    Collected in 1994 in Cropwell Bishop Nottinghamshire UK, some Rhaetic pyrite layer pieces from a Gypsum mine. Packed full of bivalves, fish teeth and coprolites. Focusing on this particular find, would anyone know what it may be (1st picture) 1mm scale.
  4. bivalves and orthocone

    Also from @Kane, i'd like a little help to determine those devonian ones 1) From Deep Springs a) 2.4 cm hight, 3.2 cm width Grammysioidea arcuata ? b ) Modiomorpha ? Grammysia ? 4 cm hight, 2.5 cm width 2) Widder formation, Eifellian : a) 2.5 cm hight, 1.7 cm width b ) 4.7 cm hight, 2.9 cm width for the taller and 1.5 cm of thickness for the other one.
  5. Attached is a photo of a cluster of shells. I would like some assistance identifying the two. Here are my guesses: Chione elevata (cross barred Venus) and Macrocallista maculata (calico clam); both Venus clams (family Veneridae). My reference is from Southern Florida’s Fossil Seashells authored by Peterson.
  6. madagascan bivalves

    I was wondering that the madagascan jurassic clams and cretaceous cockscomb oysters from my collection did not have a comprehensive label,I wanted to ask you what they were.. Here are a few photos online: https://www.google.com/search?q=madagascar+fossil+clam&sxsrf=ACYBGNSyt5RjY1qraJUr3kcrF1FSPuVtBg:1581930994833&tbm=isch&source=iu&ictx=1&fir=q1GrCKB9r4EOpM%3A%2CRVLU8rvAwW_qDM%2C_&vet=1&usg=AI4_-kRLA3HGjyWBFynUylzJaveHH4B7QA&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwish4aYoNjnAhXIUN4KHZ2nCtkQ9QEwAHoECAoQHg#imgrc=oy8HBIbkpemGJM
  7. I'm curious if anyone would be interested in trading for this wonderful piece with multiple bivalves/brachiopods. I don't have any information except that it was a beach find from southern California. Several of them are damaged, one is almost entirely complete (one small chip) and exposed most of the way. 2 others I believe are intact but are partially buried in the matrix. There are also a few more that are barely exposed that may be complete within the matrix. I think this piece could be excellent for prepping practice and with a little bit of work it could look really nice. PM me with any offers, trilobite material would be my preference but I'm not very picky. Here's a picture of the piece top down, more pictures are on the way.
  8. Dear Guys, During the last several years i detected unknown truth talking about Lithuanian boulders- the Carboniferous and Permian marine rocks are very numerous and their age is various- there can be found almost each stage of Carboniferous and Permian. The main rock types are three- dolomite and limestone with masses of brachiopods that is various in color, stromatolite limestone with mollusks and unidentified cephalon like fossils, and the last- lacustrine limestone with coelacanth scales and possible plant remains (Carboniferous rhabdodermatids are very numerous). Carboniferous period and Early- Middle Permian was not known in Lithuanian glacial boulders so I very need the strong expert, especially who works on Carboniferous- Permian brachiopods. If my age determinations are correct then I will write the scientific book about this discovery and i think there is huge possibility that many of these boulders could be transported by someone glaciation from Northwestern Russia (or Northern Ural) because there are big areas of Devonian, Carboniferous, Permian and Triassic rocks near surface and Northern mountains potentially could be the cold center at some glaciation period in the Pleistocene. I will show all the pictures with fossil identifications and size, maybe someone will tell the opinion about the taxon and age possibilities. Any contact detail or other important information is very welcome! First image- Angiospirifer (Late Carboniferous), 1.1 cm length Second image- Anthracospirifer (Middle- Late Carboniferous), 1.8 cm length third image- Archaeocidaridae sea urchin plates (Carboniferous), 5- 8 mm diameter Fourth image- unidentified brachiopod species from Carboniferous- Early Permian (8 mm- 1 cm length) Fifth image- Atomodesma? bivalves from Kungurian boulder with Waagenoconcha brachiopod (1.7- 2.3 cm length)
  9. Bivalves from Cretaceous

    Could be some bivalves from late Jurassic or washed out from Cretaceous. Northen New Mexico. All from one place. Thanks.
  10. Hi All. I was unsure where to put this message so hopefully this place is okay. I teach 7th grade Life Science and we are soon starting our coverage of major animal types (arthropods, echinoderms, molluscs, chordtates, etc). I am hoping to put together a teaching collection that can be used each year as we do this. If there are members here who are willing to donate any/all types of durable specimens (harder for young teens to destroy) that could be used to teach students the key features of these phyla. If you are willing and able to share can you please PM me directly. I do appreciate it :-)
  11. I bought a new old cabinet last winter and spent several months filling it with newly labeled specimens, most of them now stored in jewelry boxes. I took photos of it to show Tim, Fossildude19 and he suggested I post them in the Members Collections section. I followed his suggestion. The collection started in 2011 with a few fossil purchases off a well known public auction site. By the early spring of 2012 I was collecting in the field and the vast majority of my collection was self collected in that manner from sites, primarily in the Northeast and Ohio Valley as well as ones collected on trips to Texas, Germany and out west. There are also some gift specimens that I own thanks to the generosity of a number of friends, most of whom are on the Forum. The top of the cabinet is occupied by miscellaneous specimens, some that wouldn't fit in the drawers, some slated to be in a glass display case I hope to eventually get, and my collection of fossils found in New Jersey just above the Iridium Layer.
  12. There are several hundreds of small to micro marine specimen in this one stone. There's complete bivalves, odd looking gastropods and things that I have no ideal as to what they are. I'm told the age of these specimen are most likely beyond two millions years old.
  13. Looking for species ID on this Neithea bivalve. Found this in Travis County in Williamson Creek gravel bed (Qt).
  14. Unknown Bivalve

    I cannot prep this Lower Oxford Clay bivalve beyond what you see as its in quite a fragile state, I’ve identified it as a species of Meleagrinella would you agree @oxford clay keith
  15. From the album Middle Devonian

    Gosselittia triqueter Pteriomorph Bivalve (both valves) Middle Devonian Oatkacreek Formation Mottville Member Marcellus Shale Hamilton Group Swamp Road Quarry Morrisville, N.Y.
  16. From the album Middle Devonian

    Paleoneilo emerginata Paleotaxodont Bivalve (both valves) Middle Devonian Moscow Formation Windom Shale Hamilton Group Deep Springs Road Quarry Earlville, N.Y. A gift from fossildude19 Thanks Tim
  17. Bivalves or Brachiopods?

    I'm in need of your help. I'm trying to learn how to recognize and maybe differentiate brachiopods from bivalves in the worn fossil rocks I find on Lake Michigan's beaches. If indeed it is one or the other, how do you tell which? In the photo below, what looks like the shaft of an arrow, is it the foot or stalk? OTOH, if it's neither b-pod nor bivalve, what is it? Often I find just bits and pieces in these tumbled rocks. I suspect some of them to be parts of shells, but I'm not quite sure. The shape within my blue circle below is visible over and over on many of my finds. Is thisa part of a shell? Or not? This fossil turns the corner on the same rock as above. It's visible on both sides of the fossilized rock, which is about 5mm wide. I've combined photos of both sides of the rock onto one pic. The total length of this fossil is just about 2.5 cm. I assume that's a cross section of a shell showing the insides of the two valves?
  18. Florida Fossil Shells

    I don't know where to begin. I am completely new to the forum. I will eventually be posting some fossils for help with ID and others that are identified by experts already. Having said that, this poster represents some of my fossils. I am not sure if can even read the names underneath. I may have to post separately. Any ID corrections would be graciously accepted. What I really need help with is locations. While living in FL for several years, I would go to a couple of locations in Polk Co. where I knew road base, I believe it is called aggregates were often kept. I visited and collected. What I don't know if where the shells originated. APAC Pit in Sarasota, Aggregates Pit in Bonita Springs, Star Ranch Quarry, Clewiston, Cochran Pit in Labelle to name a few possible locations. Based on the shells collected, it would seem that most come from either the Tiamiami or Caloosahatchee Formations, not sure which members....Pinecrest Beds, Bermont, Ayers Landing Ft. Denaud etc. How do I know what collection data to include on my label. I can list where I found it, but it is not its origin. ID is pretty ok with Petuch's works, but if I don't know the origin, it makes ID much more difficult. Any input or ideas to help would be appreciated. Thanks in advance. I have included a sample collection label for anyone to comment on how to improve. One is more vague since I don't know origin, the other is from a fossil I purchased. Date on label was date I added to my collection. How important is it to list the taxonomist such as Petuch or Conrad etc? scienceteacher79
  19. From the album Cretaceous

    Liopistha alternata Bivalve/clam Upper Cretaceous Merchantville Formation Matawan Group Weller's Ravine Matawan, N.J. prepared by Ralph Johnson
  20. Cast of Bivalve Shell from the Pinna Layer

    From the album Just Above the Iridium Layer

    Granocardium sp.? Cast of bivalve shell Paleocene Pinna Layer Hornerstown Formation Manasquan River Basin Freehold, N.J.
  21. From the album Just Above the Iridium Layer

    Crenella cerica Cast of Tiny Bivalve Shell Paleocene Pinna Layer Hornerstown Formation Manasquan River Basin Freehold, N.J.
  22. From the album Just Above the Iridium Layer

    Pecten whitfieldi Cast of tiny partial scallop shell Paleocene Pinna Layer Hornerstown Formation Manasquan River Basin Freehold, N.J.
  23. Trigonia from the Pinna Layer

    From the album Just Above the Iridium Layer

    Trigonia eufaulensis Cast of Bivalve Shell Paleocene Pinna Layer Hornerstown Formation Manasquan River Basin Freehold, N.J.
  24. Cast of Oyster from the Pinna Layer

    From the album Just Above the Iridium Layer

    Pycnodonte convexa Cast of Oyster Shell Paleocene Pinna Layer Hornerstown Formation Manasquan River Basin Freehold, N.J.
  25. Pair of Cucullaea from the Pinna Layer

    From the album Just Above the Iridium Layer

    Cucullaea vulgaris Pair of Bivalve Casts Paleocene Pinna Layer Hornerstown Formation Manasquan River Basin Freehold, N.J.
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