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Found 252 results

  1. Here is a small trip only minutes away from downtown Salt Lake City. If you would like the exact location, PM me. I hadn’t been to this site in a couple years so it took @Earth Chemistry and I a couple hours to re-discover it so here’s a little history about the area. Ok first, the structural geology in this area is quite famous as it is a large pair of synclines. From https://geology.utah.gov/wp-content/uploads/synclines.gif They were made in the Sevier Orogeny about 120 Ma to 50 Ma ago.
  2. I have come across several tiny bivalves and gastropods while digging marine fossils out of sandstone boulders, they range in size from about less than 1mm to about 10mm. I was wondering, do all of these small specimen grow into the larger ones? Also, I can plenty photos of present day small specimen but I can not seem to find many photos of prehistoric small bivalves and gastropods, anyone have any links to tiny prehistoric shells???
  3. Toronto creek - big haul

    Location: Etobicoke creek, Toronto, CA Date collected: July 27th, 2019 Hello! I pulled in a whole bunch of fossils along the Etobicoke creek (a little bit further north compared to my last trip - almost same location though). LOTS of Orthoconic Nautiloids (as usual), a couple different bivalves and a few crinoid fragments. This is the nautiloid haul. The top right one doesn't look like much but there are about 5 or 6 nautiloids embedded in the matrix! I'm considering learning how to clean up the fossils so that I can show it off in all its glory! These are the bivalves and other stuff collected. These are two separate MASSIVE chunks of monster Nautiloids (~5cm in diameter) - hopefully I can clean this one up as it would make a veryyy nice shelf piece! Closeup on the full bivalve, I've never really found a complete bivalve with both shells in one clump like this before (correct me if its actually just a lame rock - I could be wrong). I thought this one was really interesting: notice the dark brown, lined layer just under the rocky outer layer? I've seen a good lot of Orthoconic Nautiloids but I haven't seen a layer like this before. Maybe its nothing but I thought it might be worth looking into - let me know if you guys have any info, or what you think! Anyways thats what I pulled in this past weekend! I'd say its a decent haul, not my nicest stuff but still a good lot. -Em
  4. Monday was an extremely nice one weather wise. I took advantage and visited a small private quarry near Morrisville in Central New York. I've been to this site several times in the past, but the last trip was roughly a year ago. The quarry exposes the Mottville Member of the Middle Devonian Oatkacreek Formation. It is part of the Marcellus Shale which represents the bottom of the Hamilton Group. In terms of fauna it has similarities with the nearby Deep Springs Road and Briggs Road quarry sites which are younger in age. There are also notable differences.
  5. There is a bit of Georgian Bay formation in my neighbourhood. It is littered with trace fossils and guarded by swarms of mosquitos. This area surrenders its treasures very reluctantly. There are a few little bryozoan pieces and not much else that I can see. The exception is a single outcrop from which I've pulled some sedimentary rock and found shell imprints. Some are quite wonderful, and there are several species. I think they might have these genus names: Ambonychia, Rafinesquina, Zygospira. The rocks also have all kinds of "colonies" in them, but I cannot identify them and they are not easy to make out.
  6. I contacted a few scientist trying to figure out some of the marine fossils that I had found and many them appeared to be shocked at how many these had color in them. Is it really rare to find marine fossils beyond 2.5 millions years old with color??....OMG, just had another freaking earthquake!!!!!!!
  7. On the west side of the harbour in Oakville, Ontario, they have set up a waterfront with hundreds of big stones from Orillia. They are covered with fossils...many thousands of them, and some quite striking. Last I saw, it wasn't officially open, but it's accessible.
  8. From the album Middle Devonian

    Phestia brevirostra Paleotaxodont Bivalve Middle Devonian Moscow Formation Windom Shale Hamilton Group Deep Springs Road Quarry Lebanon, N.Y. A generous gift from fossildude19
  9. Pteriomorph Bivalve from Cole Hill

    From the album Middle Devonian

    Actinodesma erectum Pteriomorph Bivalve Middle Devonian Skaneateles Formation Delphi Member Hamilton Group Cole Hill Quarry North Brookfield, N.Y.
  10. Back in January I bought a new 15 drawer cabinet and have slowly been transferring my collection to it. Going through my old finds, some of which have been boxed and/or bagged away I haven't seen for years has been a pleasure and some new gems have turned up that I had overlooked the first time around. There was this Actinodesma erectum, a pteriomorph bivalve which had broken when it was excavated last summer at Cole Hill.
  11. Bivalve Shell Imprints

    From the album Cretaceous

    Ethmocardium welleri Bivalve Shell Imprints Upper Cretaceous Wenonah Formation Matawan Group Big Brook Marlboro, N.J.
  12. Bivalve from Big Brook

    From the album Cretaceous

    Eriphyla parilis Bivalve Upper Cretaceous Wenonah or Navesink Formation Matawan or Monmouth Group Big Brook Marlboro, N.J.
  13. From the album Cretaceous

    Panope decisa Partial Bivalve Upper Cretaceous Merchantville Formation Matawan Group Weller's Ravine Matawan, New Jersey
  14. While in Florida I have been doing some fossil shell collecting, I really do love collecting these shells, the diversity is great. I do like finding large and small shells, but the smallest are always my favorite as the quality is usually exceptional. In this post I will show a few pics after I found some of the “regular” size shells and then my haphazard attempt at trying to identify some. Please do not take my ID’s as truth- though I love collecting these shells, I am really bad at getting the ID’s correct. There are a lot of shells that I do not have any ID for and I did not attempt to guess like I did on the others. Some of the specimens that I took pictures of are not the greatest and I have since found better ones, but since I already took the pics, I did not update. I did not take any individual pictures of the smallest pieces, but believe me, some are really small. My favorite find so far- the colors are phenomenal and the glossiness is just crazy- because of this, I thought is might have been a Lindoliva spengleri, but I do not think it is large enough. I believe it is Oliva sayana, and again it is my favorite find. Here are a couple other pics after I picked some up. Now i will start with my attempt to ID some of my finds- this will take a few posts since there are a lot of different ones.
  15. Amazing hunt at the Banjaard

    Hi everyone, I'm really late on this one, but better late than never! On the 6th of April I went to the Banjaard beach again, and although our hunt was short it was super interesting! I started off by searching the coastline, where I found lots of bivalves such as Tridonta borealis, Mya truncata, Mytilus edulis, Arctica islandica, etc. After a while I went higher up the beach and started looking for the gastropod shell banks we had a lot of luck at last time. Unfortunately I didn't manage to find them... which tells me that the banks come and go, and that that previous hunt was just really lucky. However we got lucky again this time, by finding another type of shell bank! This giant 'cloud' you see here yielded a crazy amount of smaller rare fossils!
  16. Bivalves from Madagascar

    Hi everyone, I went to a small rock shop some time ago and bought these three fossil bivalves. Unfortunately, the only information they had on them was that they were from Madagascar. More importantly than the species, I'd really like to find out a more precise location and age (including formation) for them. There were 6 shells available in the shop (all clearly from the same location). 4 of them were #1, then #2 and #3 were unique. #1: I think it's something from the Mactridae family.
  17. Hi everyone, Not last Wednesday, but the one before that one, I went to the Zandmotor again for a hunt, and it went well! As soon as I went down on the beach (I was still in the Kijkduin area, not yet on the Zandmotor), so only some 5 minutes or so into the hunt, I found this little ugly thing in the sand: It's a small (slightly incomplete) mammoth (Mammuthus primigenius) lamella! It's from the late Pleistocene, some 40'000 years ago. It's nowhere as nice as the previous one I found, but this one's cool too. Still happy to have found it because lately I've really been on a dry spell when it comes to the mammal stuff, so hopefully this is a sign that I'm gonna find some more again. After that, I continued hunting for some 4 hours or so, until the rain chased me away. The weather, although sunny at first, was really not great because there was a lot of wind. This made it a bit colder, but more annoyingly there was sand going everywhere. At some point I was checking out a little sand cliff for some shells, but had to turn my back immediately because the sand was going in my eyes. Also, the 'wich' part of my sandwich became essentially irrelevant... I did make some cool fossil shells finds though:
  18. Fossil hunting in the Santonian - lower Campanian Geistthal-formation of the Gosau basin of Kainach, Eastern Alps (Styria, Austria) As a whole, the Gosau basin of Kainach - St. Bartholomä is not very fossiliferous. In contrast to the St. Bartholomä-formation with its rudists etc., the other, much more extensive formations, especially the very extensive, somewhat tubititic Afling-formation, are generally very poor in fossils. Some are known, eg. ammonites, but their occurrences are rather elusive. One exception - or at least in part - are Trochactaeon snails. They are known since the beginning of geological documentation of the area (around 1850), but only as loose pieces. It took until about the 1960ies for the first finds of this snails in outcrops. However, only a few sentences were (repeatedly) published since then, only a list of the species is given (without any description), and also no detailed description of the occurrences and their exact locations. That´s the sad side. The good side is: There is at least one (permanent) occurrence of this snails in an outcrop at a major road! This occurrence is at the red X... Part of Geofast-map (left, squares are 2x2 km) and geological overview from Ebner (2000) (right). There seems to be not much correspondence between these maps. For orientation, see village Geistthal in upper part of both maps. ...and it is featured in an excursion guide from 2015 (from Hubmann & Gross, 2015): The snails are located in the upper part of the Geistthal-formation, a succession of gray conglomerates, sandstones and siltstones with very occasional thin coal layers and thin beds of calcareous onkoids. The lower part of the Geistthal-formation is a coarse-grained, red conglomerate; its the basal formation of the Gosau basin of Kainach. I have visited this outcrop in December 2015, and yes, the snails are still there.
  19. Florida Fossil Hunting Part 1

    No trip to Florida from those of us 'up north" should happen without at least bringing back some shells and in my case, fossil shells. And no shell collector identifying his/her finds should go without having @MikeR give his opinion on IDs. (By the way, Mike, I skipped Shell Creek after an invite by Shellseeker to visit the Peace River). Next time!) Trying to attach a genus and species to Floridian fossil gastropods and bivalves is VERY difficult. I will be happy if I bat 50% on my identifications. It is for this reason, I hope Mike can peek at my finds. With that said, the shells found in this post were found by me just milling around the Sarasota/ Bradenton area east of I-75. Yes these were construction sites, but most were inactive, not a sole to be seen, and without "no trespass signs". Infra structure for the next phase (home building) had been already completed. People were walking dogs, riding bikes, or just strolling around. Fossil shells are SO abundant in Florida. If dirt is showing, fossils are in it! Just need to stop your car and look if in the area. Now to show what can be found. Over 50 different species were discovered in only a few hours in the early morning before my family awoke. Enjoy and please correct any misidentifications!!!!! As I said, this is Part 1. I can't begin with Part 2 until those fossils arrive in the mail. Part 2 involves assistance by forum members @jcbshark, @Shellseeker, and @Sacha. These are three wonderful individuals that deserve ALOT of praise for putting up with me!! This report will follow soon. Well maybe later since I am relying on the mail service!
  20. Day One; Locality Four Tizi N'Talghaumt Pass 19th February 2019 This pass runs through a slightly lower section of the eastern High Atlas along the course of the Ziz River which snakes its way right through to Algeria. These wonderful trees are common in the Sub Sahara, but I don't know what they are. We stopped by the altitude sign overlooking the Aoufous Oasis on the River Ziz. Whilst wifey and Abdulla admired the huge palmerie oasis, one of the largest in Morocco, Anouar and I nipped across the road to see what we could find :
  21. Fossil IDs (if possible)

    I like collecting fossils, but I usually am not sure what my finds are. Please, could you help me identify these fossils? I noted down some possibilities down below. 1 - could be a late Albian ammonite from central Serbia, but I am not entirely sure. Acquired in Serbia. 2 - Found at Southerndown, Wales. Could it be a tree root or something in the region of that? It has a cross-hatched pattern if you look closely. 3 & 4 - A shell I found at Penarth, Wales but I am not entirely sure what it is called. 5 - A bone I found in the mud at Tites Point, Severn, Gloucestershire. maybe a birds? 6 - Some shells I found in mudstone at Charmouth, England. Was found in the same stone as 7. 7 - wood I found at Charmouth? It was very crumbly and delicate. 8 - A Trilobite fragment possibly, Llanfawr quarries, Wales. 9 - A bivalve I found in Southerndown. Not sure what it is though.
  22. Hello all! It's almost spring, and that means it's time for @Kane and me to alter the geography of New York state once again! Current plans are to start at Penn Dixie on April 26th, then off to the DSR area on Saturday. Sunday is a mystery still, but we're working on it. As always, anyone is welcome to come out and join in the destruction, er... fossil hunting. Last year was a heck of a thing, lots of good stuff was found, and I think everyone had a pretty good time. @Pagurus, @JamesAndTheFossilPeach , @Fossildude19 , @Malcolmt, @Jeffrey P (I'm sure there are more I'm forgetting off-hand.)
  23. Fossils on Wheels received another generous donation to our education programs this week. TFF member @Herb sent us a box of super cool invertebrates. He sent us a diversity of fossils from the Southern US that cover a wide range of eras. These fossils will be given to students in fossil starter kits and used in hands-on activities. Herb's donation is also awesome because this pushes me to learning a lot more about invertebrate fossils. One of the best parts of teaching kids about natural history through fossil exploration is that I get to learn a lot. Good teachers learn and challenge themselves so they can challenge their students. I do not have a lot of knowledge about these types of animals but I am so excited to start learning. Among the fossils we received were- Mississippian Corals and Brachiopods from Kentucky, Crinoid stems and Silurian sponges from Tennessee, Cretaceous Gastropods from Texas, and Eocene Bivalves from Alabama. Thank you Herb for a generous donation that will get put to good use
  24. Another Crate

    I mentioned in a recent post that I was heading off into the field, or in this case the woods, again. It's getting to be a habit with me that I don't think to take my camera until it's to late, so, true to form, I forgot it again. This is why I've titled this with "Crate", since that's all I have to show for the trip to begin with. My plan was to go to my favorite Callovian site in order to finally fulfill my recurring dream of a large, well-preserved Bullatimorphites and/or Cadoceras ammonite. I always drive down to the end of a forestry road and park the car under the trees before I mosey off to the site, but this time it didn't quite pan out. The farther on I drove into the woods, the more the snow and ice had accumulated, so when I turned around and reversed into my parking spot, I noticed for the first time that I had to drive slightly uphill in order to complete the maneuver. Problem was that I couldn't, since the wheels were running on the spot and digging deeper into the quagmire every second. My head became immediately filled with visions of walking the 5 kilometers back to the next village in search of a tow truck or a frendly farmer, but after I'd settled down a bit, I decided that the best thing would be to get out of the car and assess the situation first. Fortunately, being a serious fossil collector, I always have a plethora of tools of all sorts in the trunk, so I selected my trusty pickaxe and spent the next half hour shaving the 5-inch layer of ice, mud and decaying leaves down to the gravel roadbed. Then, easing off in second gear, I managed to get back to dry land, so to speak. Thank goodness! It was at this point that I also decided that since I hadn't brought along my downhill skis, I would forgo slipping and sliding to a site which is more than likely still buried under a foot of snow. Fortunately this area has a good number of sites to chose from, so after a bit of driving around, I managed to find one on the hills of the Scheffheu which is pretty well free of snow and spent the rest of the day exploring and chipping out the odd fossil. This time it's a selection from the Aalenian and Bajocian of ammos and bivaves along with one belemnite, all of which need a good bit of prep.
  25. Finally got out again!

    The weather suddenly warmed up for a few days and started melting the snow, so I figured I'd grab the opportunity yesterday and check out the Geisingen area as long as the weather held. It's supposed to get colder again next week, so I thought I'd try to take advantage before more snow gets dumped on us. This was my first sojourn in over a month, so I was just glad to get out into the field, even if it didn't pan out much. I'd heard that a group had been digging with some success at the clay pit, so I thought I'd have a look-see to at least assess the situation there. It turned out that the spot where they had dug was pretty obvious, but the clay from above had slid down and buried it, which would make for a days work for a group of 4. I then decided to explore the old north end of the pit in the hopes that slips had perhaps created some new exposures, didn't find any though, so I doubled back down the east edge to a spot where I'd found some loose blocks in the distant past and started scratching around a bit. Luck was with me this time in the form of a nicely weathered block which gave up 3 well-preserved ammos and a few bivalves. I was needless to say already more than satisfied with these results, but since it was still early in the afternoon, I decided to check out a field nearby which had been productive in the past. I had noticed while driving past it on the way to the pit that it had been freshly plowed. This also turned out to be a good decision. I ended up after a couple of hours with a mini sack full of ammos in varying conditions of preservation, some in matrix, some free. All in all, it was a good day, so my itch has been stilled for another month or so, I would say. I didn't think to take my camera along again , so there are no in situ pictures, but I can at least provide you with a photo of the finds and I promise to post some of them once they're prepped.
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