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Found 197 results

  1. French Miocene shells

    Hi all, Here are 11 different shells, bivalves and gastropods, that I would like to be able to ID down to species level. I got them in a little bag full of these little shells, . I have a decent idea of the genus of most, but I'm lost as to when it comes to species. The shells are all from Ferriere-Larcon, Loire, France. It says on the label that they are from the "Falun de Pontelivien" ("falun" translates to "shelly", as in "shelly layer", referring to the main components of the layer: fossil shells), and that they are from the Serravallian stage of the Miocene (approx 12 mya). These are just 11 of the different species, from about an estimate of 40 different ones. These are the ones I am most interested in IDing for now. But, if you maybe have a document or so with a list or plates of all the possible species from this location/formation, that would be even better! In case better pictures are needed, let me know. Thanks in advance for the help, Max #1: Cardita sp (species... ?)
  2. Natlandite Fossil Stone

    I joined with the hopes that someone here may know more about Natlandite fossil stone. My wife inherited a polished three piece set and unfortunately there is very little information available about it online. Within the two articles I could find we have learned that "it was first discovered in 1954 in Los Angeles, Ca. by geologist Manley L. Natland, during a small dig he made in his offices backyard. He was given a rock brought up during soil testing for an annex to the old Atlantic Richfield Building at 6th and Flower streets. Natland estimated the fossil stone to be between 5 to 7 million years old and said that it was likely formed when an earthquake dislodged a great mass of sludge from the Los Feliz area (then the seashore) and moved it to the Arco site, where it solidified. He had it cut and polished, revealing shells of bivalves, gastropods and coral in a marble like material, but thought no more about it until 1969, after he had retired from Atlantic Richfield, now Arco. That year, he asked to examine the excavation site where the building and it's annex were being torn down to make way for Arco towers, now known as City National Plaza. What he found was an entire bed of the fossil stone that he had seen years earlier. Natland arranged to have 500 tons of it hauled away and eventually had the rock cut and shaped into tables and statuary. The rock is about as hard as quartz and it contains about 350 different species. It was also named the official gemstone of Los Angeles in 1981." I have spoken with a paleontologist here at our local museum of natural history and he stated that he believes that some record of the stones should be preserved in a museum, if that has not already happened. He gave me the contact information of a paleontologist at the Los Angeles County Museum of Natural History and suggested that I contact them, as they would be the most appropriate place to store such fossils. They are absolutely beautiful pieces and any info or suggestions will be greatly appreciated! Thank you so much for taking time to read my post. Brandon Massey
  3. Bunch of micro-mollusks

    Hi all, A handful of days ago there was a sand pile right in my neighborhood. Not sure why it was there, probably someone was making constructions to their house, but in any case I was happy. That's because that kind of sand comes straight from the North Sea, which is full of Eemian fossil sediments! So I took a little plastic bag and spent an hour or two looking in that pile of sand for fossils. The very common Eemian bivalves came up abundantly (so species like Mactra plistoneerlandica, Cerastoderma edule, C. glaucum, Macoma balthica, etc), but that is not what I was too excited about. Seeing that the sand pile was rather small, it forced me to focus on just that little pile. Which is great, because therefore I actually started looking much more closely, and hereby also collecting tiny micro-fossils! Lots of gastropods, which is awesome because these are not as common as bivalves in these sediments. I namely found a complete yet puny Anomia ephippium, some very small Cerastoderma's, and also the ones attached. I would love to be able to bring these down to species level. So I am asking for your help! The Hague, Netherlands (from North Sea sediments) Eem Formation Eemian, Pleistocene; 120'000 y Thanks in advance, Max #1: Looks a little bit like Macoma balthica, but still a bit different... Very likely from the Tellinidae
  4. Fossil bivalves with periostracum???

    Hi all, Found these two shells in Antwerp, Belgium. It was in a place with lots of sand, and the sea was rather far away. There are tons of Pliocene shells there to be found. I also found these two bivalves. What I find really weird is that the periostracum (the brown layer) is still preserved!? How could that be? Nearly all fossil shells lose it when fossilizing, yet these two seem to have kept it. What do you think is the answer to this mystery? Fossils, with the periostracum preserved, or modern (but how did they get here?)? (Or maybe this isn't a periostracum at all. But what is it then?) I think that the species are Mytilus edulis and Spisula subtruncata (although that's by far the biggest Spisula I have ever seen) (both present modern in the North Sea, and occur as fossils in Belgium). I'm greatly anticipating your thoughts on this! Max
  5. From the album Cretaceous

    Ramsetia whitfieldi (cast of bivalve shell) Upper Cretaceous Merchantville Formation Mattawan Group Mattawan, New Jersey A gift from Ralph Johnson
  6. From the album Cretaceous

    Granocardium sp. (cast of Bivalve shell- both valves) Upper Cretaceous Merchantville Formation Mattawan Group Mattawan, New Jersey A gift from Ralph Johnson
  7. From the album Cretaceous

    Inoceramus sp. (cast of bivalve shell) Upper Cretaceous Merchantville Formation Mattawan Group Mattawan, New Jersey A gift from Ralph Johnson
  8. From the album Cretaceous

    Cucullaea antrosa (bivalve internal cast) Upper Cretaceous Merchantville Formation Mattawan Group Mattawan, New Jersey A gift from Ralph Johnson
  9. From the album Cretaceous

    Etea carolinensis (cast of bivalve shell) Upper Cretaceous Merchantville Formation Mattawan Group Mattawan, New Jersey A gift from Ralph Johnson
  10. From the album Middle Devonian

    Phthonia sectifrons (bivalve shell) Middle Devonian Moscow formation Windom Shale Hamilton Group Deep Springs Road Quarry Lebanon, NY.
  11. From the album Cretaceous

    Granocardium sp. (Cardiidae bivalve-cockle shell-internal cast) Upper Cretaceous Merchantville Formation Mattewan Group Mattewan, New Jersey
  12. From the album Lower Devonian

    Actinopteria communis (Pteriomorpha bivalve) Lower Devonian Port Jervis Formation Tristates Group Shimer's Brook Montague, N.J.
  13. From the album Tertiary

    Ostrea tecticosta (bivalve) Paleocene Hornerstown Formation Crosswicks Creek New Egypt, N.J.
  14. From the album Cretaceous

    Panopea decisa ( Saxicavidae bivalve-both valves) Upper Cretaceous Merchantville Formation Mattewan Group Mattewan, N.J.
  15. Hi all, As always, I am looking for more bivalve fossils to complete my collection. I saw somewhere that the species Venericardia planicosta (previously also known as Cardita planicosta and Megacardita planicosta), which appears in Eocene European sediments, also appears in American sediments. I often go to Zeeland (south-west Netherlands), and on the beaches of the region, this species can be found. I already found two times an umbo, one of them huge, but to this date I still haven't found a complete one (but I will keep trying!!!). Now, I don't want a Dutch specimen of this species, because I would like to find that myself, but if someone has this species from another country (and is willing to trade it) that would be awesome. Then again, I am also looking for any other cool bivalve species that you may have available for trade! The only ones I don't want are: Dutch bivalves Belgian bivalves French bivalves Bivalves from Estero Bluffs, CA Several Florida species (too many to mention; so if you have some uncommon ones that you think I might not have yet, send them through and I will say if I want them or not) Chesapecten nefrens from Calvert Cliffs There are a few other ones, but that list should cover most of the things I don't want. The reason I made the list is simply because I don't want to have duplicates in my collection. And I often get the opportunity to collect fossils in the Netherlands/Belgium/France, so I prefer to go look for them myself. Luckily, because the bivalve fauna is so fantastically wide, the chance is small that I have what you have to offer! In return, I have a wide range of different fossils, many European, and several from closed locations too. Not many display pieces though, more small cool things. Oh, please remember! Postage is to the Netherlands! So unless you are also in the Netherlands, take into account that the international postage is likely to be expensive. I am willing to ship internationally, but make sure that you are also willing to do so before going into the trade. Now, send me a PM with some pictures of some lovely bivalves for me to drool on! Best regards, Max
  16. Despite the foreboding weather prediction, the conditions for the spring gathering of TFF members at Deep Springs Road quarry was nearly ideal; sunny and pleasantly cool in the morning and when the rain finally did arrive in early afternoon it was only light and intermittent. Kane had announced to us he was traveling across the border from Ontario, accompanied by his wife, Deb, and member of the month, Jay (Devonian Digger). Members from New York, PA., Connecticut, and Massachusetts wanting to meet them and collect at a great spot gathered there. Deep Springs Road is the easternmost exposure of the Middle Devonian Hamilton Group's Moscow Formation's Windom Shale, the same formation exposed at Penn Dixie where Jay work and collects. But the fauna at Deep Springs Road is entirely different. Corals are nearly absent. Bivalves are extremely abundant. Species such as the large trilobite Dipleura dekayi which are very rare at Penn Dixie are common here. Every rock has the potential to reveal the gems of this rich and diverse fauna. Oh, and by the way, thanks largely to Kane and Jay's and Darktooth Dave's prodigious efforts a massive amount of rock was moved. In the picture, left to right-Kane's wife Deb, Jay, Mike (Pagurus) and his wife, Leila. Above them- Jay. On the far right, Tim (Fossildude19).
  17. Cementation

    I was interested in the process of cementation bivalves use to attach. I used the internet to research and couldn't come up with much information. I don't know if I am using the right search terms or if there isn't that much information. I thought this was the best avenue to find the answers. Maybe @doushantuo could help but any help would be appreciated!
  18. From the album Middle Devonian

    Cypricardella tenuistriata (bivalve shell) Middle Devonian Moscow Formation Windom Shale Hamilton Group Deep Springs Road quarry Lebanon, N.Y.
  19. From the album Middle Devonian

    Modiomorpha concentrica (open bivalve shell, both halves) Middle Devonian Moscow Formation Windom Shale Hamilton Group Deep Springs Road quarry Lebanon, N.Y.
  20. From the album Middle Devonian

    Tellinopsis subemarginata (bivalve shell) Middle Devonian Moscow Formation Windom Shale Hamilton Group Deep Springs Road quarry Lebanon, N.Y.
  21. From the album Middle Devonian

    Paleoneilo emarginata (bivalve shell) Middle Devonian Moscow Formation Windom Shale Hamilton Group Deep Springs Road quarry Lebanon, N.Y.
  22. From the album Middle Devonian

    Mytilarca oviformis (bivalve shell) Middle Devonian Moscow Formation Windom Shale Hamilton Group Deep Springs Road quarry Lebanon, N.Y.
  23. An afternoon on the Zandmotor

    Hi all, So on Tuesday afternoon, I was lucky enough to only have a half day of school. Seeing that the weather was nice, and that I had nothing else to do except go home, I decided to take the bus in the other direction, so to Kijkduin, in order to do some fossil hunting! I bought a sandwich and a chocolate bar at the Shell gas station, and set out on the beach. From the beach of Kijkduin I walked south, so towards the Zandmotor, while of course looking for fossils. View of the beach (mind that the sea is on the right side, on the left side it's just a small lagoon), with the haven of Rotterdam in the background. View of the beach with Kijkduin, and then Scheveningen, in the background. (Sorry for the blurriness...)
  24. Goin' Devonian

    Inspired by my friend, Darktooth, Dave and his recent exploits at Deep Springs Road quarry I decided due to a favorable weather report on Monday to visit my favorite site for the for first time in 2018. I woke up Monday morning to an inch of snow in the Hudson Valley. Headed north on the Thruway to Albany through more snow, then west, finally on Route 20. About hallway there, the sky cleared and the snow covering reduced to patches. After a three and a half hour trip I arrived at Deep Springs Road. True to Dave's word, the site was completely snow free. The temp was in the mid 40s, sunny and warm enough that later in the day I was removing my outerwear. Deep Springs Road quarry is the eastern most exposure of the Windom Shale, the Moscow Formation which lies at the top of the Hamilton Group- which is also the top of the Middle Devonian. It is the same formation exposed at Penn Dixie. What is notable about this site is the biodiversity- at least 20 species of brachiopods, more than 20 species of bivalves, at least 5 species of gastropods, plus cephalopods, trilobites, phyllocarids, plants, etc. Dave's recent excavation left me a lot of rock to split which took up most of my day. I did my own excavation as well. Here are some of my finds: My favorite find of the day- the largest Spyroceras nautiloid I've found at the site so far. A Cimitaria recurva, a bivalve in 3D. Pholadella radiate, another bivalve.
  25. Chlamys lattisimus, miocene, south Austria if you interesting for trade please contact me! posible all kind of trade and also posible to get more.
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