Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'bivalves'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
    Tags should be keywords or key phrases. e.g. carcharodon, pliocene, cypresshead formation, florida.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Fossil Discussion
    • General Fossil Discussion
    • Fossil Hunting Trips
    • Fossil ID
    • Is It Real? How to Recognize Fossil Fabrications
    • Partners in Paleontology - Member Contributions to Science
    • Questions & Answers
    • Fossil of the Month
    • Member Collections
    • A Trip to the Museum
    • Paleo Re-creations
    • Collecting Gear
    • Fossil Preparation
    • Member Fossil Trades Bulletin Board
    • Member-to-Member Fossil Sales
    • Fossil News
  • Gallery
  • Fossil Sites
    • Africa
    • Asia
    • Australia - New Zealand
    • Canada
    • Europe
    • Middle East
    • South America
    • United States
  • Fossil Media
    • Members Websites
    • Fossils On The Web
    • Fossil Photography
    • Fossil Literature
    • Documents

Blogs

  • Anson's Blog
  • Mudding Around
  • Nicholas' Blog
  • dinosaur50's Blog
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • Seldom's Blog
  • tracer's tidbits
  • Sacredsin's Blog
  • fossilfacetheprospector's Blog
  • jax world
  • echinoman's Blog
  • Ammonoidea
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • Adventures with a Paddle
  • Caveat emptor
  • -------
  • Fig Rocks' Blog
  • placoderms
  • mosasaurs
  • ozzyrules244's Blog
  • Sir Knightia's Blog
  • Terry Dactyll's Blog
  • shakinchevy2008's Blog
  • MaHa's Blog
  • Stratio's Blog
  • ROOKMANDON's Blog
  • Phoenixflood's Blog
  • Brett Breakin' Rocks' Blog
  • Seattleguy's Blog
  • jkfoam's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Lindsey's Blog
  • marksfossils' Blog
  • ibanda89's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Back of Beyond
  • St. Johns River Shark Teeth/Florida
  • Ameenah's Blog
  • gordon's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • Pennsylvania Perspectives
  • michigantim's Blog
  • michigantim's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • GPeach129's Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • Olenellus' Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • maybe a nest fossil?
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • bear-dog's Blog
  • javidal's Blog
  • Digging America
  • John Sun's Blog
  • John Sun's Blog
  • Ravsiden's Blog
  • Jurassic park
  • The Hunt for Fossils
  • The Fury's Grand Blog
  • julie's ??
  • Hunt'n 'odonts!
  • falcondob's Blog
  • Monkeyfuss' Blog
  • cyndy's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • nola's Blog
  • mercyrcfans88's Blog
  • Emily's PRI Adventure
  • trilobite guy's Blog
  • xenacanthus' Blog
  • barnes' Blog
  • myfossiltrips.blogspot.com
  • HeritageFossils' Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Emily's MotE Adventure
  • farfarawy's Blog
  • Microfossil Mania!
  • A Novice Geologist
  • Southern Comfort
  • Eli's Blog
  • andreas' Blog
  • Recent Collecting Trips
  • The Crimson Creek
  • Stocksdale's Blog
  • andreas' Blog test
  • fossilman7's Blog
  • Hey Everyone :P
  • fossil maniac's Blog
  • Piranha Blog
  • xonenine's blog
  • xonenine's Blog
  • Fossil collecting and SAFETY
  • Detrius
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Kehbe's Kwips
  • RomanK's Blog
  • Prehistoric Planet Trilogy
  • mikeymig's Blog
  • Western NY Explorer's Blog
  • Regg Cato's Blog
  • VisionXray23's Blog
  • Carcharodontosaurus' Blog
  • What is the largest dragonfly fossil? What are the top contenders?
  • Hihimanu Hale
  • Test Blog
  • jsnrice's blog
  • Lise MacFadden's Poetry Blog
  • BluffCountryFossils Adventure Blog
  • meadow's Blog
  • Makeing The Unlikley Happen
  • KansasFossilHunter's Blog
  • DarrenElliot's Blog
  • jesus' Blog
  • A Mesozoic Mosaic
  • Dinosaur comic
  • Zookeeperfossils
  • Cameronballislife31's Blog
  • My Blog
  • TomKoss' Blog
  • A guide to calcanea and astragali
  • Group Blog Test
  • Paleo Rantings of a Blockhead
  • Dead Dino is Art
  • The Amber Blog
  • TyrannosaurusRex's Facts
  • PaleoWilliam's Blog
  • The Paleo-Tourist
  • The Community Post
  • Lyndon D Agate Johnson's Blog
  • BRobinson7's Blog
  • Eastern NC Trip Reports
  • Toofuntahh's Blog
  • Pterodactyl's Blog
  • A Beginner's Foray into Fossiling
  • Micropaleontology blog
  • Pondering on Dinosaurs
  • Fossil Preparation Blog
  • On Dinosaurs and Media
  • cheney416's fossil story
  • jpc
  • Red-Headed Red-Neck Rock-Hound w/ My Trusty HellHound Cerberus
  • Red Headed
  • Paleo-Profiles
  • Walt's Blog
  • What first interested you in fossil hunting/collecting?

Calendars

  • Calendar

Categories

  • Annelids
  • Arthropods
    • Crustaceans
    • Insects
    • Trilobites
    • Other Arthropods
  • Brachiopods
  • Cnidarians (Corals, Jellyfish, Conulariids )
    • Corals
    • Jellyfish, Conulariids, etc.
  • Echinoderms
    • Crinoids & Blastoids
    • Echinoids
    • Other Echinoderms
    • Starfish and Brittlestars
  • Forams
  • Graptolites
  • Molluscs
    • Bivalves
    • Cephalopods (Ammonites, Belemnites, Nautiloids)
    • Gastropods
    • Other Molluscs
  • Sponges
  • Bryozoans
  • Other Invertebrates
  • Ichnofossils
  • Plants
  • Chordata
    • Amphibians & Reptiles
    • Birds
    • Dinosaurs
    • Fishes
    • Mammals
    • Sharks & Rays
    • Other Chordates
  • *Pseudofossils ( Inorganic objects , markings, or impressions that resemble fossils.)

Found 210 results

  1. I don't throw around the word "best" casually, but I think it's safe to say that my recent trip was one of the best in all my years collecting, if not the best. I spent the better part of five or six hours collecting at numerous different sites across western Maryland ranging in age from the lower Devonian to the lower Mississippian, so this is part one of my posts (for simplicity's sake I may include photos of most of my other finds from these sites even if I didn't collect them last go around). The trip started off okay. I visited a couple of my oldest sites that are some small roadside exposures of the Oriskany Sandstone and Mahantango Formation. These sites produced decent material in the past, but over the repeated years of collecting I seem to have worn them out as this time all I found were some brachiopods (including a decent Mucrospirifer sp. from the Mahantango site). I'll talk more about these finds later, but afterwards I found time to visit a new site in the Brallier Formation. By this point it had started to thunder, and while driving to the site the rain started to come in and fog filled up the valley. I thought it was the end of my trip, but as I got to the site it was pretty much dry. My best guess is that I was simply hearing a storm from way off in the distance. The site I visited, as I recently learned, might actually expose two different formations: the Brallier Formation and the Foreknobs Formation. The difficulty in discerning between the various upper Devonian formations in Maryland is multifold. First off, the MGS doesn't differentiate the Harrell, Brallier, and Scherr Formations, even on their most recent geologic maps. Second of all the literature around these deposits is scant and very dated. Most still use the (now) incorrect Woodmont and Chemung Formations, which further exacerbates problems as the Woodmont Formation consisted of the current Brallier and Scherr Formations, making it difficult for an amateur like me to really tell just which fossils occur in either formation. On top of this the contact between the Harrell, Brallier, Scherr, and Foreknobs is mostly gradational, so the differentiating layers lithologically is next to impossible as the beds gradually blend into one another. Generally speaking the Harrell is a dark shale with a fossiliferous limestone (the Tully Limestone) demarcating it's base, the Brallier is mostly dark, fissile shale with interbeds of siltstone, the Scherr is mostly lighter colored shale and siltstone with some sandstone beds, and the Foreknobs is a mixture of gray shales, red shales, conglomerate, sandstone, and siltstone. A guide fossil for the Brallier is the brittle star trace fossil Pteridichnites biseriatus, which was the fossil I originally set out to collect and found in the darker shale. Generally speaking the brachiopod genus Cyrtospirifer sp. in particular C. disjunctus is a guide fossil for the Foreknobs, but I believe this genus also occurs in the Brallier Formation. I found both fossils at this site, the brittle star in the dark shale and the brachiopod in a reddish siltstone, and considering the transition in rock types (one end of the site was just dark, fissile shale and the other had significant amounts of conglomerate and siltstone with shell beds) I think it's likely that the upper end of the cut was in the basal Foreknobs Formation and the lower end was in the upper layers of the Brallier Formation. As such, all of my trace fossils are from the Brallier and almost all of my other fossils are from the Foreknobs. The Brallier Formation is a late Devonian turbidite unit that was deposited in fairly deep water as the Acadian Mountains eroded. It is mostly unfossiliferous, but does have the occasional pelycopod, gastropod, and trace fossil (these being the most common). Ammonoids are also reported from the Brallier. Like I said earlier I originally came trying to find the brittle star trace fossil Pteridichnites but I ended up finding some other very interesting trace fossils. I picked up two of them because I had seen images of similar looking things from the Pennsylvanian of Alabama which I believe @Rockin' Ric labeled as resting traces from horseshoe crabs. These are late Devonian, deep water marine in origin, not terrestrial/freshwater from the Pennsylvanian, so I don't really know what they could be. Perhaps from some other arthropod? Anyways I also found some brittle star traces, including a group of what look to be four or five Pteridichnites biseriatus oriented in life position as if it were an imprint of the brittle star body. Image 1: Pteridichnites biseriatus Image 2: A group of four poorly preserved P. biseriatus Image 3: Unknown arthropod (?) trace fossil Image 4: Unknown arthropod (?) trace fossil If any of you guys know what the last two fossils are, please feel free to let me know.
  2. From the album Cretaceous

    Turritella sp. (gastropod) Ostrea falcata (oyster) Upper Cretaceous Wenonah Formation Mattawan Group Big Brook Colts Neck, N.J.
  3. From the album Middle Devonian

    Bivalves, a gastropod, a bryozoan (Fenestella sp.), and a brachiopod (Mediospirifer) Middle Devonian Mount Marion Formation Marcellus Shale Hamilton Group Route 209 road cut Wurtsboro, N.Y.
  4. From the album Middle Devonian

    Pseudoaviculopecten princeps (partial bivalve shell with (worm?) borings) Middle Devonian Mount Marion Formation Marcellus Shale Hamilton Group Route 209 road cut Wurtsboro, N.Y.
  5. From the album Middle Devonian

    Modiomorpha mytiloides (palaeoheterodont bivalve) Middle Devonian Mount Marion Formation Marcellus Shale Hamilton Group Route 209 road cut Wurtsboro, N.Y.
  6. From the album Middle Devonian

    Michelinoceras (nautiloid) Goniophora hamiltonensis (bivalve) Middle Devonian Mount Marion Formation Marcellus Shale Hamilton Group Route 209 road cut Wurtsboro, N.Y.
  7. From the album Middle Devonian

    Goniophora hamiltonensis (palaeoheterodon bivalve) Middle Devonian Mount Marion Formation Marcellus Shale Hamilton Group Route 209 road cut Wurtsboro, N.Y. Goniophora is an uncommon bivalve in Central New York, but shares dominance with Modiomorpha here.
  8. Armed with information courtesy of @FossilDAWG , I've headed to Montgomery, Alabama to get my first taste of Cretaceous fauna from 85-80 MYA (Santonian and Campanian stages). After booking a hotel in close proximity to the creek and (restlessly) sleeping the night away, We ate breakfast, got our boots on and eagerly drove to the site with the help of a GPS. When we arrived, the GPS signal was showing us miles off from where we actually were, so Google was shelved and Papa and I started the flurry of pictures. As per description, the entrance to the site itself was kind of jagged, made of huge concrete slabs left there from a time long forgotten. After we got down this man-made hill, I took a moment to take in the sight, the outcrop plainly in view: We slowly sloshed through the creek, being careful not to slip on rocks or step into deeper-than-you-think holes in the stream bed. Once we got to the outcrop on the far side, we got right to looking. Barely even 5 steps in, I instantly recognized the blade of a shark tooth that was sticking out of the sand. It has little root on it, though I can tell that it is probably a sand tiger. It is the only one I've found, so far. Venturing further in, we started finding Oysters. Lots of them. It wasn't long before we found what was apparently the main bed they came from: To sum it up; Bivalves. Bivalves everywhere. You almost can't walk there without stepping on pieces of them they're so abundant. With everything there, it didn't take very long to get a decent haul, with pieces of ammonites, two echinoids and a lone gastropod being added to the seemingly limitless supply of bivalves. I was quite tempted to get back in the creek and have another go at it, but Papa balked, citing the heat which was in the 90's, and since he was the driver he had all the decision-making power. I came away with 4 specific favourites, the gastropod, the 2 echies, and one particularly complete valve (the name of which eludes me, as I am by no means an expert in bivalves). The right-most echie's top side is covered in River crud, though as I found it practically in the water. Cleaning tips, anyone? Do keep posted, as I will make 3 return trips, when temps aren't in the 90's.
  9. From the album Middle Devonian

    Modiomorpha mytiloides (Palaeoheterodont bivalve- both valves open) Middle Devonian Moscow Formation Windom Shale Hamilton Group Deep Springs Road Quarry Lebanon, N.Y.
  10. From the album Middle Devonian

    Leiopteria conradi (Pteriomorph bivalve) Middle Devonian Moscow Formation Windom Shale Hamilton Group Deep Springs Road Quarry Lebanon, N.Y.
  11. Hi all, Currently I am on holidays in the south of France. We were thinking of maybe going tomorrow to the location Lacoste, in the Vaucluse, in France, to hunt for Miocene bivalves. This is the location where all those amazing giant white scallops (which you often see for sale at exhilarating prices) come from! Anyone got any tips regarding the hunting there? As in how to find the best fossils, how to extract them properly, etc? If we do end up going, I will, of course, make a trip report on this forum I'll be tagging the French fossil hunters, perhaps you guys have already been here and wouldn't mind sharing some tips/feedback @fifbrindacier @Coco @caterpillar Thanks in advance! Best regards, Max
  12. Shell Shocked at Matoaka

    Calvert Cliffs has been a popular place lately and I hesitated to post one more trip report this week, but as I look for other kinds of things, I decided I'd share. I have been told on several occasions that the cabins aren't worth much. All they have are shells. as @WhodamanHD put it, "If you like snails, go to Matoaka." Well, yes. That's why I love it so much. Last year I documented at 50 species of mollusk from one spot on the beach, and that's just what I was able to bring home! I returned to the for Independence Day week. and the cliffs did not disappoint! A landslide so recent that there was no sign yet of rain erosion stretched out into the bay just north of the beach. It's a treacherous place to linger and to traverse, but I was banking on the fact that this part off the cliff had done it's falling for now -- I hoped. In other spots, trees dangled precariously over the cliffs. If you ever doubted that this can fall on you, remember this -- I'm pretty sure that the sound of thunder I herd the night we got in was the landslide I worked all week. It only rumbled once, on a windless, rainless evening. The innumerable fallen trees I had to climb over to get to my favorite spot tell the rest of the ongoing story. If you feel a bit of gravel fall own your head, RUN. You were warned. That said, we all know this is an addiction, so I se too work with a screw driver most of the week, chipping away at the loose material at the base that was sitting in the nice, cool water most of the day. On a blisteringly hot day, there's no place I'd rather be! The fall exposed all kinds of things that most folks think I'm a bit silly to carve out - clams, snails, bryozoa, brachiopods, but I love the biodiversity of the place. I chipped away at big blocks during the day, until it got too hot, the tide too low and the snack supply diminished. I met the wonderfully astute @FossilsAnonymous out there and loved getting to talk to a fellow hunter who didn't think me crazy for chasing after punky sea shells. I wrapped everything in aluminum foil and carried them in a metal pail for the mile or so trek back to the cabin, where I had my make-shift lab set up on the porch. That's where the real work began. The day before we left was blustery after successive storm cells moved in and out the night before. The beach was totally rearranged from wave action. The bay spewed forth all kinds of things. My daughter and I walked the beach to find whatever had washed ashore. I found 3 Ecphora snails sitting on the beach right at the entrance. A little further down, we met another forum member, whose name I cannot find now in my tag options HI! We spoke for about 10 minutes while she and my daughter dove into the lapping waves to grab the shark teeth that washed up at our feet. How they saw them is beyond me, but they must have collected 30 between them while we were standing there! It's taken me a week since I got home to unwrap and clean most of what I brought home. It took me an entire afternoon of diving into half a dozen texts to identify the few shells that were new to me. One I can still only get down to a genus. (see comments!) So far, I've found at least 8 more species of mollusks to add to my count. My daughter brought home great gobs of shark teeth. We even brought back a few big bone shards, one of which I believe is a (rather rare for this section) dugong bone with scratches that might be a predator's bite marks. There is still a big blocks of matrix in the basement waiting to be carefully picked with the old dental and clay tools. There is still a pile of micro matrix to sift through that I carved out of the larger shells as I prepped them. It's been like opening gifts at Christmas. This Christmas may last for a couple very happy months!
  13. The second part of our East Coast trip began with a visit to Aurora where a few shark teeth are not identifiable to me. From there we spent our time around Morehead City and Emerald Island where I am hoping these fossils can be Identified and maybe figure out what formation they may have come from.
  14. French Miocene shells

    Hi all, Here are 11 different shells, bivalves and gastropods, that I would like to be able to ID down to species level. I got them in a little bag full of these little shells, . I have a decent idea of the genus of most, but I'm lost as to when it comes to species. The shells are all from Ferriere-Larcon, Loire, France. It says on the label that they are from the "Falun de Pontelivien" ("falun" translates to "shelly", as in "shelly layer", referring to the main components of the layer: fossil shells), and that they are from the Serravallian stage of the Miocene (approx 12 mya). These are just 11 of the different species, from about an estimate of 40 different ones. These are the ones I am most interested in IDing for now. But, if you maybe have a document or so with a list or plates of all the possible species from this location/formation, that would be even better! In case better pictures are needed, let me know. Thanks in advance for the help, Max #1: Cardita sp (species... ?)
  15. Natlandite Fossil Stone

    I joined with the hopes that someone here may know more about Natlandite fossil stone. My wife inherited a polished three piece set and unfortunately there is very little information available about it online. Within the two articles I could find we have learned that "it was first discovered in 1954 in Los Angeles, Ca. by geologist Manley L. Natland, during a small dig he made in his offices backyard. He was given a rock brought up during soil testing for an annex to the old Atlantic Richfield Building at 6th and Flower streets. Natland estimated the fossil stone to be between 5 to 7 million years old and said that it was likely formed when an earthquake dislodged a great mass of sludge from the Los Feliz area (then the seashore) and moved it to the Arco site, where it solidified. He had it cut and polished, revealing shells of bivalves, gastropods and coral in a marble like material, but thought no more about it until 1969, after he had retired from Atlantic Richfield, now Arco. That year, he asked to examine the excavation site where the building and it's annex were being torn down to make way for Arco towers, now known as City National Plaza. What he found was an entire bed of the fossil stone that he had seen years earlier. Natland arranged to have 500 tons of it hauled away and eventually had the rock cut and shaped into tables and statuary. The rock is about as hard as quartz and it contains about 350 different species. It was also named the official gemstone of Los Angeles in 1981." I have spoken with a paleontologist here at our local museum of natural history and he stated that he believes that some record of the stones should be preserved in a museum, if that has not already happened. He gave me the contact information of a paleontologist at the Los Angeles County Museum of Natural History and suggested that I contact them, as they would be the most appropriate place to store such fossils. They are absolutely beautiful pieces and any info or suggestions will be greatly appreciated! Thank you so much for taking time to read my post. Brandon Massey
  16. Bunch of micro-mollusks

    Hi all, A handful of days ago there was a sand pile right in my neighborhood. Not sure why it was there, probably someone was making constructions to their house, but in any case I was happy. That's because that kind of sand comes straight from the North Sea, which is full of Eemian fossil sediments! So I took a little plastic bag and spent an hour or two looking in that pile of sand for fossils. The very common Eemian bivalves came up abundantly (so species like Mactra plistoneerlandica, Cerastoderma edule, C. glaucum, Macoma balthica, etc), but that is not what I was too excited about. Seeing that the sand pile was rather small, it forced me to focus on just that little pile. Which is great, because therefore I actually started looking much more closely, and hereby also collecting tiny micro-fossils! Lots of gastropods, which is awesome because these are not as common as bivalves in these sediments. I namely found a complete yet puny Anomia ephippium, some very small Cerastoderma's, and also the ones attached. I would love to be able to bring these down to species level. So I am asking for your help! The Hague, Netherlands (from North Sea sediments) Eem Formation Eemian, Pleistocene; 120'000 y Thanks in advance, Max #1: Looks a little bit like Macoma balthica, but still a bit different... Very likely from the Tellinidae
  17. Fossil bivalves with periostracum???

    Hi all, Found these two shells in Antwerp, Belgium. It was in a place with lots of sand, and the sea was rather far away. There are tons of Pliocene shells there to be found. I also found these two bivalves. What I find really weird is that the periostracum (the brown layer) is still preserved!? How could that be? Nearly all fossil shells lose it when fossilizing, yet these two seem to have kept it. What do you think is the answer to this mystery? Fossils, with the periostracum preserved, or modern (but how did they get here?)? (Or maybe this isn't a periostracum at all. But what is it then?) I think that the species are Mytilus edulis and Spisula subtruncata (although that's by far the biggest Spisula I have ever seen) (both present modern in the North Sea, and occur as fossils in Belgium). I'm greatly anticipating your thoughts on this! Max
  18. From the album Cretaceous

    Ramsetia whitfieldi (cast of bivalve shell) Upper Cretaceous Merchantville Formation Mattawan Group Mattawan, New Jersey A gift from Ralph Johnson
  19. From the album Cretaceous

    Granocardium sp. (cast of Bivalve shell- both valves) Upper Cretaceous Merchantville Formation Mattawan Group Mattawan, New Jersey A gift from Ralph Johnson
  20. From the album Cretaceous

    Inoceramus sp. (cast of bivalve shell) Upper Cretaceous Merchantville Formation Mattawan Group Mattawan, New Jersey A gift from Ralph Johnson
  21. From the album Cretaceous

    Cucullaea antrosa (bivalve internal cast) Upper Cretaceous Merchantville Formation Mattawan Group Mattawan, New Jersey A gift from Ralph Johnson
  22. From the album Cretaceous

    Etea carolinensis (cast of bivalve shell) Upper Cretaceous Merchantville Formation Mattawan Group Mattawan, New Jersey A gift from Ralph Johnson
  23. From the album Middle Devonian

    Phthonia sectifrons (bivalve shell) Middle Devonian Moscow formation Windom Shale Hamilton Group Deep Springs Road Quarry Lebanon, NY.
  24. From the album Cretaceous

    Granocardium sp. (Cardiidae bivalve-cockle shell-internal cast) Upper Cretaceous Merchantville Formation Mattewan Group Mattewan, New Jersey
  25. From the album Lower Devonian

    Actinopteria communis (Pteriomorpha bivalve) Lower Devonian Port Jervis Formation Tristates Group Shimer's Brook Montague, N.J.
×