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Found 6 results

  1. For those who enjoy solitude and quiet away from large crowds of people, visiting the Blue Forest of Wyoming is probably one of the best choices. I personally love the most remote places possible, so I enjoy Blue Forest but those of you accustomed to living in or near a busy city may find it unsettling (or so I've been told). It can get busy during the summer, but overall it tends to be pretty quiet especially the further away from the road you go. I was able to visit the site last month and I found some very cool things. The drive out to the site really isn't too long in my opinion, but it's really not a site to spend 20 minutes at expecting to find a lot of big logs. Most of the really big logs have been found, so a lot of patience and persistence can (but won't always) pay off. Let me just say that if you plan to dig, it gets pretty warm out there. You'll need to take breaks throughout the day and rehydrate if you aren't acclimated to the dry heat. There was no wind when I was there and only occasionally would a few clouds dot across the sky so don't count on shade being there unless you bring a canopy with you. The first couple days started off a bit lackluster as far as digging was concerned. I wasn't finding much by digging, but when I surface collected I found a lot of nice small pieces. Different people have different methods of searching for petrified wood here. Some dig blindly, some probe and then dig, some witch for petrified wood, some probe existing holes, and some just surface collect. Each method has its merits. There has been a lot of digging here over the years, so the landscape is dotted with holes all over, some of which have been filled (if you dig here, please refill your holes so BLM doesn't try to shut the site down). I was finding a lot of nice small pieces on the surface where other people had been digging, but I was hopeful of digging up my own log. I'd heard about a few other people finding some small logs when I was there, but most said the same thing: they'd all disentegrated when they tried to remove them. The petrified wood here can be pretty delicate. It is encased in layers of algae, but extracting the wood from the algae can be difficult and often results in separation of the agate layer from the wood or even the log splintering completely.
  2. Fossil Wood Petrification and mineralogy

    Mustoe, G.E., 2015. Late Tertiary petrified wood from Nevada, USA: Evidence of multiple silicification pathways. Geosciences, 5(4), pp.286-309. https://www.mdpi.com/2076-3263/5/4/286 https://www.researchgate.net/publication/282851612_Late_Tertiary_Petrified_Wood_from_Nevada_USA_Evidence_of_Multiple_Silicification_Pathways https://sciprofiles.com/profile/112497 https://www.researchgate.net/profile/George_Mustoe Mustoe, G. and Acosta, M., 2016. Origin of petrified wood color. Geosciences, 6(2), no.25. https://www.mdpi.com/2076-3263/6/2/25 https://www.researchgate.net/publication/302497324_Origin_of_Petrified_Wood_Color Mustoe, G.E., 2017. Wood petrifaction: A new view of permineralization and replacement. Geosciences, 7(4), no.119. https://www.mdpi.com/2076-3263/7/4/119/htm https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/4ff7/8f7c6899c4459c4f33e4d51c040f6374685d.pdf https://www.researchgate.net/publication/321170639_Wood_Petrifaction_A_New_View_of_Permineralization_and_Replacement Mustoe, G.E., 2018. Mineralogy of non-silicified fossil wood. Geosciences, 8(3), no.85. https://www.mdpi.com/2076-3263/8/3/85/htm https://www.researchgate.net/publication/323540027_Mineralogy_of_Non-Silicified_Fossil_Wood Mustoe, George E. "Non-mineralized fossil wood." Geosciences (8) no.223. https://www.mdpi.com/2076-3263/8/6/223 https://www.researchgate.net/publication/325827782_Non-mineralized_Fossil_Wood Luczaj, J.A., Leavitt, S.W., Csank, A.Z., Panyushkina, I.P. and Wright, W.E., 2018. Comment on “Non-Mineralized Fossil Wood” by George E. Mustoe (Geosciences, 2018). Geosciences, 8(12), no.462. https://www.mdpi.com/2076-3263/8/12/462/htm Mustoe, G.E., Viney, M. and Mills, J., 2019. Mineralogy of Eocene fossil wood from the “Blue Forest” locality, southwestern Wyoming, United States. Geosciences, 9(1), no.35. https://www.mdpi.com/2076-3263/9/1/35 https://www.researchgate.net/publication/330292211_Mineralogy_of_Eocene_Fossil_Wood_from_the_Blue_Forest_Locality_Southwestern_Wyoming_United_States Mustoe, G.E., 2015. Geologic History of Eocene Stonerose Fossil Beds, Republic, Washington, USA. Geosciences, 5(3), pp.243-263. https://www.mdpi.com/2076-3263/5/3/243 https://www.researchgate.net/publication/279786883_Geologic_History_of_Eocene_Stonerose_Fossil_Beds_Republic_Washington_USA Yours, Paul H.
  3. Blue Forest Fluorescent Petrified Wood

    From the album Fluorescent Petrified Wood

    Petrified Wood viewed under short-wave ultraviolet light Eocene Blue Forest, Wyoming
  4. Blue Forest Fluorescent Petrified Wood

    From the album Fluorescent Petrified Wood

    Petrified Wood viewed under short-wave ultraviolet light Eocene Blue Forest, Wyoming
  5. Blue Forest Fluorescent Petrified Wood

    From the album Fluorescent Petrified Wood

    Petrified Wood viewed under short-wave ultraviolet light Eocene Blue Forest, Wyoming
  6. For the second year in a row, I took a long, two-week vacation to Wyoming, Utah and Colorado in late August and early September. It was a nice vacation but perhaps a bit too long. The highlight of my trip was visits to the Warfield fish quarry in Kemmerer, WY, the Blue Forest in Eden Valley, WY, Wamsutter, WY for "Turritella Agate", Great Basin National Park in Nevada and Douglass Pass in Colorado. I've been working on a really involved narrative of the whole trip but it is taking some time and I'm running out of steam so I wanted to get some pictures and summaries up on the Forum. My first stop was to a site south of Wamsutter, WY where you can find "Turritella Agate" which is silicified rock that is jam packed with snail shell fossils. The area has changed a bit since I last visited eight years ago with many more Oil and Gas pumping sites. After collecting my fill I got back on the road. My next stop was to an area that had some agates but I didn't find anything that was terribly interesting. Finally, I stopped at a section of the “Oyster Ridge” south of Kemmerer. Here some Cretaceous aged sediments are tilted up. One of the layers is composed of a Pelecypod hash which does not often produce good quality, whole specimens. I found one nice specimen and then spent some time exploring one of the other layers which was a sandstone with lots of fluvial features like ripple marks, fluting and other features indicating it once was an estuary or beach like environment. I snagged a nice sized piece for myself and a few others for my Aunt's garden in Longmont. Cont'd...
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