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Found 233 results

  1. Community on the Half-Shell

    I love finding multiple fossils. I don't just mean multiple specimens in a single rock, I mean fossils that show evidence of more than one life-form. Shells with burrow traces, for one example. Dung beetle balls. Predation marks. And particularly, epibionts. Here I have a fairly ordinary specimen of the brachiopod Tropidoleptus carinatus. Ordinary, that is, until a closer look is taken.... This specimen supported an variety of other critters on its pedicle valve. Whether the epibionts took hold while the brachiopod was alive, or colonized the dead shell, I don't know; I would speculate the former, as the brachiopod is articulated. I think it is likely that the whole living community was buried together by mud. So who's here? Let's take a closer look. We have several examples of Cornulites hamiltoniae. Some are (relatively) large, while others are very small: Two more Cornulites pictures, then we'll see who else lived here!
  2. Brachiopod or Horn Coral

    A friend of mine found an interesting fossil a Keifer Creek in St.Louis Missouri. He was unsure of what it was but I assumed that it was a horn coral or perhaps a vertically split brachiopod. I am not the best at identifying fossils so I was hoping someone on the forum with more experience could take a look at it. The fossil being referred to is in the middle of the stone.
  3. What is this fossil?

    Found this fossil at Rockford, Iowa, last week with a student group, and it didn't show up on our identification sheets. It's about the size of a quarter. Can anyone tell us what it is? Thank you.
  4. Brachiopod Imprint?

    I found this fossil near a lake in Hamilton, Nj. The rock in the area is mostly Triassic and Crataceous exempt for a small section of rock that is from the Cambrian. I think that this is an imprint of a brachiopod because of all the ridges. Here's a picture. I hope that you can identify this. Thanks in advance.
  5. My story will be a bit(could be too much) long, so I put this report separately from @Kane's report. I'm not sure I can do this or not 'cause this is my first time to write same topic from others'. If I should not do this, I apologize administrator for making bothersome Before I start my story, I convey my profound and huge gratitude to @crinus for taking me quarries(these travels were my very first visiting to not only quarries, but also Ontario's fossil site!) and giving a lot of nice fossils to me what he found, and to @Northern Sharks for giving a nice specimen to me what he found as well from Brechin quarry and organizing Bowmanville journey(I didn't know that until seeing from @Kane's report. I'm not sure that you set the all plans), and to @Malcolmt for giving a complete crinoid to me, which is my first complete crinoid possessing arms and stems, and finally to everyone that I've met on this travel for welcoming me *Plus - My report will be incomplete 'cause I don't know that much about Ontario's geological information and some species' scientific names. So, I'll appreciate greatly if you guys tell me about right information and help me to correct it I revised this post a loooot of times 'cause I realized that it was not report, but a proper diary(Too Much Information.. and still, it's like a diary..) Well.. Now then, I'll begin my long story with some pictures though I couldn't make to take that many pictures of quarries and people. As for the Brechin quarry, I forgot to take my phone and there was no time to take DSLR out from my bag. And as for the Bowmanville quarry, I was so concentrating to find fossils that I forgot to take pictures *Date : Oct.21&22.2017 *Location : Brechin quarry & Bowmanville quarry *Records of formation : Brechin quarry - D -----> Upper Verulam Formation(There was a "cluster" of fauna that I think it's different from below one. Color was bright grey and somewhat yellowish) DD -----> Middle Verulam Formation(Bluish and grey rocks with vurnerable condition) DDD -----> Lower Verulam Formation(Brown and grey rocks) DDDD -----> Upper Bobcaygeon Formation(Alternates between sublithogenic and medium calcarenitic limestone, but also includes some brown lithographic limestone and bluish fine-grained limestone in minor thicknesses)[*] [Buried under the ground] Middle Bobcaygeon Formation(Grey and brown, very fine grained to sublithogenic, sparsely fossiliferous limestone, with some fine-grained limestone in the upper part)[*] [Buried under the ground] Lower Bobcaygeon Formation(Brownish grey, fine- and medium-grained limestone)[*] (Reference - [*] Bobcaygeon formation - Weblex Canada. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://weblex.nrcan.gc.ca/html/001000/GSCC00053001579.html @Northern Sharks informed me! Thank you! ) Bowmanville quarry - D -----> Blue Mountain Formation (I couldn't get there.) DD Upper Lindsay formation DDD Level 2 (?) DDDD Level 3(?) - Lower Lindsay formation (Below as well. The quarry was so biiiiiig!!) - - *Geological Age - Middle Ordovician These all rocks are what I took. Maybe I took a lot of fossils even if it is only a small part of trilobites. I just so excited that I found Ontario's trilobites directly, not through internet store or pictures! Well.. Now I'm worried the weight.. Could I take these whole fossils?... I should have considered about it, not just collect unnecessary things by my instinct. It was not a clever move.. That crinoid(at 11 O'clock-wise) is not what I found these quarries. I found it from Scarbourough bluffers park before. To begin, the beginning of the day(Oct.21) I've met @crinus first at the very early morning of the day(For me. 'cause I'm not the early bird type). Actually, we met from Ebay. I won his two auction and I asked him that would you wait for me until I get to Canada in order to reduce shipping cost. Then, he offered me to go to quarries with him! Anyway, we arrived there around at 8:30 AM and there were 4 or more people had already arrived. I've met @Malcolmt and two other people(Sorry, I can't remember the name. My poor memory..) on near the greenish and bluish pond in the quarry. After handshaking, @crinus and I went to the piles of rocks, which is near the pond. We climbed up the piles of rocks and met @Northern Sharks on there. He found one complete Calyptaulax sp. and dropped it from his hand while we were greeting each other(yet, fortunately, the trilobite was alive with small crack on the pygidium(if my memory is correct)) After the greeting, @crinus and @Northern Sharks went to another place and I remained there, which was that @Northern Sharks found a trilobite, and looked for trilobites with hammering big rocks. I found a horn coral, which is Lambeophyllum profundum Conrad, 1843, the cephalon part of Ceraurus sp. , and a loooot of brachiopods and so on It came from lower Verulam formation. This one is Lambeophyllum profundum Conrad, 1843( @Northern Sharks and @FossilDAWG informed me! Thank you! ) Ceraurus globulobatus? I don't know the exact name of this specimen.. This one maybe came from the middle Verulam formation because of its color. Though I found this from the lower Verulam formation area.
  6. Ambocoelia umbonata (Conrad 1842)

    Found as surface float near the top of the Windom exposure, a few feet below the Genundewa Limestone at Penn-Dixie Quarry in Hamburg, NY. A very common fossil in Hamilton Group sediments. Similar to Emanuella praeumbona, distinguished from E. praeumbona by the hinge width; the hinge of A. umbonata spans the width of the valve, while that of E. praeumbona is narrower. A. umbonata has a nearly flat brachial valve, while that of E. praeumbona shows a convex profile. Full-sized specimens of A. umbonata are also not as large as E. praeumbona. Originally designated Orthis umbonata. A. umbonata has been defined as the type species of Ambocoelia by Hall. References: Wilson, K. A. “Field Guide to the Devonian Fossils of New York” (2014). Paleontological Research Institution Special Publication No. 44. Linsley, D. M. “Devonian Paleontology of New York” (1994). Paleontological Research Institution Special Publication No. 21. Hall, J. Palaeontology of New York v. 4. (1867) Fossilworks. http://fossilworks.org
  7. Emanuella praeumbona (Hall 1857)

    Found as surface float near the top of the Windom exposure, a few feet below the Genundewa Limestone at Penn-Dixie Quarry in Hamburg, NY. Distinguished from Ambocoelia umbonata by the hinge width; the hinge of A. umbonata spans the width of the valve, while that of E. praeumbona is narrower. E. praeumbona also shows a convex profile to the brachial valve, and grew to a larger size. E. praeumbona is common in the Hamilton Group only within the upper layers of the Windom Member. Originally designated Orthis praeumbona, later assigned to Ambocoelia, then reassigned to Emanuella in 1990. References: Hall, J. Palaeontology of New York v. 4. (1867) Fossilworks. http://fossilworks.org Yale Peabody Museum Collections website (http://peabody.yale.edu/collections/invertebrate-paleontology) Brett, C. E. Biostratigraphy and Paleoecology of the Windom Shale Member (Moscow Formation) in Erie County, NY. 1974. State University of New York at Buffalo.
  8. Three productids with most of their spines intact, showing that they looked like hedgehogs. I haven't identified them further largely because I can't see the shells properly. (Edit: likely to be Echinoconchus or similar echinoconchid - see below) These are from a Brigantian (Mississippian) mudstone in NE England, Co.Durham. 1) About 6cm across 2) Interior brachial valve showing spines projecting around the edge from behind. About 3cm across. 3) about 4cm across:
  9. Camarotoechia prolifica (Hall 1867)

    Found as surface float on the scree pile at the Windom exposure. Originally assigned to Rhynchonella prolifica, currently assigned to Camarotoechia. Appears to have been assigned to several genera over time, including Stenocisma and Cupularostrum. Refs: Linsley, D. M. Devonian Paleontology of New York. (1994) Paleontological Research Institution Special Publication 21. Hall, J. Palaeontology of New York v. 4. (1867) Yale Peabody Museum Collections website (http://peabody.yale.edu/collections/invertebrate-paleontology)
  10. Cyrtina hamiltonensis recta Hall 1867

    Found as surface float on the scree pile at the Windom exposure. Refs: Linsley, D. M. “Devonian Paleontology of New York” (1994). Paleontological Research Institution Special Publication No. 21. Hall, J. Palaeontology of New York v. 4. (1867) Yale Peabody Museum Collections website (http://peabody.yale.edu/collections/invertebrate-paleontology)
  11. Cyrtina hamiltonensis (Hall 1857)

    Found as surface float on the scree pile at the Windom exposure. Originally Cyrtia hamiltonensis. Reassigned by Hall in 1867. References: Linsley, D. M. Devonian Paleontology of New York. (1994) Paleontological Research Institution Special Publication 21. Wilson, K. A. Field Guide to the Devonian Fossils of New York. (2014) Paleontological Research Institution Special Publication 44. Hall, J. Palaeontology of New York v. 4. (1867) Fossilworks. http://fossilworks.org Yale Peabody Museum Collections website (http://peabody.yale.edu/collections/invertebrate-paleontology)
  12. Patriaspirifer duodenaris (Hall 1843)

    Found as surface float on the scree pile at the Kashong exposure. Originally assigned to Delthyris, reassigned to Spirifer, Acrospirifer, and Patriaspirifer. Alternate spellings: P. duodenaris, P. duodenaria, P. duodenarius. Does not appear in Fossilworks or Wilson’s “Field Guide to the Devonian Fossils of New York”. Classification information from Fossilworks entry for Patriaspirifer genus. Reference: Linsley, D. M. Devonian Paleontology of New York. (1994) Paleontological Research Institution Special Publication 21. Hall, J. Palaeontology of New York v. 4. (1867) Fossilworks. http://fossilworks.org Yale Peabody Museum Collections website (http://peabody.yale.edu/collections/invertebrate-paleontology)
  13. Ambocoelia umbonata (Conrad 1842)

    Found as surface float on the scree pile at the Windom exposure. A very common fossil in Hamilton group sediments. Similar to Emanuella praeumbona, distinguished from E. praeumbona by the hinge width; the hinge of A. umbonata spans the width of the valve, while that of E. praeumbona is narrower. A. umbonata has a nearly flat brachial valve, while that of E. praeumbona shows a convex profile. Full-sized specimens of A. umbonata are also not as large as E. praeumbona. References: Wilson, K. A. “Field Guide to the Devonian Fossils of New York” (2014). Paleontological Research Institution Special Publication No. 44. Linsley, D. M. “Devonian Paleontology of New York” (1994). Paleontological Research Institution Special Publication No. 21. Hall, J. Palaeontology of New York v. 4. (1867) Fossilworks. http://fossilworks.org
  14. I'm putting together a bunch of entries for Collections, and I keep running across fossils for which I can't find some important pieces of data--like "Author Citation"! For example, I have one example of a tiny brachiopod listed as Cyrtina recta in my Linsley1 fossil guide. It doesn't appear at all in my Wilson2 guide, nor is it listed in Fossilworks. I did find it in Hall's Palaeontology of New York v. 43 as Cyrtina hamiltonensis var. recta. The plates used by Linsley are taken from Hall. Here's a set of photos of my specimen: Pedicle valve. 9mm x 5mm: Hinge side of pedicle valve: Brachial valve. 9mm x 5mm: Side view (Hinge at left): Now, Cyrtina hamiltonensis is listed in Fossilworks, as well as the Wilson guide, but that is a distinctly different shape. On this specimen, I'm looking for the correct Author Citation (Hall 1867?) and the current nomenclature. Example #2: Acrospirifer duodenaris, according to Linsley. Not listed in Wilson, Hall, or Fossilworks. Acrospirifer murchisoni appears in Fossilworks, but that's Lower Devonian according to Linsley (and isn't listed in Wilson or Hall, either). Here's some photos (9mm (if it weren't missing a tip) x 5mm): Pedicle, brachial: Again, I need an Author Citation and current nomenclature. Thanks for any help with this. I have more! 1. Linsley, D. M. Devonian Paleontology of New York. (1994) Paleontological Research Institution Special Publication 21. 2. Wilson, K. A. Field Guide to the Devonian Fossils of New York. (2014) Paleontological Research Institution Special Publication 44. 3. Hall, J. Palaeontology of New York v. 4. (1867)
  15. Brachiopod IDs from Jack county, TX

    I found these today in Jack county, TX not far from the Wise county border. I’m not sure what the formation is there, but I think it could be either Jasper Creek or Alluvium. I don’t know much about the Alluvium, which is Cenozoic, Quaternary. I’m not sure I’ve ever hunted in the Cenozoic so I’m not sure what would characterize it. I’m learning though. I’d say the material resembled Pensylvania. Pic 1 & 2 are side the 2 sides I’m guessing that pic 1 is the dorsal valve side (there’s a convex vertical part running down the middle of the shell). # 2 is the pedical valve side and there’s a concave vertical part running down the middle of the shell. But I could be wrong on which is which.
  16. Milwaukee

    What spots in Milwaukee would be good for hunting fossils? I'm taking 2 older boys with me as my lil son and wife will have to stay at hospital overnight.... any spots? My oldest son is interested in try to find trilobites.... thank you.
  17. Fall Break in Sulphur

    Hi! This teacher is spending the last day of Fall Break Christmas shopping - fossils for my students! Found a few beauties for teacher, too... I think this may be part of a trilobite... thoughts? More pics in comments of other mystery finds as I find them! Thanks in advance!
  18. From the album Lower Devonian

    Discomyorthis oblata (Orthida brachiopod- both valves) Lower Devonian Kalkberg Formation Helderberg Group Route 20 road cut Leesville, NY.
  19. Hi everyone! Back in June, a colleague of mine traveled to Albuquerque, New Mexico for a conference, and she extended her stay in order to do a little exploring with her husband. @PFOOLEY was nice enough to give her some tips re: where to go to look for fossils, and she was able to find a few at the Otero Canyon! She decided to give one of her finds to me, and I was hoping that someone out there would be able to identify it for me - please see pictures below: "Front" of rock: brachiopod plus some bryozoans (I think) "Back" of rock: Close-up of brachiopod: Thanks in advance! Monica
  20. Fossilised seabed

    Hi all just sorted out some old fossil and found this fossilised seabed. I found it 20 years in a river in South Wales can't remember where it was. This was before I was interested in fossils or natural history. The fossil over years is going a chalky lighter shade , if that makes any sense. What can I protect it with . Also what traces of fossils can you see in it. Kindest regards Bobby
  21. I have a number of mortality plates that I collected from the middle/upper Devonian Hamilton formation near Ithaca New York. In case the photos aren't clear, it's mostly brachiopod and crinoid hash. Would be interested in trading for any vertebrate material. Or invertebrate that lies outside the Devonian (maybe a similar mortality plate from the Ordovician or Silurian, so I could compare). Anyone interested? Make me an offer. Matt
  22. Here is some of the more interesting miscellaneous material from the little Devonian spot in my area I thought I'd share, I'm not sure of any of the specific IDs of any of these specimens I can only guess brachiopods, a possible crinoid stem, and horn corals?
  23. Eumetabolotoechia alaura n. sp. Sartenaer 2014 collected from the Pa side of the Delaware River across from Eddy Farm Sparrowbush NY. The Upper Devonian Sparrowbush Formation (NY Tully equivalent) about 40' thick is exposed here, superadjacent to the Middle Devonian Mahantango Formation (2450 ft thick in this area). E. alaura, previously described as Leiorhynchus mesacostale Hall 1860, an U. Devonian brachiopod ID of these specimens and advice of current nomenclature by Dr. Alex B of SUNY New Paltz. Gordon
  24. Hi all, I am looking to obtain some more brachiopods for in my collection, mostly because I think that it's a fascinating group of animals. Unfortunately, I do not have many of them. Therefore I'm asking the help of you all! This is what I want: Brachiopods (spiriferid or not) from any continent (preferably not from Europe) from the Paleozoic. I don't need a lot, just a few different ones to widen my collection! Having from many different locations would be nice too. I already have the following though, and as to avoid having duplicates I am not interested in these: Platystrophia from Maysville (KY, USA) Punctopsirifer from Beckenridge (TX, USA) Terebratula perforata from Kaloot (NL) Cyrtospirifer verneuilli from Barvaux-sur-Ourthe (BE) Atrypa reticularis from Eifel (DE) Cererithyris and Kallirhynchia from Lion-sur-Mer (FR) If you have one of those species (but from another location), I'm still interested! Or if you have other species but from the same location, same goes! What I don't want is to have the same species from the same location. In return, I have a selection of different (mainly) European fossils, ranging from shark teeth to seashells (and a few brachiopods ), and many other things. I also have several fossils from closed locations! If you're looking for anything specific yourself, then you can always ask me and I'll see what I have. If you're interested and have anything to propose, please send a PM! Thanks in advance! Max PS: for international shippers, make sure that the shipping costs to the Netherlands are not too high. I'm willing to ship to anywhere, but I just want to make sure that this is both ways! (No Track & Code needed; no signing needed; no priority needed; envelope is better)
  25. From the album Beltzville State Park

    Brachiopod internal mold with crinoid impression Devonian Manhatango Formation Beltzville State Park, Beltzville, PA
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