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Found 368 results

  1. From the album Eastern NY Fossil Hunts

    Platystoma ventricosa Leptocoelia flabellites Devonian Found in 2018 from Glenerie, NY
  2. Acrospirifer arrectus

    From the album Eastern NY Fossil Hunts

    Acrospirifer arrectus Devonian Found in 2018 from Glenerie, NY
  3. Discomyorthis oblata

    From the album Eastern NY Fossil Hunts

    Discomyorthis oblata Devonian Found in 2018 from Glenerie, NY
  4. Chonetes hudsonica

    From the album Eastern NY Fossil Hunts

    Chonetes hudsonica Devonian Found in 2018 from Glenerie, NY
  5. Brachiopod

    Is this an atrypa? What part of the anatomy am I looking at?
  6. Penn Dixie Round 1

    This year I pulled the trigger on heading to Penn Dixie for the Dig With the Experts weekend! Definitely would highly recommend . I drove up from Boston to the Buffalo area on Thursday and spent the day Friday digging with @Malcolmt and @JamesAndTheFossilPeach. It was a blast! Thanks again guys for giving me a lay of the land. Credit to @JamesAndTheFossilPeach for the find of the day with a giant Eldredgeops (pic below). Saturday and Sunday were spent looking for trilobites in the roped off Dig With the Experts section of excavated shale with some success. Monday I drove back to Boston, and stopped to stretch my legs in Glenerie, NY to walk a stretch of road looking for Devonian brachiopods and gastropods. Got a couple! All in all, a great trip... although I'm nice and sore . Here are my takeaways from the weekend. I tried to get a bit of the entire Penn Dixie Ecosystem keeping at least one of everything and as many trilobites as I could find. I wish I took more pictures Saturday and Sunday, but I was too busy splitting shale . Cheers, Barret
  7. Pentamerida?

    This sample is little more than a couple of centimeters. I was wondering if it's a brachiopod and if so, is it a pentamerida?
  8. To celebrate the end of the semester, I decided to finally take the 2 hour trip down to the Paulding Fossil Gardens. The weather sucked as most of you in the Midwest probably noticed, but I managed to get a few hours in between storms. This made everything a bit flooded, but I wasn't too concerned.
  9. Brachiopod, but which one?

    By far the most detailed Brachiopod I’ve found to date. The top impression, which isn’t shown, appeared to have two larger bands running down the center. The small piece in attachment 3 was somewhat of a steinkern or impression below it. Scale line is 1cm. Photos taken with a DSL through a microscope. This came from eroded Limestone.
  10. Devonian Brachiopod

    I have had this brachiopod for 2 years and would like to prep it out. It would be nice to know what it is first so I can envision how it sits in the matrix. Cedar Valley Formation??
  11. Lower New York?

    I was able a few years back able to visit south central New York state in Owego. A cousin took me out for some hiking and I ended up dragging a bunch of rock home with me. While walking around Pumpelly creek I found these pieces which I hope to ID now that I'm finally getting back into my fossil grove. My questions are 2: 1st from description of area, what is age / formation likely in that area? And 2nd, if anyone has ID for these or can point me to a good reference I would appreciate it. Thanks for looking
  12. Beltzville State Park

    The Delaware Valley Paleontological Society got a permit to explore the restricted area at Beltaville Dam in Lehighton, PA today. The spillway for the dam is immense! The 20-50ish foot walls of the spillway are covered with rubble in swaths of hard blue-black and red stone, soft colorful clay stone, and the occasional bit of tan sandstone. All are from the Upper Devonian Mahantango Formation. The sun was shining, the air was warm and the wind was still. Perfect day for prospecting! Everybody spread out along the walls. There was more than ample room for everybody to claim a big spot to explore. I walked along the north wall until the smooth, flat stones started showing texture. I had expected to find very little in the harder material and lots of things in the colorful clay. That’s been my experience on the beach in the adjacent state park*, anyway. Quite the opposite! As soon as I found a promising spot in the hard matrix, I sat down and examined every rock. The trilobites were lurking watching me from all directions. I found eyes from at least 8 animals. Most I kept, just for the sake of counting. A couple I tossed because this was getting silly. One I gave to someone nearby, “So he can keep an eye out for you.” The best was this 2-inch Phacops sp. cephalon. I now officially claim to have the PA State Fossil. I don’t know if I’ll ever be able to figure out if it’s P. rana, but the right genus is close enough for me. Such a cute little froggie face! I found one tiny brachiopod or bivalve among the buggies that still had the whole shell intact, albeit a might smoothed during its time under water. It's not silicified. It's not pyritized. It's still CaCO3 after all these ages. I tested it. I showed it to our trip leader who said that there was coral preserved like this shell further down the wall. Nifty. There were also some very nice, red-stained bryozoa and hash plates. Unfortunately, the hash plates were mostly at the narrow ends of long rocks, arranged 90 degrees from the plane of the layers in the splitting stone. Most I admired and left behind. There are only so many big, mostly-featureless rocks I can store in the house. After a couple hours, I appeared to exhaust my trilobite supply. People had walked past me with some pretty horn corals molds, so I headed towards the clay to see if I could find any. No luck. There was plenty of colorful stone, buy almost nothing as far as fossils, so I kept picking my way across the wall where I could get footing. I kept getting higher and higher until eventually I needed all 4s to navigate in any direction and abandoned my collection bucket. Another quarter mile or so down the wall, I found a good spot to slid tom the spillway floor. And there they were. In a space covering maybe 5 horizontal feet of the wall were rocks littered with preserved coral bodies. Jackpot! I spent at least an hour at the top. I tried to slide down a little and slid all the way to the bottom, unable to climb back up the steep pile of flat pebbles. There was definitely more at the bottom, but the middle eluded me. While poking around for corals, I found a couple of ½” brachiopods with both sides intact and a preserved crinoid stem. I walked across the spillway and back up the other side but found nothing. I somehow totally missed that the rest of the group had left, with just Rick and Steve watching me from a distance. Typical for me to be the last one out. I'll post a link in the comments to my Beltzville album when I finish sorting through my finds and photographing them. *Yes, I know it is illegal to collect fossils in most states' parks. Pennsylvania is an exception.
  13. Back in May 2017, I brought back some nice fossil plates from Ohio, I believe Ordovician in age. First photo is plate 1. Next photo (of plate 1) shows a close-up of parts of the trilobite Isotelus, next photo - a nautiloid (unknown species), next photo shows valves of the brachiopod Strophomera, along with many bryozoan fossils. Next photo is a close-up of crinoids on plate 3. (Not much on plate 2). And last photo is of quite a few crinoids on plate 4.
  14. Brachiopod?

    ID please, I think I found a brachiopod.
  15. As the snow will start to clear soon, I’ve been looking into new places to hunt for fossils in New York! If you have any suggestions I would love to hear them and visit them! Thank you in advance!
  16. Day Two ; Locality One (or Six if you include Day One) Black Sahara, South of Erfoud 20th February 2019 Well this is where things really get interesting, so stick with this thread as there are dozens of photos of fossils coming up. Looks at the tags if you want clues. I was up bright and early and wandered out at about 7 am to watch the sun rise over the still mighty Erg Chebbi dunes. And as night's candles were burnt out and jocund day stood tiptoe over the misty duney tops, the chaps came to join me and managed lots of photos. Here's one, if you would like to see more, I'm busy posting a kazillion of 'em under the Nature Photography thread.
  17. Pre/Cambrian Collection

    I have always been quite fascinated with the early stages of development of life on Earth. My interest really picked up when I first discovered the Ediacaran biota, and who can blame me. Those creatures are so enigmatic and fascinating. I was able to pick up a few specimens, but quickly realized that my desire for fossils greatly outweighed the supply and cost of Ediacaran fossils, and I soon discovered the equally fascinating and enigmatic Lower Cambrian Chengjiang biota. I was, and still am, blown away at the quality of preservation of these soft bodied critters. A lot of specimens come very shoddily or incompletely prepared, and while it's been a steep learning curve, I feel that I'm starting to get the hang of prepping them. I've decided to start posting my latest acquisitions as these fossils are too amazing not to share. First up is Cricocosmia jinningensis, a fairly common palaeoscolecid worm from the Chengjiang biota. I have several specimens but this one is the best. It came partially prepped and I am just now satisfied with the result. You can see remnants of the gut preserved as darker regions in the center of the body. Next up is a small hash plate of Bohemiella romingeri brachiopods from the Middle Cambrian of the Czech Republic. Not my usual purchase, but I felt the specimen was too beautiful to pass up.
  18. Day One ; Locality Three. Midelt 19th February 2019 The Berber nomads are hospitable, generous and very tough : The snow disappears soon after you get onto the High Plains between the Middle and High Atlas ranges. Here are the High Atlas looming in the distance : As one approaches the town of Midelt, the layered geology of what is mostly Dogger, the old name for the Middle Jurassic, still used here, becomes clear : Midelt is full of fossil shops, however most of the fossils, including a kazillion trilobites, actually come from elsewhere. Jurassic ammonites may be from here, and many of the small cut and polished ammonites are from around here, but Midelt is most famous for its minerals, vanadinite especially. Also lead ores, barite and flourite. Top Tip : Don't buy fossils in Midelt unless it's a cut and polished small ammonite you want. Minerals, yes, many are beautiful and very cheap. Hmm, this looks interesting................. "Stop the car!"
  19. Jurassic / Cretaceous Oregon fossil?

    Hey, I posted my trip to California from Washington yesterday. I have now looked through my rocks and noticed that one of these rocks are different from the rest. I took a picture of the Buchia Bivalve in the first image, to show that it has a different shape and markings than the bivalves I found there. If anyone can give me a genus that would be great. Is this another shell or something more? Thanks guys
  20. Diving Into Georgia's Silurian Seas

    Much of this past week has felt less like a winter break and more like a switch from school work to government work. It seemed like many a day this week slowly chugged along, clogged by bureaucratic paperwork, followed by some bureaucratic paperwork, topped off with...more bureaucratic paperwork. As I'm sure many of you can understand, this left me a little restless. Having only the internet to provide you much of any entertainment will only last you so long. Thus, I decided today would need some much-needed paleo zest. A couple of days back I was scanning through Fossil hunting videos on YouTube, looking for new things to do (or watching the Ditch Weasel's Megalodon tooth hunting videos for the billionth time). Then I came across a video I hadn't watched in a long time, about a mysterious GA site I had never been to before. With a quick look in the description and comment section, I learned that it was near Dalton. With this in mind, I Googled "Dalton Fossils". To my surprise, the first result was a trip report @Nimravis wrote a little more than a year ago: With GPS coordinates now saved to Google Maps, My step grandpa and I headed out, partly guided by my phone's robotic voice. We arrived at the site, greeted by a thick fog: I put on waterproof boots, grabbed my hammer and chisel, and crossed the street to begin my search for Silurian treasures from the Red Mountain Formation. When we crossed the street, going around the leftmost portion of the wall (parking lot perspective), We heard a rustling off to the right. A decent sized Boulder slid down from the top of the hill, taking a decent chunk of dirt with it. In the end, it was a relatively small event, but we kept an eye out in case of other potential instabilities in the rock face. At entrance, facing the direction the mine lankslide occured Full attention on finding fossils, it didn't take very long at all to find some brachiopod plates.
  21. Unknown Brachiopod

    Unknown brachiopod, looking for an ID. Any & all help is appreciated!
  22. This weather has got me a bad case of cabin fever, my normal fossil hunting ground along the Whitewater River in Southeast Indiana is flooded. Went out in my back yard today to look thru the two truck loads of leach line gravel I bought for landscaping, the quarry is only about a 1/4 mile away. Found this odd ball, thin layers of crystal like formations on both sides, has hollow cavities and some brachiopod fossils that are a red color. Just curious as to how it formed, wish I could get closer photos of the brachiopods, will try again tomorrow with some daylight....if the sun ever shines again LOL.
  23. Brachiopod

    Found these in Emmitsburg, but the lake was supposed to be fresh water?
  24. Show us your favorite brachiopod fossil in your Collection!
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