Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'brachiopod'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
    Tags should be keywords or key phrases. e.g. carcharodon, pliocene, cypresshead formation, florida.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Fossil Discussion
    • General Fossil Discussion
    • Fossil Hunting Trips
    • Fossil ID
    • Is It Real? How to Recognize Fossil Fabrications
    • Partners in Paleontology - Member Contributions to Science
    • Questions & Answers
    • Fossil of the Month
    • Member Collections
    • A Trip to the Museum
    • Paleo Re-creations
    • Collecting Gear
    • Fossil Preparation
    • Member Fossil Trades Bulletin Board
    • Member-to-Member Fossil Sales
    • Fossil News
  • Gallery
  • Fossil Sites
    • Africa
    • Asia
    • Australia - New Zealand
    • Canada
    • Europe
    • Middle East
    • South America
    • United States
  • Fossil Media
    • Members Websites
    • Fossils On The Web
    • Fossil Photography
    • Fossil Literature
    • Documents

Blogs

  • Anson's Blog
  • Mudding Around
  • Nicholas' Blog
  • dinosaur50's Blog
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • Seldom's Blog
  • tracer's tidbits
  • Sacredsin's Blog
  • fossilfacetheprospector's Blog
  • jax world
  • echinoman's Blog
  • Ammonoidea
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • Adventures with a Paddle
  • Caveat emptor
  • -------
  • Fig Rocks' Blog
  • placoderms
  • mosasaurs
  • ozzyrules244's Blog
  • Sir Knightia's Blog
  • Terry Dactyll's Blog
  • shakinchevy2008's Blog
  • MaHa's Blog
  • Stratio's Blog
  • ROOKMANDON's Blog
  • Phoenixflood's Blog
  • Brett Breakin' Rocks' Blog
  • Seattleguy's Blog
  • jkfoam's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Lindsey's Blog
  • marksfossils' Blog
  • ibanda89's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Back of Beyond
  • St. Johns River Shark Teeth/Florida
  • Ameenah's Blog
  • gordon's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • Pennsylvania Perspectives
  • michigantim's Blog
  • michigantim's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • GPeach129's Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • Olenellus' Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • maybe a nest fossil?
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • bear-dog's Blog
  • javidal's Blog
  • Digging America
  • John Sun's Blog
  • John Sun's Blog
  • Ravsiden's Blog
  • Jurassic park
  • The Hunt for Fossils
  • The Fury's Grand Blog
  • julie's ??
  • Hunt'n 'odonts!
  • falcondob's Blog
  • Monkeyfuss' Blog
  • cyndy's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • nola's Blog
  • mercyrcfans88's Blog
  • Emily's PRI Adventure
  • trilobite guy's Blog
  • xenacanthus' Blog
  • barnes' Blog
  • myfossiltrips.blogspot.com
  • HeritageFossils' Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Emily's MotE Adventure
  • farfarawy's Blog
  • Microfossil Mania!
  • A Novice Geologist
  • Southern Comfort
  • Eli's Blog
  • andreas' Blog
  • Recent Collecting Trips
  • The Crimson Creek
  • Stocksdale's Blog
  • andreas' Blog test
  • fossilman7's Blog
  • Hey Everyone :P
  • fossil maniac's Blog
  • Piranha Blog
  • xonenine's blog
  • xonenine's Blog
  • Fossil collecting and SAFETY
  • Detrius
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Kehbe's Kwips
  • RomanK's Blog
  • Prehistoric Planet Trilogy
  • mikeymig's Blog
  • Western NY Explorer's Blog
  • Regg Cato's Blog
  • VisionXray23's Blog
  • Carcharodontosaurus' Blog
  • What is the largest dragonfly fossil? What are the top contenders?
  • Hihimanu Hale
  • Test Blog
  • jsnrice's blog
  • Lise MacFadden's Poetry Blog
  • BluffCountryFossils Adventure Blog
  • meadow's Blog
  • Makeing The Unlikley Happen
  • KansasFossilHunter's Blog
  • DarrenElliot's Blog
  • jesus' Blog
  • A Mesozoic Mosaic
  • Dinosaur comic
  • Zookeeperfossils
  • Cameronballislife31's Blog
  • My Blog
  • TomKoss' Blog
  • A guide to calcanea and astragali
  • Group Blog Test
  • Paleo Rantings of a Blockhead
  • Dead Dino is Art
  • The Amber Blog
  • TyrannosaurusRex's Facts
  • PaleoWilliam's Blog
  • The Paleo-Tourist
  • The Community Post
  • Lyndon D Agate Johnson's Blog
  • BRobinson7's Blog
  • Eastern NC Trip Reports
  • Toofuntahh's Blog
  • Pterodactyl's Blog
  • A Beginner's Foray into Fossiling
  • Micropaleontology blog
  • Pondering on Dinosaurs
  • Fossil Preparation Blog
  • On Dinosaurs and Media
  • cheney416's fossil story
  • jpc
  • Red-Headed Red-Neck Rock-Hound w/ My Trusty HellHound Cerberus
  • Red Headed
  • Paleo-Profiles

Calendars

  • Calendar

Categories

  • Annelids
  • Arthropods
    • Crustaceans
    • Insects
    • Trilobites
    • Other Arthropods
  • Brachiopods
  • Cnidarians (Corals, Jellyfish, Conulariids )
    • Corals
    • Jellyfish, Conulariids, etc.
  • Echinoderms
    • Crinoids & Blastoids
    • Echinoids
    • Other Echinoderms
    • Starfish and Brittlestars
  • Forams
  • Graptolites
  • Molluscs
    • Bivalves
    • Cephalopods (Ammonites, Belemnites, Nautiloids)
    • Gastropods
    • Other Molluscs
  • Sponges
  • Bryozoans
  • Other Invertebrates
  • Ichnofossils
  • Plants
  • Chordata
    • Amphibians & Reptiles
    • Birds
    • Dinosaurs
    • Bony Fishes
    • Mammals
    • Sharks & Rays
    • Other Chordates
  • *Pseudofossils ( Inorganic objects , markings, or impressions that resemble fossils.)

Found 272 results

  1. K16048A.jpg

    From the album Fayette County Iowa

  2. K16048B.jpg

    From the album Fayette County Iowa

  3. Hi all, I acquired this piece, did not find on site. It seems to be basalt but the outer matrix is packed with sand and shell fragments. The brachiopods (I am assuming from the research I have done) are rather large, and appear in a cluster. Some of the fragments I have observed appear to be from the devonian era. I am assuming this is a steinkern vs true fossil. But the matrix is so fragile to clean it is destroying it. I am more of a rock hound than true fossil student. I have learned from some of my earlier posts last year that if the structure has been replaced by silica than it is not a true fossil ie steinkern, I believe. The matrix includes so much sand and shell fragments that it makes me question how silification works? Some of the shells, brachiopods, became irridescent as the stone absorbed moisture. Looks more like stone when it is dry.. . One of the pics that looks like brushing its teeth, has an opal in the background that I believe is the actual metamorphic process from this exact type of matrix and brachiopod by water and silica ooze. Interestingly as I have been cleaning the opal up also, it has the same structure as the outer pieces of the shell from the brachiopod, feather like. The striations in the opal also seem to be where the brachiopod foot would be... and also the richest mineral and most beautiful layer... Any ideas of what I should do with this piece to clean it or leave it alone I would love. If you have knowledge about brachiopods and opals I would love to hear that as well!! Thanks Kim
  4. Devonian(?) brach chunk - location?

    I'm revisiting an old chunk that I acquired some years ago in a batch of assorted fossils, some without names or locations. I posted this one a while back but there are newer members now, so thought I'd see it there is any more insight on it. It's nothing spectacular, and I need to make room so am thinking of passing it on, but before I do it'd be nice to have a better idea of the location. Does it look like something that could have come from Arkona, or is it more likely to belong with the 'Rocky Mountain Corals' I got in the same lot? It's classic heavy, clinky limestone. Hopefully the pics are ok (and not too big).. The sun has not exactly been plentiful here lately and won't be for some days yet, but I have to get this show on the road so I'm relegated to taking imperfect pics indoors, again....
  5. I went out to a site near Lake Brownwood here in Cen Texas Penn for a little while this last Saturday. Found one Brachiopod that has some spins preserved which is very unusual for this part of the world. Also found a neat grouping of Brachiopods that cleaned up nice.
  6. Utah Fossil Hunt

    When fossil hunting near Moab, UT this weekend. There was quite a bit of snow in the Moab area this weekend, so I was not expecting to find anything. Luckily, this area was in the Sun and all the the snow was melted off. Found many Brachiopods, crinoid stems, and a small partial trilobite. (I have not been able to take a good photograph of the Trilobite because it is so small, abt 3/8") Attached are photos of the best Brachiopod. It is approx 2" across. I found a slightly large one, but it is still covered in a lot of matrix and needs to be prepped. Fossils are from the Permian Rico Formation about 17 miles down the Potash Road (Hwy 279) South of Moab, UT. Does anyone know of a good reference for fossils in this formation.
  7. Rhynchopora Brachiopod a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Rhynchopora Brachiopod SITE LOCATION: Graford, Palo Pinto County, Texas, USA TIME PERIOD: Pennsylvanian Period (299-323 Million Years ago) Data: The taxonomic order Rhynchonellida is one of the two main groups of living articulate brachiopods, the other being the order Terebratulida. They are recognized by their strongly ribbed wedge-shaped or nut-like shells, and the very short hinge line. The hinges come to a point, a superficial resemblance to many (phylogenetically unrelated) bivalve mollusk shells. The loss of the hinge line was an important evolutionary innovation, rhynchonellids being the first truly non-strophic shells with a purely internal articulation (teeth-sockets). Strong radiating ribs are common in this group; and there are generally very strong plications or accordion-like folds on the sulcus (the long middle section) of the shell. This probably helps regulate the flow of water in and out of the shell. All rhynchonellids are biconvex (have a bulbous shell), and have a fold located in the brachial valve. This means that the commissure, the line between the two valves or shells, is zigzagged, a distinguishing characteristic of this group. The prominent beak of the pedicle valve usually overlaps that of the brachial valve, in order to allow the shell to open and close. There is usually a functional pedicle although the delthyrium may be partially closed. Morphologically, the rhynchonellid has changed little since its appearance during the Ordovician period. It seems to have evolved from pentamerids, and in turn gave rise to the first atrypids and athyrids, both of which are characterized by the development of a complex spiral brachidium. Although much diminished by the terminal Paleozoic extinction, it experienced a revival during the Early Jurassic period, and became the most abundant of all brachiopods during the Mesozoic Era. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Brachiopoda Class: Rhynchonellata Order: Rhynchonellida Family: †Rhynchoporidae Genus: †Rhynchopora
  8. Rhynchopora Brachiopod a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Rhynchopora Brachiopod SITE LOCATION: Graford, Palo Pinto County, Texas, USA TIME PERIOD: Pennsylvanian Period (299-323 Million Years ago) Data: The taxonomic order Rhynchonellida is one of the two main groups of living articulate brachiopods, the other being the order Terebratulida. They are recognized by their strongly ribbed wedge-shaped or nut-like shells, and the very short hinge line. The hinges come to a point, a superficial resemblance to many (phylogenetically unrelated) bivalve mollusk shells. The loss of the hinge line was an important evolutionary innovation, rhynchonellids being the first truly non-strophic shells with a purely internal articulation (teeth-sockets). Strong radiating ribs are common in this group; and there are generally very strong plications or accordion-like folds on the sulcus (the long middle section) of the shell. This probably helps regulate the flow of water in and out of the shell. All rhynchonellids are biconvex (have a bulbous shell), and have a fold located in the brachial valve. This means that the commissure, the line between the two valves or shells, is zigzagged, a distinguishing characteristic of this group. The prominent beak of the pedicle valve usually overlaps that of the brachial valve, in order to allow the shell to open and close. There is usually a functional pedicle although the delthyrium may be partially closed. Morphologically, the rhynchonellid has changed little since its appearance during the Ordovician period. It seems to have evolved from pentamerids, and in turn gave rise to the first atrypids and athyrids, both of which are characterized by the development of a complex spiral brachidium. Although much diminished by the terminal Paleozoic extinction, it experienced a revival during the Early Jurassic period, and became the most abundant of all brachiopods during the Mesozoic Era. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Brachiopoda Class: Rhynchonellata Order: Rhynchonellida Family: †Rhynchoporidae Genus: †Rhynchopora
  9. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Hebertella occidentalis Brachiopod SITE LOCATION: Trimble County, Kentucky TIME PERIOD: Ordovician Period (445-485 Million Years ago) Data: Moderate to large Hebertella species with a subquadrate outline and a moderate to highly pronounced sulcus. Shell wider than long; shell depth variable, convexoconcave to unequally biconvex; cardinal extremities angular; sulcus wide with moderate to very high depth, typically well developed in larger specimins; ventral muscle scars of variable width; dorsal and ventral umbonal angles low (<135 degrees). Articulate brachiopod. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Brachiopoda Class: Rhynchonellata Order: †Orthida Family: †Plectorthidae Genus: †Herbertella Species: †occidentalis
  10. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Hebertella occidentalis Brachiopod SITE LOCATION: Trimble County, Kentucky TIME PERIOD: Ordovician Period (445-485 Million Years ago) Data: Moderate to large Hebertella species with a subquadrate outline and a moderate to highly pronounced sulcus. Shell wider than long; shell depth variable, convexoconcave to unequally biconvex; cardinal extremities angular; sulcus wide with moderate to very high depth, typically well developed in larger specimins; ventral muscle scars of variable width; dorsal and ventral umbonal angles low (<135 degrees). Articulate brachiopod. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Brachiopoda Class: Rhynchonellata Order: †Orthida Family: †Plectorthidae Genus: †Herbertella Species: †occidentalis
  11. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Hebertella occidentalis Brachiopod SITE LOCATION: Trimble County, Kentucky TIME PERIOD: Ordovician Period (445-485 Million Years ago) Data: Moderate to large Hebertella species with a subquadrate outline and a moderate to highly pronounced sulcus. Shell wider than long; shell depth variable, convexoconcave to unequally biconvex; cardinal extremities angular; sulcus wide with moderate to very high depth, typically well developed in larger specimins; ventral muscle scars of variable width; dorsal and ventral umbonal angles low (<135 degrees). Articulate brachiopod. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Brachiopoda Class: Rhynchonellata Order: †Orthida Family: †Plectorthidae Genus: †Herbertella Species: †occidentalis
  12. Brachiopod?

    thought id try another one since you guys helped so much on the last one, I found this in a draw on the bluffs id call it mudstone but the fossil stuck out, ive been told its just a brachiopod but I'm not sold just yet, what do you guys think?
  13. Fossil book

    What is best book for fossils? What you have at home that you use to check what species? I'm more interested in book that list all species if possible.... some books don't.
  14. Hello! I found this Oleneothyris brachiopod (on left) in the Paleocene of New Jersey and noticed that it differed from my other Oleneothyris' from this site (on the left is a 'normal' shaped one that I find here). I read there was a less common brachiopod here called Oleneothyris fragilis which seems to fit the description but i couldn't find any pictures of it online so I wanted to know what everyone thought. Below is a description I found online. http://digitallibrary.amnh.org/handle/2246/2019
  15. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Hebertella occidentalis Brachiopod Trimble County, Kentucky TIME PERIOD: Ordovician Period (445-485 Million Years ago) Data: Moderate to large Hebertella species with a subquadrate outline and a moderate to highly pronounced sulcus. Shell wider than long; shell depth variable, convexoconcave to unequally biconvex; cardinal extremities angular; sulcus wide with moderate to very high depth, typically well developed in larger specimins; ventral muscle scars of variable width; dorsal and ventral umbonal angles low (<135 degrees). Articulate brachiopod. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Brachiopoda Class: Rhynchonellata Order: †Orthida Family: †Plectorthidae Genus: †Herbertella Species: †occidentalis
  16. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Hebertella occidentalis Brachiopod Trimble County, Kentucky TIME PERIOD: Ordovician Period (445-485 Million Years ago) Moderate to large Hebertella species with a subquadrate outline and a moderate to highly pronounced sulcus. Shell wider than long; shell depth variable, convexoconcave to unequally biconvex; cardinal extremities angular; sulcus wide with moderate to very high depth, typically well developed in larger specimins; ventral muscle scars of variable width; dorsal and ventral umbonal angles low (<135 degrees). Articulate brachiopod. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Brachiopoda Class: Rhynchonellata Order: †Orthida Family: †Plectorthidae Genus: †Herbertella Species: †occidentalis
  17. Discomyorthis oblata Brachiopod a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Discomyorthis oblata Brachiopod Bois d'Arc Formation (overlays the Haragan) of Oklahoma TIME PERIOD: Lower Devonian (359-383 Million Years Ago) Orthida is an extinct order of brachiopods which appeared during the Early Cambrian period and became very diverse by the Ordovician, living in shallow-shelf seas. Orthids are the oldest member of the subphylum Rhynchonelliformea, and is the order from which all other brachiopods of this group stem. Physically they are usually strophic, with well-developed interareas. They also commonly have radiating ribs, sulcus, and fold structures. Typically one valve, often the brachial valve, is flatter than the other. The interior structure of the brachial valves are usually simple. In shape they are sub-circular to elliptical, with typically biconvex valves. There is some debate over the forms that first appeared of this order as to how they should be classified. However, they began to differentiate themselves by the late Early Cambrian period, and by the late Cambrian period had diversified into numerous varieties and reach 2 to 5 cm in width. Specimens from the late Cambrian to the earliest Ordovician exhibit shells with rounded and pointed pedical valves, with sharp to obtuse extremities and ridges that are fine to course. Punctate shells appear during the mid-Ordovician, which establish the suborder Dalmanellidina. The Ordovician is a productive period which gives rise to numerous genera in this order. However, they started to become greatly reduced by the end of the Ordovician extinction event. Both the impunctate and punctate survived through to the early Devonian Eventually, though, only the punctate lived on, and would play a minor role in benthic ecosystems until the late Permian, when they became extinct. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Brachiopoda Class: †Rhynchonellata Order: †Orthida Family: †Rhipidomellidae Genus: †Discomyorthis Species: †oblata
  18. Discomyorthis oblata Brachiopod a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Discomyorthis oblata Brachiopod Bois d'Arc Formation (overlays the Haragan) of Oklahoma TIME PERIOD: Lower Devonian (359-383 Million Years Ago) Orthida is an extinct order of brachiopods which appeared during the Early Cambrian period and became very diverse by the Ordovician, living in shallow-shelf seas. Orthids are the oldest member of the subphylum Rhynchonelliformea, and is the order from which all other brachiopods of this group stem. Physically they are usually strophic, with well-developed interareas. They also commonly have radiating ribs, sulcus, and fold structures. Typically one valve, often the brachial valve, is flatter than the other. The interior structure of the brachial valves are usually simple. In shape they are sub-circular to elliptical, with typically biconvex valves. There is some debate over the forms that first appeared of this order as to how they should be classified. However, they began to differentiate themselves by the late Early Cambrian period, and by the late Cambrian period had diversified into numerous varieties and reach 2 to 5 cm in width. Specimens from the late Cambrian to the earliest Ordovician exhibit shells with rounded and pointed pedical valves, with sharp to obtuse extremities and ridges that are fine to course. Punctate shells appear during the mid-Ordovician, which establish the suborder Dalmanellidina. The Ordovician is a productive period which gives rise to numerous genera in this order. However, they started to become greatly reduced by the end of the Ordovician extinction event. Both the impunctate and punctate survived through to the early Devonian Eventually, though, only the punctate lived on, and would play a minor role in benthic ecosystems until the late Permian, when they became extinct. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Brachiopoda Class: †Rhynchonellata Order: †Orthida Family: †Rhipidomellidae Genus: †Discomyorthis Species: †oblata
  19. Leptaena acuticuspidata Brachiopod.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Leptaena acuticuspidata Brachiopod Bois d'Arc Formation (overlays the Haragan) of Oklahoma TIME PERIOD: Lower Devonian (359-383 Million Years Ago) Leptaena, genus of extinct brachiopods (lamp shells) commonly found as fossils in Ordovician to Lower Carboniferous sedimentary rocks (between 488 million and 318 million years old). The very distinctive shell of Leptaena is characterized by its wrinkled ornamentation and fine linear markings. Leptanea (Dalman 1828) is a flat, Strophomenid type shell that develops a defined lip. This prolific and long lived genera is easily recognizable and can be found in rocks from the Ordovician through the Carboniferous. Strophomenata is an extinct class of brachiopods in the subphylum Rhynchonelliformea. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Brachiopoda Class: †Strophomenata Order: †Strophomenata Family: †Rafinesquinidae Genus: †Leptaena Species: †acuticuspidata
  20. Anastrophia grossa Brachiopod a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Anastrophia grossa Brachiopod Bois d'Arc Formation (overlays the Haragan) of Oklahoma TIME PERIOD: Lower Devonian (359-383 Million Years Ago) Data: The genus Anastrophia first becomes widely seen in the Silurian and it extends into the lower Devonian before disappearing from the fossil record. The specimens below are Anastrophia grossa from the Bois d'Arc formation of Oklahoma. The shell is subpentagonal in outline with coarse costae present on both valves. There is a shallow sulcus on the pedicle valve that becomes much more expressed at the anterior margin forming a "u" shape. The corresponding fold is also shallow. Both valves are convex with the brachial valve being more so than the pedicle valve. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Brachiopoda Class: Rhynchonellata Order: †Pentamerida Family: †Parastrophinidae Genus: †Anastrophia Species: †grossa
  21. Anastrophia grossa Brachiopod a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Anastrophia grossa Brachiopod Bois d'Arc Formation (overlays the Haragan) of Oklahoma TIME PERIOD: Lower Devonian (359-383 Million Years Ago) Data: The genus Anastrophia first becomes widely seen in the Silurian and it extends into the lower Devonian before disappearing from the fossil record. The specimens below are Anastrophia grossa from the Bois d'Arc formation of Oklahoma. The shell is subpentagonal in outline with coarse costae present on both valves. There is a shallow sulcus on the pedicle valve that becomes much more expressed at the anterior margin forming a "u" shape. The corresponding fold is also shallow. Both valves are convex with the brachial valve being more so than the pedicle valve. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Brachiopoda Class: Rhynchonellata Order: †Pentamerida Family: †Parastrophinidae Genus: †Anastrophia Species: †grossa
  22. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Levenea subcarinata pumilis Brachiopod Bois d'Arc Formation (overlays the Haragan) of Oklahoma TIME PERIOD: Lower Devonian (359-383 Million Years Ago) One of the more common brachiopods that are found in the Bois d'Arc formation is Levenea subcarinata pumilis. It is similar to Rhipimelloides oblata except for a few key features. The hinge line is wide and straight and the presence of a wide, shallow fold/sulcus structure. Otherwise they share some similar traits like the rounded shape to the shell and the pedicle valve extending slightly past the brachial valve. Another difference are the fine costae on the valve surfaces which on L. subcarinata pumilis are more curved instead of straight. the margin between the valves is flat except for where it bends to follow the fold/sulcus. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Brachiopoda Class: Rhynchonellata Order: †Orthida Family: †Dalmanellidae Genus: †Levenea Species: †subcarinata pumilis
  23. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Levenea subcarinata pumilis Brachiopod Bois d'Arc Formation (overlays the Haragan) of Oklahoma TIME PERIOD: Lower Devonian (359-383 Million Years Ago) One of the more common brachiopods that are found in the Bois d'Arc formation is Levenea subcarinata pumilis. It is similar to Rhipimelloides oblata except for a few key features. The hinge line is wide and straight and the presence of a wide, shallow fold/sulcus structure. Otherwise they share some similar traits like the rounded shape to the shell and the pedicle valve extending slightly past the brachial valve. Another difference are the fine costae on the valve surfaces which on L. subcarinata pumilis are more curved instead of straight. the margin between the valves is flat except for where it bends to follow the fold/sulcus. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Brachiopoda Class: Rhynchonellata Order: †Orthida Family: †Dalmanellidae Genus: †Levenea Species: †subcarinata pumilis
  24. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Orthostrophia strophomenoides parva Brachiopod Bois d'Arc Formation (overlays the Haragan) of Oklahoma TIME PERIOD: Lower Devonian (359-383 Million Years Ago) Orthida is an extinct order of brachiopods which appeared during the Early Cambrian period and became very diverse by the Ordovician, living in shallow-shelf seas. Orthids are the oldest member of the subphylum Rhynchonelliformea, and is the order from which all other brachiopods of this group stem. Physically they are usually strophic, with well-developed interareas. They also commonly have radiating ribs, sulcus, and fold structures. Typically one valve, often the brachial valve, is flatter than the other. The interior structure of the brachial valves are usually simple. In shape they are sub-circular to elliptical, with typically biconvex valves. There is some debate over the forms that first appeared of this order as to how they should be classified. However, they began to differentiate themselves by the late Early Cambrian period, and by the late Cambrian period had diversified into numerous varieties and reach 2 to 5 cm in width. Specimens from the late Cambrian to the earliest Ordovician exhibit shells with rounded and pointed pedical valves, with sharp to obtuse extremities and ridges that are fine to course. Punctate shells appear during the mid-Ordovician, which establish the suborder Dalmanellidina. The Ordovician is a productive period which gives rise to numerous genera in this order. However, they started to become greatly reduced by the end of the Ordovician extinction event. Both the impunctate and punctate survived through to the early Devonian Eventually, though, only the punctate lived on, and would play a minor role in benthic ecosystems until the late Permian, when they became extinct. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Brachiopoda Class: Rhynchonellata Order: †Orthida Family: †Orthidae Genus: †Orthostrophia Species: †strophomenoides parva
  25. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Orthostrophia strophomenoides parva Brachiopod Bois d'Arc Formation (overlays the Haragan) of Oklahoma TIME PERIOD: Lower Devonian (359-383 Million Years Ago) Orthida is an extinct order of brachiopods which appeared during the Early Cambrian period and became very diverse by the Ordovician, living in shallow-shelf seas. Orthids are the oldest member of the subphylum Rhynchonelliformea, and is the order from which all other brachiopods of this group stem. Physically they are usually strophic, with well-developed interareas. They also commonly have radiating ribs, sulcus, and fold structures. Typically one valve, often the brachial valve, is flatter than the other. The interior structure of the brachial valves are usually simple. In shape they are sub-circular to elliptical, with typically biconvex valves. There is some debate over the forms that first appeared of this order as to how they should be classified. However, they began to differentiate themselves by the late Early Cambrian period, and by the late Cambrian period had diversified into numerous varieties and reach 2 to 5 cm in width. Specimens from the late Cambrian to the earliest Ordovician exhibit shells with rounded and pointed pedical valves, with sharp to obtuse extremities and ridges that are fine to course. Punctate shells appear during the mid-Ordovician, which establish the suborder Dalmanellidina. The Ordovician is a productive period which gives rise to numerous genera in this order. However, they started to become greatly reduced by the end of the Ordovician extinction event. Both the impunctate and punctate survived through to the early Devonian Eventually, though, only the punctate lived on, and would play a minor role in benthic ecosystems until the late Permian, when they became extinct. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Brachiopoda Class: Rhynchonellata Order: †Orthida Family: †Orthidae Genus: †Orthostrophia Species: †strophomenoides parva
×