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Found 287 results

  1. Mississippian brachiopod?

    I did a long weekend of fossil hunting in Oklahoma and NW Arkansas. All of the formations, fossils and areas were completely new to me. I will have to post a trip report in the next few days. I found this specimen yesterday in a creek in NW Arkansas in the St. Joe Limestone Member of the Boone Formation, which is Carboniferous, Mississippian. I am totally new to the Mississippian. It was all marine stuff. I’d like to ID it before I start removing more matrix so I know what it looks like and don’t accidentally take off something I shouldn’t. I saw lots of brachiopods, but none came even close to the size of this one or was of this species. Most were under 1 inch. This is what it looked like when it was found. I think it is a steinkern. I just thought it was a maybe an inch wide or so from what I could see. It was in a fairly large rock conglomerate. So I attempted to split the rock so the thing could be popped out. Turns out it is 10 x 5 cm or 4 x 2 inches. It is still in the matrix after the first split. This is the negative (cavity) of where it split out of. As you can see part of it remained on the other half. It looks like there may be a little crinoid pice on it too. These are other shots of it. You can see the end where it broke off. I’m curious about the hinge part and what it is supposed to look like. Close up of the hinge parts. The one end appears to be fused with the matrix. The other end looks like it is basically free. Any help on the ID would be greatly appreciated. I wonder if @Ludwigia, @Herb or @fifbrindacier or anyone else might be able to help with the ID.
  2. Found this somewhat flattened Brach (Derbyia crassa) in the Pennsylvanian age Finis Shale formation at the Lost Creek Reservoir borrow pit near Jacksboro, in Jack County, Texas a couple of weeks ago. It's not perfect but I love fossils that are still in the matrix and that aren't pristine and show signs of predation and deformation from the weight of the overlying matrix.
  3. Nashville Brachiopod from long long ago.

    If everyone can remember this far back, it was roughly 2 years ago that I went to Nashville TN to hunt for Ordovician Brachiopods that I had never known of up until that point. One of the places we hit was a cliff that was right next to a Target supermarket parking lot (which is a very convenient spot for hunting). There, I found one of my best Brachiopods: I always like to look at this one whenever I go back to obsessively stare at my specimens (tells you how much of a life I have ). I didn't, however get its name...
  4. I am currently providing fossils for a project involving an advanced earth science class. In talking with the instructors, a few questions came up that I could not answer. 1. What caused brachiopods to crash and then pelecypods to flourish? 2. Are present day scallops pelecypods even though they look more like brachiopods?
  5. Yesterday was chopping through some Dundee Fm (mid Devonian) limestone at a very thick brach/coral layer and found a few of these. The matrix where this is situated in this particular layer has abundant large brachs, gastropods, and large well defined coral colonies. I was just curious as to what sort of brach this may be... if it is one.
  6. UPDATE: Thanks to the help of @Fossildude19, @Al Dente and @abyssunder, (plus others), I'm currently listing this as a Buchiola sp., a bivalve from the upper Hamilton. This little fella is about 8mm across. I have yet to find another example at the site. It was found in the pyrite beds, so it's a float from somewhere, but I couldn't tell you where. It's from Penn Dixie, it's Middle Devonian, Hamilton Fm. That's what I know. Absolutely beautiful little piece. But I have no idea what it is.
  7. Devonian brachiopod? From Resteigne

    Hi all, During my trip to the quarry of Resteigne, I namely found this brachiopod. Is this a Sieberella sp (as proposed by Roger @Ludwigia)? Because the fact that it is asymmetrical makes me want to incline to bivalve... But I'm not sure what kind of bivalve it would be then. Location info: Resteigne quarry, Belgium Jemelle Formation (mostly) Eifelian, middle Devonian; ~ 390 mya Thanks in advance for your replies! Max
  8. A 380 million year old lingula brachiopod I found in NY and a recent example I won in an auction from Florida. This little brachiopod is an example of a living fossil. I've been looking for one of these recent inarticulate brachs for a loooooooooong time. Thanks Mikey
  9. BRACHIOPOD

    Rhynchonellids are hard to identify by exterior morphology as they often need to have their internal structures visible to be sure of an id. However if you know the faunal lists from a specific area, you can reduce the candidates considerably. The specimen here has 22 costae with 4 on the fold and thus, at this size must be one of two species, Rostricellula minnesotensis or Rhynchotrema wisconsinensis. The only completely safe way to differentiate between the two is the presence or absence of a cardinal process in the brachial valve but this is not possible here. However, Rostricellula usually, though not always, devoid of shell ornamentation, such as ridges or the presence of growth lines, and Rhynchotrema wisconsinensis usually, though not always, shows these, though they can also be seemingly absent through wear. But, R. wisconsinensis never shows a length to width ratio of 1.00, only from 0.80 to 0.95 and this specimen has a ratio of 1.00 which does occur in Rostricellula. Furthermore, the fold of Rostricellula is wider and less sharply developed Finally, good specimens of Rostricellula are far more common than R wisconsinense at the locality as the species most commonly found here is Rhynchotrema ainsiei which is describe elsewhere and not to be confused with the other two due to it's larger number of costae Thus, I am fairly confident with my id
  10. In the Devonian quarry

    Hi everyone! So Friday morning, after a few enjoyable days of skiing in Switzerland with my dad, we decided to leave the village because the weather was really becoming horrible for any further skiing (especially for a beginner like me!). I had done a little bit of research as to what fossil locations we could visit on the way back home, and eventually Kevin @Manticocerasman very kindly pointed me towards the site of Resteigne in Belgium! A (no-longer in use) quarry known for its Devonian brachiopods, corals, crinoids and sometimes trilobites. Which was a fantastic opportunity for me, because in my so far 7 years of fossil hunting I had never been in a quarry or hunted for trilobites!!! So seizing the opportunity, we booked a Bed & Breakfast in the small village of Resteigne. We arrived late that evening after a long and annoying road, but luckily the hosts were still up and warmly welcomed us. The man knew quite some things about the great geology of the area, and told us that apparently this region was now a Geopark of the UNESCO! (To avoid any confusion, we are allowed to collect fossils here without any problems. It is not like the national parks where it is forbidden to take things out). He sometimes found some fossils himself when he was going out on walks. After a good night sleep and a delicious breakfast, we set out to the quarry.
  11. JUVENILE BRACHIOPOD

    As with the adult this has more costae than any other brachiopod found in this formation. In this case 32. and 5 of them on the fold. The fold and sulcus are not yet very noticeable, as this species only develops a noticeable fold as it matures.
  12. BRACHIPOD

    Brachiopods, perhaps rhynchonellids most of all, are notoriously hard to identify without their internal features exposed. However, if you know the formation and rough location and have faunal lists it can be possible. Rhynchonella ainsliei, for example, has 26-34 costae with 5-7 of these appearing on the fold. This specimen has 30 and 5 respectively and is the only species that has so many found in this formation. It also has the correct shape and size to support the match.
  13. Found this ages ago just lying alongside the road in Illinois... I think it was Illinois... heh... structure looks similar to a calamites horsetail IMO, but the symmetrical succession of the parts is curious. Any ideas?
  14. Brachiopod identification needed.

    Looking to for an identification of this brachiopod. I bought it from a collector selling his collection 35 years ago. Unfornately I can't narrow the location more than the southwestern United States. Time period: Phanerozic, probably Paleozoic.
  15. Collection Update

    So, I vanished from the forums for several months while dealing with a new career and some health issues. While I spent most of my time focused on being a new teacher, I couldn't break the bug over the winter season. While I did no collecting of my own, I proceeded to spend a ton of money online purchasing additions to my collection. I am pretty proud of my modest, but growing collection and wanted to show off. Where better than on TFF! This is going to take more than a few posts...
  16. K16048A.jpg

    From the album Fayette County Iowa

  17. K16048B.jpg

    From the album Fayette County Iowa

  18. Hi all, I acquired this piece, did not find on site. It seems to be basalt but the outer matrix is packed with sand and shell fragments. The brachiopods (I am assuming from the research I have done) are rather large, and appear in a cluster. Some of the fragments I have observed appear to be from the devonian era. I am assuming this is a steinkern vs true fossil. But the matrix is so fragile to clean it is destroying it. I am more of a rock hound than true fossil student. I have learned from some of my earlier posts last year that if the structure has been replaced by silica than it is not a true fossil ie steinkern, I believe. The matrix includes so much sand and shell fragments that it makes me question how silification works? Some of the shells, brachiopods, became irridescent as the stone absorbed moisture. Looks more like stone when it is dry.. . One of the pics that looks like brushing its teeth, has an opal in the background that I believe is the actual metamorphic process from this exact type of matrix and brachiopod by water and silica ooze. Interestingly as I have been cleaning the opal up also, it has the same structure as the outer pieces of the shell from the brachiopod, feather like. The striations in the opal also seem to be where the brachiopod foot would be... and also the richest mineral and most beautiful layer... Any ideas of what I should do with this piece to clean it or leave it alone I would love. If you have knowledge about brachiopods and opals I would love to hear that as well!! Thanks Kim
  19. Utah Fossil Hunt

    When fossil hunting near Moab, UT this weekend. There was quite a bit of snow in the Moab area this weekend, so I was not expecting to find anything. Luckily, this area was in the Sun and all the the snow was melted off. Found many Brachiopods, crinoid stems, and a small partial trilobite. (I have not been able to take a good photograph of the Trilobite because it is so small, abt 3/8") Attached are photos of the best Brachiopod. It is approx 2" across. I found a slightly large one, but it is still covered in a lot of matrix and needs to be prepped. Fossils are from the Permian Rico Formation about 17 miles down the Potash Road (Hwy 279) South of Moab, UT. Does anyone know of a good reference for fossils in this formation.
  20. I went out to a site near Lake Brownwood here in Cen Texas Penn for a little while this last Saturday. Found one Brachiopod that has some spins preserved which is very unusual for this part of the world. Also found a neat grouping of Brachiopods that cleaned up nice.
  21. Devonian(?) brach chunk - location?

    I'm revisiting an old chunk that I acquired some years ago in a batch of assorted fossils, some without names or locations. I posted this one a while back but there are newer members now, so thought I'd see it there is any more insight on it. It's nothing spectacular, and I need to make room so am thinking of passing it on, but before I do it'd be nice to have a better idea of the location. Does it look like something that could have come from Arkona, or is it more likely to belong with the 'Rocky Mountain Corals' I got in the same lot? It's classic heavy, clinky limestone. Hopefully the pics are ok (and not too big).. The sun has not exactly been plentiful here lately and won't be for some days yet, but I have to get this show on the road so I'm relegated to taking imperfect pics indoors, again....
  22. Rhynchopora Brachiopod a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Rhynchopora Brachiopod SITE LOCATION: Graford, Palo Pinto County, Texas, USA TIME PERIOD: Pennsylvanian Period (299-323 Million Years ago) Data: The taxonomic order Rhynchonellida is one of the two main groups of living articulate brachiopods, the other being the order Terebratulida. They are recognized by their strongly ribbed wedge-shaped or nut-like shells, and the very short hinge line. The hinges come to a point, a superficial resemblance to many (phylogenetically unrelated) bivalve mollusk shells. The loss of the hinge line was an important evolutionary innovation, rhynchonellids being the first truly non-strophic shells with a purely internal articulation (teeth-sockets). Strong radiating ribs are common in this group; and there are generally very strong plications or accordion-like folds on the sulcus (the long middle section) of the shell. This probably helps regulate the flow of water in and out of the shell. All rhynchonellids are biconvex (have a bulbous shell), and have a fold located in the brachial valve. This means that the commissure, the line between the two valves or shells, is zigzagged, a distinguishing characteristic of this group. The prominent beak of the pedicle valve usually overlaps that of the brachial valve, in order to allow the shell to open and close. There is usually a functional pedicle although the delthyrium may be partially closed. Morphologically, the rhynchonellid has changed little since its appearance during the Ordovician period. It seems to have evolved from pentamerids, and in turn gave rise to the first atrypids and athyrids, both of which are characterized by the development of a complex spiral brachidium. Although much diminished by the terminal Paleozoic extinction, it experienced a revival during the Early Jurassic period, and became the most abundant of all brachiopods during the Mesozoic Era. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Brachiopoda Class: Rhynchonellata Order: Rhynchonellida Family: †Rhynchoporidae Genus: †Rhynchopora
  23. Rhynchopora Brachiopod a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Rhynchopora Brachiopod SITE LOCATION: Graford, Palo Pinto County, Texas, USA TIME PERIOD: Pennsylvanian Period (299-323 Million Years ago) Data: The taxonomic order Rhynchonellida is one of the two main groups of living articulate brachiopods, the other being the order Terebratulida. They are recognized by their strongly ribbed wedge-shaped or nut-like shells, and the very short hinge line. The hinges come to a point, a superficial resemblance to many (phylogenetically unrelated) bivalve mollusk shells. The loss of the hinge line was an important evolutionary innovation, rhynchonellids being the first truly non-strophic shells with a purely internal articulation (teeth-sockets). Strong radiating ribs are common in this group; and there are generally very strong plications or accordion-like folds on the sulcus (the long middle section) of the shell. This probably helps regulate the flow of water in and out of the shell. All rhynchonellids are biconvex (have a bulbous shell), and have a fold located in the brachial valve. This means that the commissure, the line between the two valves or shells, is zigzagged, a distinguishing characteristic of this group. The prominent beak of the pedicle valve usually overlaps that of the brachial valve, in order to allow the shell to open and close. There is usually a functional pedicle although the delthyrium may be partially closed. Morphologically, the rhynchonellid has changed little since its appearance during the Ordovician period. It seems to have evolved from pentamerids, and in turn gave rise to the first atrypids and athyrids, both of which are characterized by the development of a complex spiral brachidium. Although much diminished by the terminal Paleozoic extinction, it experienced a revival during the Early Jurassic period, and became the most abundant of all brachiopods during the Mesozoic Era. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Brachiopoda Class: Rhynchonellata Order: Rhynchonellida Family: †Rhynchoporidae Genus: †Rhynchopora
  24. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Hebertella occidentalis Brachiopod SITE LOCATION: Trimble County, Kentucky TIME PERIOD: Ordovician Period (445-485 Million Years ago) Data: Moderate to large Hebertella species with a subquadrate outline and a moderate to highly pronounced sulcus. Shell wider than long; shell depth variable, convexoconcave to unequally biconvex; cardinal extremities angular; sulcus wide with moderate to very high depth, typically well developed in larger specimins; ventral muscle scars of variable width; dorsal and ventral umbonal angles low (<135 degrees). Articulate brachiopod. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Brachiopoda Class: Rhynchonellata Order: †Orthida Family: †Plectorthidae Genus: †Herbertella Species: †occidentalis
  25. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Hebertella occidentalis Brachiopod SITE LOCATION: Trimble County, Kentucky TIME PERIOD: Ordovician Period (445-485 Million Years ago) Data: Moderate to large Hebertella species with a subquadrate outline and a moderate to highly pronounced sulcus. Shell wider than long; shell depth variable, convexoconcave to unequally biconvex; cardinal extremities angular; sulcus wide with moderate to very high depth, typically well developed in larger specimins; ventral muscle scars of variable width; dorsal and ventral umbonal angles low (<135 degrees). Articulate brachiopod. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Brachiopoda Class: Rhynchonellata Order: †Orthida Family: †Plectorthidae Genus: †Herbertella Species: †occidentalis
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