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Found 394 results

  1. September Hunt NY 2019

    September Hunt NY 2019 I cleaned our Devonian aged fossils from the other day and assembled a group photo of our favorite finds. The brachs are rare (Elythe, Meristina) and several rare and uncommon corals (Botryllopora, Heliophyllum delicatum, large Pleurodictyums) were found. The large orange Heliophyllum (4.5") is covered in epibionts. A large enrolled Eldredgeops found in a creek stone, needs more prepping and would have been over 3" long if prone. All finds were surface collected in NY. Thanks, Mikeymig
  2. I have some brachs I recently collected just outside of Swissvale, CO. I believe I have a some Rynchonelida, Strofomenida, Orthida, and possibly some poorly preserved that could be spiriferids though I'm not really sure. Although I can identify them to the level of order, I have no reference for brachiopods in my meagre library so I'm hoping someone here may be able to help out. I'd like to maybe identify some to better than order. The formations in the area of this age are the Belden and Minturn fmts, I don't know which the fossiliferous mudstone these came out of belongs to. It's very fossiliferous. I also saw some chunks of what looked like a limestone with fossils, though they were too large to collect. I still have a bag of loose matrix to sort through for small fossils. These are just the little ones, and loose brachs I found already eroded out. I have some more larger ones waiting to see a little prep. The entirety of the tiny collection, including partial brachs and my few token crinoid columnals below.
  3. Brachiopod (Rafinesquina)

    From the album Finds From the Ordovician -488 to 443 MYA-

    From the Georgian Bay Formation.
  4. Tiny

    This was found in glacial material near Presque Isle, Maine. I believe it to be an internal mold of a brachiopod shell. What was it that lived in, on, or with it ? Scale in mm.
  5. Mecca Quarry Shale finds

    I had a great time hunting with ESCONI at the Starved Rock Clay Pit. It exposes the Pennsylvanian aged Francis Creek Shale and Mecca Quarry Shale. There were tons of concretions lying around, but we were told they are usually empty and rarely split well, so I didn't bother. I was really there for the black shale anyways. I found a bunch of bits which may prove to be more interesting after prep, but here are the more exposed finds of the day. I am not familiar with this fauna, so I was hoping to get help with IDs. #1) I found a few similar specimens. Best guess is coprolite. #2) Not sure if this is a fossil. Maybe coprolite or an arthropod carpace. Or just a mineral stain.
  6. St. Leon IDs

    Here are a few small bits from the Cincinnatian (Upper Ordovician) roadcut near St Leon, IN, that I’m not sure of the IDs. They were all collected from the butter shale trilobite layer of the Liberty Formation. First is what I think may be part of a crinoid? Not positive. Next, I have no idea. Maybe part of a crinoid. A fragment of a conulariid also crossed my mind. Here is a small brachiopod that I picked up thinking it was Zygospira but is definitely not. I’m guessing this trilobit is Flexicalymene, but I know a few other species of trilobites are found here so I wanted to check.
  7. Hello All, I was able to scrounge up a few hours of free time a couple of days ago. I decided to head towards the Bardstown Kentucky area to scout out a couple of spots I had on my list of possible collecting sites. The first 4 stops proved to be fossil barren. Feeling a little bummed I decided to get some lunch and regroup. After the quick bite to eat, I realized I was running out of time, but I figured I had enough for one more stop. I headed to a road cut that exposed Ordovician rock. More specifically the Drakes Formation. I'm not sure which Member of the Drakes Formation yet. Still working that out. It took a little longer than I anticipated to get to the road cut that exposed the formation, so I ended up with only 30-45 minutes of collecting time. After about 5 minutes of looking, I realized that my perseverance had paid off! I quickly collected what I could in the limited time that I had left to me. The site is definitely on my list now and I will be paying a visit again when I can stay longer. Below are some of my finds. Here are some in situ pics... A couple of nice brachiopods. I haven't had a chance to try and identify them yet, and I am not as good with brachs as I would like to be, so if anyone has a suggestion feel free to chime in. This little guy is hiding. Can you spot him? Sorry for the lack of scale ( I was in a hurry ) This colonial coral is about 6 inches across and not the largest that I found! (Favosites sp.) Possibly Foerstephyllum sp. Here are a few more pics after I got to the house... Here is the little guy that was hiding. Both valves were together. With a little clean up he should look nice. This one is nice, but very delicate as it has completely weathered out of the matrix. Another one of the nicer brachiopods that I picked up. It too had both valves. I picked up this hash plate. A lot of brachiopods, but there is also a layer of iron just below them. You can see it rusting a little in the top left of the photo. I'm fairly certain that this is a stromatoporoid. It is heavily crystalized and has a thin layer of matrix over the top, but I think with a little prep it will reveal its secrets. Last, but certainly not least, is a very large coral. Favosites sp. Foerestophyllum sp? It measures around 9 inches long x 7 inches wide x 5 inches thick.
  8. Hello there! I was inspired by @markjw to check out the Credit River here in Mississauga, Ontario (Georgian Bay Formation, Upper Ordovician) because where I normally hunt there are typically no corals and I'd love to add a couple to my collection. Consequently, I went out for about an hour this morning before the family got up in order to try my luck, and I'm happy to say that I was successful!!! Based on information provided by @FossilDAWG in other threads here on TFF, I think all of my colonial rugose corals are Favistina calcina - here are photos of three of my specimens: Specimen #1 - side view: Specimen #2 - top and bottom views: Specimen #3 - top and bottom views: more to come...
  9. Northeastern BC Quarry Find

    Hello all! This is my first post here but surely not my last. I have always been fascinated by fossils, but after accidentally stumbling across some fossils lately (some decorticated rugosa coral) I have taken quite the interest in fossil hunting. I have a recent find that really intrigues me and I'd like to have some expert opinions on it! This was found near some trace fossils and some small (1" or 2.5cm dia.) ammonite fossils. These were in a mountain quarry (approx 950m above sea level) on some nearly vertical shale. Thanks in advance!
  10. From the album Western NY Fossil Hunts

    Assorted Brachiopods, Horn Corals and Crinoid Stem Devonian Hamburg, NY Found 2019
  11. I’ve got quite a handful of Devonian fossils that I’ve found this past week on the shore of Seneca lake in Upstate NY. This post is more of a confirmation of my original thoughts and a hope for a more definitive and exact identification of some of these finds. Thanks for any help in advance! 1– horn coral
  12. Penn Dixie stuff

    Hello everyone! I'm here once again to ask for some identification help as I continue to work on my fossil area display. Today I have a few items from Penn Dixie (Hamburg, NY, mid-Devonian) for you to look at. But before I show the photos, I was wondering about the formation that we find fossils in at Penn Dixie - is it all Moscow Formation? Okay, now on to the photos... Specimen #1: A Platyceras gastropod, but I'm not sure of the species: Specimen #2: A horn coral on the same rock as the Platyceras - is it Stereolasma rectum or Amplexiphylum hamiltoniae? Specimen #3: I've posted this one before, asking if it was a goniatite or a gastropod, but I'm starting to think it's a gastropod with some of the middle missing - perhaps Naticonema lineata or Euomphalus laxus? Specimen #4: A brachiopod and horn coral on the same rock as the goniatite/gastropod specimen - is the brachiopod Athyris spiriferoides? And is the horn coral Stereolasma rectum or Amplexiphylum hamiltoniae? Specimen #5: An unknown piece of something on the same rock as the goniatite/gastropod and the brachiopod - any ideas? Thanks in advance! Monica
  13. some cool finds from a creek near seneca lake in upstate new york. any & all help is appreciated!!
  14. Unknown from Penn Dixie

    Hi all, here is another find from Penn Dixie not sure what it is maybe a bivalve or brachiopod. Also the outer layer used to be a very thin calcite, most flaked off but a bit is still left. Thank you.
  15. Cole Hill Invertebrates

    I went with the Delaware Valley Paleontological Society to a few spots in Central New York last month. Cole Hill Rd. in Hubbardsville has several outcrops on private land where the owners are willing to share with fossil hunters. We scrabbled up and down the scree - Whee- and found our fill of trilo-bits, including one Dipleura cephalon covered with druse calcite, plus oodles of brachiopods, nautiloids, straight-shelled cephalopods, gastropods of all different shapes, and bivalves. I learned a tough lesson that afternoon. Always wrap your specimens as you go. Not only will they keep from breaking, but they are easier to find when your bucket tips and tumbles down the hillside across countless tons of scree There were lots of pained faces around me as I hunted down the things I'd already found.. It took me half an hour to recover everything I could, but the best ones managed to make it home. Dilpeura trilobite cephalon Another trilobite cephalon, found by someone else in the group. This one is covered in sparkling calcite. Crinoid holdfast? with Ptomatis rudis gastropod unknown, probably nautiloid Cornellites fasculata bivalve Palaeozygopleura sp. misc. unknown brachiopods If anyone has any ideas, I'd like to hear them. This spine-shaped object is about 6 inches long. I'd discount it as variations in the rock color, but the left end is curved outward from the matrix. Worm trace fossil. They made carpets of these on the sea floor.
  16. Found this one last week in the South pit at Hungry Hollow near Arkona, Ontario. I did a bunch of searching but couldn't narrow this one down. Devonian age Widder fm Hungry Hollow member Measures 2.25 x 2.0 x 1.5 cm
  17. Attached to a large Megastrophia brachiopd, this is one of the best Aulopora coral colony I have ever found. A before and after prep photo from 2014 - 7/2019.
  18. I took my family across the river to Clarksville Indiana today to visit The Falls of the Ohio State Park. It was very hot with a high in the 90s, but we had a good time walking the Devonian fossil beds and visiting the Interpretive Center . The river was down enough to get onto the upper limestone beds, but the lower beds were still underwater. They are typically exposed during the months of September and October and occasionally in the summer when there is little rain (not this year!). The river is at 20 ft right now. The lower beds become dry around the 13.5 ft mark. Their official website has a page that monitors the river levels and tells you when certain areas and strata are exposed. I suggest checking that out before making the trip to visit the park. https://www.fallsoftheohio.org/current-ohio-river-conditions/ The Interpretive Center houses the main indoor exhibit, gift shop, a river viewing room, and bird/wildlife viewing room, along with friendly staff. The main exhibit has fossils and interactive areas for the kids. Not only are there fossil on display, but also sections regarding the Native Americans that lived in the area, the current wildlife, and information regarding the Lewis and Clark expedition. A piece of fossilized wood just outside of the center on the backside by the parking lot. It is roughly 4 feet in length and 2 feet wide. When you walk into the main foyer of the Interpretive Center this boulder is on display. It is about a meter across and half as thick. I don't want to spoil the trip for everyone so I'm just going to post some pictures of a few of my favorite pieces. I thought this was interesting. It's labeled as orange chert, which I assume it is, but it also has a horn coral right in the middle of it. A sampling of the fauna found in the fossil record here. There was also a small exhibit on mammoths as evidence of a few have been found in the surrounding area. Presumably crossing the Falls to get to the salt licks in Kentucky. This was a comparison of a mammoth and mastadon tooth. The interior exhibit is nice, but for me the best part of the Falls of the Ohio is outside. Its the fossil beds that you can walk on and explore. I've been here a few times and find something new each time I come. Remember folks, it's against the law to collect here. Leave the fossils alone for others to enjoy! No matter how tempting... . If you just have to collect something, the park usually has a couple of dump truck loads of material near the back of the parking lot that they allow you to search through. Seriously. Here are some of the fossils that me and the family found while walking around the fossil beds. A word of caution, if you want to get to certain areas there is some climbing that you must do. A lot of the strata has fissures or large boulders that must be climbed, or walked around to move farther down the coast. This is on the fossil beds themselves. You can stay higher on the slope and circumvent a lot of the really strenuous stuff, but the fossils are not as good the higher up you go. Here are a some of the more impressive horn coral that I found. They actually call these larger ones "tusk coral" because the are so large. I'm not certain what these coral are, but Siphonophrentis and Cystiphylloides are common here. I know a hand isn't the best for scale, but it's all I had at the time. lol From the tip of my index finger to where my thumb connects is just over 5 inches. Some mainly brachiopod hash plates. A large favosites. Crinoids Lace Bryozoan This was my favorite find. A large colonial coral. It is over a meter in diameter. What is commonly called a Pipe Organ Coral. Eridophyllum I think that is all for now. It was a great day of discovery and fun with the family. If you are in the area and have a couple of extra hours, I highly recommend you stop by and check out the sights for yourself. You won't be disappointed. Just remember to check the river water levels and be ready for a little exercise!
  19. hi everyone this is Matt again the other day in the creek I found this massive 50 pound brachiopod fossil here is 2 photos of the fossil
  20. Arkona 07/06/2019

    As usual I had the urge to go fossil hunting this weekend so I decided to take a trip to Arkona and have a relaxing day of surface collecting. It was calling for rain all week but turned out to be a nice day (aside from the brutal heat and swarming deer flies). Things were looking a little different this year. Spring hit this roadway to one of the pits pretty hard. Critters everywhere so you have to watch your step. There were loads of tiny toads that must have just grown up and left the water. Also found this poor strawberry plant struggling on top of a hill in poor soil but somehow managed to fruit And now for the fossils... I didn't have any luck finding the blastoid or crinoid I was after but I did take a few things home. Some corals Aulocystis ramosa, Platyaxum frondosum Favosites sp. A brach species I didnt have yet and a large Callipleura Nucleospira concinna, Callipleura nobilis An interesting bryozoan and a cluster of tube worms unknown bryozoan, Spirorbis sp. Gastropods Platyceras bucculentum, Naticonema lineata Possible arthropod trackway? And a new trilo species for me. Beaten up but I'll take it. The cephalon+partial thorax look like Basidechenella Pseudodechenella arkonensis. The pygidium looks like Crassiproetus crassimarginatus (top one was found last year).
  21. Found in my Garden

    I know nothing about fossils. I found some things in my garden and trying to determine if they are fossil or rock
  22. Peninsula point

    Think about go camp near Peninsula Point and I'm little confused on where is that road cut located in one of Paleo Joe's video.... can anyone help me out? Thanks!
  23. Brachiopod ID

    Hello all, I have some brachs in my collection that I have not identified yet, any insight would be great. I believe at the bottom is a Devonian Mucrospirifer but I am not sure the other two look like some Jurassic ones I have seen. Also if anyone knows any texts where I could get information about all kinds of brachiopods and especially Paleozoic ones I would love it if you shared it here as I really want to get to know these amazing animals better. Thank you,
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