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Found 381 results

  1. Taking advantage of my time spent home, I finally got a couple of glass display cases to showcase fossil specimens from my collection. Finding ones that were affordable and blended with the style of our home, was challenge, and I took my time choosing. Despite a bit of criticism I receive from some of my fossil collecting friends, I am a generalist collector who doesn't specialize in anything. Having said that, my collection does feature some rare faunas; Devonian and Cretaceous bivalves, Lower and Middle Devonian brachiopods and gastropods, Cretaceous vertebrates, etc. The focus is largely on fossils of the Northeast (New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Connecticut, Maryland, and Eastern Canada), but a number of trips to the Ohio Valley, Texas, out west, and Germany have expanded my collection which is about 90% self collected with remaining fossils primarily gifts from generous friends. There is only one purchased fossil in the display and one I traded for. I ended up with twelves shelves- ten devoted to animal life (seven of those are invertebrates), and two for plants. I was seeking to emulate the old style of specimen display that one might encounter in a 19th century museum, when displaying specimens was the priority. I didn't and couldn't display my entire collection which is too large, so I picked representative specimens to tell the story of the vast variety of prehistoric life on earth. Some of my best specimens didn't make it into the display. These are the cases which are situated in our finished basement:
  2. One of the nice things about being on the team to design a new facility is you can get what you want. All retaking walls and benches are locally quarried Stoner Limestone from Weeping Water, Nebraska. I can’t wait to get my scribe and chisels out...
  3. Okay gang. Don’t ever do this. Brachs are so common here ( along with crinoid bits) I use them as aquarium gravel... But, here’s what happens when you figure out how to acid prep Kewitz limestone to expose calcite and not loose morphology: I finish these with a week long silicon oil soak to make them shine.
  4. Yesterday, Tim (Fossildude19) and myself met at our usual meeting spot and with Tim driving and his downloads playing, we headed north to a planned rendezvous with the New York Paleontological Society's outing at Cobleskill Stone Products just outside Schoharie, N.Y. The weather was gorgeous- perfect really, sunny mid-50s. Fall colors were in full swing. We drove through the northern edge of the Catskills, arriving early at our rendezvous, the parking lot at the Cobleskill Stone Company. It was my first time there since 2013. I went on two previous NY Paleontological Society outings to this site, access tightly restricted. I had wanted to return, but every year there always seemed to be a conflict. One year I recall there was a planned Fossil Forum gathering at DSR on the same day. There were many reasons I wanted to return: The quarry had the best exposure of the Kalkberg Formation I've ever encountered. The Kalkberg is Lower Devonian, part of the Helderberg Group. Marine fossils are especially abundant and well preserved. The biodiversity is exceptional. There are many species of brachiopods, plus corals, nautiloids, bryozoans, the sponge, Hindia, and trilobites. Since the quarry is infrequently hunted, many specimens can be found exposed, even weathered clean right out of the limestone. Many of my best Kalkberg fossils are from there. I was excited to be there. It is always a pleasure to be out collecting with Tim. It was his first time at this quarry. Here are a couple pictures of the quarry. Notice the bright fall colors in the background.
  5. I found a variety of brachiopods in the Devonian Silica Shale Formation near Sylvania, Ohio, in mid-August. A few are a bit pyritized.
  6. Brachiopod

    We visited our son at the house he bought outside of Lafayette, Macon County, Tennessee, United States. This limestone with a nice brachiopod and a partially exposed one and others was sitting along the fire pit. No telling where it is actually from or who left it there, but it may well be a local find. Please tell me if I am correct on the type of pod? Richmondian (Upper Ordovician) strata in the Central Basin of Tennessee. Ordovician Period beginning 488.3 million years ago and ending 443.7 million years ago. 1 5/8" w 4.2 cm x 1 1/4 3.2 cm high Brachiopods- Rafinesquina ponderosa- showing one side- Ordovican. also a partially exposed 2 cm wide. The slab is 5 1/4 wide x 8 1/2 in tall. 2 1/4 in thick
  7. NE Iowa Paleozoic

    I read a lot of fossil hunting reports on here, but I don’t post many. I think it’s primarily because it is usually many, many months after I have gone when I finally get everything cleaned up, ID’d and take photos, etc. It just seems too after the fact to me at that point, haha. But this time, due to a wonderful “tour guide” we had, I wanted to get something posted in a relatively timely fashion. Because of that, I haven’t had time to do a lot of research I need to do on specific ID’s but luckily I’m somewhat familiar with most of what we found to make at least an educated guess. I have seen numerous folks on here show some of their finds from the Ordovician and Devonian of Iowa and nearby states and it always looked intriguing to me as I have collected the Ordovician in the (relatively) nearby Cincinnati area and the Devonian in the Great Lakes area and Oklahoma. I wanted to see how the Iowa stuff compares. So my wife and I opted to take the long way home from Indiana to Texas and swing through Iowa (and on to South Dakota, but that was more for sight-seeing). I had done some research on sites to check out and contacted Mike @minnbuckeye to see if he could help me high grade my list. Being the absolute gentleman that he is, he did one better and offered to act as our tour guide for a day of collecting through the Ordovician! What a guy!! I can’t thank him enough for taking the time to do this. We had a great day and hit a bunch of nice spots, most of which I had not found on my own and certainly didn’t know some of the very important details of the sites. Many folks have said it in other trip reports and I can only add to the chorus of how valuable it is to go with someone that knows the area and how nice it is of TFF members such as @minnbuckeye to offer their time and energy to do it. Based on Mike’s recommendation, we spent our first day doing some collecting in the Devonian rocks of the Coralville, Iowa area. The first spot we could not access due to some current road construction but we made our way to the next one and spent several hours along the Iowa River/Coralville Lake collecting from the Coralville Formation of the Cedar Valley Group. You quickly learn how Coralville got its name as the rocks are a coral/bryozoan limestone. There are brachiopods and other fauna, but corals make up the bulk of the fossils at this site. And there were some very nice ones as you can see in the pictures below. Beautiful Hexagonaria, huge horn corals and others. We also went to the Devonian Fossil Gorge and a nearby state park, both of which have nice exposures of Devonian rocks with fossils, but no collecting. Here is a shot of the area, fossils litter the ground. This represents our total haul from this site The horn coral in here were abundant and quite large. Corals What I believe are Hexagoanaria corals. I think with a little cleaning, these will look really nice and I like the juxtaposition with the horn coral. Brachiopods and bryozoans A nice piece that was a little too big to take.
  8. Back to the Ohio Valley

    Hi Everyone, I took a 2 week trip to the Ohio Valley, arriving back in New York about a week ago. It was primarily a family visit since many of my relatives now reside in the Elizabethtown, KY area. However, the Ohio Valley, as some of you know, is very rich in Paleozoic fossils and I just had to make a few stops on my way there and back as well as between family engagements. I will try to share enough to give you all a gist of it: It was a long day's drive from the northern suburbs of New York City to Richmond, Indiana where I spent the first night. The next day I was headed down State Road 101 to Garr Hill, to collect in the Upper Ordovician Liberty Formation. It was my first time at the site and everything I found was collected from loose rocks at or near the base of the outcrop. A couple of pictures:
  9. Hi, my daughter is fossil obsessed and we are heading out to regional NSW for a trip and would love to do some fossil fossicking along the way. We are going to Canowindra, Parkes, Bourke, Broken Hill, and Griffith. If you have any suggestions as to places we could fossick that would be wonderful! thanks
  10. Hi everyone! Today I went on another fossil hunting trip with the fossil club the BVP. https://www.paleontica.org/sites/fossil_site.php?plaats=3&language=en We visited the "La Couvinoise" quarry in Couvin, Belgium. The rocks in this quarry are part of the Hanonet Formation which lies at the boundry of the Eifelian & Givetian. But the layers we searched in today where all Givetian in age (387,7 - 382,7 mya), I mainly searched in the Crinoïd & Brachiopod layer. Although I have to admit that we probably visited the quarry at a bad moment, as the yield was quite poor in the quarry this time according to members who've been there before. Which was quite obvious as I think we only found our first fossil rich rocks after 50 minutes of searching and even then the first hour of finds where few and poor in quality. But after a while of searching I found some good and rich blocks and managed to get some decent Crinoïd stems, Brachiopods and some rugose coral pieces. But the best 3 finds we did during the last 30 minutes of being in the quarry. The 1st one was the only Trilobite I found during the hunt! Trilos are very rare from this quarry and I believe only 1 other member found one before me on this trip. I found a pygidium which is still partially enbedded in rock. At first I wasn't sure whether I was a trilo or a brachiopod but after having a couple of other members checking it out, they all believed it to be trilobite. The excursion leader time was quite amazed by the find as this trilo came from the Crinoïd layer, which is a layer where he believed no trilobite had ever been found. The trilobites are usually found in another part and layer a bit further in the quarry. So yeah I am very pleased with that find! The 2nd best find, was one I didn't find myself but recieved from our Excursion leader Tom, which was a piece of very nice Stromatoporoidea which I wasn't lucky enough to find. The 3rd best find an perhaps my favorite was something that Tom told me to check out. He had discovered the remains of a cave that collapsed during some excavations in the quarry. You could clearly see the remains of dripping stones on the walls and luckily for us, some pieces of those dripping stones where also laying on the ground. So I managed to take a nice piece of them home with me They are encrusted with a layer of dried mud but I am sure they will look gorgeous once they are cleaned! The rings are already clearly visable in some areas. Here are some pictures from inside the quarry. This was the way to the newly excavated plateau which unfortunatly was a complete was of time as not a single fossil could be found in those rocks. After that we went to the other lower parts of the quarry where I mainly worked in a single piece of wall in the Crinoïd layer. I was lucky enough to find a few good fallen blocks and some good places in the wall with some decent Crinoïds and Brachiopods. One of the nice Crinoïds stems I found in the layer. And here is the piece of wall that has some of the dripping stones in it.
  11. Hi everyone! Yesterday my girlfriend & I went on a fossil hunting trip to an abandoned quarry in Resteigne in Belgium. https://www.paleontica.org/sites/fossil_site.php?plaats=10&language=en I am currently at home for some time due to mental health issues. I am currently dealing with despression and severe anxiety attacks all related to COVID-19, I am in a risk group and work in an essential store and the stress and way that people threat you finally became too much and I simply snapped. I finally decided to go see a doctor and a psychologist to help out of it all. Since besides going to work I hadn't left the house for the past 6 months and I really needed to get out to help me get rid of the stress and fear, so both the psychologist and doctor encouraged my to go on some fossilhunts as I needed to come out of the house and do some outdoor activities to help with my healing process. So yesterday I went on my first hunt to help me recover! The quarry we visited was an abandoned quarry in Resteigne and the rocks found there are Devonian in age. Most of the fossils found here are from the Eifelian (393.3 - 387.7 mya) and are part of the Jemelle formation. We arrived quite early at the quarry and spent almost 5 and a half hours searching for fossils here. Since we went on a normal week day, we were lucky enough the have the quarry all to our self! Since it was our first time in the quarry we didn't really find anything too spectacular, but I am very happy with the things we found and most important of all, we had a great and fun day! The surrounding environment was stunning and the weather was prefect, sunny but not too hot and not too cold! Ruguse coral in the rocks Only 15 minutes after we arrived we already found our first trilobite! Unfortunatly it was enbedded in a big boulder of very though rock at an impossible angle to remove. We did try to remove it, but when we noticed it would be near impossible and removing it would probably destroy the trilo we eventually decided to leave it. There where multiple other fossils in the same boulder, among them these nice Brachiopods
  12. My son and I got our first trip looking for fossils in! We checked out a road cut exposing some Lower Devionian rocks and found a chunk of rock that looked like it came loose with the recent rains we had. There were a ton of Brachiopods in it. We didn't really dig around in the rocks or split anything. We really were just looking on the surface, but I want to learn more about actually finding fossils that are not just loose. We also checked out the rock formations in our backyard, which we only found 1 really tiny Brachiopod in it, despite a lot of searching what was visible on the surface! Lots to learn and we are looking forward to it! The formation in the photo is the one in our backyard. I am not sure how to search it yet thoughtfully though. I am also not sure of the geology of this area yet and we are searching for more information on it. Overall, we had a blast!
  13. Lingula brachiopods

    Could these be Lingula Brachiopods? If not, what? Thanks Greg
  14. North Vernon Creek Fossils Finds

    Made my way from NY to IN to visit my girlfriend's family for the week in the small town of North Vernon. Her parent's backyard has a creek running through it and it's full of fossils! Here are some that I found while splashing around a bit:
  15. Trip to St. Leon, IN

    Finally made it out to St. Leon, IN while visiting my girlfriend's family in rural Indiana. Here are some cool specimens I found (lots of brachiopods):
  16. What do you think?

    Hey guys, I'm back with another ID question. The fossil I'm trying to identify is in the 1st picture. I think that what I have is a fossilized brachiopod WITHOUT the shell. What do you guys think? It's the same general shape, but the color and textures of this fossil look different than others I've found in the area. The symmetrical textured part in between the two humps, I've never seen before. Pictures 1,2, and 5 show the fossil in question and pictures 3 and 4 show examples of other brachiopods that I've found. The last picture is an example of a brachiopod that was broken in half, exposing the animal inside. (when I uploaded the post the pictures got out of order) So anyways, that's what I think I have but I'd really appreciate your thoughts on this. Ya'll have a lot more experience with these thing than I do so I welcome your opinions. Thanks!
  17. I found these Jurassic fossils in the Jaisalmer Basin, Thar Desert, India. Belemnites (left), brachiopods of various sizes (center), ammonite fragments (top) & 3 small whole ammonites (lower right). Quarter coin shows scale.
  18. Hello everyone, These were all found in St. Claire, PA. Mahantango Formation. Anybody know what these are? #1. Looks like octopus suckers in brown outline. Is it a coral? #2. Crinoid star stems? #3. Cylindrical molds, what are these?
  19. Jurassic brachiopod ID

    Perhaps could somebody help to ID these bajocian brachiopods found last week in a Vendée quarry? Thanks the first on matrix,i think it could be Sphaeroidothyris with a not usual shape
  20. Helderberg Group Fossils

    A few years ago I collected with the NYPS at a quarry exposing some Helderberg Group limestone. I failed to label some of my finds. I have a best guess on the trilobites but I was hoping to get some confirmation. I have struggled identifying a few of the brachiopods and a bryozoan and I could use some help with those. Any help is greatly appreciated. #1 - some type of bryozoan but I am not sure which one #2- ??? #3- ??? #4- Paciphacops logani? #5- Odontocephalus sp.? #6- Dalmanites pleuroptyx?
  21. IMG_9848.JPG

    From the album Huge Big Brook Fossil Collection

    ONLY the brachiopods, ghost shrimp, belemnite phragmacone, crab claws, and snails were collected from big brook
  22. Interesting assortment of fossils

    Last year while fossil hunting in a creek in Chenango Forks, New York I came across an interesting looking rock. The rock was primarily made up of gastropods with a few bivalves and brachiopods. It was a very crumbly, silty rock. I believe it is upper Devonian because I’ve only ever found upper Devonian rocks at that creek but I’ve been unable to find anything close to what I found in Karl A. Wilson’s Field Guide to the Devonian Fossils of New York
  23. More Big Brook what?

    Found at big brook they appear to be the same but same what? Thanks again
  24. A rock with a lot of life in it

    Hi! Found this interesting rock on my walk today with a lot of remains. Sone of them I can try to ID (I see lots of crinoids), but there is also new staff. location: Tompkins county, NY, USA period: Devonian size:1-2 cm Rock compositions: shale with layers of remains-rich material Items of interest: On the last picture what are the comb-like structure and two things that remind me of sea acorn? Thank you!
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