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Found 372 results

  1. Hi, my daughter is fossil obsessed and we are heading out to regional NSW for a trip and would love to do some fossil fossicking along the way. We are going to Canowindra, Parkes, Bourke, Broken Hill, and Griffith. If you have any suggestions as to places we could fossick that would be wonderful! thanks
  2. Hi everyone! Today I went on another fossil hunting trip with the fossil club the BVP. https://www.paleontica.org/sites/fossil_site.php?plaats=3&language=en We visited the "La Couvinoise" quarry in Couvin, Belgium. The rocks in this quarry are part of the Hanonet Formation which lies at the boundry of the Eifelian & Givetian. But the layers we searched in today where all Givetian in age (387,7 - 382,7 mya), I mainly searched in the Crinoïd & Brachiopod layer. Although I have to admit that we probably visited the quarry at a bad moment, as the yield was quite poor in the quarry this time according to members who've been there before. Which was quite obvious as I think we only found our first fossil rich rocks after 50 minutes of searching and even then the first hour of finds where few and poor in quality. But after a while of searching I found some good and rich blocks and managed to get some decent Crinoïd stems, Brachiopods and some rugose coral pieces. But the best 3 finds we did during the last 30 minutes of being in the quarry. The 1st one was the only Trilobite I found during the hunt! Trilos are very rare from this quarry and I believe only 1 other member found one before me on this trip. I found a pygidium which is still partially enbedded in rock. At first I wasn't sure whether I was a trilo or a brachiopod but after having a couple of other members checking it out, they all believed it to be trilobite. The excursion leader time was quite amazed by the find as this trilo came from the Crinoïd layer, which is a layer where he believed no trilobite had ever been found. The trilobites are usually found in another part and layer a bit further in the quarry. So yeah I am very pleased with that find! The 2nd best find, was one I didn't find myself but recieved from our Excursion leader Tom, which was a piece of very nice Stromatoporoidea which I wasn't lucky enough to find. The 3rd best find an perhaps my favorite was something that Tom told me to check out. He had discovered the remains of a cave that collapsed during some excavations in the quarry. You could clearly see the remains of dripping stones on the walls and luckily for us, some pieces of those dripping stones where also laying on the ground. So I managed to take a nice piece of them home with me They are encrusted with a layer of dried mud but I am sure they will look gorgeous once they are cleaned! The rings are already clearly visable in some areas. Here are some pictures from inside the quarry. This was the way to the newly excavated plateau which unfortunatly was a complete was of time as not a single fossil could be found in those rocks. After that we went to the other lower parts of the quarry where I mainly worked in a single piece of wall in the Crinoïd layer. I was lucky enough to find a few good fallen blocks and some good places in the wall with some decent Crinoïds and Brachiopods. One of the nice Crinoïds stems I found in the layer. And here is the piece of wall that has some of the dripping stones in it.
  3. Hi everyone! Yesterday my girlfriend & I went on a fossil hunting trip to an abandoned quarry in Resteigne in Belgium. https://www.paleontica.org/sites/fossil_site.php?plaats=10&language=en I am currently at home for some time due to mental health issues. I am currently dealing with despression and severe anxiety attacks all related to COVID-19, I am in a risk group and work in an essential store and the stress and way that people threat you finally became too much and I simply snapped. I finally decided to go see a doctor and a psychologist to help out of it all. Since besides going to work I hadn't left the house for the past 6 months and I really needed to get out to help me get rid of the stress and fear, so both the psychologist and doctor encouraged my to go on some fossilhunts as I needed to come out of the house and do some outdoor activities to help with my healing process. So yesterday I went on my first hunt to help me recover! The quarry we visited was an abandoned quarry in Resteigne and the rocks found there are Devonian in age. Most of the fossils found here are from the Eifelian (393.3 - 387.7 mya) and are part of the Jemelle formation. We arrived quite early at the quarry and spent almost 5 and a half hours searching for fossils here. Since we went on a normal week day, we were lucky enough the have the quarry all to our self! Since it was our first time in the quarry we didn't really find anything too spectacular, but I am very happy with the things we found and most important of all, we had a great and fun day! The surrounding environment was stunning and the weather was prefect, sunny but not too hot and not too cold! Ruguse coral in the rocks Only 15 minutes after we arrived we already found our first trilobite! Unfortunatly it was enbedded in a big boulder of very though rock at an impossible angle to remove. We did try to remove it, but when we noticed it would be near impossible and removing it would probably destroy the trilo we eventually decided to leave it. There where multiple other fossils in the same boulder, among them these nice Brachiopods
  4. My son and I got our first trip looking for fossils in! We checked out a road cut exposing some Lower Devionian rocks and found a chunk of rock that looked like it came loose with the recent rains we had. There were a ton of Brachiopods in it. We didn't really dig around in the rocks or split anything. We really were just looking on the surface, but I want to learn more about actually finding fossils that are not just loose. We also checked out the rock formations in our backyard, which we only found 1 really tiny Brachiopod in it, despite a lot of searching what was visible on the surface! Lots to learn and we are looking forward to it! The formation in the photo is the one in our backyard. I am not sure how to search it yet thoughtfully though. I am also not sure of the geology of this area yet and we are searching for more information on it. Overall, we had a blast!
  5. Lingula brachiopods

    Could these be Lingula Brachiopods? If not, what? Thanks Greg
  6. North Vernon Creek Fossils Finds

    Made my way from NY to IN to visit my girlfriend's family for the week in the small town of North Vernon. Her parent's backyard has a creek running through it and it's full of fossils! Here are some that I found while splashing around a bit:
  7. Trip to St. Leon, IN

    Finally made it out to St. Leon, IN while visiting my girlfriend's family in rural Indiana. Here are some cool specimens I found (lots of brachiopods):
  8. What do you think?

    Hey guys, I'm back with another ID question. The fossil I'm trying to identify is in the 1st picture. I think that what I have is a fossilized brachiopod WITHOUT the shell. What do you guys think? It's the same general shape, but the color and textures of this fossil look different than others I've found in the area. The symmetrical textured part in between the two humps, I've never seen before. Pictures 1,2, and 5 show the fossil in question and pictures 3 and 4 show examples of other brachiopods that I've found. The last picture is an example of a brachiopod that was broken in half, exposing the animal inside. (when I uploaded the post the pictures got out of order) So anyways, that's what I think I have but I'd really appreciate your thoughts on this. Ya'll have a lot more experience with these thing than I do so I welcome your opinions. Thanks!
  9. I found these Jurassic fossils in the Jaisalmer Basin, Thar Desert, India. Belemnites (left), brachiopods of various sizes (center), ammonite fragments (top) & 3 small whole ammonites (lower right). Quarter coin shows scale.
  10. Hello everyone, These were all found in St. Claire, PA. Mahantango Formation. Anybody know what these are? #1. Looks like octopus suckers in brown outline. Is it a coral? #2. Crinoid star stems? #3. Cylindrical molds, what are these?
  11. Jurassic brachiopod ID

    Perhaps could somebody help to ID these bajocian brachiopods found last week in a Vendée quarry? Thanks the first on matrix,i think it could be Sphaeroidothyris with a not usual shape
  12. Helderberg Group Fossils

    A few years ago I collected with the NYPS at a quarry exposing some Helderberg Group limestone. I failed to label some of my finds. I have a best guess on the trilobites but I was hoping to get some confirmation. I have struggled identifying a few of the brachiopods and a bryozoan and I could use some help with those. Any help is greatly appreciated. #1 - some type of bryozoan but I am not sure which one #2- ??? #3- ??? #4- Paciphacops logani? #5- Odontocephalus sp.? #6- Dalmanites pleuroptyx?
  13. IMG_9848.JPG

    From the album Huge Big Brook Fossil Collection

    ONLY the brachiopods, ghost shrimp, belemnite phragmacone, crab claws, and snails were collected from big brook
  14. Interesting assortment of fossils

    Last year while fossil hunting in a creek in Chenango Forks, New York I came across an interesting looking rock. The rock was primarily made up of gastropods with a few bivalves and brachiopods. It was a very crumbly, silty rock. I believe it is upper Devonian because I’ve only ever found upper Devonian rocks at that creek but I’ve been unable to find anything close to what I found in Karl A. Wilson’s Field Guide to the Devonian Fossils of New York
  15. More Big Brook what?

    Found at big brook they appear to be the same but same what? Thanks again
  16. A rock with a lot of life in it

    Hi! Found this interesting rock on my walk today with a lot of remains. Sone of them I can try to ID (I see lots of crinoids), but there is also new staff. location: Tompkins county, NY, USA period: Devonian size:1-2 cm Rock compositions: shale with layers of remains-rich material Items of interest: On the last picture what are the comb-like structure and two things that remind me of sea acorn? Thank you!
  17. From the album Middle Devonian

    Lingula spatulata Lingulid Brachiopod Middle Devonian Moscow Formation Windom Shale Hamilton Group Deep Springs Road Quarry Earlville, N.Y.
  18. Wowowow I was very surprised to find all this amazing stuff today at my favourite river bank fossils spot of the Etobicoke creek. I managed to snag a whole lot of stuff today, some Orthoconic Nautiloids, Brachipods and what I believe to be the nicest tentaculite I've ever seen!!! The fossils are from the Georgian Bay Formation and they were found in the broken up "rock fields" next to the creek. This is going to be one of my longer posts, so I will have to split them up into section. The full haul, with the typical estwing 22 ounce rock pick (33 cm from bottom of the handle to the top of the hammer end for anyone who doesn't own one). First lets start with the usual: Them cone boys, aka Orthoconic Nautiloids. I believe all of the following to be Treptoceras crebriseptum.
  19. It was an all day outing on a perfect spring day in Central Upstate New York. Al Tahan and I visited a small private quarry where the Middle Devonian Oatkacreek Formation Mottville Member, part of the Marcellus Shale and the lower Hamilton Group is exposed. It's been about a year since I visited the site which I've been coming to for the past five years and it was Al's first visit. Erosion had broken down almost all of the pieces of shale which covered much of the site on previous visits. However a lot of fossils here, preserved in calcite are weathered free from the matrix and surface collecting can be very productive. This is by far the best site I've been to for the gastropod, Bembexia sulcomarginata. There were dozens strewn about the site. I couldn't resist picking up a few adding to my already extensive Bembexia collection. Brachiopods were also plentiful, especially the large spiriferid, Spinocyrtia granulosa (upper right). I couldn't help adding this inflated example to my large collection. Upper left is Mucrospirifer murcronatus, certainly one of the most abundant and distinctive Middle Devonian brachiopods in New York. Lower left is Protoleptostrophia perplana, a Strophomenid.
  20. Rickard Hill Road 5/20/20

    Today I was able to get out to the outcrop along Rickard Hill in Schoharie, New York. I didn’t find a ton of interesting things because I was looking in a more crystalline layer of the Kalkberg formation that had less abundant fossils. I found a handful of nice orthid, spiriferid, and atrypid brachiopods and one fenestellid bryozoan. Next time I go I’m going to try and get into a different, more fossiliferous layer because the crystalline rock is hard to break and when it does it breaks randomly, often damaging the fossils.
  21. Yesterday I was able to get out to Onondaga County in central NY. While I was there I got a chance to do some fossil hunting at two locations. The first was in Pompey Center, NY near Pratt’s Falls. The second location was a creek in Delphi Falls. The rock at both of these locations was the Skaneateles formation. I was able to get into a different formation at the second spot that was more shaly and had better preservation. This was my first time fossil hunting in the middle Devonian and I was amazed with the number of bivalves I found. (I’ve never found one in the lower Devonian near me). As well as bivalves I was able to find a few very well preserved gastropods, some brachiopods, a bunch of ostracods, and what I believe is a partial phyllocarid carapace.
  22. Last weekend I got a chance to do some fossil hunting in a creek in Greene, New York. I am a unsure if the exact formation I was in but I know it was upper Devonian. Brachiopods were quite abundant, especially spiriferid ones. I also found a couple nice bivalves and some bryozoans/corals.
  23. A few weeks ago I went on a fossil hunting trip to Albany County. I was hunting in the New Scotland formation which is lower Devonian in age. It was very quick and easy to collect in and the dry dredging technique was quite useful. The rock was a very thin shaly limestone which could break easily but many of the fossils had been silicified, making it easy to pop them out of the rock. I found many different species of brachiopods, some gastropods, lots of corals and large bryozoa and a few trilobites
  24. Hi! Please excuse us if we aren’t following decorum with our photo sizes, staging, etc. Since the quarantine has us unexpectedly homeschooling, we took our 5th grader to collect some fossils and though I’m sure they are pretty basic, I’m having a hard time helping her ID all of them. Any info is appreciated, as we are absolute beginners. ☺️ These were collected at a random roadcut in northern PA, another in West Virginia, and also at Beltsville Lake (where we searched all day for a trilobite until I realized I probably don’t even know what the fragments would look like).
  25. From the album Brachiopodes, Shells, corals, sponges......

    Zeilleria Humeralis Kimméridgian pointe du Chay , Angoulins, près de La Rochelle (Charente Maritime).France
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