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Found 326 results

  1. Hi I was wondering if anyone could help me identify some of the key anatomical features of the calyx of this crinoid (Apiocrinites elegans) and any anatomical features of this brachiopod (specimen unknown). I have trawled and searched but am having limited success so thought there might be a fair few people that would be able to lend a helping hand on here! cheers mark
  2. Bizarre Productid Brachiopods

    I came across an older book on productid brachiopods by famous British paleontologist, Helen Muir-Wood. Link: H. Muir-Wood and G. A. Cooper. 1960. Morphology, classification and life habits of the Productoidea (Brachiopoda). Geological Society of America Memoir 81. The book was apparently in the library of German-American paleontologist, Curt Teichert, who edited many of the Treatises of Paleontology. Link. Some of the brachiopods were, to coin a phrase, exhibiting derived convergent evolution with the mollusk rudists. Both were: elongated with one large and one small valve; and formed important parts of reefs. Coscinarina species in plate 28 looked like rugose horn corals. Proboscidella in plate 124 look like elephant trunks. Prorichthofenia permiana from west Texas, figures 2 and 12 in plate 29, look like they are ready to swallow up Kirk’s Starship Enterprise. This book is so unloved, someone was trying to sell another copy for under six bucks including shipping.
  3. My first fossil encounters began here, on a little Maine beach, more than a few years ago. My grandparents lived only a hundred yards away and I lived here every summer as a child. Five generations of my family have cherished these rocks ever since. I don't live here now, at the edge of the sea, but I am still fortunate enough to visit my childhood playground often. I was here this week, wrestling with plumbing and storm windows, and enjoying the opportunity to wander on the sand, explore the tidepools and search among the tumbled cobbles for an increasingly infrequent brachiopod or two. Most of the exposed bedrock is a wonderfully swirly and deformed metamorphic tale of shifting sands, tectonic plates and molten magma. The cobbles on the beach are mostly an Ordovician, Silurian and Devonian potpourri. The dark mudstones which occasionally reveal a few worn brachiopods are probably Silurian. While fossils were fairly common when I first began looking, I now can wander an hour with not a find. I was happy, then, when I uncovered this 7-inch plate. Not too impressive in another setting, but the best I've found here in quite awhile. I was lucky to find this as well. I'll add a few more photos, now, and maybe I'll add to this thread as time goes by. Thanks for looking.
  4. From the album Middle Devonian

    Brachiopods: (Top left) Spinocyrtia granulosa (Bottom left) Protoleptostrophia perplana (Bottom right) Ambocoelia umbonata (Middle right) Mucrosprifer muconatus Middle Devonian Oatkacreek Formation Mottville Member Marcellus Shale Hamilton Group Swamp Road Quarry Morrisville, N.Y.
  5. From the album Middle Devonian

    Protoleptostrophia perplana Strophomenid Brachiopod Middle Devonian Moscow Formation Windom Shale Hamilton Group Deep Springs Road Quarry Earlville, N.Y.
  6. Bivalves or Brachiopods?

    I'm in need of your help. I'm trying to learn how to recognize and maybe differentiate brachiopods from bivalves in the worn fossil rocks I find on Lake Michigan's beaches. If indeed it is one or the other, how do you tell which? In the photo below, what looks like the shaft of an arrow, is it the foot or stalk? OTOH, if it's neither b-pod nor bivalve, what is it? Often I find just bits and pieces in these tumbled rocks. I suspect some of them to be parts of shells, but I'm not quite sure. The shape within my blue circle below is visible over and over on many of my finds. Is thisa part of a shell? Or not? This fossil turns the corner on the same rock as above. It's visible on both sides of the fossilized rock, which is about 5mm wide. I've combined photos of both sides of the rock onto one pic. The total length of this fossil is just about 2.5 cm. I assume that's a cross section of a shell showing the insides of the two valves?
  7. I'm trying to tell some of my brachiopods from Jacksboro Texas apart but the information I can find is confusing. I would like to see any examples of isolated pedicle valves of Marginifera lasallensis, Retaria lasallensis and Kutorginella lasallensis. They are about 2 cm wide, 1 cm deep and 1 cm tall, with a wide heart-shaped appearance and two delicate triangular ears that often break off. They also have 10-14 wrinkles near the nose with the smaller valve almost completely flat and the larger valve very curved, ending in a delicate scooping trail. They tend to occur in upper Misssourian and low to mid-Virgilian formations from Texas to Illinois. I would like pictures of the inside of the flat valve, lit from the side to enhance contrast if possible. Thanks for any help.
  8. Last summer, I took a trip to North and South Lake campgrounds for a casual camping trip. While there, I snooped around my camp site and found these nodules filled with shells. What I was wondering was if these fossils actually came from the site I was at or if the rocks were imported to outline the camping grounds. North and South Lake campgrounds is here: The fossils look like this: Thank you for your time.
  9. Some more Jurassic Brachiopods.

    Hello everyone, I got a few brachiopods from a trade with @will stevenson , I don't have much info on them other than that they used to be part of a Victorian collection and are from Wiltshire, as well as them being Jurassic. Very curious as to what they are, any info is appreciated. Brach 1: Brach 2: Brach 3, Very similar to 2: Brach 4:
  10. Unknown brachiopod

    Hello everyone today I acquired this fossil from @will stevenson and am not sure what kind of brach it is. It looks really interesting and I believe it may be Jurassic, but that's just a guess. Any info would be greatly appreciated. Thank you.
  11. I just made my third trip to northern New Mexico in pursuit of Pennsylvanian fossils. I love this area and I’m especially interested in the Carboniferous periods, and I usually hit a new location on each trip in addition to my favorite location, San Diego canyon near Jemez Springs. But I am always eager to find new locations to hunt! I visited two locations on this trip. I will post my finds from this trip and follow up with another report from previous visits. 1) I spent a few hours at Fossil Hill near Taos. I had little information to work from at this site and had only a little success, but enjoyed the hiking nonetheless. I walked up and down the hill for a few hours, only finding one area with a significant quantity of larger crinoid stems. I also found a single brachiopod and a single Gastropoda. The longest crinoid stem in the image is 1.5” long. This location was near the top of the hill. The fossils were all loose in dirt. I could not find the source layer unfortunately. If you have any good experience at fossil hill, please message me!
  12. Hi, a few days ago I went on my first ever fossil hunting trip to Eben-Emael, a Limestone quarry in Belgium that dates to the Maastrichtian and is part from the type location (the historical ENCI quarry being only a 3,5 km to the north. The trip was orginized by the BVP (Belgische Vereniging voor Paleontologie) and a short report of the trip with phot's and some of the finds can be found in this topic by @Manticocerasman who I was lucky enough to tag along with, cause I doubt I would have found many mention worthy fossils without the guidance of Kevin. But since I am into microfossils I decided to collect some samples of the limestone without the obvious fossils home to later be able to look for microfossils as it should be quite rich. I think I have around 1 - 3 kg of matrix left to look for microfossils. But I have never myself dissolved matrix, and although it seems easy, I don't want to make any mistakes. During the trip they advised me on two different approaches, depending on what kind of fossils I wanted to find. One approach was dissolving in water and the other in vinegar, but now the seeming obvious question. How exactly do I do that? Should I just take a bucket of a glass, fill it halfway with said liquids and just wait? Or should I use a sieve and lay the block there so only fossils remain in the sieve and the rest goes to the buttom. Does the limestone just dissolve or does some kind of putty residu where the microfossils will be in? If so, how to properly remove the fossils when you pour out the liquids without pouring out the fossils? I know I have many questions and some might be very obvious and straigh-forward, but I really haven't done this before and I would like to do it the right way from start. So thanks in advance for any tips & tricks, I would really appreciate any help!
  13. Hey, all! I have a surplus of Upper Ordovician (Cincinnattian series) and Silurian fossils from the Dayton area. Fossils include diverse brachiopods, horn corals, orthoconic nautiloids, and bryozoans as well as trilobite fragments. Would anyone like to trade for these fossils? If there's anything in particular that you'd like from the area that I don't already have in my collection, then I may be able to go search for it before the trade, too. If anyone expresses interest, then I'll upload images of said fossils in the next few days. Let me know!
  14. Monday was an extremely nice one weather wise. I took advantage and visited a small private quarry near Morrisville in Central New York. I've been to this site several times in the past, but the last trip was roughly a year ago. The quarry exposes the Mottville Member of the Middle Devonian Oatkacreek Formation. It is part of the Marcellus Shale which represents the bottom of the Hamilton Group. In terms of fauna it has similarities with the nearby Deep Springs Road and Briggs Road quarry sites which are younger in age. There are also notable differences.
  15. There is a bit of Georgian Bay formation in my neighbourhood. It is littered with trace fossils and guarded by swarms of mosquitos. This area surrenders its treasures very reluctantly. There are a few little bryozoan pieces and not much else that I can see. The exception is a single outcrop from which I've pulled some sedimentary rock and found shell imprints. Some are quite wonderful, and there are several species. I think they might have these genus names: Ambonychia, Rafinesquina, Zygospira. The rocks also have all kinds of "colonies" in them, but I cannot identify them and they are not easy to make out.
  16. Hi all! Now that I'm finally getting around to organizing my fossils into cabinets, I'm looking to get a bit more information on some of them. As I'm currently finishing up the Ordovician shelves of my cabinets, I was hoping to get some help with identifying brachiopods from the St. Leon roadcut in Indiana that I acquired through winning some past auctions benefiting the forum. Photo #1: Mainly strophomenids, I think - does anyone have a more precise ID? Photo #2: Dalmanellids perhaps? Any specific IDs out there? Photo #3: These are really tiny and adorable More to come...
  17. I've bought fossils, and I've found them myself! Here are some of my greatest finds in my collection!
  18. Penn Dixie this weekend

    This weekend we're taking a long weekend up to the Niagara Falls NY area. We're going to be doing the typical tourist stops plus a visit to Penn Dixie. . Based on the weather forecast I would assume to be there at opening time to avoid the afternoon heat and possibility of thunderstorms. I don't know yet if we're going to be there on Saturday or Sunday. Is there any tips or suggestions for first timers to Penn Dixie? We have a rock hammer, mason's hammer, an engineer hammer and several cold chisels. Also on a totally unrelated note any restaurants in the Buffalo/Niagara Falls area that anyone would recommend for the family. Thanks for any information and I will post a field report early next week.
  19. It was a planned family get together at my sister's ranch in Kentucky to celebrate my father's 90th birthday. I was travelling from Southeastern New York by car. Made it to Harrison, Ohio the first day, right on the border with Indiana. Next morning, weather was pleasant and I was out to the famous St. Leon road cut, a place that I've wanted to visit for years. Finally made it there. Spent the entire day. Despite the site's fame, didn't see another collector and except for one brief shower the weather was perfect though a little on the warm side. I explored the entire exposure though the best was just below one of the terraces where the brachiopods and corals were weathering out of the shale complete.
  20. So I went back to Tannery Park to find fragments...got a few gastropods. But walking on the rocks, I encountered lots that I had missed. Brought my wife along and her eyes are sharp. She found a couple of nautiloids so large that I can't believe I missed them before. I'd not noticed many brachiopods before, but I did this time. Also lots of "periwinkle beds". This place will open to the public as a lakeside promenade in September.
  21. From the album Eastern NY Fossil Hunts

    Acrospirifer arrectus Chonetes hudsonica Platystoma ventricosa Devonian Found in 2019 from Glenerie, NY.
  22. Acrospirifer arrectus

    From the album Eastern NY Fossil Hunts

    Acrospirifer arrectus Devonian Found in 2018 from Glenerie, NY.
  23. A week ago today, I took the day off work to hit one of my favorite sites, a roadcut above the Illinois River in Oglesby, Illinois. This cut exposes the Pennsylvanian LaSalle Limestone member of the Bond Formation and produces abundant brachiopods as well as occasional other fauna including gastropods, cephalopods, coral, trilobites, and shark teeth. The weather was perfect, sunny but not too warm, when I pulled up. The cut is a somewhat unstable slope of cobbles and boulders of varying size, almost all with at least some fossils in them. To get up to the slope, you have to hop across a small ditch with running water. I have a good sampling of the common brachiopods from here, so I am looking for unusual fossils when I go now. I was very happy to quickly find a piece of trilobite as I started to search the rocks at the base of the hill. (I will put pics of everything I brought home in a response post) One interesting find that I was not able to bring home was this Linoproductus brachiopod with some shell preserved and a really pretty dendritic pattern on it- it was very delicate and firmly embedded in the middle of an ~80 lb boulder. I was able to stay for 4 hours, and I felt like I gave most of the site at least a quick look. I am very happy with what I found- I was able to check off many of the rarer things I was looking for, including shark teeth, a trilobite, cephalopod material, and a brachiopod with spines attached, as well as some nice crystallized brachiopods. I will post all of my finds below.
  24. Today I was out collecting in Lawrenceburg, Indiana for several hours, accompanying me was some rainfall. This will be a picture heavy post and I will show various fossils that I found and many pieces that I left in the field. I will start out with trilobite parts of Flexicalymene and Isotelus. I did find my first ever complete trilobite, at least I think it is my first, and also my largest piece of an Isotelus that I have ever found. Now the pieces- Next post will be Bryozoan-
  25. This collecting trip was more of a scouting expedition than an actual dig. After the snow and ice have melted, its fun to get out and see whats newly exposed/uncovered. Today we found the usual cast of characters like horn corals, tabulate corals, brachiopods, gastropods, pelecypods, and trilobites. I was mad at myself for not having faith in a trilobite fossil that I found on this trip. It was barely visible in the rock I found it in and I thought it would be incomplete just on how it looked. I started to remove the matrix (hard limey shale) with a hammer and small chisel. The bug popped out of the rock complete and fell on the floor. The trilobite landed on its glabella and some of its shell broke off. I think I found all the pieces but I should have been more careful. After all these years of collecting I should know better. I promised myself to make up for it and that I would find a killer bug this season with some new sites that I have lined up Thanks and Happy Collecting mikeymig
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