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Found 337 results

  1. Spring of 2020 We took advantage of the time off and the break in weather to hunt one of our favorite streams here in Western New York. This was just a spring scouting mission to see what was exposed after the ice and snow has melted. Some of the more interesting finds were a crinoid crown (very rare for this locality) possibly Logocrinus, Spinocyrtia granulosa open with both valves, Orthospirifer marcyi, a large Megastrophia concava cleaned by nature with epibionts, and 3 small nearly complete Greenops. We also found many small Favosites coral colonies, large Heliophyllum corals, and 8 different species of brachiopods. Happy Collecting!
  2. Brachiopods from Germany ID

    it's my 4 days of quarantine and i thought it was time to put a label on few unknow brachiopods bags:) I received these in two bags as a gift with a very strange label inside ,it could be a mix from various sites,i try to make few "Familly"of species,there was also three othe fossils inside a bag.perhaps somebody could help?
  3. US Brachiopods ID

    I received from the states these brachiopods,but no ID and without the site ,perhaps it's a kind of Platystrophia?
  4. On March first, I decided to rent a car and drive south. I'm finishing school in Chicago in May and am preparing to move west, so I really had no time to waste collecting Illinois. I hit three spots - one limestone road cut and one shale road cut in Oglesby, IL and the Mazon pits on the way back up to the city. I'm grateful to a few members for their posts and message replies regarding the road cuts, I couldn't have done this trip without them. I took off at 7 AM towards Oglesby. Here's the map, if you look at Oglesby on Google maps the location here should come together: Once you're there, it's basically a free for all. You are searching through the LaSalle Limestone Member of the Bond Formation which houses Pennsylvanian fossils. There are brachiopods everywhere you look which crumble down the hill and expose new matrix. Here are some of the Linoproductus I took home: I'll make another post for the second road cut
  5. I'm curious if anyone would be interested in trading for this wonderful piece with multiple bivalves/brachiopods. I don't have any information except that it was a beach find from southern California. Several of them are damaged, one is almost entirely complete (one small chip) and exposed most of the way. 2 others I believe are intact but are partially buried in the matrix. There are also a few more that are barely exposed that may be complete within the matrix. I think this piece could be excellent for prepping practice and with a little bit of work it could look really nice. PM me with any offers, trilobite material would be my preference but I'm not very picky. Here's a picture of the piece top down, more pictures are on the way.
  6. Hi All. I was unsure where to put this message so hopefully this place is okay. I teach 7th grade Life Science and we are soon starting our coverage of major animal types (arthropods, echinoderms, molluscs, chordtates, etc). I am hoping to put together a teaching collection that can be used each year as we do this. If there are members here who are willing to donate any/all types of durable specimens (harder for young teens to destroy) that could be used to teach students the key features of these phyla. If you are willing and able to share can you please PM me directly. I do appreciate it :-)
  7. Pennsylvanian disc-shaped fossil

    Hi experts, this year during one of my trips to the San Diego Canyon in northern New Mexico, I found this mystery fossil. It looked a lot like a mushroom to me, complete with radial fissures on the surface and a hint of a stalk on the backside. It is about 4cm in diameter and about 1cm thick. Any ideas? Coral? Heavily deformed bivalve? Red herring? Thanks for your input!
  8. cleaning a Brachiopod

    Removing matrix from the Brachiopod. "Boring!" plus Crinoids. X-acto knife and fiberglass brush. 5.0 cm x 4.7 cm. Brachiopod. 2.3 cm was thick and covered most of it.
  9. This was my second time visiting this well-known Late Carboniferous, Kasimovian stage (305-7mya) spot on the NW edge of the Illinois basin. Here are some things I found. Some large brachiopods. After splitting some rocks, came across this nice tooth. I kept both halves for careful extraction/reassembly at home, which took at least a few hours. I don't know much about shark teeth and after researching, and from what I can glean from what scarce information is available, I think it's a Holocephalia subclass, Chimaera tooth. Possibly Cochliodus sp...? It measures 2cm. Correct me if I'm wrong, as I don't know much about teeth. Another cool thing I noticed is that it fluoresces a eerie green under ultraviolet light, however my cell phone camera interprets the UV light differently than my eye. I probably have to mess around with exposure settings or something. Whatever the case, it helps bring out details. Also,, found this genal spine of Ameura sp. with a tooth fragment(dark spot, lower right). I was crossing my fingers that at least the entire cephalon would be there ,but no dice... however, it also fluoresces glow-in-the-dark green which makes it stand out from the matrix easier to photograph. Ahh, to find a complete Ameura that fluoresces.. Thanks for reading.
  10. I bought a new old cabinet last winter and spent several months filling it with newly labeled specimens, most of them now stored in jewelry boxes. I took photos of it to show Tim, Fossildude19 and he suggested I post them in the Members Collections section. I followed his suggestion. The collection started in 2011 with a few fossil purchases off a well known public auction site. By the early spring of 2012 I was collecting in the field and the vast majority of my collection was self collected in that manner from sites, primarily in the Northeast and Ohio Valley as well as ones collected on trips to Texas, Germany and out west. There are also some gift specimens that I own thanks to the generosity of a number of friends, most of whom are on the Forum. The top of the cabinet is occupied by miscellaneous specimens, some that wouldn't fit in the drawers, some slated to be in a glass display case I hope to eventually get, and my collection of fossils found in New Jersey just above the Iridium Layer.
  11. Hi I was wondering if anyone could help me identify some of the key anatomical features of the calyx of this crinoid (Apiocrinites elegans) and any anatomical features of this brachiopod (specimen unknown). I have trawled and searched but am having limited success so thought there might be a fair few people that would be able to lend a helping hand on here! cheers mark
  12. Bizarre Productid Brachiopods

    I came across an older book on productid brachiopods by famous British paleontologist, Helen Muir-Wood. Link: H. Muir-Wood and G. A. Cooper. 1960. Morphology, classification and life habits of the Productoidea (Brachiopoda). Geological Society of America Memoir 81. The book was apparently in the library of German-American paleontologist, Curt Teichert, who edited many of the Treatises of Paleontology. Link. Some of the brachiopods were, to coin a phrase, exhibiting derived convergent evolution with the mollusk rudists. Both were: elongated with one large and one small valve; and formed important parts of reefs. Coscinarina species in plate 28 looked like rugose horn corals. Proboscidella in plate 124 look like elephant trunks. Prorichthofenia permiana from west Texas, figures 2 and 12 in plate 29, look like they are ready to swallow up Kirk’s Starship Enterprise. This book is so unloved, someone was trying to sell another copy for under six bucks including shipping.
  13. My first fossil encounters began here, on a little Maine beach, more than a few years ago. My grandparents lived only a hundred yards away and I lived here every summer as a child. Five generations of my family have cherished these rocks ever since. I don't live here now, at the edge of the sea, but I am still fortunate enough to visit my childhood playground often. I was here this week, wrestling with plumbing and storm windows, and enjoying the opportunity to wander on the sand, explore the tidepools and search among the tumbled cobbles for an increasingly infrequent brachiopod or two. Most of the exposed bedrock is a wonderfully swirly and deformed metamorphic tale of shifting sands, tectonic plates and molten magma. The cobbles on the beach are mostly an Ordovician, Silurian and Devonian potpourri. The dark mudstones which occasionally reveal a few worn brachiopods are probably Silurian. While fossils were fairly common when I first began looking, I now can wander an hour with not a find. I was happy, then, when I uncovered this 7-inch plate. Not too impressive in another setting, but the best I've found here in quite awhile. I was lucky to find this as well. I'll add a few more photos, now, and maybe I'll add to this thread as time goes by. Thanks for looking.
  14. From the album Middle Devonian

    Brachiopods: (Top left) Spinocyrtia granulosa (Bottom left) Protoleptostrophia perplana (Bottom right) Ambocoelia umbonata (Middle right) Mucrosprifer muconatus Middle Devonian Oatkacreek Formation Mottville Member Marcellus Shale Hamilton Group Swamp Road Quarry Morrisville, N.Y.
  15. From the album Middle Devonian

    Protoleptostrophia perplana Strophomenid Brachiopod Middle Devonian Moscow Formation Windom Shale Hamilton Group Deep Springs Road Quarry Earlville, N.Y.
  16. Bivalves or Brachiopods?

    I'm in need of your help. I'm trying to learn how to recognize and maybe differentiate brachiopods from bivalves in the worn fossil rocks I find on Lake Michigan's beaches. If indeed it is one or the other, how do you tell which? In the photo below, what looks like the shaft of an arrow, is it the foot or stalk? OTOH, if it's neither b-pod nor bivalve, what is it? Often I find just bits and pieces in these tumbled rocks. I suspect some of them to be parts of shells, but I'm not quite sure. The shape within my blue circle below is visible over and over on many of my finds. Is thisa part of a shell? Or not? This fossil turns the corner on the same rock as above. It's visible on both sides of the fossilized rock, which is about 5mm wide. I've combined photos of both sides of the rock onto one pic. The total length of this fossil is just about 2.5 cm. I assume that's a cross section of a shell showing the insides of the two valves?
  17. I'm trying to tell some of my brachiopods from Jacksboro Texas apart but the information I can find is confusing. I would like to see any examples of isolated pedicle valves of Marginifera lasallensis, Retaria lasallensis and Kutorginella lasallensis. They are about 2 cm wide, 1 cm deep and 1 cm tall, with a wide heart-shaped appearance and two delicate triangular ears that often break off. They also have 10-14 wrinkles near the nose with the smaller valve almost completely flat and the larger valve very curved, ending in a delicate scooping trail. They tend to occur in upper Misssourian and low to mid-Virgilian formations from Texas to Illinois. I would like pictures of the inside of the flat valve, lit from the side to enhance contrast if possible. Thanks for any help.
  18. Last summer, I took a trip to North and South Lake campgrounds for a casual camping trip. While there, I snooped around my camp site and found these nodules filled with shells. What I was wondering was if these fossils actually came from the site I was at or if the rocks were imported to outline the camping grounds. North and South Lake campgrounds is here: The fossils look like this: Thank you for your time.
  19. Some more Jurassic Brachiopods.

    Hello everyone, I got a few brachiopods from a trade with @will stevenson , I don't have much info on them other than that they used to be part of a Victorian collection and are from Wiltshire, as well as them being Jurassic. Very curious as to what they are, any info is appreciated. Brach 1: Brach 2: Brach 3, Very similar to 2: Brach 4:
  20. Unknown brachiopod

    Hello everyone today I acquired this fossil from @will stevenson and am not sure what kind of brach it is. It looks really interesting and I believe it may be Jurassic, but that's just a guess. Any info would be greatly appreciated. Thank you.
  21. I just made my third trip to northern New Mexico in pursuit of Pennsylvanian fossils. I love this area and I’m especially interested in the Carboniferous periods, and I usually hit a new location on each trip in addition to my favorite location, San Diego canyon near Jemez Springs. But I am always eager to find new locations to hunt! I visited two locations on this trip. I will post my finds from this trip and follow up with another report from previous visits. 1) I spent a few hours at Fossil Hill near Taos. I had little information to work from at this site and had only a little success, but enjoyed the hiking nonetheless. I walked up and down the hill for a few hours, only finding one area with a significant quantity of larger crinoid stems. I also found a single brachiopod and a single Gastropoda. The longest crinoid stem in the image is 1.5” long. This location was near the top of the hill. The fossils were all loose in dirt. I could not find the source layer unfortunately. If you have any good experience at fossil hill, please message me!
  22. Hi, a few days ago I went on my first ever fossil hunting trip to Eben-Emael, a Limestone quarry in Belgium that dates to the Maastrichtian and is part from the type location (the historical ENCI quarry being only a 3,5 km to the north. The trip was orginized by the BVP (Belgische Vereniging voor Paleontologie) and a short report of the trip with phot's and some of the finds can be found in this topic by @Manticocerasman who I was lucky enough to tag along with, cause I doubt I would have found many mention worthy fossils without the guidance of Kevin. But since I am into microfossils I decided to collect some samples of the limestone without the obvious fossils home to later be able to look for microfossils as it should be quite rich. I think I have around 1 - 3 kg of matrix left to look for microfossils. But I have never myself dissolved matrix, and although it seems easy, I don't want to make any mistakes. During the trip they advised me on two different approaches, depending on what kind of fossils I wanted to find. One approach was dissolving in water and the other in vinegar, but now the seeming obvious question. How exactly do I do that? Should I just take a bucket of a glass, fill it halfway with said liquids and just wait? Or should I use a sieve and lay the block there so only fossils remain in the sieve and the rest goes to the buttom. Does the limestone just dissolve or does some kind of putty residu where the microfossils will be in? If so, how to properly remove the fossils when you pour out the liquids without pouring out the fossils? I know I have many questions and some might be very obvious and straigh-forward, but I really haven't done this before and I would like to do it the right way from start. So thanks in advance for any tips & tricks, I would really appreciate any help!
  23. Hey, all! I have a surplus of Upper Ordovician (Cincinnattian series) and Silurian fossils from the Dayton area. Fossils include diverse brachiopods, horn corals, orthoconic nautiloids, and bryozoans as well as trilobite fragments. Would anyone like to trade for these fossils? If there's anything in particular that you'd like from the area that I don't already have in my collection, then I may be able to go search for it before the trade, too. If anyone expresses interest, then I'll upload images of said fossils in the next few days. Let me know!
  24. Monday was an extremely nice one weather wise. I took advantage and visited a small private quarry near Morrisville in Central New York. I've been to this site several times in the past, but the last trip was roughly a year ago. The quarry exposes the Mottville Member of the Middle Devonian Oatkacreek Formation. It is part of the Marcellus Shale which represents the bottom of the Hamilton Group. In terms of fauna it has similarities with the nearby Deep Springs Road and Briggs Road quarry sites which are younger in age. There are also notable differences.
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