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Found 306 results

  1. From the album Eastern NY Fossil Hunts

    Acrospirifer arrectus Chonetes hudsonica Platystoma ventricosa Devonian Found in 2019 from Glenerie, NY.
  2. Acrospirifer arrectus

    From the album Eastern NY Fossil Hunts

    Acrospirifer arrectus Devonian Found in 2018 from Glenerie, NY.
  3. A week ago today, I took the day off work to hit one of my favorite sites, a roadcut above the Illinois River in Oglesby, Illinois. This cut exposes the Pennsylvanian LaSalle Limestone member of the Bond Formation and produces abundant brachiopods as well as occasional other fauna including gastropods, cephalopods, coral, trilobites, and shark teeth. The weather was perfect, sunny but not too warm, when I pulled up. The cut is a somewhat unstable slope of cobbles and boulders of varying size, almost all with at least some fossils in them. To get up to the slope, you have to hop across a small ditch with running water. I have a good sampling of the common brachiopods from here, so I am looking for unusual fossils when I go now. I was very happy to quickly find a piece of trilobite as I started to search the rocks at the base of the hill. (I will put pics of everything I brought home in a response post) One interesting find that I was not able to bring home was this Linoproductus brachiopod with some shell preserved and a really pretty dendritic pattern on it- it was very delicate and firmly embedded in the middle of an ~80 lb boulder. I was able to stay for 4 hours, and I felt like I gave most of the site at least a quick look. I am very happy with what I found- I was able to check off many of the rarer things I was looking for, including shark teeth, a trilobite, cephalopod material, and a brachiopod with spines attached, as well as some nice crystallized brachiopods. I will post all of my finds below.
  4. Today I was out collecting in Lawrenceburg, Indiana for several hours, accompanying me was some rainfall. This will be a picture heavy post and I will show various fossils that I found and many pieces that I left in the field. I will start out with trilobite parts of Flexicalymene and Isotelus. I did find my first ever complete trilobite, at least I think it is my first, and also my largest piece of an Isotelus that I have ever found. Now the pieces- Next post will be Bryozoan-
  5. This collecting trip was more of a scouting expedition than an actual dig. After the snow and ice have melted, its fun to get out and see whats newly exposed/uncovered. Today we found the usual cast of characters like horn corals, tabulate corals, brachiopods, gastropods, pelecypods, and trilobites. I was mad at myself for not having faith in a trilobite fossil that I found on this trip. It was barely visible in the rock I found it in and I thought it would be incomplete just on how it looked. I started to remove the matrix (hard limey shale) with a hammer and small chisel. The bug popped out of the rock complete and fell on the floor. The trilobite landed on its glabella and some of its shell broke off. I think I found all the pieces but I should have been more careful. After all these years of collecting I should know better. I promised myself to make up for it and that I would find a killer bug this season with some new sites that I have lined up Thanks and Happy Collecting mikeymig
  6. Sorry I haven’t been around the forum as much for a couple months now but I’m starting to get some more free time recently. Here’s a quick trip @Earth Chemistry and I did a little bit ago. Let’s start out with what stratigraphy we’re looking at here. I’ve been visiting multiple locations of what is locally known as the Gardison Limestone. Source: http://utahgeology.com/utah-stratigraphic-columns/?var=strat_27 It is from the early Mississippian or Early Carboniferous for our international members.
  7. English Brachiopod Identification

    Hello, I just got a surprise package from my Aunt and Uncle who live in Somerset, England. It contained a nice amount of Brachiopods they found near them, at a place called Hill Farm. (May be meaningless to some, not for others.) I know definitively that these came out of the Blue Lias. What they are i'm not so certain. May anyone ID? First Batch: (All look similar; I included back and front sides as well) Second Batch: (Similar to some MD oysters Thanks!
  8. Last Saturday (April 6th, 2019) my wife and I made our second trip to Tully, NY to search for trilobite fossils. Unfortunately this was the second time I was unable to find a complete trilobite; I'll keep searching for them in other locations. I did find some other fossils that I thought were interesting enough to keep. The first photo is of the hill in Tully that I searched. On our first trip I tried to cover the entire hill while we were there, on our second trip I concentrated on smaller areas and had better results with finding fossils. A gastropod fossil which is next to another fossil that is round, flat and has a spiral pattern that is difficult to see in the photo. I found many brachiopods and some bivalves. This is the longest crinoid stem that I've found so far at Tully, it is about 13/4 inches in length. I'm guessing this is another crinoid stem. It has a much larger diameter than the other crinoid stems that I've found and it has "spikes". And two very small pieces of fossil from trilobites, which I was happy to find even though they are not complete. Thanks for looking.
  9. Fossil hunting in the Ardennes

    Hello All Today and the next five days I'm on a family trip in the Ardennes. I am close to the region around Hotton. This is known for the many invertebrate fossils that can be found here. I went to a quarry first. I had to get permission from the owners but they gave if I didn't break the obvious rules of fossilhunting in an active quarry. The weather was very nice and the fossils numerous. What else does a fossilhunter want? I searched in an the loose rocks and didn't even had to use my hammer. The ground here is littered with fossil corals. In 5 minutes I found about 20 pieces. I have no Idea of the species yet.
  10. Chonetid impressions in slate (“Chonetenschiefer”) from the Plabutsch-formation, Palaeozoic of Graz, Styria, Austria (Devonian – Eifelian) The classic occurrence at Gaisbergsattel, west of Graz The Eifelian Plabutsch-formation – mostly fossiliferous limestones – of the Palaeozoic of Graz, Styria, Austria, contains locally beds of slates of various colors. Some of these beds contain abundant limonitic imprints of brachiopods and bivalves (“Chonetenschiefer”). The locality first mentioned in the literature (1871) is that at Gaisbergsattel west of Graz: Austrian map with "classic" occurrence of “Chonetenschiefer” at Gaisbergsattel (red x). Part of geological map of Kuntschnig (1937) with “Chonetenschiefer” between the two red x east of Gaisbergsattel. Here, the slate layer is up to 2 m thick, grey like mice and splits easily in flat pieces (Hanselmayer, 1957). The fauna was first listed in Heritsch (1935): Chonetes subquadrata Chonetes sarcinulata Chonetes oblonga Chonetes nova species (most abundant!) Spirifer aculeatus Pterinea fasciculata Pterinea cf. bifida Pterinea cf. costata More than 10 years ago, my first attempt looking for these rocks was not successful. A few days ago (03/29/2019), however, I stumbled over this rock by pure serendipity. A small piece of it was lying on a rather busy hiking trail (“Mariazeller Weg 06”) east of Gaisbergsattel. Relief map with my first find of “Chonetenschiefer” at the hiking trail (red x) and supposed outcrop area of this rock after the geologic map of Kuntschnig (1937). Hiking trail “Mariazeller Weg 06”, where I found my first specimen. Pic from 04/01/2019. I was able to split the rock with my fingernail – and there they were, the limonitic brachiopod imprints! A faint radial ripping is visible. No other specimen was found on the trail. Now I looked closely at the geologic map, the text of Hanselmayer (1957), and the relief map and decided to explore the area around the red line (see above), where the outcrop of this rock is supposed to be. It’s a forested area with dense undergrowth, among the undergrowth many spiky blackberry bushes… No outcrop was found, but fallen trees have exposed some rock fragments: Abundant limestones, light brownish slates and, yes, some grey slate, mostly small pieces. I split only the largest of them – and again some brachiopod imprints were found...
  11. Hi all, Some weeks ago, I found a site pretty rich in brachipods from the Late Pliensbachian/Early Toarcian in my area (Pedraforca Zone, SE Pyrennes) So, I made a parenthesis in my Upper Cretaceous usual issues, for a change, and I have been picking & preparing them last weeks. This site is very well studied in this paper (in French), and in fossilworks. I probably i found all the species mentioned from the site: Telothyris pyrenaica Telothyris jauberti Quadratirhynchia vasconcellosi Soaresirhynchia sp. Soaresirhynchia (Alméras, 1994) (former Stolmorhynchia) is a genus of little brachiopods first described by Alméras in a study about Portugueses Toarcian specimens, but are common in all the Iberian-Pyrenean Toarcian basin, from Portugal to South France. Unfortunately, they show great morphology diversity, and I must confess the I am not be able to distinguish one specie from another (S.bouchardi, S.flamandi, S.rustica). Maybe @ricardo could help. These are some examples: Homoeorhynchia batalleri And finally, the only Liospireferina falloti I found, though in poor condition:
  12. Recovery and Extinction

    The recovery period after an extinction event may lead to evolutionary bottlenecks. Counterintuitive. https://m.phys.org/news/2019-03-fossils-recovery-extinction-event-evolutionary.html
  13. This weekend we had a quick stop near the city of Mons in the south of Belgium. It is not commonly known that in some forrests in this area are ancient quarries of Maastrichtian phosphatic chalk, not all are accessible but with a reasearch on old maps some of them can be found with a little effort you can clear out a spot on the ground and search for a multitude of small fossils. we only stayed 2 hours, but we did find our fair share of tiny but beautiful brachiopods, bryozoans, shark teeth, dentaliums, bellemnite fragments,... . @Tidgy's Dad , you'll like those little critters and even a few teeth and an echinoid spine:
  14. Our Moroccan trip from 19th-23rd February 2019. Day One; Locality One IFRANE Here we are near Ifrane, a village built by the French in the 1930's in a Swiss chalet style so there are pointy roofs instead of the usual traditional flat roofs of Moroccan buildings. This is wifey and Anouar, a Moroccan tour guide, old friend and one time student of English, his brother, our driver Abdullah, is taking the photo. Anouar paid for the trip, accommodation and food in return for me teaching him a little about the fossils, crystals and minerals that we encountered. The trip was mainly an exploratory voyage for me to discover where was worth revisiting when i was alone and had more time to spare. Somewhere in this area are outcrops of Pleinsbachian (stage of the Liassic/ Lower Jurassic) rocks that are stuffed with terebratulid brachiopods including more than a dozen species and subspecies that were first described from this locality, many unique to the site. Unfortunately, it's well off the beaten track, but I think i know roughly where now, so will return another day. Not time today! The area is covered in loose rocks, ploughed up in fields and roadbuilding, eroded from outliers or washed into the area in the autumn rainy season floods or spring melts. The ones behind us look Middle Jurassic to me, yellowish limestones, some with iron staining. Upper Jurassic and Cretaceous rocks are also in the region. The high ridges in the background are basalt intrusions as the Atlas mountains were formed as Africa began to collide with Europe throughout the Palaoegene and Neogene and this resulted in a lot of volcanoes. We moved on north of the village and stopped where we saw a group of the local fossil huts. These are all year round businesses, but in the season, from May til October you will find little stalls selling local fossils and minerals all the way along the route through the Atlas Mountains to the Sahara. But the temporary stalls are all closed at this time of year, as it's pretty chilly and there are few tourists. Top Tip : Always pop into a couple of different shops and check out prices. Tell the next shopkeeper how much the previous one had stated and see if they'll undercut for a similar item. Always, always haggle! Top Tip : Ask which fossils and crystals are local if you don't know already; most of the shops in Morocco have local fossils and others from all over the country. Local fossils will usually be much cheaper, wait until you get nearer to the localities of other fossils and see the prices come down! Top Tip : If you have the time, ask the purveyors of local fossils to show you where they came from. Then go and have a look. They don't mind this at all.
  15. So as the titles states "Mazon Creek Collecting or the Joy of Instant Gratification- Choose Wisely", that was my choice today, and I choose instant gratification. Even though I have not been out to Pit 11 this year, I wanted to find some fossils and not just concretions with the hope of finding something, plus I still have a lot of buckets to crack open, so I decided to collect some other Pennsylvanian fossils. I decided to stop by a road cut that exposes the LaSalle Limestone member of the Bond Formation and had a great day collecting in near 40 degree weather. It was very sketchy collecting today since the ground is not frozen, but it is also not thawed, so it is very slick in the none snow covered area and it can send you sliding to the bottom of the road cut as it did to me today- a nice controlled slide of about 20 feet. Here are only a few of my finds from today, after a short time I stopped taking pics. Here is a nice partial Peripristis Shark Tooth, I believe I found a couple other possible partial teeth, but I will check those out tomorrow. A few large Echinaria brachiopods- Many big Composita argentia brachiopods- A little Orthoconic nautiloid- Spirifer brachiopod- Linoproductus cora brachiopods- Juresania nebrascensis an Spirifer brachiopods-
  16. Devonian of NY

    Been taking some pictures of fossil finds the last couple weeks and decided to share. These are from our last couple trips.
  17. Silurian Brachiopods from Georgia

    For reference, here's a link to my recent trip report: There have been two things I've been wondering about the trip: IDs for the brachiopods, and clarification on formation member (I know that it's Red Mountain Formation, but there's multiple members and I'm not sure which one this particular exposure is from). Anyone more knowledgeable on Silurian shells like to chime in?
  18. Dictyoclostus?

    I’ve found a few of these neat brachiopods which look to be dictyoclostus sp. or maybe linoproductus. Thoughts? (Edit: oh yeah pretty certain they are from the Pennsylvanian of east Kansas)
  19. Spirifer with lophophore

    I was cleaning up my drawer with spiriferids from the Ardennes and I found a weathered one that I picked up for a particular reason. The suport of the lophophore of the spiriferid is partially visible. this lophophore is the feeding apparatus of the brachiopods and looks like a ring with tentacles. On spiriferids the lophophore suport is a typical spiral on both sides of the shell. The “spiral” is also the reason for the name of the fossil “Spirifer “= “Spiral-bearers” I'd love to se some more brachiopods in tff-members collections with preserved lophophores
  20. Fossil Models

    Hello to everyone. I am studying Geology in the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki and I am facing difficulties in passing the subject of Invertebrate Paleontology. This subject requires Identification of fossils both in power point but also live. Because of this I am interested in buying models (paper models, plastic models , whatever) of fossils. I have been told by my professor that some of the samples exhibited during classes were sold to the University a very long time ago by a well known shop which I will not name that sells such products. Sadly though I have not been able to find what I need. Since public advertising of such shops is against the forum's rules I would like to be informed by Personal message if necessary of anywhere I can purchase the fossils I need. Also I would be much obliged if someone could point me in the right direction without violating the forum's rules. Thank you in advance
  21. It’s winter and time to explore as many canyons as possible before it gets hot here. As always; in search of exercise, fossils and other items of interest. A visual summary of the ascent of one side canyon and the descent of the another. The entrance to the two canyon loop Today I had to share the trail Ordovician formations with small cave Ordovician staircase walkway in canyon bottom, Silurian cliffs at top of pic As the main canyon ascends, the hiking eventually meets where Ordovician contacts Silurian At the top of this Silurian dry falls is the Devonian but not much of it. This Devonian area is just before the canyon splits into two canyons
  22. On a short schedule for searching so it was a mad dash. I have very few ways to easily reach the Pennsylvanian Formations. Ordovician-Silurian-Devonian-Mississippian no problem. Anyway, I've found some interesting ferns in the Pennsylvanian Gobbler and wanted to see what I could find in another location about 3 miles as the crow flies away. About 1.5 miles into the site and a fairly productive morning for an initial search. Not the best of specimens but holds promise. Found this interesting brachiopod panel presenting itself with some glints. It was easily opened up by dragging my long chisel into it Some of the brachs. Not cleaned up yet.. A brach hash plate and the layer the brachs deposited on showing trace fossil depressions. Not cleaned yet A couple of phylloid algal limestone specimens
  23. Hi, I have a good selection of self-found Devonian aged marine fossils from Ontario, Canada that I am offereing to trade for shark teeth. I have; -several species of brachiopods -a few species of gastropods -ammonites -corals -Bryozoa -trilobites -and more All of my specimens are self-found and many are identified to genus or species. I can provide detailed location and age data with the specimens. Also, I have lots of photos available upon request, but here are a few to give you and idea. i am looking for shark teeth, especially; -interesting Cretaceous teeth -Carcharocles -Carcharodon and/or cospopolitodus -Cretoxyrhina, Cardabiodon, Dwardius -Palaeocarcharodon -Leptostyrax -Ctetodus -interesting locations -anything else interesting Thanks for looking!
  24. Though I just visited this site a few days ago and posted a trip report of that session, I decided to go back yesterday for three reasons: #1- My lower back was back to being 100%, that's a good thing. #2- It was supposed to snow today, and it is. I think the Olgesby area might have about 3" on the ground now and you can't collect on a steep scree field covered in snow. And #3, I just like collecting fossils. This area contains fossils from this formation- La Salle Limestone member of the Bond Formation (Missourian, Pennsylvanian) Unit 3. I am pretty sure that a portion of the Gray Shale (Unit 2) also came down. So yesterday I headed off to the road cut to collect in the balmy winter weather of Illinois. I was alone except for the Bald Eagles that were soaring high over head, from time to time you could hear their screech. With my back being a 100% I was able to maneuver along the loose rocks without a problem and was able to spend some time looking a the rocks a found a number of beautiful plates and large loose brachiopods. This site will continue to produce as the weathering process takes affect. As I stated in my last post, if you are ever in that area, you should stop and take a look, there are some beautiful fossils there. Here are some pics that I took in the field and I will end with pics of some of the same fossils, but hopefully in better light. Here a chunks of rocks that are just loaded with brachiopods. Composita argentia- I did find a number of fossils filled with crystals, this one is a favorite. Bryozoan- CONTINUED---------Next Post
  25. How I Found Fossils in the Snow

    The cabin fever I’ve had the last couple months finally drove me mad. Inspired by the posts of @KimTexan, @FranzBernhard, @Al Tahan, and @Calico Jack. I decided to brave the snow and cold and attempt a new place that I had been contemplating visiting for several months now. This was not the easiest time to be hunting and probably not the safest thing to do as I haven’t seen a lot of the fossils in the formation, the entire outcrop may be under a foot of snow, and adding snow to any fossil trip is inherently more dangerous. But I tried to insure the highest chance of success and safety and I will now share my experience with this. I don’t claim to be a professional and I don’t claim this is safe, if you attempt to hike and hunt fossils in the snow you do so at your own risk. Since, I didn’t know what exactly the fossils looked like, I had only glimpsed at a couple specimens in a couple local museums. I took to the internet for any pictures I could find. I found this thread This website http://www.ammonoid.com/Manning.html This paper https://emp.byui.edu/STRICKLAND/fossil.pdf And various examples for sale that I won’t link here. I just basically looked at anything and everything from the formation to get a sense of what the fossils looked like. To make sure I was going to the right location I looked at geologic maps via the apps I have listed here I looked land ownership maps like this one https://platmap.trustlands.utah.gov/ and this one https://blm-egis.maps.arcgis.com/apps/webappviewer/index.html?id=6f0da4c7931440a8a80bfe20eddd7550 And a couple other more site specific maps to double check. I also looked at a topographic map of the area with geologic maps overlaid https://geology.utah.gov/apps/intgeomap/index.html# Sattelite images from https://www.google.com/earth/ and roadmaps like this one https://www.google.com/maps I knew I may not have cellular reception so I brought a Garmin eTrex GPS as my field instrument along with extra batteries. I also brought a rugged Brunton compass in case my batteries all died. Some tips: Research how the area generally is during winter. Look up depths of snow in the area if available, any road closures, if available, where snow plows will plow in the event of a snow storm, take a look at the weather forecast, look up roads or trails you will use as escape routes during snow storms, etc. Having camped in the snow and have done a decent amount of winter sports like ice fishing, I know how to dress warm. Remember more layers is better. It’s better to have to remove layers than add some because you may not have any extra clothes to add. On the other hand, try not to break a sweat as that sweat will cool you down very quickly and may put you at risk of hypothermia. Make sure to bring And ALWAYS notify someone where you are going, when you are going, how long you will probably be, what you will be doing there, and if needed how you are getting there. FOR MORE TIPS refer to this handy guide by the Boy Scouts http://www.boyscouttrail.com/library/wintercampingtips.asp This article from Backpacker https://www.backpacker.com/skills/beginner/winter-camping And this article from Backcountry https://www.backcountry.com/explore/winter-camping-101-gear-tips-for-staying-warm
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