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Found 10 results

  1. Pleurocystites squamosus Billings, 1874

    From the album Invertebrates

    Pleurocystites squamosus Billings, 1874 Ordovician Bobcaygeon Formation Brechin Carden Ontario Canada
  2. Brechin Ontario 12/2/2017

    Here are my finds from the Verulam fm in Brechin Ontario. I had never been to an active quarry before so it was cool to see some of the machinery in addition to the unending supply of rocks to split. The temperature was amazing for December and we didn't get any rain. The very bottom of the quarry exposes the Bobcaygeon fm but it was flooded this time. @Malcolmt thanks for taking me to your spot! I remember what you said most of these are but will need reminding on a couple... 1. Pleurocystite - sadly missing the stalk and one of the arms but great to find one (Didn't know they existed until Saturday) A few of the plates fell off so I got a better look at the structure underneath before gluing it back together 2. Ceraurus trilobites 3. Isotelus trilobite 4. (forgot the name) partial trilobite Needs some cleaning but I'm afraid to damage it 5. Crinoid calyx (forgot the name) 6. Unknown cephalopod
  3. Mystery Ontario crinoid

    I've posted this on FB, but a certain expert is rarely on there. This was the crinoid I found a few weeks ago that had everyone stumped at the time. Now, after my preliminary prep and then an hour or so of Malcolm's magic, none of us are any the wiser as to what it is. It's from Ontario's Ordovician Bobcaygeon formation and doesn't match anything in the local reference book. It seems as though the plates at the bottom are fairly distinctive so does anyone have any clue as to a possible identification????
  4. Bakers dozen

    I had an amazing day up at my local spot collecting. There had been no new blasts or work at the quarry so I decided to scour the pit wall near the north end of a pond area near the road way down into the BobCaygeon formation material. Those who collect there will know the general area. . To my surprise I found very quickly a fortediscus edrioasteroid about 1 1/2 inches across. Will likely post something on it once it is prepped . I quickly noted that there was a crinoid layer about 3 inches above the layer the edrio was on and that there was a layer about 3 inches below the edrio that I could make out tail sections from pleurocystites. Well five hours later we had taken out probably a ton of rock between two of us.We had to remove about 4 feet of overburden to get to the first layer. If only we had brought a 6 foot pry bar we would have been golden. Regardless we excavated about 10 feet of wall going back about 2 1/2 feet. My reward an edrioasteroid, a cyclosystoid, a plate with two unknown at this point large crinoid calyxes, 13 cycstites (a combination of pleurocystites and amycystites). My friends reward an edrioasteroid and some crinoids.... We will be back next weekend with some heavier bars and my friend the excavating machine Kane...... Here is some pictures of the first one I prepped this morning.... We are blessed with some great collecting up here in Ontario Canada...... A number of you have been up to hunt with me over the years..... Hopefully more will make it in the future......
  5. Penn Dixie and Brechin

    If anyone is interested I will be taking / meeting some people from the Fossil Forum to go to Penn Dixie (Hamburg NY) on Friday June 2 and Brechen (about 1/12 hours north east of Toronto) on Saturday June 2. Please PM me if you are interested in joining us. Expect to work hard but come away with some nice goodies. Both localities are good for trilobites, Brechin also adds crinoids and cystoids to the mix as well as brachs and all those other things that I don't collect.
  6. Junk is not always junk

    Well I went out collecting on Saturday which turned out to be a cold and windy day. Got there after a two hour drive at about 7:45. Was too cold overall with the windchill, ended up leaving about 2:30, usually stay till about 4:00. I was pretty disapponted on the day as I only brought 5 pieces of matrix home with me. My two regular collecting buddes had no better luck (perhaps even less) than I did. One of them even gave up at 11:00 which was very unusual. For me, a crappy disarcticulated isotelus about 2 inches long but it had a nice cephalon with perfect eyes. A starfish which now that I look at it under a bright light and scope is probably a species I have never found before and two cute little hash plates with a bunch of cephalons from Flexi and calyptalaux on them. What actually made my day now that I have finished prepping it is a split that I did that showed the outline of a trilobite. In the field under cloudy conditions I thought it was perhaps a flexicalymene (nothing to get excited about) although it was fairly large and prone. Here is what it looked like before any prep. You can see why I was not too excited, it is not much to look at. I should have recognized in the field that this was a ceraurus with some potential but being a dull cloudy day it went into the bucket with little thought as to it being anything good. Well at 10 minutes into the prep using dolomite <325 mesh abrasive in a Comco air abrasion unit at 30 PSI with a .018 nozzle it was obvious that it was a ceraurus and if the pygidium was there under all the matrix then probably a fairly nice one. Usually the ceraurus found at this location are not buried in the matrix and are very flaky. Here is the bug at 10 minutes of prep. Definitely starting to show some potential
  7. Here is a highly inflated 3-dimensional Homocystites sp that was found this past Saturday May 14 on a very cold rainy day. The only bright note to the weather was that the wet matrix made it a bit easier to see the fossils. This is from the Ordovician Verulam formation and was found in a new blast pile from the previous 7 days. The homocystites typically found is Homocystits anatiformis which is found in the Cobourg formation. This species is typically a little smaller and is under review as potentially being a different species. Homocystites has an ovate theca and a fairly long stem (most missing in this specimen). It has a distinct pattern of radiating ridges on the plates that are very geometric in shape. It was prepped in about 5 minutes using low PSI (10) and dolomite in the 200 to 325 mesh range. No airscribing was needed. There is no restoration or repairs. The specimen is 36 mm long with a 27 mm theca (body) It is 11 mm wide and about 5 mm extends out of the matrix . I am considering finishing off the prep by completely exposing the specimen 360 degrees around, essentially making it a free standing on its stem specimen. I have seen a few prepped this way over the years and they are focal points in people display collections. What do you folks think should I take the chance and go for it.
  8. Here is an extremely rare association of a pretty much complete Ceraurus globulobatus trilobite and a ventral partial amecystite echinoderm from the Verulam formation of the Brechin area in Ontario , Canada. Over the next month or so I will be taking a number of forum members and clubs to this area to hunt. Hopefully there will be some nice finds that we can share. This specimen was found by splitting rock at the end of April 2016. We tend to find the best specimens at this locality by splitting rock. the shaley limestone does not weather well once exposed to the elements.The preservation observed is quite typical of the ceraurus from this locality. The exoskeleton is extremely thin and flakey. The preparation was done mostly with very low pressure (8-10 PSI) 320 mesh dolomite . Prep time was about 5 hours over quite a number of days. Some dilute vinac was used to help consolidate the exoskeleton which was just screaming to want to flake off. This is the only time I have ever found an amecystite associated with a complete ceraurus. They are both rare finds in their own right.
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