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Found 29 results

  1. Hey all! Hopefully the pics are decent enough. I found this odd looking rock at my feet while out fishing in a creek in South Eastern British Columbia in the East Kootenays region. Any insight or info would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance.
  2. Meet Cambroraster falcatus, the sediment-sifting ‘Roomba’ of the Cambrian This crustacean-like critter stalked the seas half a billion years ago. Katherine Wu, NOVA,, July 30, 2019 Moysiuk, J. and Caron, J.B., 2019. A new hurdiid from the Burgess Shale evinces the exploitation of Cambrian infaunal food sources. Proceedings of the Royal Society B, 286 (1908), p.20191079. Open access Proceedings of the Royal Society B PDF Brantford Lapidary and Mineral Society PDF Sun, Z., Zeng, H. and Zhao, F., Occurrence of the hurdiid radiodont Cambroraster in the middle Cambrian (Wuliuan) Mantou Formation of North China. Journal of Paleontology, 1(6), p.2. More research by Fangchen Zhao Liu, Y., Lerosey-Aubril, R., Audo, D., Zhai, D., Mai, H. and Ortega-Hernández, J., 2020. Occurrence of the eudemersal radiodont Cambroraster in the early Cambrian Chengjiang Lagerstätte and the diversity of hurdiid ecomorphotypes. Geological Magazine, pp.1-7. Open access Pates, S., Botting, J.P., McCobb, L.M. and Muir, L.A., 2020. A miniature Ordovician hurdiid from Wales demonstrates the adaptability of Radiodonta. Royal Society Open Science, 7(6), p.200459. Open access Yours, Paul H.
  3. Hi all, hope everyone is safe and healthy in these troubled times. What a great time to go over your collections and plan for the next trip. Found some info regarding fossils (Geo report) and petrified wood found near Stemwinder Park, Pickard Creek area between Princeton (fossil mecca) and Hedley B.C. Anyone know of the site? Example from someones find, undisclosed spot. We were going thru that area for work, now cancelled, so can't really justify the exploratory trip, but love to dream. . Just noticed the auctions! Must check here more often!! If you must foray out on rock trips, keep your adventures moderate! (I am a search and rescue first responder). Roweness
  4. Petrified wood?

    I found an odd piece of rock when my apartment has it's second floor garden soil removed. My neighbor said that it looks like petrified wood but I just want to make sure. Thanks.
  5. British Columbia’s Tyrannosaur

    Hi I have a question, has there been anything on the Tumbler Ridge Tyrannosaur? And have they identified it in any way yet? Thank you!!
  6. Hi I decided to make this since the new Tyrannosaur from Alberta’s Foremost Formation, Thanatotheristes deerootorum has just been named and described. Enjoy!! Tyrannosaur bearing Formations in Canada: Formations in Alberta but most of the Formations on my list are I Alberta anyway. Horseshoe Canyon Formation 74-68 million years ago, Alberta: Albertosaurus sarcophagus, possibly Daspletosaurus sp. but no compelling evidence so far. Oldman Formation 78.2-77 million years ago, Alberta: Daspletosaurus torosus, Gorgosaurus sp. Foremost Formation 80.5-78.2 million years ago, Alberta: Thanatotheristes deerootorum, possibly Gorgosaurus sp. Milk River Formation 84.5-83.4 million years ago, Alberta: Tyrannosaur. indet could be a species of Thanatotheristes, possibly Gorgosaurus sp. Scollard Formation 68-66 million years ago, Alberta: T. rex, possibly Nanotyrannus Formations in British Columbia: Wapiti Formation 76.8-70 million years ago, Alberta, British Columbia: Unknown Albertosaurinae either Gorgosaurus or Albertosaurus, possibly Daspletosaurus sp. Tumbler Ridge 135-74 million years ago, British Columbia: Tyrannosaur. indet Formations in Saskatchewan and Manitoba: Dinosaur Park Formation 77-75.5 million years ago, Alberta, Saskatchewan: Daspletosaurus sp., Gorgosaurus libratus Frenchmen Formation, 68-66 million years ago, Saskatchewan: T. rex, possibly Nanotyrannus Bearpaw Formation 75-72 million years ago, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba: Daspletosaurus sp. one specimen from Daspletosaurus sp. that drowned. For now these are all the Tyrannosaurs known from Canada. No Eastern Tyrannosaurs in Canada yet either but maybe someday. I will also update this and add as more information comes available.
  7. Olenellus or Mesonacis?

    From the Eager Fm near Fort Steele, BC, Lower Cambrian. Which one is this? @piranha Sorry for the poor photo, I'll try again if necessary. It is no more than 2cm wide.
  8. First fossil dragonflies from B.C. identified and named Simon Fraser University, November 04, 2019 http://www.sfu.ca/sfunews/stories/2019/11/first-fossil-dragonflies-from-bc-identified-and-named.html Fifty-million-year-old dragonfly species that once flew in B.C. identified for first time. Identifying dragonflies from fossils involves mapping their distinctive wings and comparing the results to species living today. By Kevin Griffen, Vancouver Sun, November 4, 2019 https://vancouversun.com/news/local-news/fifty-million-year-old-dragonfly-species-that-once-flew-in-b-c-identified-for-first-time The open access paper is: Archibald, S.B. and Cannings, R.A., 2019. Fossil dragonflies (Odonata: Anisoptera) from the early Eocene Okanagan Highlands, western North America. The Canadian Entomologist, pp.1-34. https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/canadian-entomologist/article/fossil-dragonflies-odonata-anisoptera-from-the-early-eocene-okanagan-highlands-western-north-america/74A59170711807272E35236BA309AC9A Related paper is: Archibald, S.B., Greenwood, D.R., Smith, R.Y., Mathewes, R.W., and Basinger, J.F. 2011a. Great Canadian Lagerstätten 1. Early Eocene Lagerstätten of the Okanagan Highlands (British Columbia and Washington State). Geoscience Canada, 38:155–164. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/262485004_Great_Canadian_Lagerstatten_1_Early_Eocene_Lagerstatten_of_the_Okanagan_Highlands_British_Columbia_and_Washington_State Yours, Paul H.
  9. Fossils?

    I'm very new to fossil collecting and would like to check if these rocks are fossils. My apartment was built in the 80s and is currently undergoing massive construction due to the rapidly deteriorating structure of the building. I was given permission by strata to collect a few rocks from the discard pile and I came up with these. https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1l7M5NQVfFNXUXIxwqfopnE_wnq1kCiijePd5yEZRyRI/edit?usp=sharing
  10. McAbee Fossil Beds site ready to reopen to the public Site was taken over by the Province and closed to the public in July 2012, Barbara, Roden, The Ashcroft-Cache creek Journal. June 11, 2019 https://www.ashcroftcachecreekjournal.com/news/mcabee-fossil-beds-site-ready-to-reopen-to-the-public/ https://www.ashcroftcachecreekjournal.com/our-town/group-is-working-to-reopen-mcabee-fossil-beds-site/ "Fossil Feather" - actually about McAbee Fossil Site to re-open to the public at the end of June 2019, ARCHEA, Musing in Natural history https://fossilhuntress.blogspot.com/2018/08/eocene-fossil-feather.html According to the above web site: " McAbee will re-open to the public at 10AM on June 21, 2019..." McAbee Fossil Beds - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/McAbee_Fossil_Beds Yours, Paul H.
  11. Fossil from Marble Canyon could become a provincial symbol British Columbians can vote for a provincial fossil, with a local candidate in the running, Barbara Roden, Nov. 7, 2018. https://www.ashcroftcachecreekjournal.com/news/fossil-from-marble-canyon-could-become-a-provincial-symbol/ Designating a British Columbia Provincial Fossil https://www2.gov.bc.ca/gov/content/industry/natural-resource-use/land-use/fossil-management/designating-a-provincial-fossil https://www2.gov.bc.ca/assets/gov/farming-natural-resources-and-industry/natural-resource-use/land-water-use/crown-land/fossil-management/fossil_candidate_map-web.pdf British Columbia Provincial Fossil Candidates (August 2018) https://www2.gov.bc.ca/assets/gov/farming-natural-resources-and-industry/natural-resource-use/land-water-use/crown-land/fossil-management/fossil_candidate_table-web.pdf Yours, Paul H.
  12. Hi there, Posting here after hours and hours of research and not being able to find any answers. In around 1974, my mother was walking up a small river on or near the border between southern Alberta and southern BC, Canada, and she stumbled across what looked like a smooth, polished rock. She picked it up, and realized it was a rather large canine tooth from an animal. She thought it was a bear tooth, which I don't agree with - doesn't seem to be the right shape. She brought it to a jeweller and had it capped with silver and made into a pendant. The jeweller said it was the hardest thing he'd ever drilled into and broke several bits trying... The curvature and strange twist of the tooth have thrown me off in my search, but I have a suspicion that its potentially from a large Mountain Lion, or possibly a large Wolf. Any help here would be greatly appreciated! Attached are photos. Thank you!
  13. RBCM donation from Leahy and Langevin

    The families of one of our late members John Leahy and his friend Dave Langevin have donated their large collection to the Royal BC Museum: https://www.timescolonist.com/news/local/royal-b-c-museum-scores-fossil-gift-for-the-ages-1.23411022
  14. Any sites in British Columbia?

    Hello guys! So at this new school my new friend Brad heard about my fossil hunting trips in Florida, and he wanted to have a go. This Christmas he will be going to British Columbia to visit his relatives. I want to ask, are there any fossil hunting sites in British Columbia and is taking them away legal? Thanks. Ho Lam PS. He will be staying very close to the American border, near the coast. He told me his parents drove him to Seattle. So I imagine he won't be far from the US, and might want to know some sites there as well.
  15. Dried mushrooms or fossils

    Not sure what I've come across. Not even sure what this type of mushroom is called. These were stored away in my parents basement. The box is labelled British Columbia... Is there any way to tell if these are just dried or actual fossils?
  16. Fossil hunter with a taste for trilobites is foraging in the Rockies. University of Calgary paleontologist uses his tongue as a guide to finding specimens CBC News Jul y31, 2017 http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/calgary/fossil-trilobite-rockies-banff-yoho-stanley-glacier-1.4229117 Yours, Paul H.
  17. Orygmaspis jenkinsi

    My absolute favorite trilobite.
  18. Chiropractor discovers BC's first dino skull. Looks like a Tyrannosaurid. Pretty good find while on holiday http://www.cbc.ca/amp/1.4158748
  19. Ancient arthropod with gnarly claws discovered in Burgess Shale Calgary Sun - ‎April 26, 2017‎ http://www.calgarysun.com/2017/04/26/ancient-anthropod-with-gnarly-claws-discovered-in-burgess-shale Paleontologists identify new 507-million-year-old sea creature with can opener-like pincers, University of Toronto, April 26, 2017‎ https://www.utoronto.ca/news/ouch-u-t-paleontologists-identify-508-million-year-old-sea-creature-can-opener-pincers https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/04/170426131024.htm This 508-million-year-old sea predator had a remarkable mouth Washington Post - ‎April 26, 2017‎ https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/speaking-of-science/wp/2017/04/26/this-508-million-year-old-sea-predator-had-a-remarkable-mouth/?utm_term=.770085e2838c The paper is: Aria, C., and J.-B. Caron, 2017, Burgess Shale fossils illustrate the origin of the mandibulate body plan. Nature (2017) doi:10.1038/nature22080 https://www.nature.com/nature/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/nature22080.html Yours, Paul H.
  20. Hello All, I am not only new to this group, but I am new to fossil/rock hunting . I live somewhere , where there was much ice age melt glacial activity and I have hundreds of fossils. at the risk of sounding insane, I found this one in my pocket when I woke up one morning . Have others similar to it, but no idea how I came to be in possession of this one in particular. Any help is appreciated... I have other angles of the same, but I am unsure of how to shrink the file size of the photo. Thank you
  21. Orygmaspis sp. nov.

    From the album More Fossils

    Stunning example of the asaphid trilobite Orygmaspis sp. nov. collected near Cranbrook, British Columbia by Chris Jenkins. This new species will be officially described in B.D.E Chatterton's upcoming monograph on the new Upper Cambrian localities. Specimen is rough 1.3cm long.
  22. Fossil ID

    What is this? Petrified frog eggs? The spot are dark green!
  23. Street, Peter John, 1966, Trilobite zones in the Murray Range, Pine Pass map-area, British Columbia, Unpublished Master of Science thesis, University of British Columbia. https://elk.library.ubc.ca/handle/2429/36558 http://circle.ubc.ca/bitstream/id/130223/UBC_1967_A6_7 S8.pdf Yours, Paul H.
  24. On occasion I'm asked about collecting regulations in Ontario and other provinces. This got me thinking what are the regulations across Canada. Listed below are various regulations pertaining to fossil collecting in different provinces across Canada. The information is merely an amalgamation of different sources with the sources linked or stated. I do not have the legal training to state whether fossil collecting is legal or not in each province but have put forth information that can help one come to a conclusion. Collecting fossils in Canada Fossils hold a great deal of scientific significance and can be the key to uncovering the lost linkage between ancestral organisms providing answers to modern day life. As a student geologist I work with beautiful specimens that have been properly catalogued for scientific research. As a member of a local geology club I have been searching for fossils for many years. Collecting fossils is a fun way to enjoy the outdoors but it is important that proper cataloguing and information be obtained when collecting. It is also important to understand local laws when collecting. In Canada every province has a different perspective on collecting fossils, ranging from provinces where collecting in forbidden to others with limited regulations. Ontario Sourced from the Fossil Forum: “Ontario is one of the less restrictive Canadian provinces. In speaking to one of the Paleobiology curators from the Royal Ontario Museum, you can take a fossil out of the province without a permit, if it is valued under $500 Canadian.” Source: http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/46868-fossil-collecting-laws-and-crossing-the-border/ Ontario has been doing a good job at promoting the province as a great source for recreational geology. For more information on recreational geology check out: http://ohto.ca/wp-content/uploads/Informational-Resources_FINAL.pdf British Columbia Source from the British Columbia government website: “Amateur collectors bring many important discoveries to the attention of professional paleontologists. The contribution of amateur collectors is becoming increasingly important for scientific discovery as the number of professional paleontologists in the field decreases. Recreational or amateur collecting is restricted to the collection of small amounts of the types of fossils that are common at the site. When unusual or rare specimens are discovered or when small quantities of fossils are present at a site, amateur collectors are encouraged to assist by reporting the findings to determine if they are significant. Under the Ministry of Lands, Parks and Housing Act, the Minister has the authority to grant a general permission to the public to collect fossils, and to affix terms and conditions to that permission. Until the Minister’s formal permission is provided, minor collecting may continue as long as the amounts are small, the fossils are common at the site, the fossils are kept for personal use, and are not sold, or removed from BC. Exceptions to this general permission to collect fossils from the surface are where the land is in a park or protected area, or where exclusive rights have been issued to another party. The Crown retains ownership of fossils collected by amateur collectors. Amateur collectors may retain possession of the fossils as long as they do not sell them or export them from the Province without permission. The permission to collect for recreational purposes does not apply to the removal of vertebrate skeletal fossils or fossil tracks. The removal of these fossils must be undertaken by a qualified person holding a research permit. Guidelines will be developed and made publicly available to assist amateur collectors in following the guidelines relating to quantity and type of fossils that are allowed to be gathered.” Source: http://www2.gov.bc.ca/gov/content/employment-business/natural-resource-use/land-use/fossil-management/collection-and-use Alberta Sourced from the Royal Tyrrell Museum: “If you live in Alberta, and legally surface collected, you may keep the material as a custodian of the fossil, although ownership remains within the Province of Alberta. The Historical Resources Act prohibits removal of fossils from the province without a Disposition Certificate issued by the Government of Alberta.” Surface collected: the act of collecting a fossil that requires no ad (no use of tools) and can be picked up freely. Source: http://www.tyrrellmuseum.com/research/fossils_law.htm Manitoba Reading The Heritage Resources Act from Manitoba it appears that all fossils, which fall under “Heritage object,” are protected and collecting is not permitted. Sourced from Manitoba Laws The Heritage Resource Act: Section 51 - “No person shall destroy, damage or alter any heritage object, whether or not the person is the owner thereof, or any human remains.” Section 52 – “No person shall remove a heritage object from the province, whether or not the person is the owner thereof, except pursuant to a heritage permit and in accordance with such terms and conditions as may be prescribed by the minister and set out in or attached to the heritage permit.” Source: http://web2.gov.mb.ca/laws/statutes/ccsm/h039-1e.php Saskatchewan Sourced from The Heritage Property Act: Section 66.1 – Ownership of vertebrate fossils is by the crown. Section 66.2 (7) “No person shall buy, sell, offer for sale, trade, or otherwise dispose of or remove from Saskatchewan any archaeological object or palaeontological object found in or taken from land in Saskatchewan without the written permission of the minister.” Section 67 appears as though the act of searching for and removing fossils requires a permit. Source: http://www.qp.gov.sk.ca/documents/English/Statutes/Statutes/H2-2.pdf Quebec Sourced from Cultural Property Act: Looking over the Cultural Property Act it appears as though Quebec has the most ambiguous rules pertaining to paleontological items. There is numerous use of “Archaeological property” but under the definition section there is no mention of fossils or palaeontological objects concluding that this wouldn’t apply. Typing in palaeontology or fossils, no record shows up. Sources: http://www2.publicationsduquebec.gouv.qc.ca/dynamicSearch/telecharge.php?type=2&file=/B_4/B4_A.html New Brunswick Sourced from New Brunswick government website: “The importance of our palaeontological record is officially recognized in the Heritage Conservation Act. Formally asserting provincial ownership of all palaeontological objects, it stipulates that any fossils discovered in the Province must not be destroyed or removed from sites where they are found, without the required permit.” “Any activity carried out for the purpose of obtaining and documenting data on fossils, including excavation and/or removal, is defined by the Act as palaeontological field research. Exacting standards must be met under any permit authorizing such research in regard to observation, collection, preservation and recording techniques.” “Individuals who wish to study fossils, but who are not considered professionals, may also apply for field research permits. To qualify, they must demonstrate basic understanding of palaeontology, as well as appropriate knowledge of current collection and reporting techniques. The relevant application form is accessible here. Enquiries from all those interested in such palaeontological research in New Brunswick should contact the New Brunswick Museum.” Source: http://www2.gnb.ca/content/gnb/en/departments/thc/heritage/content/heritage_conservationact/palaeontological.html Nova Scotia Sourced from the Nova Scotia Government website: Nova Scotia is very similar to New Brunswick. Collecting fossils in Nova Scotia is only to be carried out by those with a “Heritage Research Permit.” This permit allows you to search for fossils, document, and photograph. Collected specimens are to be deposited at the Nova Scotia Museum. Source: https://cch.novascotia.ca/exploring-our-past/special-places/palaeontology-permits-and-guidelines Prince Edward Island Sourced from Government of P.E.I. Under the Heritage Places Protection Act fossils fall within “historical resource” as palaeontological. Going through the act I was unable to see any distinct mentioning of how the law applies to collecting and maintaining of fossils. Source: http://www.gov.pe.ca/law/statutes/pdf/h-03_1.pdf Newfoundland Sourced from the Geological Survey of Canada, also Natural Resources: It appears as though the Geological Survey has a good section describing various collecting tips indicating that collecting is permitted in Newfoundland. I did not come across any regulations pertaining to the removal of fossils from Newfoundland. “When looking for fossils, it important to remember that complete specimens are rarely found. While complete specimens are better for scientific description in paleontological studies, even a poorly preserved fossil fragment is often enough for field identification and dating of rocks. Fossils can be found by picking through weathered rubble along cliffs, beaches, streams, quarries, road and railway cuts and rock outcrops. Finding them in place, however, requires a careful layer-by-layer examination of the enclosing sedimentary rocks with a hammer and chisel. Many Newfoundland fossils are quite small and easily overlooked. It is wise, therefore, to have a magnifying glass or a hand lens for checking favorable rock types. Good eye protection is essential, preferably in the form of safety glasses. A good geological hammer with either a chisel or a point made of well tempered, shatter-free metal is advisable. A stone chisel and small sledge hammer are also useful. Broken fossil specimens can be repaired in the field with nontoxic white glues such as Lepage Bond Fast. Modelling clay, liquid latex (such as Lewiscraft rubbertex compound or ETI Mold Builder) or plaster can be used to obtain a replica of an otherwise nonretrievable specimen. Fossils which can't be collected may also be photographed or sketched. After collection, all specimens ought to be securely wrapped in tissue or newspaper and then placed in a well labelled bag to prevent damage during transportation. It is also a good idea to note the location of the fossil collection on a map and/or in a fieldbook in order to make it easier to find again if the need arises.” “Note: Fossil collecting is illegal in National and Provincial Parks and Ecological Reserves, unless you have special permits.” Source: http://www.nr.gov.nl.ca/mines&en/geosurvey/education/fossils.stm IMPORTANT: on the Department of Natural Resources there is a link to a new legislation, “Significant Fossils.” Source: http://www.releases.gov.nl.ca/releases/2012/tcr/0109n01.htm Nunavut Sourced from Government of Canada website: Searching for and collecting fossils in Nunavut are similar to those of Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and Manitoba. In order to collect fossils from a “palaeontological site,” as defined by the act as being any site with fossils, one must obtain a permit. Once obtaining a permit, a series of guidelines are laid out to produce a formal report which will be submitted to the Government of Nunavut. Specimens collected in the field are to be deposited to the minister of the government of Nunavut responsible for culture and heritage before March 31 of the year following the permit issue. March 31st seems to be a popular date amongst government organizations when fossils are to be deposited. Source: http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/regulations/SOR-2001-220/FullText.html Northwest Territories Sourced from the Northern News Services: Based on the article linked below it appears as though there is no regulations on fossil in the Northwest Territories, although it appears as though researchers are thinking it is a good idea. Source: http://www.nnsl.com/frames/newspapers/2014-01/jan27_14fos.html Yukon Sourced from the Yukon Government website: “You are required under the Historic Resources Act to tell the Yukon Palaeontology Program about any fossils found in the Yukon. Any fossils found on settlement lands are to be reported to the appropriate First Nation. The Historic Resources Act applies everywhere in Yukon except in National Parks. If you find a fossil, please leave it where it is, record its location, take a photo if possible, and contact the Yukon Palaeontology program or appropriate First Nation. If you find a fossil in the Yukon, you may be allowed to keep it in your possession, but the Yukon Government or First Nation owns it. If you find a fossil on private land, the land owner takes custody of it unless some other agreement has been made. The Yukon First Nation government will set terms and conditions to protect the fossil.” “The Heritage Resources Act prohibits the collection of fossils without a permit. If you are from a qualified research institute and are interested in collecting fossils in the Yukon you require a Scientists and Explorers Research License. Please contact the Yukon Palaeontology Program for further information.” Source: http://www.tc.gov.yk.ca/faq_palaeontology.html Additional sources: Canada Wide General Information http://www.pc.gc.ca/eng/docs/r/pfa-fap/notes.aspx
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