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Found 62 results

  1. Bryozoa Clump prepped

    Hello gang, This is one of the first fossils I prepped a long time ago. It may not be the best job, but I still like it. I know it Bryozoa, but not much else. It was an unprepped flea market find. Any ideas?
  2. Bryozoa

    Any ideas about the type of Bryozoa in the left rock? I found several of these long string types this past weekend in the Devonian shale at Beltzville State Park in PA. Very different from the other bryozoa I have found there in the past. Thanks, Mike
  3. Hello, I think the rocks below contain at least two different species of bryozoa fossils. Is it possible to identify them by name? If not, would better specimens with more visible detail make that possible? Some, as in the first pic appear as b/w, narrow lacy (sometimes striped) leaf like shapes. Others, as in the second pic, look more animal like, sometimes "hairy", but sometimes are just wide blobs with no visible detail. I'd really appreciate this forum's fossil experts superior knowledge. Thanks in advance.
  4. Huge Colony Found

    Atactotoechus fruticosus Took me about 12 hours to reassemble this Bryozoan colony. Found Tuesday 8/27. The majority of the colony is very nice with all the fronds complete to tips. Its getting heavy with every new piece added. I was lucky that most of the colony was in shale and preserved from weathering. Thank you and Happy Collecting. Moscow fm., Kashong member, New York. 11" x 8" and 5+ lbs.
  5. Hi, a few days ago I went on my first ever fossil hunting trip to Eben-Emael, a Limestone quarry in Belgium that dates to the Maastrichtian and is part from the type location (the historical ENCI quarry being only a 3,5 km to the north. The trip was orginized by the BVP (Belgische Vereniging voor Paleontologie) and a short report of the trip with phot's and some of the finds can be found in this topic by @Manticocerasman who I was lucky enough to tag along with, cause I doubt I would have found many mention worthy fossils without the guidance of Kevin. But since I am into microfossils I decided to collect some samples of the limestone without the obvious fossils home to later be able to look for microfossils as it should be quite rich. I think I have around 1 - 3 kg of matrix left to look for microfossils. But I have never myself dissolved matrix, and although it seems easy, I don't want to make any mistakes. During the trip they advised me on two different approaches, depending on what kind of fossils I wanted to find. One approach was dissolving in water and the other in vinegar, but now the seeming obvious question. How exactly do I do that? Should I just take a bucket of a glass, fill it halfway with said liquids and just wait? Or should I use a sieve and lay the block there so only fossils remain in the sieve and the rest goes to the buttom. Does the limestone just dissolve or does some kind of putty residu where the microfossils will be in? If so, how to properly remove the fossils when you pour out the liquids without pouring out the fossils? I know I have many questions and some might be very obvious and straigh-forward, but I really haven't done this before and I would like to do it the right way from start. So thanks in advance for any tips & tricks, I would really appreciate any help!
  6. Some of my collection

    Hello gang, As promised this is where I will share specimens from my personal collection, my grandfather's collection, and the collection that was donated to the university I work for. The latter is interesting as it is literally boxes of rock and fossils, with no information and my university does not have a geology or paleontology department. I'll be updating it every so often. Enjoy! NOTE: Some of the donated items have old school "labels" on them. If you see initials or such that you recognize, please PM me, as I am doing my best to properly catalog them properly as part of my job!
  7. Fenestella? Bryozoa of some type?

    Tonight I found a new limestone ledge sitting 6 inches from a stream water level. My father and I started hammering away at the shallow edges and removed a ton of interesting specimens. While there were some nice cephalopods, lots of brachiopods and clams, this piece caught my eye. I’ve read about Bryozoa and I’ve seen similar things on fossil plates. I believe I remember seeing pieces of them in limestone while digging, but never anything big. So, is it a Fenestella? Or something else? I’ve never found one worth showing. I saw a species list for it and it is very long.
  8. Texas Fossils Identification

    Hey guys, I was wondering if ya'll could help me identify these. All were found in Texas to the best of my knowledge. I have what I believe to be the phyla of each but I'm not totally sure so take it with a grain of salt. Photo 1: Bryozoa Photo 2: Hemichordata Photo 3: Bryozoa Photo 4: Chordata, this is obviously a shark tooth I think but I'm unsure of the species
  9. Back in May 2017, I brought back some nice fossil plates from Ohio, I believe Ordovician in age. First photo is plate 1. Next photo (of plate 1) shows a close-up of parts of the trilobite Isotelus, next photo - a nautiloid (unknown species), next photo shows valves of the brachiopod Strophomera, along with many bryozoan fossils. Next photo is a close-up of crinoids on plate 3. (Not much on plate 2). And last photo is of quite a few crinoids on plate 4.
  10. Day Two ; Locality One (or Six if you include Day One) Black Sahara, South of Erfoud 20th February 2019 Well this is where things really get interesting, so stick with this thread as there are dozens of photos of fossils coming up. Looks at the tags if you want clues. I was up bright and early and wandered out at about 7 am to watch the sun rise over the still mighty Erg Chebbi dunes. And as night's candles were burnt out and jocund day stood tiptoe over the misty duney tops, the chaps came to join me and managed lots of photos. Here's one, if you would like to see more, I'm busy posting a kazillion of 'em under the Nature Photography thread.
  11. Day One; Locality Four Tizi N'Talghaumt Pass 19th February 2019 This pass runs through a slightly lower section of the eastern High Atlas along the course of the Ziz River which snakes its way right through to Algeria. These wonderful trees are common in the Sub Sahara, but I don't know what they are. We stopped by the altitude sign overlooking the Aoufous Oasis on the River Ziz. Whilst wifey and Abdulla admired the huge palmerie oasis, one of the largest in Morocco, Anouar and I nipped across the road to see what we could find :
  12. Okay, I left this specimen where I could find it in the future, but the sun and atmosphere was such I could not get a crisp photo or achieve a decent zoom. It almost appears bryozoan in nature, but the regular spacing and rounded conic shapes might be something someone has seen before?
  13. MIOCENE ISLAND

    I should have posted this long ago, but am going to do it now, in the hope that then it is behind me and then I can look forward to future adventures. Due to ill health from 2012, finances and responsibilities, I have been unable to do any personal collecting except for this one wonderful trip which reminded me that I've still got it in me. In October 2016 wifey and I were relaxing in a bar on Tarifa beach, the southernmost point in mainland Europe, located at the south-western corner of Spain, opposite Tangier, the two Pillars of Hercules that are the entrance to the Mediterranean from the Atlantic. I noticed an island connected to the mainland by a man made causeway. it had a lighthouse on and some ruins, so I thought that being only a little distance, I'd go and explore. Here is the location, to the left of the picture is the Mediterranean, to the right, the Atlantic. There are no more location pics, I'm afraid, as wifey can't be prised away from bars very easily and she has the camera phone, but the island was closed to visitors without a guide or permit as it's a place for protected birds, the lighthouse and Napoleonic fortress ruins. But to the left of the causeway was a small beach with exposed rocks and even a little notice board explaining that the rocks were a Miocene oyster bed 5 to 10 million years old. My interest was aroused so I clambered about the beach and found the fossils in the next post. Very pleased with myself, I was, especially as I had no tools and the rock was really seriously hard. Had to use other bits of rock as hammer and chisels. And my breathing held out pretty well. I can still do this! Life's Good.
  14. I found what appears to be a small sandstone on a Tampa Bay beach in Florida. It's about 1 inch by 1 1/4 inch. After looking at it under magnification I saw unusual vein-like strands on these raised tanner bumps on both sides. What is it? Is it a fossil? Thanks Guys! Front view angles
  15. TaylMcKinn Cretaceous Bryozoa from the Campanian and Maastrichtian of the Atlantic and Gulf Coastal Plains, United States Paul D. Taylor & Frank K. McKinney Scripta Geologica, 132: 1-346, 141 pls, 5 figs, 2 tables, Leiden SIZE:about 10,5 Mb Nice to see a species named after Brood!!
  16. moostierchen(BRYOZOA)mosdiertjes

    i1540-7063-043-01-0087.pdf INTEGR. COMP. BIOL., 43:87–98 (2003) Complexity Generated by Iteration of Hierarchical Modules in Bryozoa STEVEN J. HAGEMAN RECOMMENDED(times n) SKIP this one if theoretical paleobiology is not your thing
  17. Mesozoic moss animals

    pauldt Colony growth strategies, dormancy and repair in some Late Cretaceous encrusting bryozoans: insights into the ecology of the Chalk seabed Paul D. Taylor, & Emanuela Di Martino & Silviu O. Martha Palaeobiodiversity and Palaeoenvironments pp 1–22 First Online: 07 December 2018 size: about 18 MB Given the status of the first author: I wouldn't exactly say "MUST-read",but when you love the bryozoa(and let's face it ,who doesn't*?),and you have some spare time.. *useless asterisk Corrigendum/apology/whateffah*:The above is misleading in the sense that people might underestimate the awe in which I hold Paul Taylor. Certainly one of the great bryozoologist of this century post(=after everyboday has reacted)post
  18. Borg!

    Folke Borg On the body wall of Bryozoa Journal of Cell Science/1926/s2-70 *TAKES a deep BOW* very little of this great bryozoologist can be found online. Which is disappointing,he said ,with a great feeling for understatement borgfolke{jcelsciontogeindispensabodywall1926bryozo1923(watersharmervigeliu)phylog.pdf recommended If anyone knows of any other accessible(non paywalled)online pieces by him,please tell me (edit NOT counting his piece on the recent dulcaquicole bryozoa of the Sahara*) *seemingly: Fredericella and Membranipora
  19. Trilobite - Morocco

    I picked this up at a market stall in Fes this week. No information other than it is from South of me in Morocco. Because I thought it was sweet and it has a cracking bryozoan around the eyes (which are sadly broken) I think it looks like Devonian matrix and is a Phacopid? Phacops speculator? It is about 6 cm long. (straight line, not including the curve over) @piranha And anyone got any ideas re the bryozoa?
  20. intriguing Sarmatian bryozoan

    pauldtayontoanbryozLBB_0038_1_0055-0064.pdf About 0,71 MB Recommended ,not in the least because of the stature of the first author. Short,well illustrated,informative Taylor et al:Unusual Early Development in A cyclostome bryozoan from the Ukrainian Miocene Linzer Biol.Beitr.38/1,2006
  21. bryozoans

    Two colonies found today in central Poland. Erratic boulders, so no data available other than this: Ordovician or Silurian, Baltica. Is there an easy way to distinguish between various 'monticuliporid' taxa actually placed in different trepostome families? Smaller specimen:
  22. Hippoporidra edax

    Mutualistic relationship between bryozoa and hermit crab inhabited gastropod shell.
  23. Tubular Bryozoan?

    I had posted this piece in General Fossil Discussion area since it had my first trilobite on it. Someone message me saying that they thought it may be an echinoderm. The person said “that looks like an echinoderm ("calcichordate")fragment. Possibly the M1-M4 of a stylophoran(marginale elements)” I thought it was a form of bryozoan. However, I do not know the Mississippian or any Carboniferous fossils very well. So I’m willing to admit complete ignorance. Can anyone ID it and educate me as what it is? I found it in Siloam Springs, Arkansas in an area which Mancos identified as the Pitkin Limestone, which is Mississippian. ROCKD ID’d the area as St. Joe’s limestone. This is the item in question. I can’t say that I have seen segmented Bryozoa. The segments aren’t uniform in size. Although, I’m not sure if the segments are endemic or an artifact of being broken. I believe they are breaks. It is about 1.25 inches long and 7 mm wide. Just a slightly zoomed in pic of the same thing. A pic of the end. This is is a pic of the back side of the other side of the plate and other end of it, where there is a cross section honeycomb looking view. Your thoughts and comments would would be greatly appreciated. Kim
  24. Well, I found my very first trilobite!!! I just had to share my excitement with people who can appreciate hunting for something elusive and then finally finding it. With the family I get a polite “Oh, that’s nice.” I can actually tell it’s a trilobite. I’m pretty sure I’ve found pieces of others in the past, but they were so mangled it’s hard for me to be certain what I have. Anyway, I’m not sure if it is whole or not. I am still cleaning it up. Funny thing is I found it in my own home town of Siloam Springs, Arkansas of all places where I lived while in high school. My family still lives there. It was only about 1/2 mile from my parent’s house. Crazy. I found it on a micro hash plate of sorts next to Bryozoa that I had picked up from a new home construction site. I don’t know about anyone else, but hunting in the middle of a nice quiet little neighborhood feels a bit like dumpster diving. People watch and give you odd looks. I was looking at the Bryozoa with 10x magnification when I found the little trilobite. I absolutely was not expecting that. It’s so tiny I can barely see it with the 10x. LOL But hey a first trilobite is a first trilobite even if I can’t take pics of it and show it to anyone. It seems like the counter equivalent of a tall fish tale only it’s a microscopic trilobite tale. “It was this big/tiny . . .” I think there may be 2 others on the plate as well, but not quite as small. Not that you can see it, but it is a little white speck inside the red circle below. The Bryozoa thing is maybe 1.25 inches long and 7 mm wide. The little trilobite isn’t even 1 mm long. All I can see is the tale end. There are crinoid segments all over this piece too that are also microscopic. Some less than 1 mm. I found it in NW Arkansas in the Pitkin Limestone, St. Joe member possibly, which is Mississippian. The Bryozoan piece is actually much prettier than the pics portrays it to be. It’s all sparkly. It’s crystalized.
  25. Shell Shocked at Matoaka

    Calvert Cliffs has been a popular place lately and I hesitated to post one more trip report this week, but as I look for other kinds of things, I decided I'd share. I have been told on several occasions that the cabins aren't worth much. All they have are shells. as @WhodamanHD put it, "If you like snails, go to Matoaka." Well, yes. That's why I love it so much. Last year I documented at 50 species of mollusk from one spot on the beach, and that's just what I was able to bring home! I returned to the for Independence Day week. and the cliffs did not disappoint! A landslide so recent that there was no sign yet of rain erosion stretched out into the bay just north of the beach. It's a treacherous place to linger and to traverse, but I was banking on the fact that this part off the cliff had done it's falling for now -- I hoped. In other spots, trees dangled precariously over the cliffs. If you ever doubted that this can fall on you, remember this -- I'm pretty sure that the sound of thunder I herd the night we got in was the landslide I worked all week. It only rumbled once, on a windless, rainless evening. The innumerable fallen trees I had to climb over to get to my favorite spot tell the rest of the ongoing story. If you feel a bit of gravel fall own your head, RUN. You were warned. That said, we all know this is an addiction, so I se too work with a screw driver most of the week, chipping away at the loose material at the base that was sitting in the nice, cool water most of the day. On a blisteringly hot day, there's no place I'd rather be! The fall exposed all kinds of things that most folks think I'm a bit silly to carve out - clams, snails, bryozoa, brachiopods, but I love the biodiversity of the place. I chipped away at big blocks during the day, until it got too hot, the tide too low and the snack supply diminished. I met the wonderfully astute @FossilsAnonymous out there and loved getting to talk to a fellow hunter who didn't think me crazy for chasing after punky sea shells. I wrapped everything in aluminum foil and carried them in a metal pail for the mile or so trek back to the cabin, where I had my make-shift lab set up on the porch. That's where the real work began. The day before we left was blustery after successive storm cells moved in and out the night before. The beach was totally rearranged from wave action. The bay spewed forth all kinds of things. My daughter and I walked the beach to find whatever had washed ashore. I found 3 Ecphora snails sitting on the beach right at the entrance. A little further down, we met another forum member, whose name I cannot find now in my tag options HI! We spoke for about 10 minutes while she and my daughter dove into the lapping waves to grab the shark teeth that washed up at our feet. How they saw them is beyond me, but they must have collected 30 between them while we were standing there! It's taken me a week since I got home to unwrap and clean most of what I brought home. It took me an entire afternoon of diving into half a dozen texts to identify the few shells that were new to me. One I can still only get down to a genus. (see comments!) So far, I've found at least 8 more species of mollusks to add to my count. My daughter brought home great gobs of shark teeth. We even brought back a few big bone shards, one of which I believe is a (rather rare for this section) dugong bone with scratches that might be a predator's bite marks. There is still a big blocks of matrix in the basement waiting to be carefully picked with the old dental and clay tools. There is still a pile of micro matrix to sift through that I carved out of the larger shells as I prepped them. It's been like opening gifts at Christmas. This Christmas may last for a couple very happy months!
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