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Found 43 results

  1. intriguing Sarmatian bryozoan

    pauldtayontoanbryozLBB_0038_1_0055-0064.pdf About 0,71 MB Recommended ,not in the least because of the stature of the first author. Short,well illustrated,informative Taylor et al:Unusual Early Development in A cyclostome bryozoan from the Ukrainian Miocene Linzer Biol.Beitr.38/1,2006
  2. bryozoans

    Two colonies found today in central Poland. Erratic boulders, so no data available other than this: Ordovician or Silurian, Baltica. Is there an easy way to distinguish between various 'monticuliporid' taxa actually placed in different trepostome families? Smaller specimen:
  3. Hippoporidra edax

    Mutualistic relationship between bryozoa and hermit crab inhabited gastropod shell.
  4. Tubular Bryozoan?

    I had posted this piece in General Fossil Discussion area since it had my first trilobite on it. Someone message me saying that they thought it may be an echinoderm. The person said “that looks like an echinoderm ("calcichordate")fragment. Possibly the M1-M4 of a stylophoran(marginale elements)” I thought it was a form of bryozoan. However, I do not know the Mississippian or any Carboniferous fossils very well. So I’m willing to admit complete ignorance. Can anyone ID it and educate me as what it is? I found it in Siloam Springs, Arkansas in an area which Mancos identified as the Pitkin Limestone, which is Mississippian. ROCKD ID’d the area as St. Joe’s limestone. This is the item in question. I can’t say that I have seen segmented Bryozoa. The segments aren’t uniform in size. Although, I’m not sure if the segments are endemic or an artifact of being broken. I believe they are breaks. It is about 1.25 inches long and 7 mm wide. Just a slightly zoomed in pic of the same thing. A pic of the end. This is is a pic of the back side of the other side of the plate and other end of it, where there is a cross section honeycomb looking view. Your thoughts and comments would would be greatly appreciated. Kim
  5. Well, I found my very first trilobite!!! I just had to share my excitement with people who can appreciate hunting for something elusive and then finally finding it. With the family I get a polite “Oh, that’s nice.” I can actually tell it’s a trilobite. I’m pretty sure I’ve found pieces of others in the past, but they were so mangled it’s hard for me to be certain what I have. Anyway, I’m not sure if it is whole or not. I am still cleaning it up. Funny thing is I found it in my own home town of Siloam Springs, Arkansas of all places where I lived while in high school. My family still lives there. It was only about 1/2 mile from my parent’s house. Crazy. I found it on a micro hash plate of sorts next to Bryozoa that I had picked up from a new home construction site. I don’t know about anyone else, but hunting in the middle of a nice quiet little neighborhood feels a bit like dumpster diving. People watch and give you odd looks. I was looking at the Bryozoa with 10x magnification when I found the little trilobite. I absolutely was not expecting that. It’s so tiny I can barely see it with the 10x. LOL But hey a first trilobite is a first trilobite even if I can’t take pics of it and show it to anyone. It seems like the counter equivalent of a tall fish tale only it’s a microscopic trilobite tale. “It was this big/tiny . . .” I think there may be 2 others on the plate as well, but not quite as small. Not that you can see it, but it is a little white speck inside the red circle below. The Bryozoa thing is maybe 1.25 inches long and 7 mm wide. The little trilobite isn’t even 1 mm long. All I can see is the tale end. There are crinoid segments all over this piece too that are also microscopic. Some less than 1 mm. I found it in NW Arkansas in the Pitkin Limestone, St. Joe member possibly, which is Mississippian. The Bryozoan piece is actually much prettier than the pics portrays it to be. It’s all sparkly. It’s crystalized.
  6. Shell Shocked at Matoaka

    Calvert Cliffs has been a popular place lately and I hesitated to post one more trip report this week, but as I look for other kinds of things, I decided I'd share. I have been told on several occasions that the cabins aren't worth much. All they have are shells. as @WhodamanHD put it, "If you like snails, go to Matoaka." Well, yes. That's why I love it so much. Last year I documented at 50 species of mollusk from one spot on the beach, and that's just what I was able to bring home! I returned to the for Independence Day week. and the cliffs did not disappoint! A landslide so recent that there was no sign yet of rain erosion stretched out into the bay just north of the beach. It's a treacherous place to linger and to traverse, but I was banking on the fact that this part off the cliff had done it's falling for now -- I hoped. In other spots, trees dangled precariously over the cliffs. If you ever doubted that this can fall on you, remember this -- I'm pretty sure that the sound of thunder I herd the night we got in was the landslide I worked all week. It only rumbled once, on a windless, rainless evening. The innumerable fallen trees I had to climb over to get to my favorite spot tell the rest of the ongoing story. If you feel a bit of gravel fall own your head, RUN. You were warned. That said, we all know this is an addiction, so I se too work with a screw driver most of the week, chipping away at the loose material at the base that was sitting in the nice, cool water most of the day. On a blisteringly hot day, there's no place I'd rather be! The fall exposed all kinds of things that most folks think I'm a bit silly to carve out - clams, snails, bryozoa, brachiopods, but I love the biodiversity of the place. I chipped away at big blocks during the day, until it got too hot, the tide too low and the snack supply diminished. I met the wonderfully astute @FossilsAnonymous out there and loved getting to talk to a fellow hunter who didn't think me crazy for chasing after punky sea shells. I wrapped everything in aluminum foil and carried them in a metal pail for the mile or so trek back to the cabin, where I had my make-shift lab set up on the porch. That's where the real work began. The day before we left was blustery after successive storm cells moved in and out the night before. The beach was totally rearranged from wave action. The bay spewed forth all kinds of things. My daughter and I walked the beach to find whatever had washed ashore. I found 3 Ecphora snails sitting on the beach right at the entrance. A little further down, we met another forum member, whose name I cannot find now in my tag options HI! We spoke for about 10 minutes while she and my daughter dove into the lapping waves to grab the shark teeth that washed up at our feet. How they saw them is beyond me, but they must have collected 30 between them while we were standing there! It's taken me a week since I got home to unwrap and clean most of what I brought home. It took me an entire afternoon of diving into half a dozen texts to identify the few shells that were new to me. One I can still only get down to a genus. (see comments!) So far, I've found at least 8 more species of mollusks to add to my count. My daughter brought home great gobs of shark teeth. We even brought back a few big bone shards, one of which I believe is a (rather rare for this section) dugong bone with scratches that might be a predator's bite marks. There is still a big blocks of matrix in the basement waiting to be carefully picked with the old dental and clay tools. There is still a pile of micro matrix to sift through that I carved out of the larger shells as I prepped them. It's been like opening gifts at Christmas. This Christmas may last for a couple very happy months!
  7. Brevicoceras casteri, with Hederella filiformis

    From the album Middle Devonian Hamilton Group Fossils

    Brevicoceras casteri, with an example of Hederella filiformis. According to their 2008 paper, "Morphologies and Affinities of Hederelloid "Bryozoans" ", Paul D. Taylor and Mark A. Wilson "... interpret hederelloids as colonial, phoronid-like invertebrates, with retractable lophophores." Thanks to Scott (piranha) for the paper listed above. Middle Devonian, Moscow Formation, Hamilton Group. Deep Springs Road, Lebanon, NY. Generously gifted to my by Darktooth (Dave)

    © © 2018 T. Jones

  8. Growth, shade, competition

    It genuinely is my distinct pleasure to feature this pretty rare PDF and its few, but VERY nice images of overgrowth competition and sclerobiosis. Worth your time? You bet. About 1,2 MB harmecorabryozecolsciap-in-the-northern.pdf
  9. Bryozoa from VT?

    found at Lake Champlain, in Vermont, Iberville formation which is Ordovician in age. These two pieces don’t have a ton of detail left but is there enough to be sure these are Bryozoa?
  10. It Pays to Look Closely!

    After the MAPS fossil show a few weeks ago, I had an hour to play around in a little rock in the Coralville, Ia area before departing for home. A piece of what I think was a cephalopod caught my eye and I tossed it into my bucket as I continued to scrutinize the shelf of Devonian rock in front of me. A few very nice coral pieces were added to my bucket before hitting the road. I didn't pay too much attention to my finds until yesterday. But as I was getting to put the cephalopod piece into the "fossils for kids" pile, I noticed something on it's surface. Such beauty bestowed to a junk piece of cephalopod! One must take the time to look closely or he/she often misses the diamond in the rough. Enjoy this simple fossil grouping.
  11. Bryozoa?

    Any ideas on this guys? I guess it's some type of bryozoa/bryozoan (dunno if it's one beast or lots of 'em) It's like an undulating mat. The 'mat' varies in thickness from, I guess, 2mm -5mm. The round things are in relief not indented. Era: Silurian Location: Wrens Nest, Dudley, UK @TqB
  12. Orthoceras sp. colonised with Bryozoa

    From the album Invertebrates

    Orthoceras sp. colonised with Bryozoa Early Devonian Emsian Bundenbach Rhineland-Palatinate Germany
  13. Scarce bryozoan. Dyscritella?

    Hi. Last month i've found this one on the Renmore Beach in Galway,Ireland. Early Carboniferous limestone from late Visean it's common all around Co Galway. I search for fossils in this county for 15 years and thats first fossil of this kind i got. Main specimens here are Siphonodendrons, Lithostrotions, Productids and many more brachiopods, corals, crinoids and gastropods. This one here I hope is bryozoan Dyscritella sp. I didn't look to my Mc Coy book yet but the species is described in Geological Survey of Ireland catalogue.
  14. My story will be a bit(could be too much) long, so I put this report separately from @Kane's report. I'm not sure I can do this or not 'cause this is my first time to write same topic from others'. If I should not do this, I apologize administrator for making bothersome Before I start my story, I convey my profound and huge gratitude to @crinus for taking me quarries(these travels were my very first visiting to not only quarries, but also Ontario's fossil site!) and giving a lot of nice fossils to me what he found, and to @Northern Sharks for giving a nice specimen to me what he found as well from Brechin quarry and organizing Bowmanville journey(I didn't know that until seeing from @Kane's report. I'm not sure that you set the all plans), and to @Malcolmt for giving a complete crinoid to me, which is my first complete crinoid possessing arms and stems, and finally to everyone that I've met on this travel for welcoming me *Plus - My report will be incomplete 'cause I don't know that much about Ontario's geological information and some species' scientific names. So, I'll appreciate greatly if you guys tell me about right information and help me to correct it I revised this post a loooot of times 'cause I realized that it was not report, but a proper diary(Too Much Information.. and still, it's like a diary..) Well.. Now then, I'll begin my long story with some pictures though I couldn't make to take that many pictures of quarries and people. As for the Brechin quarry, I forgot to take my phone and there was no time to take DSLR out from my bag. And as for the Bowmanville quarry, I was so concentrating to find fossils that I forgot to take pictures *Date : Oct.21&22.2017 *Location : Brechin quarry & Bowmanville quarry *Records of formation : Brechin quarry - D -----> Upper Verulam Formation(There was a "cluster" of fauna that I think it's different from below one. Color was bright grey and somewhat yellowish) DD -----> Middle Verulam Formation(Bluish and grey rocks with vurnerable condition) DDD -----> Lower Verulam Formation(Brown and grey rocks) DDDD -----> Upper Bobcaygeon Formation(Alternates between sublithogenic and medium calcarenitic limestone, but also includes some brown lithographic limestone and bluish fine-grained limestone in minor thicknesses)[*] [Buried under the ground] Middle Bobcaygeon Formation(Grey and brown, very fine grained to sublithogenic, sparsely fossiliferous limestone, with some fine-grained limestone in the upper part)[*] [Buried under the ground] Lower Bobcaygeon Formation(Brownish grey, fine- and medium-grained limestone)[*] (Reference - [*] Bobcaygeon formation - Weblex Canada. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://weblex.nrcan.gc.ca/html/001000/GSCC00053001579.html @Northern Sharks informed me! Thank you! ) Bowmanville quarry - D -----> Blue Mountain Formation (I couldn't get there.) DD Upper Lindsay formation DDD Level 2 (?) DDDD Level 3(?) - Lower Lindsay formation (Below as well. The quarry was so biiiiiig!!) - - *Geological Age - Middle Ordovician These all rocks are what I took. Maybe I took a lot of fossils even if it is only a small part of trilobites. I just so excited that I found Ontario's trilobites directly, not through internet store or pictures! Well.. Now I'm worried the weight.. Could I take these whole fossils?... I should have considered about it, not just collect unnecessary things by my instinct. It was not a clever move.. That crinoid(at 11 O'clock-wise) is not what I found these quarries. I found it from Scarbourough bluffers park before. To begin, the beginning of the day(Oct.21) I've met @crinus first at the very early morning of the day(For me. 'cause I'm not the early bird type). Actually, we met from Ebay. I won his two auction and I asked him that would you wait for me until I get to Canada in order to reduce shipping cost. Then, he offered me to go to quarries with him! Anyway, we arrived there around at 8:30 AM and there were 4 or more people had already arrived. I've met @Malcolmt and two other people(Sorry, I can't remember the name. My poor memory..) on near the greenish and bluish pond in the quarry. After handshaking, @crinus and I went to the piles of rocks, which is near the pond. We climbed up the piles of rocks and met @Northern Sharks on there. He found one complete Calyptaulax sp. and dropped it from his hand while we were greeting each other(yet, fortunately, the trilobite was alive with small crack on the pygidium(if my memory is correct)) After the greeting, @crinus and @Northern Sharks went to another place and I remained there, which was that @Northern Sharks found a trilobite, and looked for trilobites with hammering big rocks. I found a horn coral, which is Lambeophyllum profundum Conrad, 1843, the cephalon part of Ceraurus sp. , and a loooot of brachiopods and so on It came from lower Verulam formation. This one is Lambeophyllum profundum Conrad, 1843( @Northern Sharks and @FossilDAWG informed me! Thank you! ) Ceraurus globulobatus? I don't know the exact name of this specimen.. This one maybe came from the middle Verulam formation because of its color. Though I found this from the lower Verulam formation area.
  15. Today I spent about two hours near Lawrenceburg, Indiana collecting some Ordovician fossils. I had a lot of luck with collecting some great looking complete brachiopods that I believe might be Herbertella, but I am going to ask the experts @Herb and @Peat Burns on this formation and see if they can correct any mistakes or unidentified finds. Rafinesquina ponderosa Platystrophia? It was bryozoan heaven today, as shown by some of the pics below. One piece was extremely large. Trilobites Parts ? Gastropods- "Sinuites" Unknown ? And some very nice small hash plates that are probably my favorite fines of the day.
  16. Wenlock Edge, Shropshire, England

    This place is just like Wrens Nest Dudley i.e. Silurian. I like both places but find different things at each. Personally I have found more Trilobites bits at Wrens Nest. 1 - Arachnophyllum murchisoni Coral, top view 2 - Amphistrophia funiculata Brachiopod 3 - Favosites Coral 4 - Halysites Coral 5 - Heliolites Coral 6 - Kodonophyllum truncatum Solitary Coral 7 - Labechia conferta Stromatoporoid sponge 8 - Leptaena depressa Brachiopod 9 - Trepostome Bryozoa
  17. Bryozoa

    From the album Beltzville State Park

    Bryozoa Devonian Manhatango Formation Beltzville State Park, Beltzville, PA
  18. H.A.Nicholson on tabulata

    As is (almost) customary in the 19th century,some bryzoans are thrown in with the corals Pleurodictyum
  19. Some new finds

    Found some nice bryozoan assemblages, also found crystalized interior of something. Cephalopods often have that crystal formation interior. The right pict also has some gastropods.
  20. Bryozoa; Massive Form

    This is a common find at this particular quarry, this one P. collum has encrusted what appears to be a Chlamys cookei bivalve. After deciding to add this bryozoa, I had to do a lot of research. What I found is that I really knew nothing about bryozoans. I had always believed this to be an encrusting type bryozoa. Well, I found this species is one of the massive type byozoans. It initially encrusts the host, but then it builds layer upon layer, hence making it a massive form.
  21. Bryozoa introduction

    I came across this nice piece , written by someone who knows these animals. Expect no anatomical line drawings,but there are some nice pics in this one. rylandbryozoDENISIA0.pdf
  22. I was looking through a bunch of Thylacocrinus stem pieces looking for interesting encrusters for tradebait, and ran across something I didn't notice before. These photos are of 2 different stem pieces: My first thought was Constellaria, but (to my knowledge) that only occurs in the Ordovician, and is much larger. These are Middle Devonian (Kashong Fm.), and the whole image is less than 1 cm across, probably around 6 mm (I didn't have a measure handy). Anyone have any thoughts?
  23. From the album Middle Devonian

    Taeniopora exigua (branching bryozoan) Middle Devonian Windom Shale Moscow Formation Hamilton Group Deep Springs Road quarry Lebanon, NY.
  24. Toronto Brachiopod And Bryozoan Help

    I found these two fossils from Mimico Creek in Toronto, Canada and they both belong to the Georgian Bay formation, late Ordovician. The first one I believe is a Pseudolingula, but I can't really nail it down to a species level. The other is a bryozoan, and I was thinking of Prasopora. What do you guys think? The brachiopod I found in shale, but the bryozoan in a limestone bed with other bryozoas. The brachiopod: The bryozoa:
  25. I thought I would share some of the bryozoans that i collected at the PCS Phosphate Mine in Aurora, NC.
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