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Found 120 results

  1. Fossil coral,moss?, bryozoan

    I picked this up at the flea market. He told me it was petrified moss...which I dont think it is. Im thinking coral but I wasn't able to find the answer after some research. Its from Arizona and was collected in 1968 and its jurassic in age. Pretty cool fossil.
  2. Hello all! So I've been looking through my collection and noticed a bunch of fossils that I haven't yet identified yet. Some of them are quite peculiar, as I've never seen some of them until now. This'll be a long post with 12 different fossils in need of a name so brace yourselves hahah: All fossils found in Toronto creeks - Ordovician Era - Georgian Bay Formation 1. I thought this was the typical Treptoceras crebriseptum that I always find at my local creek, but when I cracked it out from the matrix I noticed it was perfectly smooth. Maybe its the living chamber of the nautiloid? 2. I honestly have NO clue what this is. Never seen anything like it. I thought it was nothing, but it seems to have such a defined symmetrical shape... ...
  3. From the album Lower Devonian Helderberg Group in Eastern NY

    Plate of brachiopods including Howellella cycloptera, and bryozoans including Fenestella crebipora. Lower Devonian Helderberg Gr. Kalkberg Fm. Rickard Hill Roadcut Schoharie, New York Collected 5/31/20
  4. From the album Lower Devonian Helderberg Group in Eastern NY

    Unidentified large bryozoan from the Lower Devonian Kalkberg formation. Collected 5/31/20 Rickard Hill Rd. Schoharie, NY
  5. Coral? Bryozoan?

    Found these Midwest, likely Iowa, from either Carboniferous or Devonian rocks. Any help in IDing them would be much appreciated. Thanks!
  6. Bryozoan ID

    Any help with identification of the following attached Bryozoans would be greatly appreciated. 001: Collected from Bungonia NSW Australia and is Upper Silurian in age. 002: Collected from Bowning NSW Australia and is Upper Silurian in age. (possibly a Penniretepora sp.) 003: Collected from Bowning NSW Australia and is Upper Silurian in age. and again, thank you for any help given.
  7. Age is Miocene-Pliocene. Bryozoan is an immediate thought, but I'm pretty sure that they're quite rare post Paleozoic, and this kind of encrustation is very common in the locality where the specimen was found. Here is a picture: Bonus thanks if anyone knows with some certainty what the bivalve itself might be from the photo, though I doubt it.
  8. Rickard Hill Road 5/20/20

    Today I was able to get out to the outcrop along Rickard Hill in Schoharie, New York. I didn’t find a ton of interesting things because I was looking in a more crystalline layer of the Kalkberg formation that had less abundant fossils. I found a handful of nice orthid, spiriferid, and atrypid brachiopods and one fenestellid bryozoan. Next time I go I’m going to try and get into a different, more fossiliferous layer because the crystalline rock is hard to break and when it does it breaks randomly, often damaging the fossils.
  9. Today on a hunt in the lower devonian of new york, I found on of the most unusual piece and I can't decide if its bryzoan or possible placoderm.
  10. Bryozoan and Horn coral IDs

    Hello everyone, This will be my final ID topic for a while as I am trying to get some labels for a few fossils in my collection. Here are two fossils of marine animals, the first I believe is a bryozoan, I have no idea of the location or age of either but this piece has a strong resemblance to the devonian Fistuliramus and Eridotrypella from Morocco. The second is a very white and chalky horn coral, I am guessing that it is from somewhere in the US as the person I got it from mostly has US fossils. Does anyone recognize the fossilization on this piece? I am trying to identify where it is from.
  11. Bryozoan i.d. help please

    Could someone identify if these are bryozoans attached to this bivalve from the Faringdon sponge gravels UK please. Scale bar millimetres.
  12. I've got this segment of ammonite chamber apparently nicknamed a "cats claw" due to its appearance. It's from the Faringdon sponge gravels. I'm interested to find out what it is attached to the ammonite chamber. Information I've read regarding the Faringdon sponge gravels is quoted below if it's helps. "The sediments of the Cretaceous, Lower Greensand Formation were deposited in a tidal strait some 114 million years ago (Aptian Age). The palaeo-channel of this constrained seaway was scoured from the Jurassic bedrock and quickly colonised by bryozoa, sponges, brachiopods, bivalves and echinoids. Storm surges are thought to have periodically ripped the biota and regolith, mixing the sponges and bryozoans with Jurassic rock and fossil material to form the sponge gravels." The sediments of the Cretaceous, Lower Greensand Formation were deposited in a tidal strait some 114 million years ago (Aptian Age). The palaeo-channel of this constrained seaway was scoured from the Jurassic bedrock and quickly colonised by bryozoa, sponges, brachiopods, bivalves and echinoids. Storm surges are thought to have periodically ripped the biota and regolith, mixing the sponges and bryozoans with Jurassic rock and fossil material to form the sponge gravels.
  13. With all of your help, I am learning to better identify fossils in the rocks I pick up in my yard - mostly bryozoan and crinoids. Boring to most folks, but still fun for me, LOL! I picked this rock up assuming it was a non native one, but then decided to get my macro lens after it to make sure. I need your help! Do you see any bryozoan or crinoid fossils in these macro photos? I didn't think so at first, but then I started wondering about some tiny things I was seeing. So, if no one sees any fossils, I will just go back to my original idea - that it is a non native rock to our yard. I would also love to understand a bit about how a rock like this is formed! It is a gorgeous rock and I would be happy to post a photo of the whole thing if anyone is interested. Thanks! Ramona
  14. I have so many rocks that I often like to take one and remove as much matrix as I can, to learn more about it. This rock was very interesting! The limestone was very soft and I know for a fact that I removed plenty of small fossils along the way, but I thought I was digging a geode out of the rock (the "original" thing was the dark area). After cleaning thoroughly with vinegar and a toothbrush, I started removing all soft matrix with a dental pick. I was surprised to "break through" to a totally different geode than the one I thought I was digging out! Part of this new geode broke off later, but I was able to see the inside well! :-) I also discovered what seems to be a nice bryozoan fossil? I never did figure out what the original item was - it may still be a geode, but I have stopped for now. I may have seen this before, but just though it was interesting to see the geode and fossil in the same rock. Found in Huntsville, Alabama.
  15. N. Carolina Finds

    A couple of recent finds from Easten North Carolina, Castle Hayne Formation. Scale divisions on all pix are 1 mm. The first specimen is brachiopod, I have it ID'd as Eucalathis sp. Can one of our experts confirm or correct? Second specimen(s) I really have no idea, other than possibly bryozoan, but I can't see any surface apertures. The first pic is of two nearly identical specimens and the remaining pix are of just one. The specimens are not domed, the top surface is a pebble-like texture and the opposite side is a sandy texture. The dark "object' in the center is actually a hole that goes completely through. (Last pic is a profile of it mounted in a pc of putty - sorry for the poor quality picture(s)!) What do you folks think?
  16. Back in April 2017 I posted pics of what I thought was a unique bryozoan encrusted horn coral.... Since then I have come across more while collecting in SW Ohio that I'd like to share. And, yes, the prep can be extensive. The first one, there is no real top/bottom or side view. It is 7 cm across x 10 cm "tall" This one is 4.5 cm across x 4.5 cm "tall". I believe the bryozoan on the following is Constellaria florida This one is 5.5 cm across and 6 cm "tall" This last one is my favorite. I finished prepping it in early March. I think the layering of the bryozoan is amazing. It is 7 cm across x 9 cm "tall" x 4 cm "deep". The horn coral is broken.
  17. cool bryozoan find in the creek

    Hi everyone this is matthew again in the creek today I was fossil hunting and found a very nice bryozoan fossil here is a photo
  18. Hello there! I took advantage of the nice weather we've been having to visit Mimico Creek in Toronto, Ontario (Georgian Bay Formation, Upper Ordovician) yesterday afternoon. Here are some photos of specimens that I'd like help identifying - perhaps @Tidgy's Dad would like to have a look? Firstly - the whole rock which contains the bryozoans and the unknown black objects: Specimen #1: a nice branching bryozoan - perhaps Homotrypa? Specimen #2: a nice encrusting bryozoan (there are actually two of them) - perhaps Mesotrypa? More to come...
  19. I spent yesterday trying out a location along the southwest corner of Tug Hill Plateau in Oswego County NY. There is a road cut exposure that is very weathered. Lots of crumbly mud- and silt-stone, interspersed with sandstone. I couldn’t get very low on the exposure because the river that the highway crosses was high, no shelf or margin of error to climb down. On the Rockd app, this is supposed to be late Ordovician Pulaski and Whetstone gulf, and I wanted to find trilobites. I think I found one fragile flexicalymene, Prasopora (chocolate drop bryozoan), and a big orthocone. Very few trilobite remains in any layer I examined. I hope to return this summer when the water of the river is low...
  20. I'm not sure if folks would like to do this or not, but I thought it might be fun to have a run of "I Spy" with a large fossil-rich rock that I recently found in our yard. Experts and newbies both welcome! This rock weighs 4 pounds and measures about 6 inches by 5 inches. These are macro images - all from the same rock. Check them out and see what you can "Spy" in each image! Look closely - very closely! And think in 3-D format! ;-) A bit of background - this rock was found in Huntsville, Alabama and is likely mostly limestone. I mostly find fenestellan bryozoan, crinoid, and coral fossils, with a few bivalves. So, surprise me with what YOU see in these photos!
  21. ID verifications?

    Along with being a newly avid fossil student, I am also a stock photographer. I would like to submit these images for stock images, but I want to make sure that I am identifying them correctly. You guys have helped me learn EVERYTHING you see here! All of the names and labels, I learned here! Please let me know if I am missing any thing or have mislabeled any of these? I have numbered them to help with the identification. Thanks so much! Ramona
  22. My grandson and I found this chunk of fossiliferous limestone in our yard today and I cleaned it with vinegar, but it is very crumbly. I can tell that it contains mostly fenestellan bryzoa and crinoids, which is what we find most of in our yard. What is the best way to preserve this fossil to keep it from crumbling? I am hesitant to clean it anymore due to the fragility of it! Thanks! Ramona
  23. Fossils in quartz?

    I continue to be amazed at the plethora of fossils in our yard, so I tried an experiment. I raked up some rocks that were around a tree in our front yard and half filled a five gallon bucket with them. I figure that some of them were brought in as decorative rocks, but to test that theory I grabbed two from the top at random. I cleaned them with vinegar and water and then photographed them with my macro lens. They are at least a different type of rock than I am used to seeing (not all of these are different, but those two were). I mostly see limestone, but I will post photos of these in the comments. They look like quartz to me? Or are they a different type of limestone? And maybe I am imaging it, but I think I am seeing some crinoids and bryozoans in them? If no one else sees them I will circle what I THINK are fossils for further verification. Is it odd to find an area so rich in fossils? Or am I odd in that I am looking so closely for them, LOL? I guess since this area was once covered in water, it is likely "normal" to find bryozoans and crinoids everywhere I look, right? Thanks for all input! I learn so much here! (And I won't be surprised to hear that the following photos really ARE rocks that were likely brought in as decorative, LOL!) Ramona
  24. Two tiny rocks

    In my continuing adventure in our yard, I decided to scoop up a few tiny rocks today and examine them. This one was not much of a surprise. Am I correct in stating that it is a tiny bit of fenestella bryozoan? (measurements are in mm). Found in Huntsville, AL - I have found lots of fossiliferous limestone in our yard to date. It's the next one that puzzles me most... Thanks!| Ramona
  25. What might this be?

    I have been able to identify (with your help) a few of the fossils we found while hunting at Beltzville state park. This is something that may be something. I tried to get the six-sided pics as recommended. What might this be (if anything)? Beltzville State Park in Pennsylvania, USA. I believe these come the Upper Devonian Mahantango Formation. Thank you.
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