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Found 90 results

  1. fossil in fossil

    This is from the southwest side of the York river a short way upstream from the bridge in Yorktown, VA. And I do mean up, stream. The bank is rip rap ! Something appears to have settled on this bryozoan while it was alive ? Scale is in mm.
  2. still learning

    Sorry I haven't been on the forum in a while since I've been working like crazy. After a 71 hour week last week I took a day off. My new job is a driving job around my local area so I make notes of places to revisit to rockhound ( I also do some while on layover time but its hard not to get dirty!). I went back to one today, It is a Bralier Shale (Devonian) exposure. Here's where I need some help. Are the tube things #3 corals or bryozoans? Any id's on the other things would be appreciated. Scale on all is centimeter.
  3. branching bryozoan? Reno, Nevada

    This week I found this in the Reno, Nevada area. I'm trying to get some information on what it is exactly and if it is indeed a fossil. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
  4. Prasopora bryozoan

    From the album Finds From the Ordovician -488 to 443 MYA-

    From the Collingwood member of the Lindsay (Cobourg) Fm.
  5. I’ve got quite a handful of Devonian fossils that I’ve found this past week on the shore of Seneca lake in Upstate NY. This post is more of a confirmation of my original thoughts and a hope for a more definitive and exact identification of some of these finds. Thanks for any help in advance! 1– horn coral
  6. Bryozoa Horta

    Bryozoa Horta Found - July 23, 2019 Name - Atactotoechus fruticosus Age - Middle Devonian Formation - Moscow, Kashong mbr. Locality - Livingston County, New York, USA Size - 8" x 5" Complete and unprepared. I find these colonies at only one locality here in NY. The majority of the Bryozoa colonies are branching and I have reassembled many over the years (pic included of a typical branching specimen). This is the first unbranching Atactotoechus specimen I found lying on the seafloor like a blob or a Star Trek Horta (in my eye anyway ). The specimen was found in life position on top of a mat of fenestrate bryozoan. A very rare find for me. Thanks, Mikeymig
  7. I took my family across the river to Clarksville Indiana today to visit The Falls of the Ohio State Park. It was very hot with a high in the 90s, but we had a good time walking the Devonian fossil beds and visiting the Interpretive Center . The river was down enough to get onto the upper limestone beds, but the lower beds were still underwater. They are typically exposed during the months of September and October and occasionally in the summer when there is little rain (not this year!). The river is at 20 ft right now. The lower beds become dry around the 13.5 ft mark. Their official website has a page that monitors the river levels and tells you when certain areas and strata are exposed. I suggest checking that out before making the trip to visit the park. https://www.fallsoftheohio.org/current-ohio-river-conditions/ The Interpretive Center houses the main indoor exhibit, gift shop, a river viewing room, and bird/wildlife viewing room, along with friendly staff. The main exhibit has fossils and interactive areas for the kids. Not only are there fossil on display, but also sections regarding the Native Americans that lived in the area, the current wildlife, and information regarding the Lewis and Clark expedition. A piece of fossilized wood just outside of the center on the backside by the parking lot. It is roughly 4 feet in length and 2 feet wide. When you walk into the main foyer of the Interpretive Center this boulder is on display. It is about a meter across and half as thick. I don't want to spoil the trip for everyone so I'm just going to post some pictures of a few of my favorite pieces. I thought this was interesting. It's labeled as orange chert, which I assume it is, but it also has a horn coral right in the middle of it. A sampling of the fauna found in the fossil record here. There was also a small exhibit on mammoths as evidence of a few have been found in the surrounding area. Presumably crossing the Falls to get to the salt licks in Kentucky. This was a comparison of a mammoth and mastadon tooth. The interior exhibit is nice, but for me the best part of the Falls of the Ohio is outside. Its the fossil beds that you can walk on and explore. I've been here a few times and find something new each time I come. Remember folks, it's against the law to collect here. Leave the fossils alone for others to enjoy! No matter how tempting... . If you just have to collect something, the park usually has a couple of dump truck loads of material near the back of the parking lot that they allow you to search through. Seriously. Here are some of the fossils that me and the family found while walking around the fossil beds. A word of caution, if you want to get to certain areas there is some climbing that you must do. A lot of the strata has fissures or large boulders that must be climbed, or walked around to move farther down the coast. This is on the fossil beds themselves. You can stay higher on the slope and circumvent a lot of the really strenuous stuff, but the fossils are not as good the higher up you go. Here are a some of the more impressive horn coral that I found. They actually call these larger ones "tusk coral" because the are so large. I'm not certain what these coral are, but Siphonophrentis and Cystiphylloides are common here. I know a hand isn't the best for scale, but it's all I had at the time. lol From the tip of my index finger to where my thumb connects is just over 5 inches. Some mainly brachiopod hash plates. A large favosites. Crinoids Lace Bryozoan This was my favorite find. A large colonial coral. It is over a meter in diameter. What is commonly called a Pipe Organ Coral. Eridophyllum I think that is all for now. It was a great day of discovery and fun with the family. If you are in the area and have a couple of extra hours, I highly recommend you stop by and check out the sights for yourself. You won't be disappointed. Just remember to check the river water levels and be ready for a little exercise!
  8. Arkona 07/06/2019

    As usual I had the urge to go fossil hunting this weekend so I decided to take a trip to Arkona and have a relaxing day of surface collecting. It was calling for rain all week but turned out to be a nice day (aside from the brutal heat and swarming deer flies). Things were looking a little different this year. Spring hit this roadway to one of the pits pretty hard. Critters everywhere so you have to watch your step. There were loads of tiny toads that must have just grown up and left the water. Also found this poor strawberry plant struggling on top of a hill in poor soil but somehow managed to fruit And now for the fossils... I didn't have any luck finding the blastoid or crinoid I was after but I did take a few things home. Some corals Aulocystis ramosa, Platyaxum frondosum Favosites sp. A brach species I didnt have yet and a large Callipleura Nucleospira concinna, Callipleura nobilis An interesting bryozoan and a cluster of tube worms unknown bryozoan, Spirorbis sp. Gastropods Platyceras bucculentum, Naticonema lineata Possible arthropod trackway? And a new trilo species for me. Beaten up but I'll take it. The cephalon+partial thorax look like Basidechenella Pseudodechenella arkonensis. The pygidium looks like Crassiproetus crassimarginatus (top one was found last year).
  9. The Crinoid Road Cut

    I don't get to go out fossil hunting as much as I would like these days, but I was able to sneak out to a local road cut for a few hours the other morning. It was the day before my birthday after all! A great excuse for me to convince the wife to watch the kiddos for a few hours. This particular road cut is dated to the Mississippian and is full of crinoids! I was literally walking over them. They were everywhere! Upon closer inspection I found that there were a couple of layers that were mainly composed of crinoids. This large slab was laying on the ground in front of the cut. The slab was almost 2 meters in length. Covered in crinoid fragments. Another large slab of crinoid infested rock. Again, it was on the ground in front of the cut. Yet another slab. I finally remembered to put something in for scale... A picture of what I am calling crinoid gravel. If you look closely you can see many crinoid fragments mixed in. This gravel was up a little higher on the cut. The road cut has multiple accessible levels. Here is a sample of some of the pieces I picked up. In my excitement, I started out picking up everything. Then I quickly realized that was an effort in futility. I thought the specimen at the very bottom right of the picture might have been a calyx when I first picked it up, but I think it may be a geode with a piece of crinoid attached. The largest of the "coin" looking columnals (third in the top row from left to right) is over an inch in diameter. With work being crazy, I haven't had a chance to go through everything and clean them up for a closer look. Sorry this photo isn't the best. It's late here and I'm trying to not wake up the family. Its the best I can do under sub par basement lighting. A very nice (and heavy!) hash plate that I was able to manhandle to the truck. Crinoids were not the only things I found. This horn coral was sticking up out of the rubble just waiting for me to come along and take it home! I like how it is coming up out of the matrix. Lording over its domain! lol I also came across bryozoan on occasion. The shale that they are in is very delicate and brittle. It's barely more than clay. I had to handle with care. Overall it wasn't a bad little outing. Any day out fossil hunting is a good day! I picked up much more, a few longer crinoid stems, a couple of small hash plates to practice prepping on, some geological items for my brother who is more into geology than paleontology. I ran into a few brachiopods, but most were not very well preserved or were badly weathered. Ill try to post a few more/better pictures as I go back through things and get them cleaned up a bit. I also have more pictures of the exposure and crinoid layers that I might post as well. Happy Hunting!
  10. I was at the chalk cliffs at Seaford in April this year hunting for echinoids. However, I only found time to clean and prep these fossils this week, using a safety pin, a brush and water (Very low-tech, I know!). UKfossils.co.uk states the rocks here are Cretaceous, 89-86 million years old. I found a fist-sized chunk of chalk that yielded two enchinoderm plates (picture 4) and a very small, unknown fossil. Pictures 1-3 show the unknown fossil. 1 division on the ruler is 1mm. It is perfectly spherical, with a diameter of about 4mm and has raised dimples covering its surface. There are at least two holes, but they are not opposite each other, and I am unsure if these are biological features or just preservational artifacts. My thoughts are this is either a bryozoan or a small echinoid, but I am not sure.
  11. 2 questions

    I was wondering if the lower left white pieces with the straight row of circles are bryozoa. Secondly, I was wondering if the seemingly silver "rod" is animal or mineral. These samples are quite small and this is the best I can do as far as focus goes.
  12. Hello all! I am new to this forum and just started getting interested in rocks and fossils. I went out to Wyoming last weekend and found a lot of really nice agates and fluorescent minerals but I also came across what look like some pieces of chalcedony with these white tubular inclusions in them. I first just saw the shell imprint in the rock so I pocketed it, but later when I looked closer noticed the white webbed tubes. I posted these pictures on reddit in r/fossilid and got a few responses telling me that they are Bryozoans. I looked this up and it looks right to me! My question is this...all of the pictures of fossilized bryozoans I have seen look very traditional (in sedimentary rock). Is it usual to find them embedded in silicate like this? I cannot find one other example of this on the internet which makes me think that maybe this type of specimen is called by a different name and that I am just not searching for the right thing. Anyways, any help and insights would be much appreciated! I am going back out to Wyoming this weekend to search some more and would love to know exactly what it is I am looking for! Thanks in advance for any responses! Erik
  13. Fossil id

    Does anyone know what this is? I found it in Beltzville State Park, Pa, Devonian period. I’ve been told it could be snake skin, a type of Bryozoan and a certain type of tree. It’s lightweight and the bumps are very pronounced. Thank you!
  14. Possible Huge Bryozoan/Anthozoan

    Hello all! I was hunting for fossils in Owingsville, KY on a road cut that contains the Drakes Formation (Late Ordovician). Plenty of brachiopods, small bryozoans, cephalopods and other common Ordovician fossils found. I happened upon this piece, at first just thinking it was geologic with some bryozoan encrusting/deposited within the rock. I almost left it behind but couldn't help but wonder if it was all one piece and that it may truly be an example of large bryozoan or coral. I was curious as to what you all think, whether it be one of the two, mostly geologic or what have you.
  15. Today I was out collecting in Lawrenceburg, Indiana for several hours, accompanying me was some rainfall. This will be a picture heavy post and I will show various fossils that I found and many pieces that I left in the field. I will start out with trilobite parts of Flexicalymene and Isotelus. I did find my first ever complete trilobite, at least I think it is my first, and also my largest piece of an Isotelus that I have ever found. Now the pieces- Next post will be Bryozoan-
  16. Fossils on the lake

    Hey guys! I’m currently out fishing on a lake (Champaign County, IL) and I noticed a bunch of fossils strewn about the rocks on the shore. I don’t think the rocks are from here, so I don’t know if I could give any geologic info unfortunately. If you could help me figure out what I’ve got, I’d really appreciate it! I’ll add more as I find more. Thanks! #1
  17. Bryozoan? From the Banjaard

    Hi everyone, Here's a cool little thing I found on the Banjaard beach (Zeeland, Netherlands) last month. I believe it's a type of bryozoan? If so, what species? Apart from the mollusks, the invertebrates are really not my strong point... The age of this thing is probably (anywhere in the) Pleistocene, but possibly older (up to Eocene). It might be modern too... The most common sediments at this location are Eemian (warm interglacial stage in the late Pleistocene) in age. This specimen was found in a bed of lots of tiny Lacuna vincta shells, if that helps. Thanks in advance, Max
  18. Day One ; Locality Three. Midelt 19th February 2019 The Berber nomads are hospitable, generous and very tough : The snow disappears soon after you get onto the High Plains between the Middle and High Atlas ranges. Here are the High Atlas looming in the distance : As one approaches the town of Midelt, the layered geology of what is mostly Dogger, the old name for the Middle Jurassic, still used here, becomes clear : Midelt is full of fossil shops, however most of the fossils, including a kazillion trilobites, actually come from elsewhere. Jurassic ammonites may be from here, and many of the small cut and polished ammonites are from around here, but Midelt is most famous for its minerals, vanadinite especially. Also lead ores, barite and flourite. Top Tip : Don't buy fossils in Midelt unless it's a cut and polished small ammonite you want. Minerals, yes, many are beautiful and very cheap. Hmm, this looks interesting................. "Stop the car!"
  19. Devonian of NY

    Been taking some pictures of fossil finds the last couple weeks and decided to share. These are from our last couple trips.
  20. A return: Tales of my uncle's truck travels

    Again, it's been a while. Today I've been at my Mom's memorial service, as she passed away in the past week, effectively leaving me without parents. It's been really hard for me to feel good about much anything recently, so here's something else to think about for a change: After the service, my uncle Austin came to me to say he found a fossil. Usually he just jokingly comes to me with a chunk of basalt, saying it's an "alien bone" This time was different, though. He presented me with this: There's a good number of bryozoans, I think a few crinoid sections, and a piece of brachiopod or two on all sides of this piece. What I'm wondering is what formation/age it would be. Austin said he'd found it at a truck stop somewhere in Utah or California, so that could be a clue. Anyone from that area know what formation this may be from?
  21. Bryozoan for further ID

    I've been trying to narrow down the ID for bryozoans I've been finding. I'm not sure if they're weathering out of the Bennett shale or from further up. I have collected about 15 of these over the years and found a nice one several days ago. They are characterized by rounded form with flattish uneven bases. Spacing between monticules is about 1 cm regardless of specimen size. The below example is about 8 cm wide at base and 5 cm tall. I can't find it right now so can only show photos. I'll put a link below to my more recent find. All help appreciated!
  22. Hi guys! This is a continuation of a previous post focusing just on the sponges. These fossils are from the Capitan Formation, which is Permian Period, Guadalupian Epoch, Capitanian Stage. Because these fossils are in the park, no collecting was allowed, and I can't provide additional images. Any confirmations about the identification or suggestions about a more specific identification are welcome. This trilobite is the only fossil out of these images that was actually found in Carlsbad Caverns, right behind the elevator. Can I get more specific on an ID? Cross section of rugose coral? Sponge? Bryozoan. Acanthocladia? Bryozoan? Crinoid.
  23. Hi guys! I don't post here often, but I'm a PhD student in geology, currently working on tropical Paleogene palynology. I'm taking an unrelated class on the Permian Basin and I am working on identifying some of the fossils our class saw in Guadalupe Mountains National Park. I'm not a sponge expert, and I was hoping someone on the forum might be able to confirm or correct my identifications. I might make a follow-up post on the non-sponge fossils we saw on the trip. A bit of background, these pictures were taken in the field with a metric scale, the scale has been cropped out of the pictures and a 5 mm scale bar is added. No fossil collecting was allowed on this trip so I won't be able to provide additional images. The fossils are from the Capitan Formation, which is Permian Period, Guadalupian Epoch, Capitanian Stage. The global stage name is actually named after the nearby El Capitan peak. Amblysiphonella? Archaeolithoporella?
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