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Found 53 results

  1. Ordovician bryozoan

    I pulled this one out of a creek bed a couple weeks ago but cant narrow it down. Any ideas? Its from the Georgian Bay fm (Upper Ordovician) Forgot to add: the specimen is ~5cm/2 inches in length
  2. All specimens come from the Devonian aged Arkona formation. 1. Echinoderm, possibly a blastoid Tried taking another pic...still not quite sharp 2. Unknown, possibly bryozoans (remainds me a bit of Evactinopora) 3. Unknown, probably the inner structure of ostracods With these being the outer shell: 4. I posted these about a month ago but I don't think we figured it out. Now I am pretty sure they are scaphopods.
  3. This November there were 2 days on the beach when I found over 336 various sizes of gastropods covered with at least 2 different types of bryozoa. I have found similar gastropods covered with coral from the Pliocene in Florida. These fascinate me (hardly of any interest to others on the beach whose focus is shark teeth) because they have a story: the gastropod dies; a hermit crab occupies the dead shell; bryozoa attaches itself to the shell and begins to cover it. I had found maybe 5 of these gastropods at the high tide mark prior to these two days. It was in low tide areas that i found the 336 (previously I had searched the same areas and found none. After the 2 days I did not find anymore even in other areas of the beach some distance away. I am aware that id of bryozoa is difficult but perhaps someone can recognize the "bumpy" pimply variety in the picture. But more importantly, I am looking for confirmation that these are indeed fossil (beach finds) and any idea as to their age? I also found about 15 small individual bryozoan colonies.
  4. Please help with ID of sponges, corals and bryozoans

    Dear Guys, I collected some interesting specimens in Jurassic- Early Cenozoic erratics like sponges, bryozoans and hexacorals and also two primitive Ordovician sponges. The sponge pieces are 3-8 mm length (In yellowish limestone on sponge has very interesting skeleton growth outside). The size of coral in greenish gray limestone is 9 mm diameter, in the white limestone- 7 mm diameter. The bryozoans are from 7 mm to 1 cm length, they web shaped. Please help with ID of these fossils if you could. Best Regards Domas 1. Late Jurassic sponges in my opinion. 2. Early Cretaceous (?) sponges. 3. Late Cretaceous- Paleocene sponges I think.
  5. I collected this specimen earlier today from the Pennsylvanian, Kansas City group, Winterset limestone near Kansas City. When I split the rock, I was delighted to see the delicate preservation. Am I correct that this is an internal mold of a fan bryozoan? Russ Here is the right side. Here are both sides. Here is the left side. An here is another view of the right.
  6. Another trip to Wrens Nest

    Had a great day out with Candace and Nick @thelivingdead531 @Barerootbonsai Friday 20th. Here are a few of my finds, I’ll post the hash plates when I’ve photographed them. We all got a great variety of finds, here are some of mine. I’m sure Nick and Candace will add to this thread.
  7. Fall Break in Sulphur

    Hi! This teacher is spending the last day of Fall Break Christmas shopping - fossils for my students! Found a few beauties for teacher, too... I think this may be part of a trilobite... thoughts? More pics in comments of other mystery finds as I find them! Thanks in advance!
  8. Mahantango Bryozoan

    Hi folks. Still searching for a complete trilobite. The "Bit" count is over 80 now .... still hopeful though. Anyway, I cracked open this densely populated plate of bryozoans. Several species were throughout this chunk. I saved this split as it is probably the best (size) example of this particular species that I have found here so far. Kind regards,
  9. Hi rock heads Last weekend I was teaching in London which gave me the opportunity to break the journey up by stopping off 2/3 of the way home to Manchester at Wrens Nest. Wrens Nest is situated in Dudley, a town close to Birmingham in the West Midlands, UK. Wrens Nest is the best and productive Silurian site in the UK. Here's two maps of the location Not often you find a site of this size and quality bang in the middle of a large town! There are are three options for parking, the actual car park (which was locked as a UK public holiday. Or The Caves pub next to Wrens Nest. Or the road. After a two minute walk I was in the national park. No hammers are allowed or needed! Here's the Silurian sea bed. It's cordoned off as there are regular rock slides revealing another layer of sea bed. Cool huh?
  10. Bryozoan Seabed Plate

    Found this large Bryozoan Seabed plate north of Milwaukee, WI a while back. I noticed an imprint that almost looks like a footprint of some sort. Curious to hear from group on potential dinosaur footprint. Probably unlikely given size 2-3/4 long but thought I would ask
  11. Tabulate Coral

    From the album Beltzville State Park

    Pleurodictyum americanum Devonian Manhatango Formation Beltzville State Park, Beltzville, PA Thank you to @fossildude19 for the ID!
  12. Bryozoan

    From the album Beltzville State Park

    Bryozoan Devonian Manhatango Formation Beltzville State Park, Beltzville, PA
  13. Bryozoan

    From the album Beltzville State Park

    Bryozoan Devonian Manhatango Formation Beltzville State Park, Beltzville, PA
  14. Unidentified

    From the album Delaware Fossils

    Found on the beach in New Castle, Delaware. Known Paleozoic fossil area. Identity unknown.
  15. Would like fossil ID of the bryozoan, please
  16. Middle Devonian Bryozoan

    From the album Canandaigua trilobites

    Bryozoan sp. about 6 cm in situ in mudstone shale of the New York Fingerlakes region
  17. Constellaria sp.

    Specimen from the upper member of the Verulam Fm. Measures 56 mm at widest extent of the colony. Stellate maculae clustered more closely together than C. florida and more akin in appearance to C. fischeri. . Specimen is currently not described in this formation, to the best of this collector's knowledge, although other specimens have been collected from this location in the past.
  18. Middle Devonian Bryozoan?

    Beyond being able to pick out a fenestellate bryozoan, my knowledge of bryozoans is quite poor. I was hoping for an ID on this one (bryozoan? sponge?), which is among the most peculiar I've found around these parts (these parts being fill deposited from Bois Blanc / Amherstburg Fms). Those large, circular pores were what persuaded me to take it home. Is it even a bryozoan? It is about an inch (though no saying how large it might have spread).
  19. My Cousin's Fossil

    While visiting family, my cousin showed me a fossil he collected at the coast when he was a child, cracking rocks to see what he could find. They spent a lot of time on the Jurassic coast, but also went to places like Hunstanton, which have Cretaceous layers. I'm really not sure what this is, but it's something in a flint nodule. Could it be a bryozoan?
  20. Hello once again! Yesterday when I went out with Viola to Mimico Creek in Toronto (Georgian Bay Formation, Upper Ordovician), I found an interesting piece and I'd like your thoughts regarding its identity. The dome-shaped object in the photos below has bumps all over it, and there are tiny pores throughout, so I was wondering if you think it's a bryozoan or perhaps a stromatoporid (apparently Labechia huronensis is a bumpy-looking stromatoporid that can be found in the Georgian Bay Formation, but MANY bryozoans can be found here, too - including on this piece of rock! - so I'm not sure which it is). "Front" of specimen: "Back" of specimen: What is the conical-shaped, segmented item in the upper right-hand corner, by the way? Closer views of the bumpy, dome-shaped object: Thanks for your help! Monica
  21. Permian shale in Manhattan, KS

    We moved to Manhattan, Kansas two years ago but I never tried looking for fossils in the area until last week. This is in the Flint Hills area so lots of Permian shale and limestone everywhere. We visited a 20-foot cliff behind the Manhattan Aquarium Co building at the southeast edge of town, and picked up a lot of loose sheets and blocks of bearing lots of fusinilids and brachiopods. We found an interesting chunk resting halfway up the cliff with large curved pieces which I was pretty excited about since it looks like bone at a glance, but they might be bryozoan colonies since they're too evenly covered in tiny pores (we did find clam shells that had similar colonies on their surface but it was patchier). There's a small object (shown first by the quarter) in the same matrix almost completely exposed. It looks symmetrical along a center axis but has a strange indentation in the middle, with the sides actually folded in and what appear to be seams. It seems too complex to be a brachiopod shell. A nice find from lower down was an extremely rich matrix with a lot of shells, fusilinids, and crinoid bits. There's a dark object near the corner that looks like part of a trilobite? There's another object in this I can't identify, shown in the last two photos above the Y-shaped bryozoan piece. It consists of a straight stick with regularly spaced branches or openings on both sides. It could be a cross section of a spiral but I would expect the sides to be offset from each other more. I'm not sure if it's attached to the flat piece at one end.
  22. Bryozoan Fossil ??

    I found this over the weekend north of Milwaukee on the shoreline of Lake Michigan. It looks to be in the Devonian or possible Silurian Period and what I am guessing is Bryozoans from the seafloor of what once was. I would appreciate anyone knowledgeable to confirm. I know these are pretty common finds, but wondering if it is somewhat rare to find this big (11" x 12" x 3" & weighs 24lbs). Also given the dense formation, I assume my guess of being from seafloor is correct?
  23. OBX: Surprise, Surprise!

    Last week, we went out to the Outer Banks of North Carolina for some wind-and-water sports. Only one problem: no wind. So, we combed the beach most days. It'd been a week since Hurricane Matthew tore through the Caribbean and Southern US. The Outer Banks are not generally considered a hot spot for fossils, though seekers of modern shells love the place. When we went out, I told myself I had enough modern seas shells. I wasn't taking anything home unless it was at least 10,000 years old. That should be enough self-restraint to send me home with empty pockets. As luck would have it, Matthew carved into the Pleistocene shelf on which the islands rest and churned up chunks of shell-laden sandstone off the coast of Avon, on Hatteras Island. Some of the ancient shells are so well-preserved that I'd not recognize them as any older than a few years -most of it while they were inhabited - if not for the sandstone firmly affixed to the shells. Some were conglomerates of identifiable shells. Some are agatized. One had grown a calcite (?) crystal lattice. No empty pockets for me! I am definitely no expert. Or local. My guess was that my finds were relatively recent. Digging around with the kind help of Abyssunder, I came up with Pleistocene era. A few other goodies from the day include: an echinoid sand dollar, probably Mellita sp. Argopecten gibbous cluster and another scallop Mercanaria sp. with a small, agatized bivalve embedded on on the inside clockwise from upper left: Astrangia lineata, an unidentifiable bivalve, Solenastea bella, and Septastrea marylandica
  24. My kids and I sorted through some gravel that had been given to us by a friend, from a creek that is south of the North Sulphur on private land. Here is a video of some of the finds: And here are some photos, verts first:
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