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Found 100 results

  1. ID verifications?

    Along with being a newly avid fossil student, I am also a stock photographer. I would like to submit these images for stock images, but I want to make sure that I am identifying them correctly. You guys have helped me learn EVERYTHING you see here! All of the names and labels, I learned here! Please let me know if I am missing any thing or have mislabeled any of these? I have numbered them to help with the identification. Thanks so much! Ramona
  2. My grandson and I found this chunk of fossiliferous limestone in our yard today and I cleaned it with vinegar, but it is very crumbly. I can tell that it contains mostly fenestellan bryzoa and crinoids, which is what we find most of in our yard. What is the best way to preserve this fossil to keep it from crumbling? I am hesitant to clean it anymore due to the fragility of it! Thanks! Ramona
  3. Fossils in quartz?

    I continue to be amazed at the plethora of fossils in our yard, so I tried an experiment. I raked up some rocks that were around a tree in our front yard and half filled a five gallon bucket with them. I figure that some of them were brought in as decorative rocks, but to test that theory I grabbed two from the top at random. I cleaned them with vinegar and water and then photographed them with my macro lens. They are at least a different type of rock than I am used to seeing (not all of these are different, but those two were). I mostly see limestone, but I will post photos of these in the comments. They look like quartz to me? Or are they a different type of limestone? And maybe I am imaging it, but I think I am seeing some crinoids and bryozoans in them? If no one else sees them I will circle what I THINK are fossils for further verification. Is it odd to find an area so rich in fossils? Or am I odd in that I am looking so closely for them, LOL? I guess since this area was once covered in water, it is likely "normal" to find bryozoans and crinoids everywhere I look, right? Thanks for all input! I learn so much here! (And I won't be surprised to hear that the following photos really ARE rocks that were likely brought in as decorative, LOL!) Ramona
  4. Two tiny rocks

    In my continuing adventure in our yard, I decided to scoop up a few tiny rocks today and examine them. This one was not much of a surprise. Am I correct in stating that it is a tiny bit of fenestella bryozoan? (measurements are in mm). Found in Huntsville, AL - I have found lots of fossiliferous limestone in our yard to date. It's the next one that puzzles me most... Thanks!| Ramona
  5. What might this be?

    I have been able to identify (with your help) a few of the fossils we found while hunting at Beltzville state park. This is something that may be something. I tried to get the six-sided pics as recommended. What might this be (if anything)? Beltzville State Park in Pennsylvania, USA. I believe these come the Upper Devonian Mahantango Formation. Thank you.
  6. From other examples I have seen, I think these are bryozoans (sp?). Is that correct? The first example in question is the one exhibiting pencil-like structure in the center of the rock. In the second picture (of the same specimen), there seems to be a porous structure shown. The shadows may look like the mold is raised from the rock, but it is not. The fossil is an imprint (concave into the matrix). I think these are from the Upper Devonian Mahantango Formation. Thanks
  7. Ontario Edrioastreroids

    I didn't take part in the Secret Santa this year but it almost feels like I did, as I received a package from @Nimravis the other day (not a surprise, I knew it was coming, but the timing was right for Christmas) - Edrio's from the Bobcaygen formation. Thanks again Ralph! I could us a bit of help with IDs. I guess they could use a bit of prepping to make them easier to see, but maybe someone can recognize them the way they are. I figure #3 is Belochthus orthokalus, and #4 is Cryptogoleus chapmani, but not sure of the other two. Is #1 a smaller Belochthus? It looks like there are two there but the 2nd one is even more buried so it may not be identifiable. And is #2 a larger Cryptogoleus, or something else? Also, what is the small discoidal bryozoan?
  8. Wormholes? Or bryozoan tubes?

    It's me again! And I promise that this is NOT a piece of concrete! ;-) (Joke from previous post.) This is the bottom of a limestone rock that has a lot of bryozoan fossils in it, found in our yard in Huntsville, AL. Do the holes look like trace wormholes? Or could they be from the digestive systems of the fenestalla bryozoans? I can get a closer photo tomorrow, plus photos of the rest of the rock if that would help. I left this one in the yard, but I know where it is! Thanks! Ramona
  9. Bryozoan guesses

    I occasionally pick up a few bryozoan when hunting for "fossils", but they must have something about them that are intriguing. These two specimens caught my eye and were collected from a road cut in southern Indiana. There is Kope overlain by Belleview, Ordovician. After studying possible bryozoan that match, I am not sure of an ID. So let me know your thoughts. Mike First: Second:
  10. Is this bryozoan or just rock

    Hello again, I found these 2 rocks this morning on my property. Redwall limestone, Mooney falls member, Arizona, Mississippian. I think the tiny branch looking thing might be bryozoan and I don't know if the bumpy rock is anything at all. What do you guys think, are these just weathered rocks?
  11. fossil in fossil

    This is from the southwest side of the York river a short way upstream from the bridge in Yorktown, VA. And I do mean up, stream. The bank is rip rap ! Something appears to have settled on this bryozoan while it was alive ? Scale is in mm.
  12. still learning

    Sorry I haven't been on the forum in a while since I've been working like crazy. After a 71 hour week last week I took a day off. My new job is a driving job around my local area so I make notes of places to revisit to rockhound ( I also do some while on layover time but its hard not to get dirty!). I went back to one today, It is a Bralier Shale (Devonian) exposure. Here's where I need some help. Are the tube things #3 corals or bryozoans? Any id's on the other things would be appreciated. Scale on all is centimeter.
  13. branching bryozoan? Reno, Nevada

    This week I found this in the Reno, Nevada area. I'm trying to get some information on what it is exactly and if it is indeed a fossil. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
  14. Prasopora bryozoan

    From the album Finds From the Ordovician -488 to 443 MYA-

    From the Collingwood member of the Lindsay (Cobourg) Fm.
  15. I’ve got quite a handful of Devonian fossils that I’ve found this past week on the shore of Seneca lake in Upstate NY. This post is more of a confirmation of my original thoughts and a hope for a more definitive and exact identification of some of these finds. Thanks for any help in advance! 1– horn coral
  16. Bryozoa Horta

    Bryozoa Horta Found - July 23, 2019 Name - Atactotoechus fruticosus Age - Middle Devonian Formation - Moscow, Kashong mbr. Locality - Livingston County, New York, USA Size - 8" x 5" Complete and unprepared. I find these colonies at only one locality here in NY. The majority of the Bryozoa colonies are branching and I have reassembled many over the years (pic included of a typical branching specimen). This is the first unbranching Atactotoechus specimen I found lying on the seafloor like a blob or a Star Trek Horta (in my eye anyway ). The specimen was found in life position on top of a mat of fenestrate bryozoan. A very rare find for me. Thanks, Mikeymig
  17. I took my family across the river to Clarksville Indiana today to visit The Falls of the Ohio State Park. It was very hot with a high in the 90s, but we had a good time walking the Devonian fossil beds and visiting the Interpretive Center . The river was down enough to get onto the upper limestone beds, but the lower beds were still underwater. They are typically exposed during the months of September and October and occasionally in the summer when there is little rain (not this year!). The river is at 20 ft right now. The lower beds become dry around the 13.5 ft mark. Their official website has a page that monitors the river levels and tells you when certain areas and strata are exposed. I suggest checking that out before making the trip to visit the park. https://www.fallsoftheohio.org/current-ohio-river-conditions/ The Interpretive Center houses the main indoor exhibit, gift shop, a river viewing room, and bird/wildlife viewing room, along with friendly staff. The main exhibit has fossils and interactive areas for the kids. Not only are there fossil on display, but also sections regarding the Native Americans that lived in the area, the current wildlife, and information regarding the Lewis and Clark expedition. A piece of fossilized wood just outside of the center on the backside by the parking lot. It is roughly 4 feet in length and 2 feet wide. When you walk into the main foyer of the Interpretive Center this boulder is on display. It is about a meter across and half as thick. I don't want to spoil the trip for everyone so I'm just going to post some pictures of a few of my favorite pieces. I thought this was interesting. It's labeled as orange chert, which I assume it is, but it also has a horn coral right in the middle of it. A sampling of the fauna found in the fossil record here. There was also a small exhibit on mammoths as evidence of a few have been found in the surrounding area. Presumably crossing the Falls to get to the salt licks in Kentucky. This was a comparison of a mammoth and mastadon tooth. The interior exhibit is nice, but for me the best part of the Falls of the Ohio is outside. Its the fossil beds that you can walk on and explore. I've been here a few times and find something new each time I come. Remember folks, it's against the law to collect here. Leave the fossils alone for others to enjoy! No matter how tempting... . If you just have to collect something, the park usually has a couple of dump truck loads of material near the back of the parking lot that they allow you to search through. Seriously. Here are some of the fossils that me and the family found while walking around the fossil beds. A word of caution, if you want to get to certain areas there is some climbing that you must do. A lot of the strata has fissures or large boulders that must be climbed, or walked around to move farther down the coast. This is on the fossil beds themselves. You can stay higher on the slope and circumvent a lot of the really strenuous stuff, but the fossils are not as good the higher up you go. Here are a some of the more impressive horn coral that I found. They actually call these larger ones "tusk coral" because the are so large. I'm not certain what these coral are, but Siphonophrentis and Cystiphylloides are common here. I know a hand isn't the best for scale, but it's all I had at the time. lol From the tip of my index finger to where my thumb connects is just over 5 inches. Some mainly brachiopod hash plates. A large favosites. Crinoids Lace Bryozoan This was my favorite find. A large colonial coral. It is over a meter in diameter. What is commonly called a Pipe Organ Coral. Eridophyllum I think that is all for now. It was a great day of discovery and fun with the family. If you are in the area and have a couple of extra hours, I highly recommend you stop by and check out the sights for yourself. You won't be disappointed. Just remember to check the river water levels and be ready for a little exercise!
  18. Arkona 07/06/2019

    As usual I had the urge to go fossil hunting this weekend so I decided to take a trip to Arkona and have a relaxing day of surface collecting. It was calling for rain all week but turned out to be a nice day (aside from the brutal heat and swarming deer flies). Things were looking a little different this year. Spring hit this roadway to one of the pits pretty hard. Critters everywhere so you have to watch your step. There were loads of tiny toads that must have just grown up and left the water. Also found this poor strawberry plant struggling on top of a hill in poor soil but somehow managed to fruit And now for the fossils... I didn't have any luck finding the blastoid or crinoid I was after but I did take a few things home. Some corals Aulocystis ramosa, Platyaxum frondosum Favosites sp. A brach species I didnt have yet and a large Callipleura Nucleospira concinna, Callipleura nobilis An interesting bryozoan and a cluster of tube worms unknown bryozoan, Spirorbis sp. Gastropods Platyceras bucculentum, Naticonema lineata Possible arthropod trackway? And a new trilo species for me. Beaten up but I'll take it. The cephalon+partial thorax look like Basidechenella Pseudodechenella arkonensis. The pygidium looks like Crassiproetus crassimarginatus (top one was found last year).
  19. The Crinoid Road Cut

    I don't get to go out fossil hunting as much as I would like these days, but I was able to sneak out to a local road cut for a few hours the other morning. It was the day before my birthday after all! A great excuse for me to convince the wife to watch the kiddos for a few hours. This particular road cut is dated to the Mississippian and is full of crinoids! I was literally walking over them. They were everywhere! Upon closer inspection I found that there were a couple of layers that were mainly composed of crinoids. This large slab was laying on the ground in front of the cut. The slab was almost 2 meters in length. Covered in crinoid fragments. Another large slab of crinoid infested rock. Again, it was on the ground in front of the cut. Yet another slab. I finally remembered to put something in for scale... A picture of what I am calling crinoid gravel. If you look closely you can see many crinoid fragments mixed in. This gravel was up a little higher on the cut. The road cut has multiple accessible levels. Here is a sample of some of the pieces I picked up. In my excitement, I started out picking up everything. Then I quickly realized that was an effort in futility. I thought the specimen at the very bottom right of the picture might have been a calyx when I first picked it up, but I think it may be a geode with a piece of crinoid attached. The largest of the "coin" looking columnals (third in the top row from left to right) is over an inch in diameter. With work being crazy, I haven't had a chance to go through everything and clean them up for a closer look. Sorry this photo isn't the best. It's late here and I'm trying to not wake up the family. Its the best I can do under sub par basement lighting. A very nice (and heavy!) hash plate that I was able to manhandle to the truck. Crinoids were not the only things I found. This horn coral was sticking up out of the rubble just waiting for me to come along and take it home! I like how it is coming up out of the matrix. Lording over its domain! lol I also came across bryozoan on occasion. The shale that they are in is very delicate and brittle. It's barely more than clay. I had to handle with care. Overall it wasn't a bad little outing. Any day out fossil hunting is a good day! I picked up much more, a few longer crinoid stems, a couple of small hash plates to practice prepping on, some geological items for my brother who is more into geology than paleontology. I ran into a few brachiopods, but most were not very well preserved or were badly weathered. Ill try to post a few more/better pictures as I go back through things and get them cleaned up a bit. I also have more pictures of the exposure and crinoid layers that I might post as well. Happy Hunting!
  20. I was at the chalk cliffs at Seaford in April this year hunting for echinoids. However, I only found time to clean and prep these fossils this week, using a safety pin, a brush and water (Very low-tech, I know!). UKfossils.co.uk states the rocks here are Cretaceous, 89-86 million years old. I found a fist-sized chunk of chalk that yielded two enchinoderm plates (picture 4) and a very small, unknown fossil. Pictures 1-3 show the unknown fossil. 1 division on the ruler is 1mm. It is perfectly spherical, with a diameter of about 4mm and has raised dimples covering its surface. There are at least two holes, but they are not opposite each other, and I am unsure if these are biological features or just preservational artifacts. My thoughts are this is either a bryozoan or a small echinoid, but I am not sure.
  21. 2 questions

    I was wondering if the lower left white pieces with the straight row of circles are bryozoa. Secondly, I was wondering if the seemingly silver "rod" is animal or mineral. These samples are quite small and this is the best I can do as far as focus goes.
  22. Hello all! I am new to this forum and just started getting interested in rocks and fossils. I went out to Wyoming last weekend and found a lot of really nice agates and fluorescent minerals but I also came across what look like some pieces of chalcedony with these white tubular inclusions in them. I first just saw the shell imprint in the rock so I pocketed it, but later when I looked closer noticed the white webbed tubes. I posted these pictures on reddit in r/fossilid and got a few responses telling me that they are Bryozoans. I looked this up and it looks right to me! My question is this...all of the pictures of fossilized bryozoans I have seen look very traditional (in sedimentary rock). Is it usual to find them embedded in silicate like this? I cannot find one other example of this on the internet which makes me think that maybe this type of specimen is called by a different name and that I am just not searching for the right thing. Anyways, any help and insights would be much appreciated! I am going back out to Wyoming this weekend to search some more and would love to know exactly what it is I am looking for! Thanks in advance for any responses! Erik
  23. Fossil id

    Does anyone know what this is? I found it in Beltzville State Park, Pa, Devonian period. I’ve been told it could be snake skin, a type of Bryozoan and a certain type of tree. It’s lightweight and the bumps are very pronounced. Thank you!
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