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Found 23 results

  1. Good afternoon, I have submitted photos of this fossil to multiple local groups in hopes of a possible identification to no avail, therefore I have turned to this forum and home to figure this out! I hope it to be a calamite cone fossil but I have been wrong before, so I am asking for a second opinion. Thank you very much! Important information: This fossil was pulled off a shale cliff that is abundant in calamite and fern fossils. The cliff is located near Carnegie, Pennsylvania (Western PA). The specific fossil has both calamite and ferns on the reverse side. Edit 1: The size is about 1.5 inches (3.81 cm). Information that is possibly helpful but may not be: The cliff has a few layers of coal and black colored shale, while the majority of the cliff is a grey colored shale. This rock was pulled off just above a black shale line.
  2. What species of Calamite is this

    I know these two are Calamites but I’m unsure how to identify the species. They were both found in the North Attleboro part of the Rhode Island formation and I’m thinking the larger one is C. Cistii?
  3. Calamite #2

    From the album Missouri Plant Fossils

    One of my favorite Calamites due to how well preserved its internal anatomy is! I gave this to a friend's little brother who loves fossils.
  4. Calamite #1

    From the album Missouri Plant Fossils

    One of many calamite fossils I have found
  5. Alabama coal mine additions

    I picked up two additional fossils I needed. First one is a Calamites Leaf Tip, needed this to go with all my other Calamite fossils. Second is a Lepidodendron Leaf , I only had one small sample of this so wanted more. this is all Pennsylvanian age
  6. This was found in Hamlin wV in a layer of sandstone approx 614 ft above see level it looks to be calamite but the needles or whatever you call them around the stem seem to close together. Theres a pop bottle cap up top for reference to size or whatever u call it Soda bottle cap in your area of the country. This came from my back yard theres a rock outcrop at the base of this hill and every square inch of this rock is smashed plant material like it was a leading edge of a flash flood how it carrys all the plants trees and trash that it picks up in that thick slurry cause 10 ft up and 20ft over theres nothing but mud notice that hollow stem there on the right
  7. Calamites?

    This was given to me from a third hand source. I’m only assuming it’s from Illinois—I really don’t know. I supposed it was a calamites horsetail, but I’m seeking confirmation before I catalogue it. Anyone?
  8. 3-D CALAMITES a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Calamite Tree Fossil SITE LOCATION: eastern Kentucky TIME PERIOD: Carboniferous, Pennsylvanian Period (330 million years ago) Data: Calamites is a genus of extinct arborescent (tree-like) horsetails to which the modern horsetails (genus Equisetum) are closely related. Unlike their herbaceous modern cousins, these plants were medium-sized trees, growing to heights of more than 30 meters (100 feet). They were components of the understories of coal swamps of the Carboniferous Period (around 360 to 300 million years ago). A number of organ taxa have been identified as part of a united organism, which has inherited the name Calamites in popular culture. Calamites correctly refers only to casts of the stem of Carboniferous/Permian sphenophytes, and as such is a form genus of little taxonomic value. There are two forms of casts, which can give mistaken impressions of the organisms. The most common is an internal cast of the hollow (or pith-filled) void in the centre of the trunk. This can cause some confusion: firstly, it must be remembered that a fossil was probably surrounded with 4-5 times its width in (unpreserved) vascular tissue, so the organisms were much wider than the internal casts preserved. Further, the fossil gets narrower as it attaches to a rhizoid, a place where one would expect there to be the highest concentration of vascular tissue (as this is where the peak transport occurs). However, because the fossil is a cast, the narrowing in fact represents a constriction of the cavity, into which vascular tubes encroach as they widen. The trunks of Calamites had a distinctive segmented, bamboo-like appearance and vertical ribbing. The branches, leaves and cones were all borne in whorls. The leaves were needle-shaped, with up to 25 per whorl. Their trunks produced secondary xylem, meaning they were made of wood. The vascular cambium of Calamites was unifacial, producing secondary xylem towards the stem center, but not secondary phloem. The stems of modern horsetails are typically hollow or contain numerous elongated air-filled sacs. Calamites was similar in that its trunk and stems were hollow, like wooden tubes. When these trunks buckled and broke, they could fill with sediment. This is the reason pith casts of the inside of Calamites stems are so common as fossils. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Pteridophyta Class: Equisetopsida Order: Equisetales Family: †Calamitaceae Genus: †Calamites
  9. 3-D CALAMITES a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Calamite Tree Fossil SITE LOCATION: eastern Kentucky TIME PERIOD: Carboniferous, Pennsylvanian Period (330 million years ago) Data: Calamites is a genus of extinct arborescent (tree-like) horsetails to which the modern horsetails (genus Equisetum) are closely related. Unlike their herbaceous modern cousins, these plants were medium-sized trees, growing to heights of more than 30 meters (100 feet). They were components of the understories of coal swamps of the Carboniferous Period (around 360 to 300 million years ago). A number of organ taxa have been identified as part of a united organism, which has inherited the name Calamites in popular culture. Calamites correctly refers only to casts of the stem of Carboniferous/Permian sphenophytes, and as such is a form genus of little taxonomic value. There are two forms of casts, which can give mistaken impressions of the organisms. The most common is an internal cast of the hollow (or pith-filled) void in the centre of the trunk. This can cause some confusion: firstly, it must be remembered that a fossil was probably surrounded with 4-5 times its width in (unpreserved) vascular tissue, so the organisms were much wider than the internal casts preserved. Further, the fossil gets narrower as it attaches to a rhizoid, a place where one would expect there to be the highest concentration of vascular tissue (as this is where the peak transport occurs). However, because the fossil is a cast, the narrowing in fact represents a constriction of the cavity, into which vascular tubes encroach as they widen. The trunks of Calamites had a distinctive segmented, bamboo-like appearance and vertical ribbing. The branches, leaves and cones were all borne in whorls. The leaves were needle-shaped, with up to 25 per whorl. Their trunks produced secondary xylem, meaning they were made of wood. The vascular cambium of Calamites was unifacial, producing secondary xylem towards the stem center, but not secondary phloem. The stems of modern horsetails are typically hollow or contain numerous elongated air-filled sacs. Calamites was similar in that its trunk and stems were hollow, like wooden tubes. When these trunks buckled and broke, they could fill with sediment. This is the reason pith casts of the inside of Calamites stems are so common as fossils. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Pteridophyta Class: Equisetopsida Order: Equisetales Family: †Calamitaceae Genus: †Calamites
  10. Calamite??

    Hi, it's this a fossil calamite? Found it in besom hill Oldham uk.
  11. Calamite

    From the album Carbondale, PA

    Calamities sp., a tree-like plant with hollow, woody stem that grew more than 100 ft high (30m). Found in a tailings pile in Carbondale, PA.
  12. Lepidodendron

    From the album My Collection

    Here is another plant material plate I found over at Cory's Lane, Rhode Island. This medium sized plate has a lepidodendron branch going through the middle with calamites and neuropteris leaves around the edges of the matrix.
  13. It might be hard to see from the pic. But looking at the calamite fossil I found, it appears that it had many layers of bark. It almost seems like it had many layers of skin like onion. I know these tree would get up to 100 feets or so. I was wondering if anybody knew if it had diffrent layers of bark?
  14. Here are pictures of Calamite found in New Brunswick Canada
  15. This is the first of a collection of photos I had taken during a fossil hunt that my brother and I did in Rhode Island back in early 2000's. Most all were to big to bring home but we did bring home some nice smalls and some cool pic's. I could not bring myself to hack into Mother Natures work so it was not disturbed. I hope that they still are there for all to enjoy. This picture is of a calamite cast with very little detail due to the coarse gravel that filled the void.
  16. Hi everyone! I'm new to this site (signed-up-5-mins-ago new, lol), and I have a question. Unfortunately, I don't have a picture, because I wasn't thinking and sent it to school with my daughter, who is studying fossils in class. Anyway, my husband and I took our daughter fossil-hunting on a trail in Frostburg, MD (Allegany Co.). As a kid, I used to go through shale piles at my grandpa's farm and occasionally run across a fern fossil, and since this particular trail (down from the train depot, Allegany Highland trail, perhaps?) has lots of shale on the sides, I thought it would be a good place to look. Without much luck, we dug through fallen piles of the black shale. I finally stumbled across a piece of shale (right as I was ready to give up, lol!) that had an imprint that I'd never found before. The only way I can describe it is that it looked like a bunch of vertical lines, very even, and the prints (two side by side) were about 2-3 inches wide. I looked it up online, and the pictures of calamite fossils looked identical as far as I could tell. The question posed to you all, after all the long-winded explanations, is: Is it possible to find calamite fossils in Western MD? None of the websites I visited specifically stated what I would be able to find in Western MD, and I'd like to have a name to put to the fossil. After she's done showing it to her class, I will try to take a photo. For now, if anyone can confirm/deny/offer any other suggestion as to what I have found, I'd be so darn grateful! Thanks!, MissusTodd
  17. So got out fossil hunting for a couple hours today in Washington, PA and found some new stuff, some better examples of previous finds, and a lot of the same... Some of which I still had to pick up but didn't go overboard... lol. I would like to start with something I picked up on the way back to my car. First one of its kind I have found at this site. Thoughts? In trying to adjust my eyes for more 2 or 3D plant fossils I found these. The second I have found a similar piece of in the past that was ID'd as an inner layer of a plant fossil. This is a new piece so welcome to any new thought on that or this other one... More to follow...
  18. Carboniferous Plants

    Some pics of a few local finds.
  19. Plant Id's

    This is Washington, PA dunkard group. I am starting with one and will be adding pics of other plant material to this same post. I have a couple.... #1 (the piece I found is a fairly large size... Let me know if additional pic would help)
  20. Calamite Maybe?

    Found a couple things in some river or lake rocks today. Found calamite before and thinking this is possibly a somewhat worn piece? Thanks in advance!
  21. Pittsburgh PA. I need to get a better camera.... The nodule (?) has a vein like pattern in it, and the other an area of perfectly straight lines. Hope pics are good enough to maybe ID. Also not sure if the second one is just an imprint.... Thought? http://www.thefossilforum.com/public/style_emoticons/#EMO_DIR#/smile.png
  22. We collected these Neuropteris fern leaves and stems, and Annularia (Calamite tree) leaves at McIntyre Mountain in June 2012. This site is at the very top of the mountain, where the coal pits have been reclaimed and converted to a forested park. The veins of the leaves show up very clearly in the closeup photos.
  23. In June we were collecting neuropteris fern impressions from the shale spoils at the top of McIntyre Mountain (on our first fossil trip) and we discovered this plant fossil which is more "plant-like" - definitely not neuropteris and doesn't look much like a fern but has a distinctive pattern. UPDATE: The consensus is that this is Annularia, the leaves of the calamite tree. Probably Pennsylvanian.
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