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Found 177 results

  1. California fossil laws

    There are many laws that should be known in California. The consequences of these laws include fines and sometimes even prison. One of the most important laws in California is that there is no fossil collecting on Federal land. If you want to collect fossils on Federal land, you need to have a special permit and you have to donate all specimens to a museum, university etc. On BLM land, you are allowed to collect common invertebrate fossils. However, you need a special permit to sell or trade any fossils that you find on BLM land. You need permission from landowners to collect on private land. Research other laws. One of the best ways to fossil hunt without worrying about laws is to volunteer on museum or university fossil digs. Overall, research laws before you fossil hunt, not after.
  2. I dont know

    Hello, Im sorry but have no experience in fossils or geology. I was hiking around Rainbow Basin in southern california high desert near Barstow. I found this in a wash. It doesnt look like any rock I have seen. Not sure if it is a fossil or anything at all. It is about 23 centimeters long and 18 centimeters wide. If you could please help it would be appreciated thanks.
  3. All Would anyone have access to the following? PALAIOS (2007) 22 (6): 630-641. INFLUENCE OF SPATIOTEMPORAL SCALE ON THE INTERPRETATION OF PALEOCOMMUNITY STRUCTURE: LATERAL VARIATION IN THE IMPERIAL FORMATION OF CALIFORNIA CORY M. REDMAN, LINDSEY R. LEIGHTON, STEPHEN A. SCHELLENBERG, CHRISTOPHER N. GALE, JENNIFER L. NIELSEN, DONALD L. DRESSLER, MARY K. KLINGER Thanks in advance! Mike
  4. Turtle Fossil and Question ?

    Hey guys, So I found this and I thought maybe it looked like a turtle flipper? Also, a side question. Is it possible for pigment to still be present in fossil turtle scutes? Thanks for your time and help!
  5. @Boesse While cleaning shells from the Pliocene deposits at Capitola I came across this dolphin tooth ~17 mm. Any ideas on a more specific identification? Thanks Mike
  6. Great White??

    Found this small tooth on a recent trip to California. My guess is great white but it so similar to C. hastilis but with serrations. Could this be transitional tooth or is this Great White?
  7. Greetings. I have a lot of photos I’d like to share and get some feedback on, assuming there is not a unanimous agreement that the specimens you see in this photo are purely Geological in origin... I found them, and many more, within the geographical boundaries of a Jurassic age rock formation in Northern California that is listed primarily as meta volcanic rocks. Considering that information, please tell me if you thinking I’m barking up an imaginary tree here... If you are uncertain, let me know, and I will post more pictures... Thanks for your time! -Quinn
  8. Total Unknown

    Hi all, Very new to fossils, but stumbled upon this. It was found on the shore in Long Beach, CA. Wondering if yall could help. Thanks!
  9. Bone or teeth?

    are these bones or teeth? they look similar to some Ive seen around. Found in Menlo Park, CA
  10. Antler?

    Found a bunch of petrified wood up in the California Sierra Nevada foothills around 8500 ft After going over them this is one of 2 that stuck out as different. It is 3 1/2" long with rounded edges. Any ideas what it is? Thanks in advance Harry
  11. Hey guys, I dont really know what this could be, maybe just rock, but the color, shape, texture made me think twice - specifically the curved smooth bottom, sharp sides that curve strangely and just the shape in general. At first glance i thought it looked like a meteorite because of the flow-line'esque texture it has in some parts and the bottom side was smooth with little holes with some thumb print 'ish indents, and its darn heavy. But then it also reminded me of some marine mammal and large reptile fossil bones I've seen on here while perusing so I thought I'd ask. Also because of some other things I have found, which I want to ask about as well but dont want to spam all at once. Actually I'll post two of the other things too Found in Menlo Park, California about ~12" inches in ground, maybe slightly deeper. Menlo Park is considered Pleistocene/Holocene alluvial but there have been cretaceous foraminifers found in the towns surrounding Menlo Park. And then there was the paleoparadoxia found during the excavation of the Stanford Linear Accelerator as well, which is about a mile away from me, and they are from the Miocene I believe. Also after reading the USGS geological map survey of my area it seems that theres out crops from every time period, mostly due to the gazillion faults in SF bay area. So Im not really sure what I'm living on. Anyways.. The second rock looks like it has a mouth and some teeth which I found interesting. The third looks like a shell on the one curved end, but also like a saurapelta armor plate I've seen in photos before. Appreciate any thoughts, and if it is rock, do you know what kind? Thanks for your time and feedback!
  12. Bone Identification Help

    Hey guys and gals, While this isn't a fossil, I was wondering, if any of you had the time, could you help me ID this bone, as many of you are good at that sort of thing and I am clueless. Found in Menlo Park, CA. Still doing yard work when I have time and I came across this. Thanks for your help in advance! Hope everyones having a good day.
  13. ? Evestes jordani Gilbert

    From the album Vertebrates

    ? Evestes jordani Gilbert Middle Miocene Buellton Santa Barbara California Length 15cm
  14. Shark tooth?

    Hi everyone, I’m new to this community but have always had an interest in fossils and artifacts. This week I was in So California for work and walked down to the beach one night and found this. It looked like a large shark tooth but it didn’t look like images online. I’ve seen Megalodon teeth before and this looks like a petrified version. If it’s just a rock, that’s okay too. Thanks in advance for your responses.
  15. Hi I recently joined this forum and I need help to identify what type of fish fossil. My dad gave it to me several years ago and don't really know much about it so can someone identify it
  16. Natlandite Fossil Stone

    I joined with the hopes that someone here may know more about Natlandite fossil stone. My wife inherited a polished three piece set and unfortunately there is very little information available about it online. Within the two articles I could find we have learned that "it was first discovered in 1954 in Los Angeles, Ca. by geologist Manley L. Natland, during a small dig he made in his offices backyard. He was given a rock brought up during soil testing for an annex to the old Atlantic Richfield Building at 6th and Flower streets. Natland estimated the fossil stone to be between 5 to 7 million years old and said that it was likely formed when an earthquake dislodged a great mass of sludge from the Los Feliz area (then the seashore) and moved it to the Arco site, where it solidified. He had it cut and polished, revealing shells of bivalves, gastropods and coral in a marble like material, but thought no more about it until 1969, after he had retired from Atlantic Richfield, now Arco. That year, he asked to examine the excavation site where the building and it's annex were being torn down to make way for Arco towers, now known as City National Plaza. What he found was an entire bed of the fossil stone that he had seen years earlier. Natland arranged to have 500 tons of it hauled away and eventually had the rock cut and shaped into tables and statuary. The rock is about as hard as quartz and it contains about 350 different species. It was also named the official gemstone of Los Angeles in 1981." I have spoken with a paleontologist here at our local museum of natural history and he stated that he believes that some record of the stones should be preserved in a museum, if that has not already happened. He gave me the contact information of a paleontologist at the Los Angeles County Museum of Natural History and suggested that I contact them, as they would be the most appropriate place to store such fossils. They are absolutely beautiful pieces and any info or suggestions will be greatly appreciated! Thank you so much for taking time to read my post. Brandon Massey
  17. Beach fossil (CA) ID

    Can this be identified? Found at Huntington Beach in California.
  18. Possible Ammonite Fossil?

    Hello, I am new to the site, but I am a life long lover of all things nature. I found this little guy on the coast of California, most likely in San Simeon but possibly 30 minutes south, at Moonstone Beach. I found him about a year ago in August. He looks to be 6 1/2 centimeters. To forewarn everyone, I have little knowledge of history in terms of time periods, and am largely unfamiliar with geology as well such as rock types. I will describe as best I can per your requests. Please bear with me while I attempt to learn! Anyways, here he is. I believe him to be an ammonite but he has no spiral. Maybe a squid? Not even sure he is classified as a fossil, haha... Finally, thank you all so much for any and all responses, my scientific curiousity greatly appreciates it! Sincerely, Tyler North
  19. Hi all, can anyone tell if this is a dolphin tooth, and what species it is? It's a gift from @JBMugu It comes from Sharktooth Hill of Bakerfield, California. Round Mountain Silt Member of the Temblor Formation. It measures 1.7 inches long. Could it be Kentriodon?
  20. Any Sites in San Diego?

    I'm at San Diego for this weekend, and I'd like to know if there are any good fossil sites around there. I understand that many fossils in San Diego have been covered up or destroyed due to land development. If anyone knows of a fossil site, please reply or PM me. I've heard that Pacific Beach has some fossilized shells at its shore, has anybody been there to confirm this? Thanks, Seann
  21. Is this barnacle fossilized?

    I found this some years back at Pescadero Beach in California. I don't know if it's fossilized but if it is I think it would be from the Tertiary. Any help much appreciated.
  22. Possible STH coprolite

    I found this earlier this year, can't figure out what it is. The more I look at it the more I think coprolite. Let me know what you think.
  23. While descending from the top of our hike up Mission Peak in Fremont, CA, a friend and I came across what we suspect is a fossilized vertebrae. After doing some quick research online, I came across the following excerpt: "Some 3 miles east of the low hills and lying in the Mission District is a much taller ridge, Mission Peak, 2517 feet above sea level. Millions of years before the Pleistocene, sediments that now compose the Mission Peak ridge were deposited by both marine and fresh waters. These sediments are now a rich source of marine fossils, many of them clams and snails. Also, remains of Desmostylus, a mammal with characteristics between those of a sea cow and a walrus, have been found among the remains of seashells. These fossils were buried under marine water during the late Miocene time, or about 12,000,000 years ago. The Miocene is one of seven epochs of the Cenozoic era." Source: http://cnhm.msnucleus.org/Pleistocene/FossilBearingSediments.html I failed to take a measurement, but as I recall this object was about the size of a lemon. Can anyone help confirm if this is a vertebrae or provide any additional information? Thanks for your help!
  24. Found these fossils

    These fossils, amoung a few other, have been sitting in my curio cabinet for decades. My parents were the first homeowners in a brand new subdivision in Mission Viejo in 1967. When the backyard was dug up for a sprinkler system, they found this pair, which look like an egg. They are not matching pieces, I don't believe. They are about 3 1/2 inches long.
  25. Is this a fossil?

    I found this while out for a hike, it was in the eroded runoff ditches on the trail. It has a symmetry that seems biological to me, but that could be wishful thinking. What do you think? Thanks
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