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Found 240 results

  1. Below are some more of my macro fossils that I’ve recently put in 8”X12” Riker mount displays. To see a previous post with Riker mount displays with specimens from the Aquia Formation of Maryland and the Nanjemoy Formation of Virginia check out the below link: http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/101415-a-few-riker-mounts-with-specimens-from-the-aquia-formation-of-maryland-and-the-nanjemoy-formation-of-virginia/ Considering I’ve only made three trips to the Ernst Ranch in Bakersfield California, I’m pretty happy with the macro specimens that I’ve found in those trips. The below display contains some of my nicer macro specimens from the Miocene Round Mountain Silt Formation. The top of the display has a cetacean flipper bone, cetacean vertebra, a bird bone, and a leatherback turtle carapace bone. Then there is a row of Isurus planus shark teeth. Then a group of Carcharodon hastalis teeth (for size reference the largest tooth is 3.13”) with an Otodus megalodon to the right. The bottom of the display has two upper Hexanchus teeth and both cetacean and sea lion/seal teeth. Below is a picture of a display with macro specimens from my sons’ M&M Ranch in Sioux County Nebraska. These macro specimens came from the Eocene Chadron Formation (maybe but not likely) and the Oligocene Brule Formation (Most likely as the vast amount of the ranch flats areas where they were collected is almost all Oligocene). The top has a row of coprolites. I only have a few coprolites left as I have donated several hundred to the New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science. The next row has a few pieces of turtle/tortoise shell. Then there is a mammal tooth and rows of small mammal partial jaws. The bottom of the display contains mammal bones. Some of these specimens were given to me by my older son, Marco Jr., because I don’t do a lot of surface collecting at the ranch. I spend the vast majority of my time at the ranch searching for anthills and collecting anthill matrix which contains micro vertebrate specimens which are my main interest. Below is a picture of a display with Carcharodon hastalis shark teeth from the Miocene of Virginia. The top of the display contains teeth from the upper jaw and the bottom of the display from the lower jaw. For size reference the largest teeth are 2 5/8”. I have collected several thousand Carcharodon hastalis teeth from Virginia but this will probably be my only Riker mount display of them. I used all six of the Riker mount displays that I just recently bought so I won’t be able to post anything more until I get my next batch of them delivered. Marco Sr.
  2. Petrified Fungus?

    Hello everyone, I'm new to this forum, but I always lurked here without an account and learned a lot, so I made one to become part of the community since I collect and study fossils as a hobby. Now for the piece mentioned on the title, would you be able to help me figure what kind of fossil (or even if its one) is this? The structure reminds me of some fungus, like a polypore, but I cant figure what kind it is or if its an igneous rock or some kind of wood. I know some bracket fungus when dry can become really hard. Unfortunaly I dont have the item in my hands right now, as its from an auction that I won and I'm still going to retrieve it from the owner. All he knows is that it came from an american geologist collection in California and that it is really really old. It has 19 cm, not sure about the weigh tho. Thanks!
  3. Yesterday, I got back from a family vacation to California. While there, I was able to spend two days digging at the Ernst Quarries. The weather was beautiful and the teeth were plentiful! Carcharodon planus hiding in the rock.
  4. Hello, Does anybody know what type of fossils these are (the exact classification and era etc).. ps thanks guys... I'm new to this.
  5. Bone or stone?

    Is this a bone or a stone? It came from the Bone Beds of Shark Tooth Hill, Bakersfield, California. Miocene.
  6. plant fossil

    i found this fossil plant in the Santa cruz mountains i cant identify the plant here are both sides of it.
  7. 15 Million Years of California Birds

    Peter Kloess, 15 Million Years of Bird History: A Specimen-based Approach to Reconstructing the Late Neogene Bird Communities of California August 14, 2015, Masters of Science degree in Geology, California State University, Fullerton. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bmd5GpnHz54 For the people interested in California geology and what a thesis defense looks like, other California State University, Fullerton geology thesis defenses are at: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLXgKDqubcNoj2u6KmE90npOsGNaL_Seo2 Yours, Paul H.
  8. Scientists hope ancient Tomales Bay mammoth molar holds clues to prehistoric environment The Press Democrat, October 11, 2019 https://www.pressdemocrat.com/news/10135759-181/paleontologists-hopes-ancient-mammoth-molar Mammoth molar found on bay beach holds clues Point Reyes Light, October 16, 2019 https://www.ptreyeslight.com/article/mammoth-molar-found-bay-beach-holds-clues ACR family member makes mammoth find on Tomales Bay. ACR Conservation in Action https://www.egret.org/acr-family-member-makes-mammoth-find-tomales-bay Tomales Bay https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tomales_Bay Ice Age clues near Bodega. Scientist thinks mammoths rubbed coast rocks 12,000 years ago By Peter Fimrite, SF Gate, December 3, 2006 https://www.sfgate.com/bayarea/article/Ice-Age-clues-near-Bodega-Scientist-thinks-2466058.php Mammoth Rocks, California https://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=23566 https://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=23822 Yours, Paul H.
  9. Mysterious Fossil Found

    Thought this was a cool find! Sorry if it's been posted and I didn't see it on here. https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2019/10/26/california-earthquakes-july-reveal-mysterious-fossil-simi-valley/2468723001/
  10. Hi friends! I recently went to Rainbow Basin in California. I found this piece of fossilized something. To me, it looks like a chunk of skin and some fat layer underneath. I’m likely way off but, would love to hear all your thoughts on what this may be. Thanks in advance for your help!
  11. A new cetacean-related paper is available online: Leslie MS, Peredo CM, Pyenson ND. 2019. Norrisanima miocaena, a new generic name and redescription of a stem balaenopteroid mysticete (Mammalia, Cetacea) from the Miocene of California. PeerJ 7:e7629 https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.7629 A redescription of "Megaptera" miocaena was long overdue, as with other Miocene rorquals previously assigned to Balaenoptera and Megaptera, and the paper by Leslie et al. shows that this taxon is far more primitive than other balaenopteroids. The name Norrisanima is tongue-twisting because anima means "living" in Latin, and the genus honors the late Kenneth Norris and his son, Richard.
  12. Fossil areas.

    I know I post a lot of topics but can someone point out good fossil areas from L.a to San Diego.
  13. People have told me to go to Diamond Valley, They said there are lots of fossils there. The lake is man made though. Paleontologist already dug out the fossils. So what is so good about it.
  14. Need id please

    Hi all! Newbie to the forum. Found this item about 20-25 years ago. I’ve just reunited myself with it after re-discovering it at my fathers house, in his front yard. I found this in Agoura, California while hiking close to the 101 freeway. It was found on a hillside, elevation around 1200 feet (above sea level).Partially buried. Mastodon? Whale? Sloth? Rock? Hmmm. Hope the photos help. I apologize in advance for the lack of metric ruler. One of the photos is a magnified close up of the bottom side which shows what seems to be a cellular-like inner bone structure. Specimen also seems to have a tendon-looking impression or canal which leads me to believe it could be a lower leg joint? I also wet the specimen with de-ionized water to show more definition. I can only submit 1 or 2 photos due to size limit so maybe I’ll do several posts. Thanks for looking!
  15. Cosmopolitodus planus Bakersfield

    From the album Cenozoic Sharks

    Colorful Cosmopolitodus planus from Bakersfield, California
  16. Cosmopolitodus planus Bakersfield

    From the album Cenozoic Sharks

    Colorful Bakersfield, California Cosmopolitodus planus
  17. Conifer cone or catkin

    I found these lignified plant parts that sort of look like conifer cones from the Pliocene/Pleistocene Merced Formation along the Coast just south of San Francisco. Douglas Fir and Monterey Pine cones occur in the same formation. What are they? Could they be alder catkins? Top photo: cone is 1.5 cm high. Bottom photo: longest cone is 4 cm. Thanks, John @paleoflor
  18. Insect Plant Fish or ...?

    Greetings, everyone. I spent the other day on the east side of Ventura County breaking open sedimentary rocks. I'm not experienced enough with that sort of material to positively ID it but I think it was siltstone. There was a leaf and something else on both sides of one of the rocks. I've been having a hard time figuring out what the "something else" is. It measures about 35 by 14 millimeters. I took a few pictures of both sides under different lighting conditions to help bring out some of the finer details. It comes from the Modelo Formation (Miocene). Thanks ahead of time for any help in figuring out what it is. Here are pictures of the first side: Some pictures of the second side:
  19. Is this a vertebra and if so from what?

    Do you know what this is? I think it’s a vertebra. it’s 2.6 cm is from the early Cretaceous of California the francican melange.
  20. Fossils found in Fairmead landfill in Madera County, California https://abc30.com/science/fossils-found-in-madera-county-landfill/5431221/ Fossil Discovery Center of Madera County, in partnership with the San Joaquin Valley Paleontology Foundation https://www.maderamammoths.org/about.html McDonald, H.G., Dundas, R.G. and Chatters, J.C., 2013. Taxonomy, paleoecology and taphonomy of ground sloths (Xenarthra) from the Fairmead Landfill locality (Pleistocene: Irvingtonian) of Madera County, California. Quaternary Research, 79(2), pp.215-227. PDF file at: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/235921980_Taxonomy_paleoecology_and_taphonomy_of_ground_sloths_Xenarthra_from_the_Fairmead_Landfill_locality_Pleistocene_Irvingtonian_of_Madera_County_California https://www.researchgate.net/profile/H_McDonald Yours, Paul H.
  21. Some of my collection

    Hello gang, As promised this is where I will share specimens from my personal collection, my grandfather's collection, and the collection that was donated to the university I work for. The latter is interesting as it is literally boxes of rock and fossils, with no information and my university does not have a geology or paleontology department. I'll be updating it every so often. Enjoy! NOTE: Some of the donated items have old school "labels" on them. If you see initials or such that you recognize, please PM me, as I am doing my best to properly catalog them properly as part of my job!
  22. I'm not a huge fan of large bones but here we go: a glimpse to mammalian fauna of California 7-12 million years ago. Video is from our Christmas break trip to South California/Nevada. My favorite was a rhino tooth.
  23. Hi! I did search for pea crabs from Carmel Valley and did not find any topics on The Fossil Forum. So, I decided to fill the gap with few links hoping that others will also share the experience.
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