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Found 20 results

  1. I have gotten cabin fever recently.... those of us in Florida can get it, even though we dont have snow and ice piled up outside our houses. Mine exists because the Peace river remains well about the fossil hunting stage. A few weeks ago, I went out on the Caloosahatchee and found some nice pieces, but I have been longing to get out. So I decide this week to drive out towards the middle of the state, just slightly below Lake Okeechobee. (Boy I wish I could go through the spoil banks from all the construction going on on the south edge of the lake where the corps of engineers is reinforcing, rebuiilding the old dike.) That being prohibited, and since i didn't want to be fined, I decided to head out to a pile of lower to mid Caloosahatchee formation material that was dug a couple of years ago. When it was first left, I looked through it, and found some nice things, now after a couple of years of weathering, I thought perhaps I'd be in luck and find something new had rolled out. Since the drive is a good hour from where I live, I was also hoping they wouldn't have flattened the pile using it for fill in agricultural roads in the area. My cabin fever pushed me to try. after all the area is beautiful and I often see rare birds out there. On that trip two years ago, I saw a Scissor tailed Flycatcher ( photo # 1) This year I saw a pair of Everglades Kites..no photos, sorry, they flew up and in front of me while driving my car. Also, no photo of the Florida Panther that crossed in front of my car as i was returning home in the evening. After all that, my fossils are quite the denouement. They are not extraordinary, but I still decided to put them into a riker box and label them. Some of names may be updated from the ones I used, but for I.D. purposes I used Lelia & William Brayfields paperback , 3rd edition of "A Guide for Identifying Florida Fossil Shells and other Invertebrates." I also checked them against the Forida Invertebrate I.D. collection site.http://specifyportal.flmnh.ufl.edu/ip/?filter=oc:florida molluscabivalvia. So while I didn't end up with anything earthshaking, I was happy. I did find my first disciformis, (and the only one I"ve seen in person). And I learned alot about Anadara's as I tried to identify the species of this Genus from the family Arcidae. The various species are abundant in Florida and have always flumixed me...now I'll be able to identify at least 3 or 4 of them in the field. So while, I wasn't able to get out in my Kayak, and enjoy the hunt, the adventure will hold me till I head up to the Crystal River area in two weeks to hunt with a friend.
  2. Hi guys have this bone fragment from The Caloosahatchee Formation of South West Florida Late Pliocene/Early Pleistocene. I know it is small and perhaps unidentifiable as it is a fragment but wanted to throw ir out there. Have a few more bones will post shortly.
  3. Hi guys, moved from the Triassic of NC to Florida (JOB...). I went to a spot on the Caloosahatchee (river) Formation of Florida with a guide (as i'm new here) to do some sifting on the shores of the river and found many Garfish Scales and lots and lots of shells. However I found this (see photos) fossil which mi guide believed part of a Garfish Jaw but I have my reservations. Could you guys help me identifying this little dude. Thanks Alex
  4. I was rearranging some fossils and came across a couple boxes of Florida fossil shells that I collected about 10 years ago from a shell pit near Arcadia, Florida. These shells I believe came out of the Caloosahatchee Formation. I was recently told that the owner of this pit had passed away and that access to this pit is no longer available. At the time of my visit, it was with a "paid guide" that got me and about 10 other people in. While they waded to a small island that was in the pit looking for meg teeth, I went for the guaranteed find- shells. I will have to work on ID's at a later point, but wanted to show the size and diversity of the larger, interesting shells that I found.
  5. On my recent trip to Fort Meyers / Sanibel area, I came across a few dump sites of shell material from what I believe is the Caloosahatchee Formation. I always like to take shells that are full of sediment so I can clean them out and search for very tiny shells that are in great condition. It is amazing the diversity of shells that I find.
  6. In late March a friend and I took our kayaks to our favorite Calooosahatchee River location. We spend an afternoon looking around, and trying to protect ourselves and our kayaks from the drafts of the huge yachts that were crossing from one coast to the other, through the connecting waterways. After one huge yacht ( which didn't slow down at all), the waves knocked me and the kayak into the bank, and out dropped a lionspaw...pristine. Needless to say, though i was banged up, I started digging around a bit at the edge....out popped several more lions paws, and this beautiful problematica cowrie...still with color and sheen...I couldn't believe my eyes...it looked like I had just picked it up off the bottom of the ocean someplace. At any rate, I finally have gotten around to cleaning them all and thought I'd post them. Enjoy.
  7. Florida Fossil Bivalves

    My previous post was on the Gastropods that I collected from shell pit piles that were dropped off on the Sanibel Causeway island, so I figured I need to post the Bivalves. I believe these cane from a pit with Pliocene - Pleistocene material from the Caloosahatchee Formation (1.8 - 2.5 MYO). I'm hoping that my ids are correct. Families: Arcidae and Noetiidae Arca wagneriana
  8. Florida Fossil Gastropods

    Well after my Peace River trip from yesterday, I again decided to leave Sanibel Island and venture on to the little island on the causeway heading to Ft. Meyers since I had noticed fresh piles of what believe to have come from a shell put- I was not disappointed. With this post I will show the Gastropods that I collected, from what I believe came from a pit with Pliocene- Pleistocene material from the Caloosahatchee formation (1.8-2.5 MYO). First up is a pic of the island and one of the piles- after that I will posts the fossils.
  9. Holy moly guys. The saga of my historical yard continues... is this man made or a fossil? Had other great finds today, I think this one needs a post all of its own.
  10. Diodora caloosaensis

    Reference Olsson, A.A., and A. Harbison. 1953 (1990 Reprint). Pliocene Mollusca of Southern Florida with Special Reference to Those from North Saint Petersburg, with special chapters on Turridae by W.G. Fargo and Vitinellidae and Fresh-water Mollusks by H.A. Pilsbry, The Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia Monographs 8, The Shell Museum and Educational Foundation, 457 pages, 65 plates
  11. Siphocypraea griffini

    S. griffini has a smaller length to width ratio than S. problematica (MR 2057-121) however Petuch has named a large number of Cypraeidae from the Florida Plio-Pleistocene many of which are probably not valid. A variance plot of many individuals would need to be produced to unequivocally determine if S. griffini is a distinct species. Reference Petuch, Edward J. 1994. Atlas of Florida Fossil Shells (Pliocene and Pleistocene Marine Gastropods). Chicago Spectrum Press.
  12. Strombus keatonorum

    Reference Petuch, Edward J. 1994. Atlas of Florida Fossil Shells (Pliocene and Pleistocene Marine Gastropods). Chicago Spectrum Press.
  13. Echinofulgur echinatum

    Reference Olsson, A.A., and A. Harbison. 1953 (1990 Reprint). Pliocene Mollusca of Southern Florida with Special Reference to Those from North Saint Petersburg, with special chapters on Turridae by W.G. Fargo and Vitinellidae and Fresh-water Mollusks by H.A. Pilsbry, The Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia Monographs 8, The Shell Museum and Educational Foundation, 457 pages, 65 plates
  14. Turbo rhectogrammicus

    Reference Olsson, A.A., and A. Harbison. 1953 (1990 Reprint). Pliocene Mollusca of Southern Florida with Special Reference to Those from North Saint Petersburg, with special chapters on Turridae by W.G. Fargo and Vitinellidae and Fresh-water Mollusks by H.A. Pilsbry, The Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia Monographs 8, The Shell Museum and Educational Foundation, 457 pages, 65 plates.
  15. Scaphella floridana

    Reference Heilprin, Angelo. 1987. Explorations on the west coast of Florida and in the Okeechobee wilderness : with special reference to the geology and zoology of the Floridian peninsula : a narrative of researches undertaken under the auspices of the Wagner Free Institute of Science of Philadelphia. Transactions of the Wagner Free Institute of Science of Philadelphia v. 1.
  16. Fasciolaria scalarina

    Reference Heilprin, Angelo. 1987. Explorations on the west coast of Florida and in the Okeechobee wilderness : with special reference to the geology and zoology of the Floridian peninsula : a narrative of researches undertaken under the auspices of the Wagner Free Institute of Science of Philadelphia. Transactions of the Wagner Free Institute of Science of Philadelphia v. 1.
  17. Liochlamys bulbosa

    Reference Heilprin, Angelo. 1987. Explorations on the west coast of Florida and in the Okeechobee wilderness : with special reference to the geology and zoology of the Floridian peninsula : a narrative of researches undertaken under the auspices of the Wagner Free Institute of Science of Philadelphia. Transactions of the Wagner Free Institute of Science of Philadelphia v. 1.
  18. Siphocypraea problematica

    Reference Heilprin, Angelo. 1987. Explorations on the west coast of Florida and in the Okeechobee wilderness : with special reference to the geology and zoology of the Floridian peninsula : a narrative of researches undertaken under the auspices of the Wagner Free Institute of Science of Philadelphia. Transactions of the Wagner Free Institute of Science of Philadelphia v. 1.
  19. Florida Echinoid Help Needed

    Hey Gang, Started trying to put away some more of the stuff in the garage and ran across an echy in matrix that I found and had dismissed as unidentifable as it had this encrustation that I just couldnt seem to remove at the time....Well been playing it with most of the day I now see a majority of the test is there and I was thinking it looks like a Schizaster...wondering what you all think? Anyone have any similar finds from Sarasota County? All I could find that seemed close was a Eocene Schizaster from the Ocala Limestone. I am working in APAC spoil piles in Sarasota County and its all Plio-Pleistocene there so that presents a dilemma if its S.armiger (Clark) as that seems to be much older in age .... this seems to be heart shaped but almost round 2.9cm long X 2.7cm w and 2.5 cm tall. Also looks maybe more similar to an Eocene Schizaster ocalanus listed in the Florida MNH Galleries specimen 183665 but I'm just guessing...orafice positions look closer than the Agassizia's pictured in the gallery that are of early Pleistocene age (and coincidentally from the Caloosahatchee which is present at the site) and are similar in overall test shape. http://www.flmnh.ufl.edu/invertpaleo/display.asp?catalog_number=183665&gallery_type=Florida%20Echinoidea Any help is appreciated. Edit: added dimensions and photos/comments about S.ocalanus. Regards, Chris
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