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Found 294 results

  1. Hello everyone, I am making a shadow box for my office; before I start doing the final groupings by species and attaching said groupings to the shadow box, I could really use some help. I have made my best educated guesses (using Jayson’s website for references), but since I am a novice, I know I’ve made several mistakes. Will you you please take a look at the attached pictures and let me know if I guessed correctly? If not, will you please let me know the correct answer?
  2. After just over a year of fossil collecting, I have finally found my first Meg! On Thursday, the first semester of my senior year came to an end. The next day, Friday, school was closed for a teacher work day. I figured I'd make the most of my day off by heading out to Bayfront Park. What better way to celebrate making it through the first half of senior year? I though that because it was a Friday, and rather cold, not many people would be out on the beach because they'd either be at school, work, or home because of the weather. I was right. When I arrived at a little before noon, there were only a few cars in the parking lot, and not all of them were fellow hunters. I slipped on my waders and made my way down the path, shovel and sifter in hand. Funny enough, I never actually sifted a single screen, because I didn't need to. I had no idea the tide was going to be as low as it was. But boy, was it out there. Even with a few hours before peak low tide, the entire beach was exposed and the water was calm. I stopped briefly at the cove area that people so often underestimate, and within five minutes of stepping onto the beach found a perfect little cow shark tooth laying right out in the open. That's when I knew it was going to be a good day of hunting. The tide was probably the one of the lowest I've ever seen at Brownies, so I had plenty of ground to cover. Trying not to get ahead of myself, I made sure to still walk very slowly and scan over the ground thoroughly. After about an hour, I was walking down near the water on a part of the beach that is normally submerged when I stumbled across a large tooth, half buried in the sand. My heart stopped when I spotted it. It clearly had signs of a bourlette, so I immediately knew I was looking right at my first ever meg. I pulled out my phone and began recording. I prayed that it would be whole as I carefully pried it out of the sand. To my delight, it was mostly complete, with flawless serrations and an intact tip. It had a bit of damage and it was missing the actual bourlette (must've fallen off), but I didn't mind one bit. I cleaned it off and spent marveled at the amazing tooth I had just found. I couldn't believe what was happening. After calling my friends and family and sending them the video, I carefully wrapped the tooth in tissue paper and aluminum foil to insure that it would make it home safely. There was no way I was throwing that tooth in my waders pouch like I do with the rest! I would have been more than happy if I hadn't found a single other tooth that day, but that was not the case. I continued south, and kept looking towards the water, hoping for some other nice finds. I found a fair share of decent makos, and another large but beaten up cow shark tooth. I eventually ran into a man named Scott who was hunting for the first time ever, and he showed me his backpack full of cetacean verts, including a very large whale vert. He told me he had been there since before sunrise, and hadn't had much luck with teeth, but clearly was finding verts left and right. I of course answered his question, "Any luck?" with a prompt "Oh yes, I hit the jackpot today." He congratulated me on my first meg, and we talked for a while more. He was a really cool guy, and I enjoyed helping him identify some finds and learn more about the cliffs. After my exchange with Scott, I went farther down the beach, finding more decent teeth and a few verts. At one point, I saw what was clearly another megatooth in the sand, and held my breath as I unearthed it. Unfortunately, it was only the tip of what was most likely a very large tooth. A true heartbreaker, but with everything else I had already found I couldn't complain. As the tide began to come in, I decided to head back to the entrance and make my way home. I caught up to Scott again, and we talked about my plans to become a paleontologist as we walked back up to our cars. I can say with some confidence that this was my best Brownies Beach trip ever, and perhaps even my best trip ever, period. I ended up finding a meg (although it's technically a C. chubutensis I believe), some very nice makos, a few complete cow shark teeth, hemis, sand tigers, a lot of tigers, a ray barb/spine, and a lot of fish and shark verts. I honestly don't think I could be much happier with my finds, and I am beyond thrilled to add my first megatooth to my collection! As far as a public site like Brownies goes, this is considered an extremely productive day, especially considering I only really hunted for about four hours, compared to my usual 6-7+. 2019 is certainly off to an amazing start; this is only my second hunt of the year! Thank you so much for reading my report, and here's to many more megs in the future! Here's a link to my YouTube video of finding the tooth. I will eventually be making full length videos of my hunts in the future, so please subscribe to the channel if you like! Thank you all. Also be sure to check out the Hop 5 post that will be up soon, and cast your vote for the tripmaker. Hoppe Hunting!
  3. Looking to find out as much about this vertebrae piece found at Calvert Cliffs, MD.
  4. Matoaka Beach cabins

    Enjoyed a nice walk at matoaka and found my biggest tooth yet.
  5. Calvert Cliffs Mystery Vertebrae

    In addition to a trip to Flag Ponds this week, I was also able to spend a couple of hours at Calvert Cliffs State Park where is found the following peeking out from the clay at the surf. I’ve been doing some research but am coming up empty. Any ideas?
  6. Bayfront Park 01/04/19

    Happy New Year, everyone! I was able to sneak in one more hunt before my winter break ended. I kicked off 2019 with another trip to my favorite winter location, Bayfront Park/Brownies Beach. The tides and weather looked favorable, not too cold and relatively low tide very early in the morning. I came more equipped than ever, complete with my new hunting gear that I got for Christmas, including a pair of chest waders (finally!), a sling pack, and a hat from the Calvert Marine Museum with an awesome Hemipristis design. I was one of the first to arrive, and quickly made use of the waders by rounding the cove that can be virtually impossible to pass without them. My waders feature a large mesh zipper pocket on the chest, and that proved to be remarkably useful. No more carrying around tupperware to hold my finds! I stepped foot on the beach about ten minutes before sunrise, and I was blessed with a gorgeous display of colors as the sun shone through the clouds. A few fellow hunters passed me, but I kept my head down and walked slowly, carefully examining every inch of the beach. I was finding a good deal of smalltooth sand tigers with awesome cusplets, but nothing too big for the first hour or so. Even though the majority of teeth found here are small, you can get some pretty stunning colors, not to mention the mind-blowing quality of preservation of some of the teeth. Even after millions of years, the teeth are still sharp enough to cut you fairly easily. That's something that never ceases to amaze me. Anyway, I soon stumbled across a larger tooth laying right out in the open, high up the beach in the dryer sand. It was a very pretty Isurus desori, a mako shark tooth! I happily dropped it into the pouch and kept moving. I continued to find small and medium sized teeth for the majority of the morning. At one point, I picked up a complete dolphin epiphysis, or "cookie" as many collectors call them. I had found a few fragments of them at this location before, but this was my first one to be fully intact. I found it increasingly difficult to navigate the beach as the tide came in, as there were many fresh tree falls and cliff slides due to the recent weather conditions. I decided to call it a day at around noon, so in total I hunted for about 5 hours. My haul consisted of a plethora of sand tigers, many tigers and requiems, a handful of small hemis, a few makos and hammerheads, one broken cow shark tooth, a few odontocete teeth, ray plates, the cookie, and a nice gastropod shell. A pretty typical Brownies haul. I ran into a few other collectors, none who seemed to have found anything incredible, but I always love talking fossils with fellow enthusiasts! I was even able to identify another hunter's find for her, which I always thoroughly enjoy as well. Overall, I had a very nice first trip of the new year and couldn't think of a better way to wrap up my winter break before heading back to school. Thanks for reading my report, and please check out the Hop 5, posted below. I'm starting something new with my trip reports in 2019! I HOPPE you'll enjoy! Sorry, I just can't help myself when it comes to puns. Hoppe hunting! ~David
  7. Worn Cow Shark Symphyseal

    Hi all, This tooth was found of one of my recent hunts along the Calvert Cliffs in Maryland. I found it at Bayfront Park/Brownies Beach. It is approximately one cm in length, relatively flat, and has multiple worn but visible bumps of enamel that could either be large serrations of some shark tooth or cusps of a symphyseal cow shark tooth. I believe it's the latter, but also recognize that it is a rather uncommon find. If it turns out to be a cow shark symphyseal, it would be my first one! Excited to see your takes on this one. I feel somewhat confident with my standing ID, but would love some confirmation. Thanks in advance!
  8. Yesterday (January 2nd) was only my second trip to Calvert Cliffs. I'm pretty new to fossil collecting, but thanks to the wonderful advice and reading the greatly informative posts from members such as @Darktooth @FossilsAnonymous @WhodamanHD @racerzeke @KimTexan and @paxhunter I had a lot of success and it was a much more productive trip than my first. Below is a brief summary and some pictures of what I found: I woke up, put on a few layers clothing, and had my coffee at 3:45am. After my morning pipe (tobacco...I actually make briar tobacco pipes as a hobby) I got in my pre-loaded truck and headed south at 4:45am. I made good time on the drive down as I hit 695 and got around Baltimore before the morning rush. At 7:10am I arrived at Brownies Beach and pulled in to a parking lot with only two other cars in it. After putting on my full waders, I grabbed my sifter and headed towards the beach. I planned this trip so that I could arrive midweek and get there early enough to catch some of the low tide (tides times were not friendly this week, but I start teaching classes next week so it was this week or wait until spring). Sunrise was at 7:24, but there was more than enough light to see...and what a sight it was. When I entered the beach area the tide was way, way out. I couldn't believe how far out it was, as it was past two small sandbars (if I get my GoPro video edited I will post it). Once I was on the beach I headed south towards the cliffs. I hurried through the beach area because I wanted to be by the cliffs with the tide so low. I know I missed teeth along the beach, but I wanted to get to the cliffs with the tide being so far out where I could hopefully find some larger teeth than what are common at the beach area. As I neared the end of the beach I ran into one woman who was there just to relax and walk on the beach. We said good morning and I knew who one of the two cars in the parking lot belonged to. Once I went around the point and turned my eyes close to shell line and started looking. Because of all the wonderful advice from this forum I had a much better idea of what I was looking for and how to best look. After a few minutes I had some ray plates, very small teeth, and my first ever vert. It wasn't even 7:30 and I knew it was going to be a good day. As I made my way down the shore line that I figured had been pretty well picked over from people being off over the holidays, I remembered a forum member saying 'you need to look in the places that others don't'. I approached a fallen tree that I remembered from my first trip a few weeks ago, and with the tide being so low almost the entire tree was exposed so I got down on my hands and knees and started looking at some of the gaps between the tree and sand...then it happened. You know when you day dream and picture yourself finding a great tooth or fossil? Well that's what happened as my eyes saw a pristine Mako just laying there (pictures below). I know its not a huge tooth or a meg, but to me being new to the hobby this was completely awesome and a trip maker. I think I still have a smile on my face from finding it. As I continued down the beach I collected many more teeth from various sharks. I couldn't believe it when I found an awesome cow shark tooth (my second trip maker) laying out in the open about 8 feet up the beach. Beside it was another good tooth as well that went in my pouch. Around 10:30 I ran into a very friendly gentleman and we chatted a bit. We talked about the weather and the cliffs, what he had found (a few hemis), and he told me a story of a fall he had witnessed a few years ago that was too close for comfort. A chunk of clay the size of a car fell and nearly crushed him, but luckily he heard some soil falling and he ran straight out into the bay right before the cliff fell. Although the clay chunk did't hit him, the water threw him up into the air when the clay hit. His friend who was a down the cliffs said he heard it and it sounded like a car crash....I didn't get this gentleman's name but I feel like I read his cliff fall story on here, so if you know who it may have been please let me know. I continued south until the tide started coming in pretty far and I thought it best to head back towards the beach since I didn't know how far it would come in or how high the water would get. I continued my search along the way back and made it to my truck around 2pm. I took a short break, ditched my sifter, texted my wife, checked email, watched a truck with two high school kids pull in to smoke a pipe (although this one wasn't filled with tobacco), and headed back out for one more quick trip down and back as the tide started to go back out. It wasn't until about 3:30pm when two more local fossil collectors came up behind me and we said hello and chatted. All in all, I only ran into 3 other collectors during the day so there was not a lot of competition (although I do like the interesting conversation). After finding a few more teeth and interesting fossils dusk approached and I headed back to my truck. After putting my gear away and changing into some dry clothes I started my trek north after a fantastic start to 2019. Below are some pictures of my finds from the day. I know what many of the teeth and other fossils are, but if you can ID something that a newbie like me probably wouldn't know then please do so as it will help me get better with this hobby. Thanks!
  9. Still on the hunt before classes begin again next week. This weekend the boys and I ventured 5 1/2 hours north to the head of the Chesapeake Bay. So far... I should have gone back to Folly Beach! Lol. Some shells, neat iron formations, but no teeth yet. Brought the sifter this time but Calvert Cliffs isn’t the place for my old knees to carry much on a hike. Many people in competetion for fossil teeth. There were more people hunting on 180’ of beach 30’ wide than all of Folly Beach last weekend. Water is very cold and it is a tidal influenced area.
  10. Calvert Cliffs Shark Teeth

    Help requested identifying these shark teeth from Calvert Cliffs. After a while, I find some teeth look similar to others. Thanks!
  11. Geological or Biological

    Title mostly explains it. Are these biological or geological. The black one is from Summerville, SC, while the other one is from Calvert Cliffs.
  12. Fossil ID

    Hello, I’m new to this forum. I really don’t know much about fossil bones and mostly look for shark teeth. However, last year I found an interesting object at Calvert Cliffs. At first I thought it was a rock, but it seems to be quite a unique shape and composition, so I am uncertain. I’d love someone to tell me if it is truly just a rock or if it’s a bone of some sort. I can take more pictures if needed. Thanks!
  13. Fossil ID

    This is my first post here so I’m not exactly sure of the formats but I found a possible bone that I am unable to identify. I found this at Calvert Cliffs and have never found anything like it. It could just be a stone but it seems like a very unique shape and structure/composition. Ask if more images are needed because the end is broken off and the internal structure is complex.
  14. Hey guys, Me and a few buddies are heading to the Calvert Cliffs in Maryland to hunt for some teeth in a week or so. We are planning on staying near the Calvert Cliffs State Park and hunting around Brownies Beach. This is really the only location we know about. We were hoping someone could point us to some other spots as well to check out while we are there (we will be there 2 days). As of right now, our plan is to hunt all day, both days, so we should have plenty of time to hunt more than one area. Any pointers toward locations not too far away would be greatly appreciated! We are coming from NC so we aren't very familiar with the area other than whats very well known.
  15. Flat Fragment

    This fragment was found at Bayfront Park, where the Calvert Formation of the Calvert Cliffs is exposed. It is only about 1/2 inch in length. It is almost perfectly flat on the top, with one line running down the middle and several smaller scratchlike lines running approximately perpendicular in either direction. The middle line seems to be a wall-like structure that goes through the entire cross section as it is visible on both sides. The bottom of the object has many tiny pores, that when viewed from the side appear to be the tops of tube-like structures. I am really stumped on this one. It looks somewhat like a broken section of a ray mouthpiece, but I’ve found hundreds of those and this is unlike any of them. I’m wondering if it may not even be a fossil because of the near perfect flatness of the top side. It definitely doesn’t match anything on the resources about Calvert Cliff fossils on the internet. If anyone has an idea about this one, I’d love to hear it. Because as of right now, I’m pretty clueless. Thanks!
  16. Calvert Cliffs 2018

    So i dont post all the time anymore but as we approach the end of the year i always like to organize my finds and do a calendar. Well here are my finds for 2018 not a bad year and a found my benedini which is the rarest of the rare for Calvert. If anybody is interested in a calendar let me know i'm all done except for December still trying to find a couple more good finds! Hope everybody had a great 2018 and here is to an awesome 2019!!!!
  17. Calvert Cliffs...in the winter?

    So I am pretty new to this whole shark tooth hunting thing, but after my first time at Venice Beach I was hooked. Unfortunately I live in PA, so a trips to the beach are far and few between. Anyway, with the semester ending soon I will have some time 'off' for a few weeks and wanted to get some advice about maybe taking a day trip to Calvert Cliffs. If I go I plan to go to Brownies Beach and spend the day. I'd like to plan to go mid-week on a day when the tide is receding around sunrise, head south for a few hours and make my way back before it comes all the way back in, take a break for a bit and then do some more looking as it is going back out before dark and I head back home. Does this sound like a decent plan?...I'm also not sure how/if the cold weather effects the soil around the cliffs. Does it freeze and get much harder, thus teeth are not as easily exposed and kicked into the surf? I'd appreciate any advice you have! Thanks!
  18. Hello all, I am delighted to inform you that I am not dead, although my horrendously lengthy absence from this forum may have suggested otherwise. I am fully aware that I had already committed to being more active after taking a short hiatus a little while back, but I simply fell out of the habit of logging in and posting on this site, mostly due to my extremely busy senior year schedule. I have truly missed posting and sharing my experiences with you all, and I could not be more glad to return. Although I may have been inactive on this forum, I was certainly NOT inactive whatsoever in terms of fossil hunting. I have been on several trips since I last posted. In fact, I've probably nearly doubled my collection. At the beginning of the summer, I decided to purchase a Pelican Mustang 100x Kayak in order to reach remote areas of the Calvert Cliffs that are so frequently cited as remarkably productive. I affectionately named the kayak the H.M.S. Serra, after my favorite prehistoric shark species, Hemipristis serra. Over the course of the summer, I took her out on the Bay many times in search of large shark tooth fossils. I may have failed to find a Meg, but I found some incredible fossils that I gladly added to my ever-growing collection. Below you can find pictures of some of my finds from my various kayak trips to the Calvert Cliffs over the summer, as well as a picture of my beloved Serra. Some of my best finds from all these trips include large Hemis, a perfect 2-inch hastalis (pictured in my hand), lots of cow shark teeth, a crocodile scute, a large Lemon straight out of the matrix, and my first ever Ecphora! I truly had a very productive summer! I couldn't be much happier with all of my finds (unless of course I found a Meg...) and I can't wait to continue hunting in the coming months. The H.M.S. Serra likely won't be out on the water until it gets warm again, but there's still plenty of hunting to do at local sites on foot. In fact, I've already been on a few trips since putting her away for the colder months. I will make trip reports for those soon, and you won't want to miss them! Thanks for reading, and I hope you'll enjoy my future posts! Hoppe hunting! ~David
  19. Calvert Cliffs ID

    A couple of old finds from Calvert Cliffs. I'd like to be certain on the ID of both. Top one has enamel-like quality on one side. Seems to have broken off the other side. Are they different types of sting ray barbs? Thanks!
  20. Hello all, I found a small tooth (0.75 inches long) this week at Brownies Beach (Calvert Cliffs formation, Maryland). It was in the water along the shoreline, as the tide was coming in. I assume it's a sharks tooth, but I haven't been able to make even a decent guess at the genus/species from looking online at photos and lists of features. I would greatly appreciate any help identifying it! If the photos below aren't sufficient, please let me know and I'll try to take better ones. Thank you!
  21. [WARNING: As is my custom, this trip report is exceedingly long, verbosely worded, and copiously illustrated with photos.] (It may be a good idea to find a comfy chair and grab a drink and some popcorn.) Since Tammy's retirement earlier this year, we've been busier than ever. We finally made it to Iceland this summer and saw dozens (if not literally hundreds) of waterfalls in that geologically interesting country. While talking about waterfalls ("fossar" in Icelandic), Tammy had realized that I had somehow not yet seen Niagara Falls. Tammy did not do a lot of vacation traveling when she was younger but had visited Niagara several times in her youth. She decided it was high time I experienced the power of Niagara. It could have been a simple trip--a flight up to Buffalo, a day out on a boat getting drenched at the base of the falls, and home again with little more than a long weekend invested. Somehow though, I have a remarkable knack for constructing enormously detailed travel itineraries--and this trip was no exception. Our anniversary month is October and so with the prospect of some multi-chromatic autumn foliar displays we decided that we'd plan a roadtrip that included Niagara Falls as its underlying motivation. It didn't take me long to realize that there are a lot of great TFF members up in the New York and Ontario area. Additionally, some members from the Virginia/Maryland area suggested meeting up during our last roadtrip through the Carolinas but that trip was already lengthy and involved. Perhaps, I could combine visits with a number of TFF members along the way and do a roadtrip down the Eastern Seaboard? As I started contacting prospective members to get the idea kickstarted, the starting point of our trip changed and we tacked on several extra days to the start of our trip. My brother and his wife had just bought a new house in the north side of Chicago. He decided that since all of the family holidays (Independence Day, Thanksgiving, Christmas) were already claimed by other family members that he would start the tradition of Oktoberfest at their house--first Saturday of October. The itinerary for our trip was still in its early stages so we were easily able to incorporate a trip up to Chicago and link it to the start of our roadtrip. We considered flying from Chicago to Buffalo and picking the rental car there but the cheaper airfares were (not surprisingly) at rather inconvenient times (who wants to check into a hotel in the wee hours of the morning?) but an alternative soon presented itself. Since one of the places we'd hoped to visit along the way was the Devonian Hungry Hollow site in Arkona, ON, we'd have to backtrack west if we started in Buffalo but it would be conveniently along the route if we simply picked up the rental car in Chicago and started the roadtrip from there. This also allowed us the opportunity of visiting the small town of La Porte, Indiana where Tammy lived at one time. Things were falling into place. Of course, that is not to imply that my roadtrips are in any way quickly improvised--I think I spend as much time planning them as I do driving them. Starting the trip in Chicago allowed us both to visit family and work our way through all of our favorite food groups (authentic Chinese, Indian, Middle-eastern, and deep-dish pizza ) before gorging ourselves on lots of tasty German food and Oktoberfest-themed adult beverages at my brother's new place. Finally, we were ready to start rolling some miles (and kilometers) onto our trip odometer and we picked up the rental car and got underway. We planned on making London, ON for our first night and since it turns out it is only a mere 6 or so hours driving from Chicago, we had a bit of time to drive through La Port. It had been nearly 40 years since Tammy lived there and (as expected) much of the area was barely recognizable and not much as she'd remembered it. There were a few landmarks still in place and it didn't take us long to find the house her parents owned in town. The main floor was the Chinese restaurant they owned and the second floor above is where they lived. It's always interesting indulging some nostalgia and visiting places from the past. After a bit of driving around town we picked up the highway and in time crossed the border into Canada at Port Huron. We got to bed late that night but we had one of the longer driving days behind us already. On the road again--and a stop at a childhood home in La Porte.
  22. I have been at a conference for my work in Baltimore all week. My conference ends tomorrow and then I plan to go get a rental car and head south to the Chesapeake Bay area to do some hunting or wherever else I can find to hunt. Even just getting out to hike in a nice quiet place would be nice if tides are too high to hunt the beaches. I will be leaving Baltimore around noon and returning home on Sunday noonish I think. I can't remember my departure time, but it is in the afternoon. I have not worked out any of the details other than rental car and a possible low budget place to stay. The most affordable I found was in Lexington Park area. I have not figured out tides and all that. I am a tad nervous. As a single woman in Texas I think I can handle myself out in the wild. I am not sure about the Chesapeake Bay area. It does not seem so remote. I am not sure if there are areas that are unsafe for a woman to be alone in. I have never hunted this type of environment before. When I go hunting in Texas I know what to watch out for. I usually go to very remote places where I rarely ever see anyone. Rattlesnakes, water moccasins and wild hogs are my main concerns when hunting in Texas. I know what to take and what to wear. So, I would appreciate any input with regards to what to look out for, how to be safe, where to find tide info and what not to do kind of stuff. Comments appreciated.
  23. Miocene Mystery Mammal Vertebra

    Miocene, probably mammal bone. Hoping for some clue to the animal. Doesn't look like a piece of cetacean vertebra, but obviously has the hole for the spinal cord. HELP!!!!
  24. Help identify fossil

    Found this on the beach at Calvert Cliffs, Maryland. Miocene period. Need help identifying. Any ideas?
  25. Freely available from the Smithsonian online. https://scholarlypress.si.edu/store/new-releases/geology-and-vertebrate-paleontology-calvert-cliffs/
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