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Found 355 results

  1. I’ve recently bought some fossil shark teeth online to expand my collection beyond the local Maryland fauna (Miocene from the Calvert Cliffs and Paleocene from the Potomac River/Aquia Formation), and it occurred to me that perhaps there are some forum members who would be interested in sharing some of your finds or extras in exchange for mine. The things I have to offer are shown below—mostly fossil shark teeth and a few other things. These aren’t all perfect, but there’s a good variety, including some less common species. I’ve collected most of these myself and have also listed a few purchased teeth for trade. If there’s something that interests you, hopefully we can help each other build out our respective collections. I have particular interest in adding Ptychodus sp. and Cretodus sp. teeth from the Cretaceous to my collection, but I’m open to a broad range of offers. U.S. trades are likely easiest for shipping, but I’m happy to consider international offers too. Thanks for looking! Quick summary of shark teeth available for trade by species (also see photos below): Miocene from Calvert Cliffs - Alopias latidens (2), Carcharhinus sp. (5+), Carcharodon hastalis (1), Galeocerdo aduncus (2), Hemipristis serra (4), Negaprion eurybathrodono (5), Notorynchus cepedianus (1), and Physogaleus contortus (4) Paleocene from Potomac River/Aquia Formation - Anomotodon novus (2), Cretalamna appendiculata (2), Palaeohypotodus rutoti (3), Paraorthacodus clarkii (1), Striatolamia striata (4+), and unidentified sand tigers (4+) Miocene-Pliocene from Purchases - Carcharocles megalodon (1), Carcharodon hastalis (2) I. Shark Teeth Available for Trade A. Miocene shark teeth from the Calvert Cliffs (unless otherwise noted): Alopias latidens (thresher shark) Carcharhinus sp. (gray sharks) – I also have others available. The tooth on the far right is from a Miocene exposure in Virginia (Westmoreland State Park). Carcharodon hastalis (white shark, predecessor to the great white) Galeocerdo aduncus (tiger shark) – The smaller tooth on the right is from a Miocene exposure in Virginia (Westmoreland State Park). Hemipristis serra (snaggletooth shark) Negaprion eurybathrodono (lemon shark) Notorynchus cepedianus? (sevengill cow shark) – This is most likely N. cepedianus though it’s a partial so I don’t know if it can be definitively ID’ed. Physogaleus contortus (tiger-like shark) B. Paleocene shark teeth from the Potomac River/Aquia Formation: ** I’ve done my best to identify the various sand tiger shark teeth below, but I may have made some mistakes. Anomotodon novus (goblin shark) Cretalamna appendiculata (mackerel shark) Palaeohypotodus rutoti (sand tiger shark) – I am pretty sure these are all P. rutoti due to the presence of basio-labial folds (see this elasmo.com page), but I could be wrong. Paraorthacodus clarkii (no common name shark) Striatolamia striata (sand tiger shark) – I have others available too. Other non-striated sand tiger shark teeth – I’m unsure of the species on these; some may be Hypotodus verticalis. I have others available too. C. Purchased shark teeth available for trade: Carcharocles megalodon – This tooth was collected by a diver from the St. John’s River in Florida and measures a little over 2.75” slant height. I believe these are both Carcharodon hastalis – They are from an estate sale and their original collection location is unknown. They measure 1.7” and 1.2” slant height, respectively. II. Other Fossils Available for Trade A. Miocene from the Calvert Cliffs: Ecphora gardnerae? (gastropod) – If this is E. gardnerae, it’s also Maryland’s state fossil. Drum fish teeth Ray crushing plate fragments – The two v-shaped ones on the left are Aetomylaeus sp. and the other two may be as well. I have others available too. Fossil corral – I believe these are Astrhelia palmata. I have others available too. Fossil sand dollar fragments – I have others available too. B. Paleocene from the Potomac River/Aquia Formation: Ray crushing plate fragments – I have others available too. Turritella sp. steinkerns/casts – I have others available too.
  2. Teeth/Bone ID

    Hello! Last time I was here I posted about 50 pieces of barnacle which I thought were teeth. Good news is, this time I actually have teeth! I sent these in to another fossil ID place, and they identified a few of my teeth as possible lemon shark, and the 8th from the left as a possible C. hastalis. If anyone can help identify more specifically what sharks the teeth came from I'd really appreciate it!! Also, the big brown fragment on the far right in these pictures they identified as some kind of bone fragment- maybe it's a long shot but do any of you know what it could have come from??? I'm really curious about that one now. (Ignore the second and third from the right. They aren't interesting.) I can post more pics if needed.
  3. Mammal Tooth from Calvert Cliffs

    I found the tooth below on a beach along the Calvert Cliffs (Miocene exposure) in Maryland this morning. Any idea what it came from? It looks like some kind of mammal tooth to me though it's missing the root. I'm not sure whether it's a fossil or modern. Thanks!
  4. Miocene whale jaw or rib?

    I posted in a trip report a few weeks ago that one of my boys found two big fragments--including the joint--of whale jaw in a cliff fall from Calvert cliffs. The assumption of jaw was based on what seemed like a good comparison to a jaw on fossilguy.com plus overall shape. But a commenter suggests that the joint is maybe not flat enough to be from a mandible and that this could really be a rib. So I'm looking for any second opinions. We would really like to get a proper ID, especially as my son wants to fill in the missing segment and make a single piece out of the two pieces for display. Because of the way they came out of the fall, although they were with each other, we aren't 100% sure of what the orientation of the two pieces ought to be with respect to one another. I have put the two pieces in a few different configurations just to show what each might look like. Having a proper ID would really help. Any whale experts, please have a look and let me know what you think.
  5. Is this a ray barb fragment?

    Is this fossil from the Calvert Cliffs a ray barb fragment, or something else entirely? It measures 1/3 of an inch as far as it's size goes. Thanks for any suggestions regarding it's identity.
  6. What types of vertebrae are these?

    Here are two vertebrae that I've found at Calvert Cliffs sites (Miocene exposures) in Maryland in recent weeks. The first I also included in a recent trip report, but am posting it separately here along with some better pictures. Any idea what kind of animal this came from? My first thought was a cetacean/dolphin based on the oval part of the photo in the upper right (which looks sort of like the epiphysis attachment point--though that's probably not the correct term--on another but otherwise different looking cetacean/dolphin vert I found). However, I haven't yet found pictures of any similar verts to this one online. The second vert below I found a few weeks back. I think it may be from a fish but would appreciate confirmation or correction of that. I had trouble getting clear photos of the top (looking down at the "ears") and bottom, but can try again if needed/helpful. It doesn't look to me like there are broken processes on the bottom side but I could be wrong. Thanks for any help with these!
  7. I celebrated my birthday recently with three days of shark tooth hunting along Maryland's Calvert Cliffs (Miocene exposures) and had a blast, despite the hot and muggy weather. I still haven’t found that elusive Meg, but I added some great new finds to my growing (since January) collection! Day 1: Matoaka For the first day, I went to Matoaka. Low tide was in the early morning and I wanted to beat both the heat (as much as possible) and crowds, so I got up bright and early, arriving just after sunrise. I’m pretty sure I was the first one on the beach as I didn’t see any footprints in the sand and didn’t see anyone else until I doubled back later in the day. I didn’t find any particularly large teeth but I did find several firsts: my first “cookie” (cetacean epiphysis); first barracuda tooth; first thresher shark (Alopias sp.) tooth, I think; and first Miocene croc tooth (a bit worse for wear). I also found a root worn Carchardon hastalis (above on the far right) and a few dozen other teeth (Hemipristis serra, Physogaleus contortus, Galeocerdo aduncus, Carcharhinus sp., and Negaprion eurybathrodono) in various conditions, shown below.
  8. Calvert Cliffs Find

    Hello, I’m new to this forum but have enjoyed fossil collecting for quite some time. Just today my son and I went to Calvert Cliffs. While I didn’t do well with teeth, we found this which I was unable to identify. I was hoping someone might be able to give me an idea of what this might be. Thanks in advance for your time!
  9. Hi all, I'm hoping some of the resident experts here can help confirm or correct my IDs of the three fossil shark teeth and what I believe is a cetacean lumbar vert shown in the pictures below. I found these recently on a beach along the Calvert Cliffs in Maryland (Miocene exposure). Thanks for your help! For the shark teeth, I believe the the two on the left are both Carcharodon hastalis (though am more confident in my ID for #1) while the one on the right is possibly Isurus oxyrinchus though may also be Carcharias sp. All three have worn roots so I realize that may complicate the IDs. See pictures further below for scale bars and labial and side views of these. From pictures online, I believe this is a cetacean lumbar vertebra. The "bumpy" surface in the two lefthand photos also signifies that the epiphysis is missing, and thus this came from a juvenile, correct? Is it possible to further identify this as from a particular species or genus? Thanks in advance for your help!
  10. Miocene Big Bones Bonanza!

    Got out last week with my boys for a late afternoon trip to Calvert Cliffs to try a new spot. The beach was not very productive, yielding just a few smallish bull and tiger shark teeth. It seemed to have been worked over pretty hard before us. So we quickly turned our attention to a very sizable cliff fall at the tide line. Just looking over the surface, it didn't take long before boy #1 spotted what turned out to be a complete rib fully exposed. (Not 100% sure exactly what from but, I think, porpoise.) It was fragile and ended up coming out in three pieces, but we got the whole thing. On close inspection, it seems it also might have some predation marks. Then, while we were still working on that, just around the corner boy #2 yells out about something big. On the next chunk of cliff fall, also down low, he spotted a really nice piece of whale jaw also totally exposed! We got that out and also recovered the joint, although there is a missing piece in between. Still an awesome find! (The jaw is very solid, so we'll have to learn how to reconstruct the gap and make it one big piece.) We couldn't find any other part of it, unfortunately--we were all hoping for the skull. Just a little while later, on the next big chunk over, another collector pointed out a tiny surface of bone that he generously offered to my boys if they wanted to do the work to get it out. It turned out to be a really cool atlas vert from a porpoise (I think). It was extremely fragile, too, and in a couple of pieces that we'll have to glue together (any tips?), but another neat find. Then, just for good measure, boy #2 digs out a really nice tuna vert. (We added a 2nd, smaller one later.) This was all in maybe a 30-foot stretch. How no other collectors saw any of this stuff--and it was clear many had walked right by it all day--is a mystery. And to top it all off, on the way out with our bone haul, boy #1 spots a sweet croc tooth in the wash. It's funny that we set out to find some big shark teeth, and found almost none, but still ended up with maybe our best fossil trip ever! Enjoy the pics. And if anybody wants to confirm or correct ID's, please feel free.
  11. Matoaka Beach Gold

    Some of the awesome finds from 2 days worth of hunts at Matoaka Beach. I have no clue what the vertebrae belonged to (I know it’s not a shark). I believe the large bone in the back is whale, just don’t know what part. Lastly, if anyone has any information on what the shark teeth are exactly please let me know. I believe the big one is a mako, the long pointed one may be a lemon, and of course the snag for tooth. If I am incorrect please let me know! Looking forward to going back and finding more!
  12. Calvert cetacean mandible ID

    Found this mandible in a rock fall at Calvert cliffs in June. I believe it’s mysticete because of the lack of tooth sockets, but am open to complete redirection if I’ve got it all wrong. Any ideas?
  13. The girls and I got turned away from Matoaka Cabins at capacity) last weekend and I’m sure glad they did. We had a blast - a couple hours at the Cliffs and came across this little beauty laying in a muddy fall pile. I’m assuming a Hubbell Meg with some slight patho ripples. We also met @HemiHunter and his boys poking around the waves too
  14. Got out with my kids to Calvert Cliffs over the weekend for some attempted crabbing, general beachcombing and fossil collecting. Water was pretty clear without a lot of wave action, so patience was required to find anything decent in all the sand. We also had to keep our eyes out for the abundant sea nettles that have come in. Anyway, we had good success, with a couple of really nice snaggleteeth I pulled out of the wash about 10 minutes and 10 feet apart (two of a kind!). I had just been talking to a couple of collectors right in that spot lamenting poor hunting that day--so right time, right place. One of my kids also grabbed a really nice croc tooth, but it has only the front half. The highlight for me, though, was "making my own luck." I was poking around a few clay balls in the surf, as I have read about here in FF, and came across one with a really nice shark vert coming out of it. It was quick work with my screwdriver to set it free--my biggest shark vert by far and in pristine condition. (It was worth getting nailed a little by a teensy sea nettle I spotted too late--distracted!) We were lucky that we dodged a wicked thunderstorm just before heading home, but it was really cool watching the whole thing far out over the bay. I also found a tiny tooth that I can't seem to ID, so if anybody can help, I'd appreciate it. The best finds are below (minus a big piece of whale vert I forgot to include). Enjoy the pix!
  15. Quick Calvert Cliffs Trip

    It's been awhile since I've posted...but the good news is that I've been able to make many trips to Calvert Cliffs since my last post. Yesterday was my most recent trip down. The predicted tide and swell forecast looked good and I had visions of megs dancing in my head during the 2.5 hour trip down. I arrived by 6am and after a nice nature walk I was beach-side by 6:30. The tide was high as it usually is during the summer, but it never really went down at low tide (~11:00). That being said, there was very little beach to search and not much being kicked up. However, it was great weather and I spent about 6 hours enjoying the Chesapeake Bay before I called it a day (I usually stay until 5:00ish, but with no beach to search I decided to skip the traffic jam on 695 that is inevitable between 4:00-7:00). I found about 50 small teeth, some bay glass, half a cookie, and saved a few fish & horse crabs. My find of the day and total trip maker is below. Besides some large (for the area) meg frags, it is my largest tooth to date. I couldn't believe it when I saw it sitting along the high tide line, and even forgot my phone in the water when I examined it after snapping a few pics and filming an uncovering video (thank goodness for waterproof cases). Anyway, below are a few pics as found, unearthed, and dried. Although I didn't score any megs, it was a great day to enjoy nature by myself without seeing another person other than a family on a boat that anchored and was enjoying the bay themselves. Any help on ID and scarcity would be great. I'm thinking either lower isurus oxyrinchus/desori (mako), carcharodon hastalis, or possibly carcharodon plicatilis. The exposed formations at this location are Calvert and Choptank, with possible wash from St. Marys.
  16. Mystery Vert, Calvert Cliffs

    Hi all, I found this strange vertebra today in a small creek that flows into the Chesapeake Bay. If it's a fossil, it is from the Calvert Formation. It's unlike anything I've seen before, and certainly not a cetacean vert, so that begs the question: what is it? I have not done the burn test on it yet to confirm it as a fossil, but can anyone identify it based on morphology? I believe it to be from a large terrestrial animal, but I'd like an expert/experienced opinion. Thank you in advance!
  17. Are these coprolites?

    Hi all, I recently found the items below at Calvert Cliffs State Park (A-F) and Matoaka Beach (G-I) in Maryland (both Miocene exposures). Image scales are in inches. I'm not sure what these are. Could some or all of them be coprolites? If so, any ideas as to what kinds of animals they came from? Thanks for your help!
  18. Hi guys! I went out with one of my kids today to the Calvert Cliffs to see what we could find after the thunderstorms this week. We hit the beach around 9:00 and spent about 4 hours. It was calm with very clear water and favorable tide conditions. We weren't disappointed. We found a bit of eveything--some decent makos, hemis, and tigers, a couple of verts, some turtle shell, croc skin (I think), a mostly complete ecphora, a cookie fragment, some cool bone, and other stuff. We didn't find anything enormous, but we were happy with the variety. Enjoy the pic. If anyone has any idea what the delicate jawbone fragment might be from (bottom center), please chime in. I haven't found anything that small before.
  19. ID on fossil bone, Calvert Cliffs

    I found this along Calvert cliffs area north of Matoaka Cabins. I not sure what kind of bone it is or what it is from after trying to research.
  20. Fossil Bone From Calvert Cliffs 5/27

    I hope everyone is doing well. Today we went to a private beach to finally do some fossil hunting and get some exercise at Calvert Cliffs. My youngest son found this fossilized bone. He was super excited. We are hoping we can get an idea of what type of bone it is. It is our first intact fossilized bone. Thanks.
  21. Hi, Looking for identification. It is the first hunt in a long time, and the kids and I were searching for shark teeth along the Calvert Cliff formation in Maryland. We found what we believe is a whale rib, but wanted to get some expert eyes on it. It is approximately 10” by 4” and 2” thick. It is dense weighing about 2 1/2 pounds. Almost has a “metal” fell to it. The shape just looks too unique to be a rock. We found it near a fresh fall section. What do you think it is?
  22. Trace Fossils from Miocene Potomac

    Hi, longtime lurker first time poster here. I was wondering if you guys can help me ID this concretion my family found years ago near Calvert. I believe it might be a trace fossil of some kind, possibly a burrow or tunnel. I have found similar types at Westmoreland State Park. I can upload pictures from different angles if needed. Any suggestions of what it could be?
  23. Center cow Calvert cliffs

    Hi Randy here. A friend of mine found this tooth today along Calvert cliffs.its a center cow but is it pathological?
  24. Hello all! These finds showcase some coral, chesapectan fossils, shark teeth, and more. Also, this is the first time I came across a “complete”, yet very much battered, chesapectan fossil. I went with 2 others and spent around 6 hours. Thank you for reading. - Timmy
  25. Hello community! I hate to spam the feed or post these findings at such a late time, but I finally made an account suppose any information is better than no information. Anyways, this mixed bag is my best haul to date in my one year as an amateur fossil hunter. I was with 2 other people and spent 6 hours on and off searching. Some finds were given away before I can record them but this sums up the best of the trip. - Timmy
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