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Found 20 results

  1. Bryozoa Colony

    I have found a few of these over the years, but it was only recently that I looked closely enough to see that they were not broken bits of the fossil barnacles clusters that litter the beach. The shape, color and texture are actually quite different from the barnacles at this location. This one was excavated from a chunk of landslide material that also contained index fossils of the Drum Cliff Member.
  2. Don't Linger!

    From the album Calvert Cliffs

    This view of the cliffs in Calvert County, Maryland is gorgeous. I don't often see quite the vivid color range in this formation. I didn't linger, though, and I was wading in the bay to keep my distance. See those trees at the top of the 40 ft +/- cliff? The ones with the roots hanging over the edge? Those aren't going to be at the top of the cliff for long. At this point, they are probably only still there out of sheer habit. We did her a landslide the night we arrived, the spoils of which are in some of the following images in this album. I was on a trip earlier in the year, at a different part of the cliffs, when someone did get hit in the head by a bit of falling clay. Lucky for her, it wasn't a big chunk or from very high up. She *only* had a concussion. If ever you are close to the cliffs like this, watch and listen to where you are at all times. Run like crazy if you hear anything falling! DO NOT TOUCH THE CLIFFS! DO NOT STAND ON THE TOP EDGE OF THE CLIFFS! That prize Meg tooth isn't worth your life.
  3. Volute Snail

    This specimen was made incredibly soft by the surrounding matrix. The thin veneer of glossy coloration has worn away, but can be seen on this specimen, which came from the same 2 ft x 1ft x 1ft block of matrix that fell out of the cliff into the bay. Half a dozen of these were collected from that and one other small, adjacent block that day, along with more than two dozen other species. Layer originally designated Shattuck Zone 18. Donated to the Delaware Museum of Natural History.
  4. Sea Snail

    This specimen shows the original sheen and probably original coloration of the shell. It popped out of the matrix as you see it and required almost not cleaning. This specimen was stabilized, but stabilization did not change the appearance at all. Excavated from a chunk of matrix fallen from the cliffs into the Chesapeake Bay. Donated to the Delaware Museum of Natural History.
  5. Geoduck Clam

    Sometimes you just get lucky. This geoduck (pronounced gooey-duck) was sitting with its mate in living state, filled with matrix, under a pile of landslide rubble at the water's edge. The exteriors of both shells were almost completely clean of matrix. Most other specimens were badly cracked in the matrix and would never have survived the fall. This shell was donated to the Delaware Museum of Natural History.
  6. Cockle Shell

    This was carved carefully from a block of matrix that fell out of the cliffs into the bay. Of the dozens that I found, this was one of the few that did not completely fall apart what it was separated from the surrounding sand. Though thicker than many shells in the same chunk of sand, they are extremely soft in this location and incredibly fragile. Donated to the Delaware Museum of Natural History.
  7. Venus Clam

    Collected from landslide material in the bay. Donated to the Delaware Museum of Natural History.
  8. Clam

    Collected on the beach. Donated to the Delaware Museum of Natural History.
  9. Cup-and_saucer Snail

    Collected in landslide material in the Chesapeake Bay. Donated to the Delaware Museum of Natural History.
  10. Ecphora Snail

    Collected on the beach after a storm. This is an index fossil for the Drum Cliff member of the Choptank Formation, Shattuck Zone 18. Choptank is the dominant formation at Matoaka Beach. Donated to the Delaware Museum of Natural History.
  11. Matoaka Ecphora Hunt

    Warning: Lot’s of photos Well hello everyone, Ever since the monster rains we had I’ve been hearing about some great finds at Matoaka possibly hailing from the new slides. @Shark Tooth Hunter Found an awesome meg, @FossilsAnonymous walked out with some nice teeth and a big ole bone, and @I_gotta_rock found Ecphora(e), a plethora of inverts, and another big bone. She also said some person walked out with a chunk of clay bearing a complete cetecean vert and ribs. How could I pass this up? Though visions of megs danced in my head, I went with lower expectations (Matoaka is not the place you go to hunt megs). However, I love a good Ecphora! I was confident I could find a good one or two. Before I got there, I stopped at Jim’s roadside fossil stand. Had a good conversation with him, got to see some epic finds, and learned some good tips. Also bought some bones, ones kinda funny (get it! It’s a complete cetecean humerus! Permission to roll eyes and stop reading granted), and the next is a cetecean skull element, I’m not sure exactly what you call it (not up to date on my cetecean cranial osteology) but it holds the ear bones in it. Also got an Ecphora as a failsafe.
  12. I found what I believe to be a rather interesting specimen in the form of a Megalodon tooth. I have never seen one this color, or, rather, no color at all! Do these come from albino sharks? Just kidding . I was up at my mom's house in St. Leonard helping to dig out some post holes for a new fence construction. After taking a short break, lo and behold this tooth pops up in the dirt pile from our excavations! I couldnt believe my eyes. Her house is a few miles inland from the coast of the western shore of the Chesapeake Bay. I thought this was a pretty unique find. For one, its the only tooth ive ever found not at a beach or the cliffs. And two, I've never seen a white or colorless fossilized shark tooth before! Uncommon, in my opinion. I was doing some reading and found that tooth colors of this nature occur when found in areas where there is a lot of groundwater running through. The ground water will leach the sediments and minerals back out of the tooth, leaving it colorless. Pretty interesting. This makes total sense. The area it was found is up on a hill where a lot of rainwater runs off and down a slope, there's got to be a lot of groundwater running through too. This makes my fourth Megalodon tooth found recently! Im so excited! Ive been finding some really cool teeth lately including a beautiful little smaller, cream colored Meg, some nice hastalises, and some of the biggest hemi's ive ever found. I'll have to do another trip report soon! Here are some pictures below of the colorless meg! -Toothman
  13. Hello all, ToothMan here. This is my first trip report! I just joined this great forum. Stumbled upon it the other day. I have only been collecting about a year, and mostly fossilized sharks teeth at that. I also collect ray plates, I have one porpoise tooth, two crocodile teeth, some crab claw fossils, mostly marine creatures but focus mainly on shark teeth. I'm looking forward to expanding my searches for more than just teeth. Here is a link https://imgur.com/gallery/CO2q2gg to an imgur gallery from my most recent trip. Trip report below! I have some great teeth in my collection but wanted to report on my best finds to date, which ocurred over the past two days. I had some exceptional luck, paired with a keen eye, resulting in my first two Megalodon teeth ever found. I live in Solomon's, Md, and frequent some of the same sites I'm sure some of you do. Those being Calvert Cliffs, Brownies beach, flag ponds, etc. I also hunt Cove point a lot. My grandparents have a house down there so I frequent that beach often. Ive had my best finds so far there over the past two days. Last night I was there at low tide around 10:30 and found my first Megalodon tooth! I was ecstatic! I didnt think you could find those here. I thought they were mostly at calvert cliffs but I guess some wash down. I found a bunch of smaller teeth as well. Then today, I went back around noon for low tide again. Did my usual walk up to the point, picking up a bunch of small teeth along the way couple with a few hemi's here and there. I walked around past the lightouse and began finding some really nice mako's! I absolutely love finding mako teeth. Found some in the waves crashing and even up at the high tide line. The water,was still a little cold today but bearable. I wore shorts and sandals and took my sandals off, walking thru knee deep water one way searching, and up on the beach looking on the way back. I went home, happy with these finds. But I decided to return around 5 even though the tide was coming back in and I didnt expect to find much. But boy was I wrong. By this point it was really windy and the waves were really large, crashing and moving material all over the place. This is good as it turns up more stuff, but its harder to collect. You have to be quick. I felt like the karate kid snatching a fly out of my trainers hand diving in to grab teeth I had just spotted before they were swept away by the surf! Many were lost that I couldnt grab quick enough. I was picking up quite a few teeth though, a bunch of makos and some nice hemi's, when I saw a huge mako! A wave had just crashed on it, I let it recede, spotted ir again, and snatched it up before another wave could sweep it away. I had been out for hours now, and was really happy with my finds. I decided to take one last walk around the point and then I saw my second meg ever sticking up out of the sand. Only the top gum line was exposed and my heart jumped as I knew exactly what it was and it looked big! I scooped it up out of the sand and cleaned the barnacles off it. I was and am so happy! Never thought id be finding Megalodon teeth. Ive had the fossil hunting bug for about two years now. It really is addicting. Happy hunting, all. -ToothMan
  14. Need help identifying

    Please help me identify my pretty cool find
  15. My fellow fossil-hunting partner in crime, @Chomper, and I hit Brownie's Beach around 10 a.m. on President's Day. I saw a bunch of other fossil hunters there, and I understand @WhodamanHD was there as well, though I didn't see him. (I had my nose rather close to the sand most of the time -- next time I go fossil hunting, must remember my glasses!) There was a fossil hunter there, a man wearing a Lowe's bib that he was using to put fossils in. I didn't catch his name, but he was amazingly helpful! I went up to him quite a few times with questions, which he kindly answered, plus he gave me tips on learning to spot fossils. He was especially helpful in showing the difference between bone and rock, and passed on two bone fragments he found. Once I started picking up the characteristics of bone, I started seeing them everywhere. I don't know if he's a member here, but I wanted to give him a salute and a HUGE thank you! All in all, Chomper and I spent about 5 hours there, slowly combing the beach. She's going to post her fossil finds sometime after this weekend. And without further ado, here are my finds! Please, please comment away on anything, especially IDing, as I tend to throw EVERYTHING in my pockets, fossil or no.
  16. My Presidents’ Day hunt

    Had time to squeeze in a thirty minute hunt (not sure if it was worth the three hour total drive time) at Brownies (miocene) but did find some decent things. Big sand tiger, and two rib sectionss. An partial Ecphora was a welcome sight indeed (wonder why I have better luck with them at Brownies than Matoaka). A lot of sand tigers for some reason, and few physos than normal. Anyway, because of the shortness I just picked up anything strange looking, hence the broken teeth. Also a lot of bone and scute material as per usual. Hopefully someday soon the megs will be outor even
  17. Attention Maryland Residents!

    Any members of the forum who live near or in Calvert County in Maryland, I have a question. Is there currently snow on the ground in your area? I'm considering going hunting at Brownie's tomorrow, but a bunch of snow on the beaches would be a pain. According to the weather channel, it definitely snowed there (and it did quite a bit where I am), but what I'm wondering is if you think it would still be there tomorrow. I think it's supposed to be sunny tomorrow, and maybe the tides will clear the beach of some snow, but I'd really love to know the current conditions if anyone could tell me. Thanks in advance!
  18. Hi all, I've been considering applying to the Calvert Marine Museum Fossil Club. It looks like a great place to share your finds and discuss paleontology with other fossil hounds in the area. The club apparently also goes on occasional hunting trips as a group, which would be fun, especially if we could get some special access to typically restricted areas. And as an added bonus, it would probably look really good on college apps. I am just wondering if there's anyone here on the forum who is already a member of the club who would be willing to give me some more info. I'd love to here more about what goes into being a member of the club, exactly what they do at meetings, how the trips work, etc. I just want to know if it would be worth joining, because the distance is not ideal (about 2 hours as opposed to the 1 that it takes me to get to Brownie's), but I'd be willing to make the trip if it's worthwhile. Any information from members would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!
  19. Any thoughts?

    Hello all! I have looked all over and I can not ID this. Maybe it's nothing but the texture is really cool. It was found in the Chesapeake Bay in Calvert County Maryland. Would love to hear your thoughts. Thank you! Here is the back
  20. 8/6/17 Calvert Cliffs

    I took the first trip to Calvert cliffs since I was a very small child yesterday (I know I live in Maryland so I should be there more often) and although it was productive I am frustrated. A) not a single shark tooth to speak of, I think I was doing something wrong and B ) YOU CANT ACTUALLY HUNT AT THE CLIFFS!?! I knew you were not allowed to dig in the cliffs, but I thought you could at least hunt under them! The person at the front didn't mention that, just said don't dig in the cliffs, and the only warning was a small sign behind a bank that could barely be seen and four small wooden posts with orange plastic grid that was on the ground. I unknowinglyy walked a few feet in to collect fossils and was promptly yelled at and told to drop the fossils. It was one person who then left and after she left, tons of people walked over to the cliffs, one picked up the fossils I dropped! I could see (some I took pictures of) beautiful complete shells on fallen pieces of stone, beckoning to me. Now they will soon be destroyed by the waves. What is the point of Calvert cliffs without the cliffs? It makes me angry so many fossils are allowed to be destroyed, I understand why but do not agree. I'm now thinking of ways to bypass this and does riparian rights got me covered? Can I walk at mean tide levels under the cliffs legally? I just learned the fee at matoaka cabins is the same so I know where I'm going next time.... Anyway ranting aside, these are my finds, there are a ton mostly chesapecten, so I will be uploading them throughout the day. I have a paper on how to ID them but it's all confusing to me, so feel free to comment thoughts at any time. first up the sad remains of Ecphora, who instead of being collected in time, were destroyed by the waves. I don't know if it's possible to tell the species, they look most similar to gardenerae to me.
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