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Found 10 results

  1. Wanted: Sauropod Teeth

    Hi All, I am looking for sauropod teeth. Madagascan teeth at the top of my list but am interested in all sauropods. I would be interested in Rabbachisaurus teeth but they would need to be in exceptional condition. I have a lot of teeth I would be willing to trade, too many to list. If you have something you would like to trade please let me know and what type of tooth you would be looking for in return. Thank you, Randy
  2. Today we debuted the Jurassic sauropod bones we picked up and Camarasaurus was the dino of the day. The kids loved the fused ribs and each kid got to touch them. We also passed around the Trike frill as usual plus some smaller Camarasaurus bones. This was by far our most interactive program yet and the students really responded. We ended up covering fewer dinosaurs but it did not matter to the kids. They were so excited to get to touch real dino fossils. This was a very informative program for me. The more of these we do, the more I believe that we need to keep adding bones the kids can touch. The display fossils are great but it is really the hands-on experience that makes the biggest impact. We are developing a niche as the dudes that will let you touch dino bones lol The best part of the program is always the end when we pass out the free fossils. Today was Goblin shark and Lemon shark teeth with bivalves and Gastropods. 26 students got those fossils plus we left some with the teacher for future students. 3 students that volunteered to help other students get to touch fossils were given Camarasaurus bone fragments for the volunteer work. Another great day of fossil education and making kids smile !
  3. It is with a good bit of giddy enthusiasm that we share our very first Jurassic dinosaur fossils. We have a start to our Morrison Formation collection and I am so excited to take these into class. This is also a proud moment because my son and I earned these fossils with our hard work. This is a gift to our program from us and a gift to the kids we want to educate. They are also big hunks of dino bone. We needed a couple of larger bones for these programs for visual flair and these fit the bill for our budget. It will be a week before they arrive but I am too excited to wait lol One of the things we learned from our first dinosaur program was that 2nd graders learn about Diplodocus when they study dinosaurs. It was a species they knew. So we purchased a partial Diplo coracoid bone. It is a 15" x 11" x 9" hunk of dinosaur bone that weighs 12 lbs. Our largest and heaviest fossil. This one will really get the attention of the kids I think and gives us a the opportunity to feature Diplo in the program We also added two partial Camarasaurus ribs that fused together during fossilization. It is 14" x 9" so it is good sized and is a great example of the geological process they are learning about. This gives us an additional Sauropod to cover in the program and lest us talk more about niches. This will be a great fossil for the kids to touch as well. We are also adding a few pounds of chunkasaurus bones. Perfect dino fossils for hands on exploration and a few special give away dino bones too. The pictures are not great, not sure why but I will upload more when they arrive. Here are the big ones.... Picture 1- Diplo coracoid Picture 2 Cam ribs
  4. On Sunday I took a trip to the Natural History Museum in London. I queued up before it opened at 10am and even before then there was a long queue. I have not visited this museum since I was a child and spent an entire day there (10am to 4.30pm - a long time). I was surprised as it is a lot bigger than I remembered and there was so much to see. This place has the most wonderful things and is an incredible place to learn. The museum showcases a Baryonyx, Sophie the Stegosaurus (the world's most complete Stegosaurus) and more! The moving Trex and Deinonychus are also really realistic in the way they move. If you like your dinosaur teeth, the Megalosaurus and Daspletosaurus teeth are out of this world! There is something for everyone in this museum and I would highly recommend that you visit here if you have not already! A lot of the dinosaur specimens are casts taken from other museums but they are still cool to look at. I had taken the photos on my SLR and due to the size of the photos I had to reduce the quality of them to be able to post on the forum which is unfortunate but it's the only way otherwise the photos would take a really long time to load. There are more non-dinosaur related photos that I will be posting at some point later on but may take me some time to pick out. Enjoy the photos from this section of the museum! Blue Zone Dinosaurs (has a mix of some photos of crocs too)
  5. I apologize ahead of time. I do not have location of origin or any history on this piece. A friend of mine acquired this when he bought a store that was closing. Other than the pictures, all I can tell you is it weighs about 12 pounds. I was thinking a vert from a Diplodocus or a Camarasaurus. Any input would greatly be appreciated. Thank you everyone!
  6. Camarasaurus or Brachiosaurus tooth?

    Camarasaurus or Brachiosaurus tooth? I'm leaning more towards a Camarasaurus because the crown/spoon head doesn't twist much from the neck of the root. Info on where found: Morrison Formation, Big Horn Basin Ranch, Wyoming 2.25″ long
  7. My Morrison formation collection

    Here is my Jurassic collection from the Morrison formation. This is a collection I really want to expand so if anyone has any fossils from the Morrison they'd be willing to trade definitely message me. the latest addition to my Morrison formation collection is the large partial Allosaurus vert my parents got me for Christmas. The fossil in the bottom right of the first pic is a chunk of bone, probably Camarasaurus. The fossil in the top right of the first pic is a chunk of bone, probably theropod. Pics 2,3,4= Partial Allosaurus fragilis vertebra, Hanksville Utah Pics 5,6= Allosaurus fragilis vertebra, Wyoming Pics 7,8,9= Allosaurus fragilis tooth, Hanksville Utah
  8. When most collectors think about North American Camarasaurus specimens localities in Utah and Wyoming come to mind. The attached paper describes a specimen from central Montana that is the most northern occurrence of this sauropod, pretty cool. Woodruff DC, Foster JR (2017) The first specimen of Camarasaurus (Dinosauria: Sauropoda) from Montana: The northernmost occurrence of the genus. PLoS ONE 12(5): e0177423. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0177423 http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0177423
  9. These camarasaurus metacarpals were discovered within a 20' area of the digsite. A number of other camarasaurus bones were found in the same area. They all came from a smaller, sub-adult camarasaurus. I'm trying to figure out if they all come from the same foot. (left, front foot) I have only two, or three worn out toe bones, and the big claw was missing. High energy water ripped this dinosaur apart. Parts of a diplodocus were scattered around the same area.
  10. Weekend Dinosaur Verts

    I had the chance to go out on some property of a friend this weekend and found these two great associated Caudal vertebrae from a Camarasaurus. I found them sticking out of a stone embankment and it took a bit of work to extract them. They need a bit of work but I will keep updating pics as I prepare them. It was a great day.
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