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Found 247 results

  1. Changaspis sp.

    From the album Invertebrates

    Changaspis sp. Early Cambrian Yongshun Hunan China
  2. Naked chancelloriid from the lower Cambrian of China Strange sponge-like fossil creature from Chengjiang deposits of Yunnan Province, China University of Leicester, June 19, 2018 https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/06/180619230853.htm https://www2.le.ac.uk/offices/press/press-releases/2018/june/strange-nude-fossil-creature-from-half-a-billion-years-ago The paper is; Cong, P.Y., Harvey, T.H., Williams, M., Siveter, D.J., Siveter, D.J., Gabbott, S.E., Li, Y.J., Wei, F. and Hou, X.G., 2018. Naked chancelloriids from the lower Cambrian of China show evidence for sponge-type growth. Proc. R. Soc. B, 285(1881), p.20180296. doi: 10.1098/rspb.2018.0296 http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/285/1881/20180296 I could not an online PDF File of the above paper. I could only find; Bengtson, S. and Collins, D., 2015. Chancelloriids of the Cambrian Burgess Shale. Palaeontologia Electronica, 18(1), pp. 1-67. https://palaeo-electronica.org/content/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=1031:chancelloriids&catid=146:2015&Itemid=567 and Hughes, N.C., Peng, S., Bhargava, O.N., Ahluwalia, A.D., Walia, S., Myrow, P.M. and Parcha, S.K., 2005. Cambrian biostratigraphy of the Tal Group, Lesser Himalaya, India, and early Tsanglangpuan (late early Cambrian) trilobites from the Nigali Dhar syncline. Geological Magazine, 142(1), pp. 57-80. https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/1aba/719f7a72ffbd6006df6f596c749ac20b975b.pdf http://earthsciences.ucr.edu/docs/Hughesetal2005Tal.pdf http://trilobyte.ucr.edu/hughespubs.html Yours, Paul H.
  3. Wutingaspis tingi Kobayashi, 1944

    From the album Invertebrates

    Wutingaspis tingi Kobayashi, 1944 Early Cambrian Yuxi Yunnan China
  4. I love fossils from the Burgess Shale and came across this just released paper on Waptia fieldensis, very informative publication http://rsos.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/5/6/172206
  5. Can anyone help identify this soft body? I found it in the Utah - Wheeler Shale formation while searching for Trilobites. I am always keeping my eyes peeled for any soft bodies such as worms, algae, etc. and came upon this after splitting a rock. It is roughly 16 mm long with a body that can be best described as an olive with 2 stalks sticking out the top end. There does not appear to be any missing parts, although this may be a partial body. Evidence of this is the organic/mineral "halo" which can be seen around the body. Also, there appears to be an alimentary canal progressing through the middle. Any comments or ideas are welcome.
  6. https://www.haaretz.com/science-and-health/MAGAZINE-tiny-babies-of-prehistoric-giant-shrimp-were-ferocious-killers-too-1.6150981
  7. Unknown Finnish fossil

    A few weeks ago I was on my very first fossil hunts. With some beginners luck I managed to find a few trilobites and orthoceras but I also found a very peculiar fossil that I am very curious to learn more about. The place where I found it is called the Aland Islands and is located in the Baltic sea between Sweden and Finland. Ive read that the fossils in this area comes from either the Ordovician or Cambrian ages but I am clueless on which age the stone comes from that containes this fossil. It appears to be complete only missing one "eye" on the half that is exposed. On the negative I can clearly see the "eye" imprinted. The shell/skin is extremely fragile and crumbles if touched and most of the shell/skin is stuck in the negative. When I turn it upside down I can see that the fossil is symetrical with half still in stone and other half exposed. It is approx 7 cm long, 4 cm wide and 2,5 cm high. Anybody got any ideas what this might be? Ive searched thousands of pictures in this forum and on the internet but nothing even comes close.
  8. https://phys.org/news/2018-05-major-fossil-emergence-early-animal.html
  9. Parayiliangella quadrisulcata

    A new trilobite for my collection I don't think more complete specimens exist.
  10. Chlorophyte or Chloud Faces?

    Hello, all. After my last wonderfully successful Id effort on here, i thought I'd try again. This specimen was boshed free of some matrix that was sent to me by the unrivalled Ralph @Nimravisin a batch of matrix from the Conasauga Formation, Upper Cambrian, Georgia, USA and home to a multitude of the trilobite Aphelaspis brachyphasis as well as rarer agnostids and other even rarer trilos. I was looking at this paper https://www.researchgate.net/publication/250083071_Exceptional_fossil_preservation_in_the_Conasauga_Formation_Cambrian_Northwestern_Georgia_USA and thought my specimen below looks rather like the example D in Figure 3 (sorry, I don't know how to just post that image. It's a chlorophyte, so is mine ? They appear to be sort of tiny strings of sausages, the longest string being about 2 mm long, so each individual 'cell' is very tiny indeed. Thank you for any comments, ideas or suggestions. Adam.
  11. trilobite Hamatolenus

    Hi, i've bought that trilobite last week-end in an exposition of fossils and minerals. I've forgotten to ask what trilo it was and the seller forgot to tell me. I know it's a Redlichiida, Ellipsocephalidae, Hamatolenus from the Cambrian of Morocco. If one of you had an idea about its genus, it will be welcome. P.S. appparently, it was in the ptychopariida order and would now be in the redlichiida order, or am i wrong ?
  12. Zacanthoides ?typicalis

    From the album Trilobites

  13. Piochaspis sellata

    From the album Trilobites

  14. Ptychagnostus occultatus

    From the album Trilobites

  15. Itagnostus interstrictus

    From the album Trilobites

  16. Bolaspidella housensis

    From the album Trilobites

  17. Possible Cambrian Panarthropod fossils?

    Hi! I was searching my backyard for fossils (even though I knew I probably wouldn't find anything), when I came across a piece of shale that was splitting. I used my pick to split it, and I found these "fossils". I'm not sure if this is even a fossil, but it looks like some kind of carbon film. They were so small that I couldn't take any good pictures of them. Each of these "fossils" are ~2 cm long. The rocks I found these in were there when I moved into the house, so I don't know if they were already there, or if they were imported. The first one resembles the possible anomalocaridid relative Pambdelurion, or at least that's what it resembles the most. The second "fossil" is what looks to be some kind of Arthropod with overlapping swimming fins. The last one looks to be some kind of frond (possibly algae?). Any help would be much appreciated, even though I doubt they are even fossils.
  18. The is an online Youtube video of a series of talks by well-respected sedimentologists on pre-vegetation river systems. It is quite informative series of talks about what is known and unknown concerning river systems before the advent of land vegetation. The conference is at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FQ-O8YEXtjQ The text about it states: “This is a recording on the online conference on "Pre-vegetation river systems" (September 16, 2016). Talk by Jim Best, Darrel Long, Phil Fralick, Renato Almeida, Mauricio Santos, Alessandro Ielpi, Arjan Reesink, and James Syvitski” Yours, Paul H.
  19. Well I finally had the opportunity to head out to Millard Co. with my Geology professor, the esteemed Forest Gahn. He is one of the worlds leading experts in Echinoderms and he specializes in Crinoids. The guy goes diving a lot to study Echinoderms in their natural habitat and he's managed to keep some Crinoids thriving in a tank at BYU in Rexburg, Idaho. Here's some pictures of the trip to some special Geology and Paleontology sights in south western Utah. I had a blast. Students sitting on the edge of Fossil Mountain, one of the richest Ordovician deposits in the world learning about it's geology from Forest Gahn. The major fossiliferous formations are the Juab and Kanosh Shale formations. In a remnant of the last ice age lake, Lake Bonneville forest scopes up a handful of algae and cyanobacteria rich mud along with Playa (dried up lake). This is an extinct marine animal known as a Graptolite discovered at a nearby Ordovician road cut in Millard Co. UT. No trip is complete without trilobites. Here's a large Asaphiscus wheeleri molt from U-Dig near Delta, UT. This Native American arrowhead was recovered in Millard CO Utah during one of our hikes. My professor claims its origins may be from the Shoshone Tribe. Forest teaches students about the Cambrian marine fauna at U-Dig near Delta, UT. Forest shows students the fossilized remains of a Stromatolite (just above his knee) colony alongside the Lake Bonneville Playa (dried lake) near Notch Peak UT. Here is the view of Fossil Mountain in Millard CO, UT at sunrise. At dusk on the first night we camped at the dunes of Little Sahara which are composed of ancient sand deposits from the Sevier River dumping into Lake Bonneville. Perhaps one of my favorite parts of the trip was being let into the collections archive room at the BYU museum of paleontology in Provo, UT. A lot of the dinosaurs in the collections here are from the Saints and Sinners Quarry in Colorado. Lots of neat therapods including a near complete Allosaurus.
  20. Megapalaeolenus deprati Mansuy, 1912

    From the album Invertebrates

    Megapalaeolenus deprati Mansuy, 1912 Early Cambrian Gaolufang Yunnan China
  21. Elvinia roemeri.jpg

    From the album Northern's Trilobites

  22. Taenicephalus.jpg

    From the album Northern's Trilobites

  23. Wujiajiania lyndasmithae.JPG

    From the album Northern's Trilobites

  24. Itagnostus interstricta

    From the album Trilobites

    Wheeler Formation Millard County Utah, United States

    © 2018 by Jay A. Wollin

  25. Bolaspidellus housensis

    From the album Trilobites

    Wheeler Formation Millard County Utah, United States

    © 2018 by Jay A. Wollin

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