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Found 370 results

  1. Bone or Tooth?

    Hey this little thing is driving me bonkers, most times I’m close to ball parking what some thing is but this I have no idea. Is it just sediment ? It’s ivory white on the outside with a chocolate brown inner layer and a light brown swirl at the center.
  2. The Burgess Shale

    I’ve decided to take a break from dissertation writing and write up something else instead, one of the greatest fossil hunts I’ve been on, my trip to the Burgess Shale. Its been a little while since I got to go but here is the story as I remember it. I’ll write this up in a few parts since I took a lot of pictures and I’m going through and editing them as I go. Part 1: Going on an Adventure A little bit of background to start off. When I was younger (around 12 I think) I got the opportunity to go to the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History in Washington DC. Of all of the displays my favourite was a small board under glass with a half a dozen or so small dark slabs of shale, the museums display of the fossils of the Burgess Shale. I can’t remember if there actually was a Pikaia on display but I distinctly remember the Pikaia and when it came time to exit through the gift shop I went the book which had the closest looking thing on the cover. That book, needless to say, was Stephan Jay Gould’s ‘Wonderful Life’, a book which was admittedly a little above my reading level at the time but one that I was enthralled with nonetheless. I knew that one day I had to go see where they came from for myself. Fast forward to five years ago now, I had finished high school a few months previously and was one week away from starting university. For my graduation present I had been given tickets for a guided tour, my father and I were going, I was going to get to see the Walcott Quarry in the Burgess Shale. The whole trip was going to take three days, my father’s car (a beaten up red Ford Windstar which we weren’t sure was going to survive the trip) was packed was packed with tents, a small amount of other camping gear, my trusty blue backpack, and the requisite 5lb bag of trail mix and we set off on our way since the driving would take the better part of the first day. The folks at the border were a little suspicious when we told them we were going to Banff for only two days but after a half an hour or so of checking over the car we were allowed on our way again into Canada. After a few hours we started to get into the Rockies. Growing up in western Washington I’m used to big mountains but while the Cascades were large these were different. I took a few pictures out the car window, the sharp treeless peaks of some almost looked a little like teeth. After a long day’s drive we reached our campsite, just a few miles away from the parking lot where the tour would start the next day and set up camp. The next morning we were up with the sun. Our tour group consisted of about 8 of us in total, my father and I and a handful of others, mostly retired petroleum geologists. Just a few minutes up the trail and the scenery was already breath-taking with a waterfall thundering over the nearby rock face. Soon we had properly left civilisation behind and after about an hour or so of hiking, stopped at the edge of a crystal clear glacial melt water lake where the ranger went over a little about geologic time, using the ever popular calendar analogy (that humans have been around only for a few hours on the last day of the year compared to the age of the rocks we were going to see). The hiking became tougher as the incline increased, through the forest. I’d been on a fair number of hikes during my many years with scouts but I was definitely out of practice compared with the rest of the group, mostly septuagenarians, who seemed to make it up the trail like they were part mountain goat. After another little while there was a sign on the side of the trail and even though the surrounding mountains were shaded by the trees I knew we were getting closer. We stopped briefly to go over the regulations of the area, there is of course no civilian collecting in the Burgess Shale. The ranger also explained how rare the soft bodied preservation present was and passed around a map dotted with the locations of all the spots on the globe with Burgess Shale type preservation. I quickly took a picture in case I was ever nearby another one before we started on our way again. Continued in Part 2 . . .
  3. Beach Find

    I found this on a beach in Sutton, North Dublin City, April 15th, 2020. To all intents and purposes it feels like stone and more than likely is. I only post it due to its perculiar shape, what looks like a concentric ring pattern on the concave side, on the opposite side four small striated lines and on the 'top' what looks like a portion of a socket. Thank you in advance for any suggestions, I will be happy no matter what the opinions are. Regards, Waggath
  4. Trilobites from Sweden

    Wins from an auction hosted by my friend @Kasia These bits are in a medium grey limestone found at Raback, near Kinnekulle, Vastegotland, Sweden, so are probably from the Upper Cambrian part of the Alum Shale Formation. Maybe Peltura scaraboides? Or is there not enough left to get close to an id? Max 5 mm wide and 4 mm long. All specimens are on the same rock. The scale's in mm and is partially obscuring a bit seen better below : Not really expecting too much from these tiny fragments, but any help or blind guesswork very much appreciated. @piranha @Johannes @Dromiopsis But anyone else more than welcome to comment too Thank you.
  5. I wanted to add a bit of cambrian fossils to my collection. So I did some research on ChengJiang biota protection and the fossil laws of China(As of updated to 2019,I am from Hong Kong so I can read the documents) According to the Chinese Chengjiang biota protection area,the maotianshan area is a protected site,but surrounding areas do not have such protection(Its like other parts of China),where such fossils can still be found in. Yet,according to the Chinese fossil law,fossils listed as special protection cannot be commericalized,and the fossils from ChengJiang fits the description: 第七條 按照在生物進化以及生物分類上的重要程度,將古生物化石劃分為重點保護古生物化石和一般保護古生物化石。 具有重要科學研究價值或者數量稀少的下列古生物化石,應當列為重點保護古生物化石: (一)已經命名的古生物化石種屬的模式標本; (二)保存完整或者較完整的古脊椎動物實體化石; (三)大型的或者集中分佈的高等植物化石、無脊椎動物化石和古脊椎動物的足跡等遺跡化石; (四)國務院自然資源主管部門確定的其他需要重點保護的古生物化石。 重點保護古生物化石名錄由國家古生物化石專家委員會擬定,由國務院自然資源主管部門批准並公佈。 (Number 7 According to the importance on creatures evolution and creatures taxonomy,assign the fossils to be special state protected fossils and normal protected fossils. Specimens with important sciencific importance or scarce fossils of the following types of fossils,should be listed as special protected fossils 1 High quality fossils(complete for example) of described fossils. 2 Complete or mostly complete specimens of veterbrates 3 Large or concentrated fossils of highly evolved plants,invertebrates or trace fossils of veterbrates 4 Other fossils made special protected by the Chinese government. The list will be made by paleontologists and be publish after approved. Yet i couldnt find any information on chengjiang fossils being on the special protection list,since it fits 3 quite well,and since I am in Hong Kong,technically part of China,does it mean that the fossils are legal to own?(By Chinese law)
  6. Newbies looking for Fossil identification

    Hi There Myself and my two boys have just started fossil hunting. We have no clue what we are doing ,but it's exciting and the boys are ecstatic about doing this and very eager to learn. Please help with our first identification. This rock is used as an artificial river bed filler. We don't know where it was quarried ,but are keen to know what fossils are inside. I'm assuming some type of sea bed coral or tube. PS: Will return rock when identified.
  7. Yesterday I traveled to vintage pa in the hopes of finding Cambrian fossils or more specifically Anomalocaris fossils which had been found in a former quarry nearby and in the same formation I was hunting. I went to an outcropping of the kinzers formation that I saw on the Wikipedia Image that I have attached, but after an hour of splitting rocks I didn’t find anything recognizable. I was hoping someone knew if I was doing something wrong or if it was just not a good spot? thanks, Noel
  8. Help request! I am putting together a tool for judging rock age based on very crude, whole-rock, hand-sample observations of fossil faunas/floras -- the types of observations a child or beginner could successfully make. I view this as a complement to the very fine, species-level identifications commonly employed as index fossils for individual stages, biozones, etc. Attached is what I've got so far, but I can clearly use help with corals, mollusks, plants, vertebrates, ichnofossils, and the post-Paleozoic In the attached file, vibrant orange indicates times in earth history to commonly observe the item of interest; paler orange indicates times in earth history to less commonly observe the item of interest. White indicates very little to no practical probability of observing the item of interest. Please keep in mind that the listed indicators are things like “conspicuous horn corals,” purposefully declining to address rare encounters with groups of low preservation potential, low recognizability, etc. Got additions/amendments, especially for the groups mentioned above? Toss them in the comments below! Thank you..... https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1tVm_u6v573V4NACrdebb_1OsBEAz60dS1m4pCTckgyA
  9. Archotuba sp. (7cm) Anomalocaris frontal appendage (size: 3cm) Tuzoia retifera Walcott, 1912 Isoxy auritus Tuzoia sinensis Pan, 1957 (size: 4cm)
  10. What is this Cambrian appendage?

    I believe it’s a feeding appendage. I’ve been told it’s an anomalocaradid feeding appendage, but i don’t remember any of the anoms iv seen having anything quite like that. I can’t remember ever seeing it in context, although feeding appendage definitely seems right.
  11. Some trilobites I have from Guanshan Biota: Breviredlichia granulosa Undescribed Redlichia sp. Juvenile R. yunnanensis A pair of unpreped B. granulosa.
  12. Two of my weeks formation trilobites, will show more in a few days. Order.: PTYCHOPARIIDA Family.: LLANOASPIDIDAE Gen.: Genevievella, LOCHMAN, 1936 Rare trilobite with a large characteristic spine starting from the 7th axial ring. LINK: http://www.backtothepast.com.mx/ebonino/html/weeks_trilobites_1.html#Genevievella
  13. Since last year, I was starting hunting down all types of Bristolia genus. I am so fascinating about its shape. Here represents all the species I have acquired: Bristolia bristolensis (Resser 1928) Types: USNM 78390, the lectotype (defined in Palmer and Repina 1993); paralectotypes USNM 78391 and 78392. Bristolia bristolensis had originally been recognized (e.g., Riccio 1952; Palmer and Halley 1979; Palmer and Repina 1993) as a highly variable species, particularly in the condition of the intergenal and genal spine angles. However, Lieberman (1998) used univariate measurements and statistical analyses to define a well-constrained B. bristolensis based on Resser’s (1928) lectotype, and demonstrated that what had traditionally been treated as a broadly variable B. bristolensis was actually two different species. The species referred to as Bristolia n. sp. in Lieberman (1998) is described here as B. harringtoni n. sp. Bristolia bristolensis has the intergenal angle deflected at an 80 to 95 degree angle relative to a transverse line and the genal spine angle is variably developed opposite and/or between the distal tips of S2 and S3. In B. harringtoni the intergenal angle is deflected at a 50 to 65 degree angle relative to a transverse line and the genal spine angle is developed variably opposite the distal tip of S2 or the medial part of L1. Occurrence: California: the Carrara Formation, in the lower Bristolia zonule, upper part of the Olenellus zone, Early Cambrian, following Nelson (1976) and Palmer and Halley (1979), in the Grapevine, Funeral and Resting Spring ranges, the White-Inyo/Death Valley region, and in the Latham Shale, Marble Mountains, 190 m W of the limestone quarry, 0.5 mi E of Cadiz, in the Mojave Desert portion of San Bernardino County, possibly equivalent to Hazzard’s (1933) locality M-5, treated as in the Bristolia zonule. The above content comes from paper: Systematic Revision of the Olenelloidea (Trilobita, Cambrian) Bulletin 5 of the Peabody Museum of Natural History Yale University 18 October 1999 New Haven, Connecticut Bristolia Insolens (Resser, 1928) Bristolia cf. parryi
  14. Trilobite ID help

    Hello folks. I am considering a purchase and would like to know it this fossil is as described. It listed as Remopleurides species trilobite? It's from Jingxi, China.
  15. Agnostid or larva?

    Hello again, still going back through my neglected trilobites. This one I had labeled in my mind as Elrathia+ Agnostid fragment. After learning a little more about trilobite ontogeny (https://www.trilobites.info/ontogeny.htm) I wonder if the partial agnostid may rather be a larva of Elrathia? Or can I rule that out by size? I hope the "adult" is sufficient for scale comparison. The more you learn the less you know. Best Regards, J
  16. Just wanted to share one of my favorite Moroccan trilobite plates. There are two trilobites on this plate and it came with both the positive and negative halfs. These are Cambropallas telesto from the Cambrian age. The actual trilobites measure 3.9 and 3.6 inches. They were found at Toughach, Alnif, Morocco. The plates were cracked but there is no restoration. Hope you enjoy.
  17. China Trilobite ID request #1

    Hello folks. I've been digging through my "unidentified" draw again and came across eight Trilobite requiring identification. I cannot seem to locate my documentation, so, I am humbly requesting your help once again. The information I do have on this Trilobite is it comes from Yunnan, China and is from the Cambrian period. It measures 25mm x 17mm.
  18. Missouri Cambrian

    Just wanted to share this lovely old shell i had the pleasure of luck to find. It has been identified as taneospira emenensis from the eminence formation of Missouri upper Cambrian. I hope you enjoy seeing it. Happy hunting.
  19. Identification

    Hello everyone, I working in dimension stone field in Armenia. This fossils where found in a sample small stone block brought for cutting to the factory, then they were machined polished as standard marble or granite tile. The tile (second photo) is 400x800mm app.16x32 inch. Kindly help me to identify these guys. Thanks
  20. Hi all, i want to buy that Cambropallas Telesto. It seems a good specimen, i can see rock cracks passing thru the trilo so is a good sign. But i'm not sure about the entire specimen, in particular in the black areas in the back. Seems that the "shell" have been eroded. What do you think? Thank you
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