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Found 236 results

  1. Zacanthoides ?typicalis

    From the album Trilobites

  2. Piochaspis sellata

    From the album Trilobites

  3. Ptychagnostus occultatus

    From the album Trilobites

  4. Itagnostus interstrictus

    From the album Trilobites

  5. Bolaspidella housensis

    From the album Trilobites

  6. Possible Cambrian Panarthropod fossils?

    Hi! I was searching my backyard for fossils (even though I knew I probably wouldn't find anything), when I came across a piece of shale that was splitting. I used my pick to split it, and I found these "fossils". I'm not sure if this is even a fossil, but it looks like some kind of carbon film. They were so small that I couldn't take any good pictures of them. Each of these "fossils" are ~2 cm long. The rocks I found these in were there when I moved into the house, so I don't know if they were already there, or if they were imported. The first one resembles the possible anomalocaridid relative Pambdelurion, or at least that's what it resembles the most. The second "fossil" is what looks to be some kind of Arthropod with overlapping swimming fins. The last one looks to be some kind of frond (possibly algae?). Any help would be much appreciated, even though I doubt they are even fossils.
  7. The is an online Youtube video of a series of talks by well-respected sedimentologists on pre-vegetation river systems. It is quite informative series of talks about what is known and unknown concerning river systems before the advent of land vegetation. The conference is at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FQ-O8YEXtjQ The text about it states: “This is a recording on the online conference on "Pre-vegetation river systems" (September 16, 2016). Talk by Jim Best, Darrel Long, Phil Fralick, Renato Almeida, Mauricio Santos, Alessandro Ielpi, Arjan Reesink, and James Syvitski” Yours, Paul H.
  8. Well I finally had the opportunity to head out to Millard Co. with my Geology professor, the esteemed Forest Gahn. He is one of the worlds leading experts in Echinoderms and he specializes in Crinoids. The guy goes diving a lot to study Echinoderms in their natural habitat and he's managed to keep some Crinoids thriving in a tank at BYU in Rexburg, Idaho. Here's some pictures of the trip to some special Geology and Paleontology sights in south western Utah. I had a blast. Students sitting on the edge of Fossil Mountain, one of the richest Ordovician deposits in the world learning about it's geology from Forest Gahn. The major fossiliferous formations are the Juab and Kanosh Shale formations. In a remnant of the last ice age lake, Lake Bonneville forest scopes up a handful of algae and cyanobacteria rich mud along with Playa (dried up lake). This is an extinct marine animal known as a Graptolite discovered at a nearby Ordovician road cut in Millard Co. UT. No trip is complete without trilobites. Here's a large Asaphiscus wheeleri molt from U-Dig near Delta, UT. This Native American arrowhead was recovered in Millard CO Utah during one of our hikes. My professor claims its origins may be from the Shoshone Tribe. Forest teaches students about the Cambrian marine fauna at U-Dig near Delta, UT. Forest shows students the fossilized remains of a Stromatolite (just above his knee) colony alongside the Lake Bonneville Playa (dried lake) near Notch Peak UT. Here is the view of Fossil Mountain in Millard CO, UT at sunrise. At dusk on the first night we camped at the dunes of Little Sahara which are composed of ancient sand deposits from the Sevier River dumping into Lake Bonneville. Perhaps one of my favorite parts of the trip was being let into the collections archive room at the BYU museum of paleontology in Provo, UT. A lot of the dinosaurs in the collections here are from the Saints and Sinners Quarry in Colorado. Lots of neat therapods including a near complete Allosaurus.
  9. Megapalaeolenus deprati Mansuy, 1912

    From the album Invertebrates

    Megapalaeolenus deprati Mansuy, 1912 Early Cambrian Gaolufang Yunnan China
  10. Elvinia roemeri.jpg

    From the album Northern's Trilobites

  11. Taenicephalus.jpg

    From the album Northern's Trilobites

  12. Wujiajiania lyndasmithae.JPG

    From the album Northern's Trilobites

  13. Itagnostus interstricta

    From the album Trilobites

    Wheeler Formation Millard County Utah, United States

    © 2018 by Jay A. Wollin

  14. Bolaspidellus housensis

    From the album Trilobites

    Wheeler Formation Millard County Utah, United States

    © 2018 by Jay A. Wollin

  15. Elrathia kingi

    From the album Trilobites

    Wheeler Formation Millard County Utah, United States

    © 2018 by Jay A. Wollin

  16. Termierella sp.

    From the album Trilobites

    © © 2018 by Jay A. Wollin

  17. In 2005, I was in the Wellsville mountains of Utah looking for Trilobites. I really wanted a Zacanthoides grabaui but would have settled for any bug. This particular Trilobite seems so sleek and streamlined that I loved its design. If I can't own one, I can at least draw one for myself. Done on textured paper with 2B and 4B pencils.
  18. “The new discovery sheds light on the evolution of insect and crustacean nervous systems.” https://news.nationalgeographic.com/2018/03/fossil-brain-kerygmachela-tardigrade-insects/
  19. http://www.iflscience.com/plants-and-animals/earliest-evidence-of-parental-care-found-in-520-millionyearold-fossil/
  20. Segmented Cambrian fossil

    Hi there! I picked up this fossil while trilobite hunting over the summer along the continental divide in Montana. I keep looking at it and my curiosity is getting the better of me. I don't know if it is a trace fossil or a plant or something else. All I know is its not a trilobite. Maybe related to a stalked echinoderm or a crinoid, unfortunately I haven't found any applicable literature. This was found loose among various trilobite fragments at the base of Dearborn Limestone cliffs with Pagoda Limestone, Pentagon Shale and Steamboat Limestone above so this should be Middle Cambrian. The intriguing aspect to this fossil is the seemingly segmented appendages stemming from a central stalk. I am just another novice collector who enjoys all aspects of the natural world with limited geology experience but I more fossil hunts planned. Thanks for looking, jj
  21. Cambrian Trilobite Verification

    A Fossil Forum friend sent me a few Georgia rocks to split. They were full of trilobites and bits. I believe these are all Aphelaspis brachyphasis but I understand this site has other species as seen in this information : Locality 1 is an outcrop in Murray County. The matrix is mudstone and the researchers report “very abundant specimens” of Aphelaspis brachyphasis often as body clusters. Locality 1, Murray County: Agnostus inexpectans Aspidagnostus rugosus Glyptagnostus reticulatus Aphelaspis brachyphasis ; Could any knowledgeable person verify the identities of these trilobites. As I said , it seems like they are all A. brachyphasis but the HUGE size differences to the trilobites leave me wondering whether I am missing something. Thanks.
  22. WHEELER SHALE TRILOBITES

    Well, i thought I'd show my primitive prepping skills. This is all rather unnecessary as Tony @ynothas already done this thread here and probably better and the pieces shown were kindly donated to me as well. So treat this as a repeat of what Tony does better. Hey ho. So these are the three pieces that Kind Tony sent me. 1. Notice this Elrathia kingii (1.2 cm long) has a break on the anterior margin (cause of death?) .and an upside down Itagnostus interstrictus (5.5 mm) above it and a piece of another to the right of it. 2. This Elrathia (1.8 cm long) has another ones cephalon stuck to its cephalon and some serious damage on the right side pleura. 3. This one is upside down in the matrix. (2.3 cm long) All my prepping was done balancing the specimens on my knee and using a jeweller's loupe to see and a board pin to do the actual prepping. Some water and saliva were also involved, but that was all. First I carefully cleaned as much of the matrix off the first two specimens as i could using the pin and then dug around the third piece so I could 'pop' it out of the matrix. Then I dug all around the other two specimens with the pin and popped them out of the matrix. Here is the third one popped out and with a bit of prep already completed. Sorry for the dreadful photo, but wifey and her camera phone weren't about so i started prepping and then took this photo with my computer as i was impatient to continue. When it was first popped only a tiny bit of the glabella was showing clear of matrix. Here i have popped the Itagnostus before popping the Elrathia.
  23. Anomalocarid or Triobite?

    Hey, does anyone know what this is? I got it in my rock collection from a lady down the street. It was her dads and he had identified it as a trilobite from New York state, but I'm suspicious as to if it is actually a trilobite. I looked it up, but I couldn't find anything. It also doesn't appear to have legs, which I'm pretty sure that trilobites have legs. It looks like an anomalocarid to me. Does anyone know what this is?
  24. HI all, Were going through our cambrian material from the Upper Cambrian Abrigo formation from southern Arizona, and besides hordes of trilobite bits, we have found two similar calcified items in the limestones which we are not certain of. I think they are either plates from an eocrinoid, or sclerites from some sort of bottom dwelling crawly thing. Now we do very occasionally find stem ossicles here, very rare in the upper cambrian, but dont know if they are crinoid or other stemmed pelmatozoan. Here is the photos I just took, let me know your thoughts!
  25. I was splitting up some Conasauga Formation shale from the Chatsworth area exposure @Nimravis and @MeargleSchmearglhave been posting about recently. This was material I brought back 2 or 3 years ago and have had sitting around. I found numerous specimens of the usual Aphelaspis the site is noted for. Then I split a small piece and here's what popped out: Four complete Agnostus inexpectans agnostid trilobites!! Talk about "inexpected", it's hard to find one of these complete much less four on the same piece of shale. Some other views: Don
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