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Found 224 results

  1. From the album Vertebrates (other than fish)

    Dinosaur egg shell pieces. Parentage: Perhaps Struthiosaurus Campanian Found at Beaureceuil, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, France Thanks to Pixpaleosky
  2. Small theropod claw

    Hello, This is probably a long shot, especially because the ends are broken off, but I was wondering if someone could have a go at IDing this very small theropod claw from the Dinosaur Park Formation. I figured that the relative thickness above and below the blood groove might be diagnostic, but I know how hard these can be to ID at the best of times. After consulting this thread, my best guess so far is that it comes from a troodontid, but I'm skeptical about this simply because of how rare they are. Thanks!
  3. According to a new study, what was once thought to be one species Deinosuchus hatcheri may have been as many as 3 species. This new study is linked in the attached article which is a good read Deinosuchus hatcheri Deinosuchus riograndensis Deinosuchus schwimmeri https://www.hakaimagazine.com/news/when-deinosuchus-ruled-the-earth/
  4. Could not resist collecting some more Trochactaeon snails at Breitenbach-11 in Kainach, Styria, Austria last Saturday (10/10/2020). Especially the upper T-bed contains rather well preserved (for the formation, of course ) snails. But always the right amount of weathering is needed (not too much, leads to disintegration of snails; not to less, they will adhere firmly to the rock). Still some potential there. Worked only with a screwdriver, needed only a few very gentle hammer taps. No prepping, just a short brush with a soft tooth brush. For more info about the area, have a look at my previous post: Trochactaeon - Gosau of Kainach, Styria, Austria - Summary Franz Bernhard
  5. Fossil snails of the genus Trochactaeon from Kainach near Voitsberg, Styria, Austria (Gosau-Group of Kainach, upper Cretaceous) - Summary of this years prospection Introduction Snails of the extinct genus Trochactaeon (formerly part of the genus Actaeonella) are among the most familiar fossils of the upper Cretaceous Gosau-Group of the Austrian Alps. The rather large size of some species (>10 cm), their intriguing spiral pattern in transverse sections and plenty supply, based on many mass occurrence, make them particularly popular. Some well known occurrences in Austria, distributed over several 100 km, are Brandenberg in Tyrol, “Schneckenwand”/Rußbach in Salzburg, Waaggraben near Hieflau in Styria and “Schneckengartl”/Dreistetten in Lower Austria; all of these are located within the Northern Calcareous Alps, mainly composed of Mesozoic rocks, especially Triassic platform carbonates. The most extensive occurrence of Gosau-Group sediments in Austria, the Kainach Gosau, however, is resting on sediments of the Palaeozoic of Graz. The Gosau-Group of Kainach consists mainly of coarse- to fine-grained clastic sediments (conglomerates to siltstones, Geistthal-formation, Afling-formation), some bituminous marls (St. Pankrazen-formation) and some hydraulic marls (St. Bartholomä-formation). The age of the whole group is considered to be mostly Campanian, but stretches into the Santonian and possibly into the Maastrichtian (Ebner & Rantitsch, 2000). In contrast to many other Gosau-Group occurrences, the Kainach Gosau is considered to be rather poor in fossils. Noticeable fossil occurrences are rudists of the St. Bartholomä-formation, some plant fossils and accumulations of small gastropods within the St. Pankrazen-formation and a few scattered ammonite concentrations within the Afling-formation. All of these fossils are already known since the 1850ies. This is also the case for the Trochactaeon snails. Transverse section of Trochactaeon giganteus from the Kainach Gosau. Generalized geological map of Styria with Trochactaeon occurrences in the northern part of the Kainach Gosau. Location of the Waaggraben site is also indicated. Brief history of Trochactaeon in the Kainach Gosau Trochactaeon snails were first mentioned in a footnote by Morlot (1850), thereby proofing the Cretaceous age of these sediments. Only two years later, their existence was already doubted (Peters, 1852). However, in 1871, Stur was able to prove the occurrence of Trochactaeon in the Kainach Gosau with museum specimens already submitted by Morlot (Locality “Am Sengsenwerk `in der Eben´, Kainach, Nord”). Indicative was the host rock of the snails, which is different to the host rocks of Trochactaeon snails within the Gosau sediments of the Northern Calcareous Alps. It took about 100 years, before several occurrences of this snail within actual outcrops were discovered by systematic investigations of a local teacher and collector in the 1960ies. But the in-situ occurrences where never described, only briefly mentioned in mapping reports and summaries of the regional geology (Gräf, 1975). The only exception is a large outcrop at the main road in Gallmannsegg north of Kainach, where some of these snails are very firmly embedded in a very hard, conglomeratic sandstone and can therefore be observed “permanently”. This site is featured in a recent excursion guide (Hubmann & Gross, 2015) and very interestingly, this is also the discovery locality of Morlot (1850), though highly modified during later road construction. Discovery site of Morlot (1850), highly modified during road construction (red X). Römaskogel Mt. (1006 m) to the upper right. Field work and results Already since several years on my wish list, it took two events in March 2020 which allowed me to prospect efficiently for this snails: First was a hint from Hans Eck (Voitsberg), who pointed out some occurrences to me, some very detailed hints, some quite general. Their distribution enabled me to restrict the prospecting area to a rather small stretch of land in the northwestern part of the Kainach Gosau, namely from Gschmurgraben/Anesbach to the east to Eckwirt to the west. The second incident was the C-thing, which allowed me to make for several day trips in this area, walking along forest roads and other paths some whole days long... Excerpts of the geological maps 1:50.000 Köflach (left) and Voits-berg (right) with the investigated area. All Trochactaeon occurrences are located within the red rectangle. Anesbach to the upper right, Eckwirt to the lower left, size of squares is 2x2 km. This prospection resulted in more than 10 “new” occurrences of Trochactaeon snails. They range from a few snails stuck within the driveways of forest roads to up to a 0.5 m thick bed tightly packed with snails. They are situated in the uppermost Geistthal-formation or the lowermost Afling formation; the literature gives ambiguous attribution of the snail-bearing zone. The especially good exposures along a forest road in the area of Breitenbach allowed the recognition of at least 6 Trochactaeon-bearing beds within a sediment thickness of about 20 m. About 100-200 higher in the sedimentary column, another Trochactaeon bed occurs. The host rock of the snails is a rather hard, dark grey to dark brown, mostly slightly conglomeratic sandstone, firmly enclosing the snails. Adjoining rocks of the snail beds are grey to greenish grey siltstones and sandstones, sometimes containing plant debris. Coarse-grained conglomerates are also abundant. Bedding planes dip generally with 20°-60° toward southeast to south. Rather surprising was the discovery of nearly black, up to 1 m thick limestone lenses with abundant fragments of radiolitid rudists near the snail beds in several spots. Continued...
  6. I was recently reorganizing my fossil collection and thought I would share some pieces I collected during Paleontology field trips in undergrad at Alabama. I'm glad I took thorough notes at the time! The demopolis chalk is a popular formation for finding Exogyra/ostrea/pycnodonte shells and shark teeth. We visited a site in Tupelo, MS many times for surface collecting. Some of the cool pieces I found were many fragments of a mosasaur jaw (top pic, top 2 slots), a Squalicorax kaupi tooth, a scyliorhinus(?) tooth, bony fish vertebrae, and bony fish teeth. I was told the dark fossils at the right of the third picture might be ray plates, but I'm not sure. Turritella in pic 1 are from a different formation.
  7. Hello! I have collected quite many specimens with Trochactaeon snails from April to May 2020. They all come from the Upper Santonian to Lower Campanian upper Geistthal-formation or Lower Afling-formation of the Gosau of Kainach in western Styria. Some of the specimens contain abundant black, wavy, "folded", shell fragments. They seem to grow on the Trochactaeon snails in some places. They resemble small oysters in some ways. Unfortunately, I have not found anything conclusive about their identity. I found a pic in a paper of Kollmann (2014), with some somewhat similar, unidentified bivalves growing on an Upper Cretaceous snail (last pic). Other accompanying fossils are very rare fragments of phaceloid coral colonies (they to not grow on the snails, though). Any suggestions are highly welcomed! Thank you very much! Franz Bernhard First specimen is a double sided polished slab with abundant black shell fragments. Some of them seem to have grown on the Trochactaeon snails (epibiontic?). Here are some individual polished snails with bivalve fragments. Some of them seem to have grown on the snails (white polygons). The circular things in the middle left pic seem to be the same; there is a snail shell just a few mm below the polished surface at this spot (the specimen is very thin there). Rarely, also on weathered surfaces these bivalves(??) can be seen, growing on the snail shell. But I am not really sure, if this is the same thing as in the polished sections or if this is something else: This is the reference pic from Kollmann (2014), epibiontic bivalves on Nerinella grossouvrei. Thanks a lot!
  8. New study confirms the power of Deinosuchus and its 'teeth the size of bananas' by Taylor & Francis The open access paper is: Cossette, A.P. and Brochu, C.A., 2020. A systematic review of the giant alligatoroid Deinosuchus from the Campanian of North America and its implications for the relationships at the root of Crocodylia. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, p.e1767638. Yours, Paul H.
  9. A. sarcophagus or T. rex?

    Hello all, I collected this tooth last weekend along the Red Deer river in Alberta, and would like to know if it's possible to differentiate it as either A. sarcophagus or T. rex. I'm about 90% sure that it's from a deposit of the Horseshoe Canyon Formation, but the region also has exposures of the Scollard which introduces the possibility that this is from Tyrannosaurus. I had to leave the tooth with a friend until I can apply for a disposition certificate, so I can't get any additional photos, but I made a point to get pics of the major diagnostic features used to ID theropod teeth. Denticle spacing is 0.5mm, or 2 per millimetre: Thanks.
  10. Upper Campanian Foraminifera

    Upper Campanian foraminifera from Northern Germany. We found in the quarry of Laegerdorf near Hamburg. We think it is a Lituola. What's your opinion ? It is agglutinated and the specimens have such areal, multiple openings. See more of our finds at https://foraminifera.eu/loc.php?locality=Laegerdorf+Neue+Heidestrasse
  11. Specifically on the east coast if possible, but west coast suggestions are welcome too. I've found videos of them being discovered such as the one bellow and I know which states they're in, but no specific location is given. Any and all help is very much appreciated, thank you.
  12. Triakid shark?

    hi guys I was looking through some chalk Blocks obtained in a great trade and aside from the usual oysters and other common teeth I found this one and I was wondering whether you could help ID it , it’s from the campanian of hallencourt, maybe @Al Dente will know thanks all p,a it’s about 1mm I was lucky to find it with no microscope
  13. Yet Another Bearpaw Fm. Oddity

    Hello all, I recently found this strange fossil within a sandstone concretion from the late Campanian marine Bearpaw formation. I'm very familiar with the typical ammonites and other molluscs of the formation, and haven't seen anything like this - is it some sort of nautiloid, or something else entirely? Thanks.
  14. A strange fossil (Bearpaw fm.)

    Hello everyone, A few weeks ago I came across this fossil in the field, and couldn't make ends of what it could be. The locality that it was found in represents a shallow marine lagoon environment, deposited in the late Campanian marine Bearpaw formation of SK. Typical finds at that locality (all within sandstone concretions) include nacreous mollusks, as well marine vertebrate material and decapods which are preserved as glassy black, similar to this specimen. Because of this, I'm inclined to think that this fossil is either from a vertebrate, or possibly a chitinous organism. I'm totally stumped either way though. I won't be able to provide any more photos unfortunately, as this one was left in the field. Note that this fossil was actually preserved in three dimensions - unfortunately I don't have a photo, but you can see on the leftmost split on the top half of the concretion that there's a plate that extends down into the concretion. This plate was roughly triangular in shape, and had gentle striations radiating from the middle point toward the ends. Thanks.
  15. Saitta, E.T., Vinther, J., Crisp, M.K., Abbott, G.D., Kaye, T.G., Pittman, M., Bull, I., Fletcher, I., Chen, X., Collins, M.J. and Sakalauskaite, J., 2020. Non-avian dinosaur eggshell calcite contains ancient, endogenous amino acids. bioRxiv 2020.06.02.129999 preprint doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2020.06.02.129999 https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/2020.06.02.129999v1 https://www.researchgate.net/publication/341881580_NON-AVIAN_DINOSAUR_EGGSHELL_CALCITE_CONTAINS_ANCIENT_ENDOGENOUS_AMINO_ACIDS https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Evan_Saitta Free pdf: https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/2020.06.02.129999v1.full.pdf Yours, Paul H.
  16. Hello Fellow Forum members, Here are several trips that occurred during late 2019 or early 2020. If there are any finds that you'd like better id'd or photographed please let me know. All finds come from the late cretaceous deposits of New Jersey. I experimented with labeling the finds in Inkscape but it was computationally intensive and I didn't continue it. The last photograph is a find that I would appear an identification on.
  17. A new report about the Cretaceous (Campanian) bivalves of the Coffee Sand In Mississippi is now available for downloading. It is: Dockery, D.T., 2020, Cretaceous (Campanian) Bivalves of The Coffee Sand In Mississippi. Open-File Report OFR-319. Department of Environmental Quality - Office of Geology, Jackson, Mississippi. https://www.mdeq.ms.gov/geology/work-areas/publications-and-map-sales/categories/open-file-reports/ofr-319-cretaceous-campanian-bivalves-of-the-coffee-sand-in-mississippi-60272/ https://www.mdeq.ms.gov/geology/work-areas/publications-and-map-sales/categories/ In addition, two older 7.5 minute geologic quadrangles for Tishomingo County, Mississippi, are now online at: https://www.mdeq.ms.gov/wp-content/uploads/2018/02/OFR5_BelmontDigitized.pdf https://www.mdeq.ms.gov/wp-content/uploads/2018/02/OFR6_Tishomingo_BishopDigitized.pdf https://www.mdeq.ms.gov/geology/work-areas/publications-and-map-sales/categories/ Yours, Paul H.
  18. Paper reassess the previous referral of specimens to Rubeousaurus ovatu and determines it represents a new centrosaurine taxon, Stellasaurus ancellae in the Two Medicine Formation in Montana https://royalsocietypublishing.org/doi/full/10.1098/rsos.200284 Artwork by AndreyAtuchin Nasal horn
  19. Pseudocorax topic

    This topic is a short continuation of my previous topic on my Squalicorax collection, which can be seen here: This time I have chosen to show my Pseudocorax teeth. As with the Squalicorax teeth, I am open for trades and buying new additions. The oldest examples of Pseudocorax in my collection come from the Lower Campanian. Like the Squalicorax genus, they start off as a genus with very small teeth. Pseudocorax granti (x16) Ozan Formation Lower Campanian Moss Creek, Fannin County, Texas, United States of America See you guy tomorrow, Sander
  20. Quick hunt at my desk

    http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/40479-somewhere-lost-in-the-fog-in-the-deep-heart-of-picardyfrance/ hi guys got some great matrix from @nalathat came from the picerdy chalk , the topic above shows what you can find sadly no squalid for me but still great fun to search through, took a few hours of picking at it with a pin vice but happy with the results what I started with a few teeth poking out what I found from looking what fell of in transit I picked at it and reduced it to rubble which I have yet to look through but here is what I found in the process larger oysters,some weird ones, they are all complete shark teeth fish plates? bottom plates of oysters odities echie spines coral
  21. Hello, I found this fossil last spring break, in Coahuila, Mexico. It comes from the late Campanian (73-71 Myrs) Cerro del Pueblo formation. I found several fossils at the same location where I found this fossil. Some of the fossils I found include Cerithium snails, several species of Physidae freshwater snails, Inoceramus sp., petrified wood with teredolites, ammonite fragments, a caudal vertebra from a Hadrosaurid, and plenty of dinosaur bone fragments. The formation is a mess, it’s composed of layers that were deposited in marine, and terrestrial environments, as well as rivers and possibly swamps. Even though I’m very knowledgeable of the formation, and the fossils that have been found there I still have no idea as to what this specimen is. My best guess at the moment is that it’s some type of plant material maybe a fruit or a seed. There have been numerous plant fossils found at the formation, including fruits. I also think this could be embedded in a coprolite, with the rounded object being embedded in it. Let me know what you guys think about it.
  22. Oncoids - Oncolites

    04/13/2020: End of my lock-down. Visited a locality with oncoids-oncolites in the Santonian - Lower Campanian Geistthal-formation (59) of the Gosau-basin of Kainach. Locality is near Kreuzwirt south of Geistthal and was told to my by a friend, so I will keep it secret. This is a specimen from block 1. Most of block 1 is still there, I removed only about 2 kg (2 specimens) of the about 40 kg heavy block. Only two more blocks of this material were found, despite really good outcrops just nearby (with alternations of conglomerates, sandstones and siltsones). There should be a better locality west of Geistthal, but have not found anything there during previous visits. Last but not least some typical landscape of the Gosau-basin of Kainach. Cherry trees etc. are blooming at the moment, but everything was soooo try. But we finally had some rain during last night! Franz Bernhard
  23. Mosasaur or Plesiosaur?

    I found a tooth in Bladen County, NC at a site on the Cape Fear River near Elizabethtown. The site is Upper Cretaceous, and is Upper Campanian in age. It's in the Black Creek Group. I know that the tooth isn't in the best of shape, but hopefully is identifiable. All the Mosasaur teeth I had collected there before are a black color. I noticed this tooth is also curved from side to side. I don't know if it's a Plesiosaur or Mosasaur tooth. Both have been found at this site, but the Plesiosaur is far less common.
  24. Hello forum members! With the new Coronavirus raging across the world, I thought it would be nice to start some kind of advent calendar, using my own Squalicorax collection. Everyday I will post one or multiple Squalicorax teeth from one location. Let's see what ends sooner, my collection or the virus outbreak. I will start with the oldest tooth from the Albian substage and end with the teeth from the uppermost substage; the Maastrichtian. The first one is the oldest and also one of the smallest teeth in my collection. Unfortunately it is so small that the photo's are not as sharp as I would have liked, but I think they are good enough. It is Squalicorax primaevus from the Middle Albian Argiles tégulines of Courcelles, Aube Department, France. See you guys tomorrow, Sander
  25. Hello, I've put teeth here for Id a couple of times and always received a satisfactory answer. I hope you can help me this time too. It is about this Ceratopsidae tooth from the Niobrara Formationn (Wyoming). Unfortunately no fossils of this group are known from this formation and I therefore wanted to ask you if you have any idea what species of dinosaurs the tooth could belong to. The tooth is 1,5cm in size. I hope if you can help me with this! Best regards from Germany!
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