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Found 208 results

  1. A new report about the Cretaceous (Campanian) bivalves of the Coffee Sand In Mississippi is now available for downloading. It is: Dockery, D.T., 2020, Cretaceous (Campanian) Bivalves of The Coffee Sand In Mississippi. Open-File Report OFR-319. Department of Environmental Quality - Office of Geology, Jackson, Mississippi. https://www.mdeq.ms.gov/geology/work-areas/publications-and-map-sales/categories/open-file-reports/ofr-319-cretaceous-campanian-bivalves-of-the-coffee-sand-in-mississippi-60272/ https://www.mdeq.ms.gov/geology/work-areas/publications-and-map-sales/categories/ In addition, two older 7.5 minute geologic quadrangles for Tishomingo County, Mississippi, are now online at: https://www.mdeq.ms.gov/wp-content/uploads/2018/02/OFR5_BelmontDigitized.pdf https://www.mdeq.ms.gov/wp-content/uploads/2018/02/OFR6_Tishomingo_BishopDigitized.pdf https://www.mdeq.ms.gov/geology/work-areas/publications-and-map-sales/categories/ Yours, Paul H.
  2. Paper reassess the previous referral of specimens to Rubeousaurus ovatu and determines it represents a new centrosaurine taxon, Stellasaurus ancellae in the Two Medicine Formation in Montana https://royalsocietypublishing.org/doi/full/10.1098/rsos.200284 Artwork by AndreyAtuchin Nasal horn
  3. Pseudocorax topic

    This topic is a short continuation of my previous topic on my Squalicorax collection, which can be seen here: This time I have chosen to show my Pseudocorax teeth. As with the Squalicorax teeth, I am open for trades and buying new additions. The oldest examples of Pseudocorax in my collection come from the Lower Campanian. Like the Squalicorax genus, they start off as a genus with very small teeth. Pseudocorax granti (x16) Ozan Formation Lower Campanian Moss Creek, Fannin County, Texas, United States of America See you guy tomorrow, Sander
  4. Quick hunt at my desk

    http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/40479-somewhere-lost-in-the-fog-in-the-deep-heart-of-picardyfrance/ hi guys got some great matrix from @nalathat came from the picerdy chalk , the topic above shows what you can find sadly no squalid for me but still great fun to search through, took a few hours of picking at it with a pin vice but happy with the results what I started with a few teeth poking out what I found from looking what fell of in transit I picked at it and reduced it to rubble which I have yet to look through but here is what I found in the process larger oysters,some weird ones, they are all complete shark teeth fish plates? bottom plates of oysters odities echie spines coral
  5. Hello, I found this fossil last spring break, in Coahuila, Mexico. It comes from the late Campanian (73-71 Myrs) Cerro del Pueblo formation. I found several fossils at the same location where I found this fossil. Some of the fossils I found include Cerithium snails, several species of Physidae freshwater snails, Inoceramus sp., petrified wood with teredolites, ammonite fragments, a caudal vertebra from a Hadrosaurid, and plenty of dinosaur bone fragments. The formation is a mess, it’s composed of layers that were deposited in marine, and terrestrial environments, as well as rivers and possibly swamps. Even though I’m very knowledgeable of the formation, and the fossils that have been found there I still have no idea as to what this specimen is. My best guess at the moment is that it’s some type of plant material maybe a fruit or a seed. There have been numerous plant fossils found at the formation, including fruits. I also think this could be embedded in a coprolite, with the rounded object being embedded in it. Let me know what you guys think about it.
  6. Oncoids - Oncolites

    04/13/2020: End of my lock-down. Visited a locality with oncoids-oncolites in the Santonian - Lower Campanian Geistthal-formation (59) of the Gosau-basin of Kainach. Locality is near Kreuzwirt south of Geistthal and was told to my by a friend, so I will keep it secret. This is a specimen from block 1. Most of block 1 is still there, I removed only about 2 kg (2 specimens) of the about 40 kg heavy block. Only two more blocks of this material were found, despite really good outcrops just nearby (with alternations of conglomerates, sandstones and siltsones). There should be a better locality west of Geistthal, but have not found anything there during previous visits. Last but not least some typical landscape of the Gosau-basin of Kainach. Cherry trees etc. are blooming at the moment, but everything was soooo try. But we finally had some rain during last night! Franz Bernhard
  7. Mosasaur or Plesiosaur?

    I found a tooth in Bladen County, NC at a site on the Cape Fear River near Elizabethtown. The site is Upper Cretaceous, and is Upper Campanian in age. It's in the Black Creek Group. I know that the tooth isn't in the best of shape, but hopefully is identifiable. All the Mosasaur teeth I had collected there before are a black color. I noticed this tooth is also curved from side to side. I don't know if it's a Plesiosaur or Mosasaur tooth. Both have been found at this site, but the Plesiosaur is far less common.
  8. Hello forum members! With the new Coronavirus raging across the world, I thought it would be nice to start some kind of advent calendar, using my own Squalicorax collection. Everyday I will post one or multiple Squalicorax teeth from one location. Let's see what ends sooner, my collection or the virus outbreak. I will start with the oldest tooth from the Albian substage and end with the teeth from the uppermost substage; the Maastrichtian. The first one is the oldest and also one of the smallest teeth in my collection. Unfortunately it is so small that the photo's are not as sharp as I would have liked, but I think they are good enough. It is Squalicorax primaevus from the Middle Albian Argiles tégulines of Courcelles, Aube Department, France. See you guys tomorrow, Sander
  9. Hello, I've put teeth here for Id a couple of times and always received a satisfactory answer. I hope you can help me this time too. It is about this Ceratopsidae tooth from the Niobrara Formationn (Wyoming). Unfortunately no fossils of this group are known from this formation and I therefore wanted to ask you if you have any idea what species of dinosaurs the tooth could belong to. The tooth is 1,5cm in size. I hope if you can help me with this! Best regards from Germany!
  10. Ancient Shell Has Revealed Exactly How Much Shorter Days Were 70 Million Years Ago https://www.sciencealert.com/old-shell-reveals-earth-s-days-were-half-an-hour-shorter-70-million-years-ago de Winter, N.J., Goderis, S., Van Malderen, S.J., Sinnesael, M., Vansteenberge, S., Snoeck, C., Belza, J., Vanhaecke, F. and Claeys, P., Sub‐daily scale chemical variability in a Torreites sanchezi rudist shell: Implications for rudist paleobiology and the Cretaceous day‐night cycle. Paleoceanography and Paleoclimatology, p.e2019PA003723 https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1029/2019PA003723 Yours, Paul H.
  11. Dinosaur DNA

    Sorry if someone has already posted this paper, but I have searched TFF and not found it. News story: “Cartilage cells, chromosomes and DNA preserved in 75 million-year-old baby duck-billed dinosaur” Paper: “Evidence of proteins, chromosomes and chemical markers of DNA in exceptionally preserved dinosaur cartilage”
  12. I posted this image in the prep thread and I was widely stated to be an Ichnofossil of infilled burrows. I really don't want to be "that guy" that questions expert opinions, but I'm curious; the burrow seems to have attached branches and areas of tiny "grassy" masses adjacent to it. Could they be crinoid segments/branches and pinnules? I have seen photos of chondrites that have the same kind of appearance. I include 3 of my photos, including one through the eyepiece of my scope, and one internet photo of crinoid pinnules. Thanks. I'll happily accept your opinions, go away now, and not be a pest any further.
  13. My Tyrannosaur research

    Hi I decided to make a post about my main research project right now on Campanian Tyrannosaurs specifically Daspletosaurus. Today I have found something to tell teeth from the Judith River Formation and Dinosaur Park Formation. This could also do with the Tyrannosaurs prey or locality. I found out that Judith River Formation Tyrannosaur teeth serrations are more circular and more round compared to the same time Dinosaur Park Formation Tyrannosaur teeth serrations. The Dinosaur Park Formation Tyrannosaur teeth serrations are more longer skinner and more chiseled like but not like other Tyrannosaur teeth from other areas like T. rex’s teeth serrations. Certain Tyrannosaurs in different areas and times would/could of had unique serration morphology probably dew to there prey. I did this on multiple teeth from the Judith River Formation and Dinosaur Park Formation to strengthen my hypothesis. Any opinions on this topic would be great. I will post more on my research here on this and other topics on the Tyrannosaur/Daspletosaurus. I have been doing research on this Daspletosaurus from the Dinosaur Park Formation and it’s close relatives because it was the first dinosaur fossil I’ve ever found. I’ve liked fossils and dinosaurs since I was 2 but in 2018 I went to Alberta and found my first dinosaur fossil which was a fossil from the Dinosaur Park Formation Daspletosaurus sp. Thats why I have been researching on this topic. The serrations I found on Dinosaur Park Formation Tyrannosaur teeth. The serrations I found on Judith River Formation Tyrannosaur teeth.
  14. Almost 2 weeks ago I went with a small group from the rockhound club up to the Vancouver Island Paleontology Museum and the Courtenay & District Museum to see their fossils. Weather was too crummy to do an actual collecting field trip at any place! I guess it's OK to post pics here. I won't post anybody's face. The lighting and some of the display cases themselves presented problems for photography at both places, besides which it was kind of a whirlwind tour, so these shots are the best I could do. I'd say the poor lighting was the worst thing about both places, but we're dealing with small museums with small budgets here, so I figure that can be excused. First, Graham Beard gave us an informative tour of the VIPS in Qualicum Beach. It is a one-room fossil display, aimed primarily at educating the public, and Graham's tour was likewise, which suited us fine as most of the rockhounds know next to nothing about fossils. I think we all got more out of it than we would have if we'd been left to view it all on our own. He not only explained what was interesting about many of the pieces but also recounted the stories around how some of them were collected or acquired. He started at the 'types of preservation' showcase, which featured a piece from the Appian Way site up toward Campbell River which contains Eocene plants. It had been sliced and peeled to reveal fine cross-section detail of the plants. Several new species have been described from here. If you look closely at the slab leaning at an angle on the stand you can see a sheet partly peeled off: Heteromorphic ammonites from Hornby Island and V.I.: The big dark one in front, I have a piece of the same taxon from Mt Tzuhalem. Mine is missing the crook part but looks identical to the straight part. I thought it was from my mountain until Graham told me it was from up along the Inland Island Hwy near Courtenay. (Nothing to collect there now, as that was when the hwy was being built or widened). It didn't have a label and Graham couldn't remember so I'm still not sure what it's called!
  15. Ancient sea turtle fossil found in Alabama named new genus, species AlabamaCom, January 7, 2019 https://www.al.com/news/birmingham/2020/01/ancient-sea-turtle-fossil-found-in-alabama-named-new-genus-species.html Gentry, A.D., Ebersole, J.A. and Kiernan, C.R., 2019. Asmodochelys parhami, a new fossil marine turtle from the Campanian Demopolis Chalk and the stratigraphic congruence of competing marine turtle phylogenies. Royal Society Open Science, 6(12), p.191950. https://royalsocietypublishing.org/doi/abs/10.1098/rsos.191950 Yours, Paul H.
  16. Hello, some local Campanian news again... . First: The rudists from St. Bartholomä, Styria, Austria, made into a local journal (pdf, in German): DieRudistenvonStBartholomae_Mineralog_2019.pdf Second: After this nice find at point 25-North from 09/24/2019: Point 25-North - 09/24/2019 I could not resist collecting this site systematically. 18 hours of work in October and November 2019 resulted in more than 100 fossils, which is a very good yield. For details see: Point 25-North - Four weeks (External site, in German, only a few pics). This particular site is far from being exploited... Third: My last trip to this formation two days ago (12/18/2019) was very short and "designed" to bring back lesser specimens, duds, and some cutting rejects to three different sites. However, the trip resulted also in 4 fossils, two of them again from point 25-North: This is the 7th chaetetid-stromatoporoid sponge I have found in this formation, 6 of them came from this spot. I like these fossils more and more! And a rather nice (for this formation ) rudist matrix specimen: The two other fossils found this day were a small Hippurites colliciatus and a colonial coral from point 32; both specimens need to be cut and polished. Thanks for your interest and happy winter/christmas/new year fossil hunting! Franz Bernhard
  17. From the album Echinoids

    Phymosoma magnificum (Agassiz, 1840) Campanian Jarnac-Champagne (Charente-Maritime) France
  18. 400 Million years in 4 hours

    400 Million years in 4 hours The small-scale geology of Austria makes it possible to observe and collect invertebrate marine fossils from a time span of nearly 400 Million years (Ma) within a few hours and at a distance of only about 10 km: - 395 Ma old Devonian (Eifelian) corals - Ölberg - 80 Ma old Cretaceous (Campanian) rudists – St. Bartholomä - 12 Ma old Miocene (Serravallian/Sarmatian) gastropods - Waldhof I did this special hunting trip west of Graz at October 22, 2019 as a "feasibility study". The youngest and oldest fossils can simply be picked from the ground (or photographed); the “middle-agers” require some searching; I succeeded to find a few good specimens within one hour. Weather was perfect with nearly 25°C (!). Simplified geological map of Styria with the visited area west of Graz (red rectangle). Geological map of the visited area (1:50.000), composed of two adjoining map sheets. Red numbers denote visited fossil sites (and their age in Million years). Note the fossil sign in the blue formation in the upper middle of the map. This is the upper Devonian Steinberg-formation with goniatites. These fossils are not abundant, though, so I have never explored this hill… Topo map of the area. Red numbers denote fossil sites, A and B are sites of landscape pics. Just to show off some landscape: View from point “A” in Steinberg towards west. K = Kreuzegg mountain (570 m, Campanian St. Bartholomä-formation) at a distance of ca. 5 km. A = Plateau-like Amering mountain (2187 m, high-grade metamorphic rocks) at a distance of ca. 40 km. View from point “B” at Kreuzegg mountain towards north to southeast. Pano composed of 4 individual pics, spanning about 140°. Labeled mountains and hills in the background are: S = Schöckl (1445 m, Devonian epimetamorphic limestone) at a distance of ca. 20 km. P = Plabutsch mountain (754 m, namesake of the fossil-rich Eifelian Plabutsch-formation) and B = Buchkogel mountain (656 m), both at distance of ca. 10 km and located immediately to the west of Graz. Ölberg and Waldhof sites are between P and B, but not visible. Note the about 1000 m high, largely deforested mountains at the left side of the pano (Mühlberg, Pleschkogel etc., lower Devonian, dolomitic Flösserkogel-formation). The severe deforestation of these hills is due to a strong storm in 2008 (“Paula”). Continued...
  19. This new paper looks at fragmentary specimens from the east coast of America and provides a better understanding of theropod diversity in this region https://royalsocietypublishing.org/doi/10.1098/rsos.191206#.Xcv2qFgX_EQ.twitter
  20. Hello, I have summarized my hunting trips to St. Bartholomä from July 2019 to September 2019. Its in German and located at an external site: Rudists St. Bartholomä - July-Sept 2019 (external site) (pdf, ca. 4.2 MB) Fell free to delete this post if you find it inappropriate. Thanks! Franz Bernhard
  21. Late Cretaceous chalk in North America

    Hey everyone I know I've been lately rather inactive on TFF; I was held back by fieldwork and other reasons (though do expect some posts about the fieldwork next weekend ). But anyway, onto what I came to talk about... Would anyone know of some good exposures of Late Cretaceous chalk in Canada or USA? I'm thinking specifically about Campanian chalk or, even better, Maastrichtian chalk.. It would be great if the exposed chalk is very fossiliferous, of course. Thanks for any help! -Christian
  22. Hi, Recently I found this quite complete (both valves) oyster shell in an Upper Campanian to Lower Maastrichtian strata in SE of Pyrenees. My guess is Amphidonte pyrenaicum, a widespread species in the Tethys at this epoch. Supposing my guess is correct, problem is that I find that species named as (from older to newer papers): Exogyra pyrenaica, Ceratostreon pyrenaicum, Amphidonte pyrenaicum, Amphidonte (Amphidonte) pyrenaicum, and Amphidonte (Amphidonte) pyrenaica. So, I understand that former Exogyra genus has been splitted, Anyone knows of a paper about this issue? Thanks
  23. Hello, today I had another opportunity to fossil hunt in St. Bartholomä. I tidied mostly up my main dig and collecting site in the quarry at Point 25 east of Kalchberg. As expected, I did not find much, only some small so-so specimens (19 specimens in 3 hours, but the majority would be rejects). However, in the same small quarry, a few meters to the north of the main dig site, "Knödelbrekzie" is also exposed (upper part of lower right pic), with some steep scree below. I have found two good rudists in this scree two years ago. Today, I dug again with bare hands in the scree. First without any success. Sure, every piece was fossiliferous limestone, but even not a rudist fragment among them. But then, only a few minutes before I had to leave, it was there! Just pulled out of the dark hole to the left of the specimen: A slender, slightly bend Vaccinites vesiculosus. The apex is broken off (pillars are visible there) and it is also broken at the top end, but it is quite aesthetic and elegant, that´s at least my thinking . I like it very much! Ok, back to work : This is the main dig site at point 25 as of today, 09/24/2019. There are no longer many clasts of fossiliferous limestone in the scree, mostly sandstone and marl. The orange bucket in the upper left pic contains clasts of fossiliferous limestone, the black bucket waste material (marl and sandstone). Today I have removed 23 buckets (10 Liter) of waste and 3 buckets of fossiliferous limestone from the dig site. Scale bar is 1 m. In the lower left pic, piles of fossiliferous limestone are visible, the waste material is dumped to the left (not visible). In the lower left corner, cutting rejects are deposited. At the right edge of the lower right pic, fragments and partials of rudist are deposited. This was probably my last hunting trip to St. Bartholomä for some time. I would like to do more prospecting and light surface collecting during my next trips. I am not really the born digger, I like prospecting more, but sometimes, I just have to dig . Thanks for looking! Franz Bernhard
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