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Found 265 results

  1. link Reassessment of a juvenile Daspletosaurus from the Late Cretaceous of Alberta, Canada with implications for the identifcation of immature tyrannosaurids Jared T.Voris, Darla K. Zelenitsky, François Therrien & Philip J. Currie NATURE Scientific Reports | (2019) 9:17801 | https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-53591-7
  2. Petrified wood?

    I found an odd piece of rock when my apartment has it's second floor garden soil removed. My neighbor said that it looks like petrified wood but I just want to make sure. Thanks.
  3. Whitby, ON Trilobites

    Took this opportunity to head to the shores of Lake Ontario in Whitby and find some trilobites, among other stuff! Edit: Kane corrected this - they're nautiloids. Cheers!
  4. All ready for the current season of collecting... Unfortunately all the organized events have been cancelled
  5. Old Mill, Humber River, Toronto

    Hi, I found this off Old Mill Rd., Toronto, near the Humber River. The subject is 4 cm long. I'd appreciate any help identifying it! Thank you, Bellamy
  6. Bowmanville, ON Finds

    Hi everyone, These were found in Bowmanville, ON, Canada, on the coast near Port Darlington. I would appreciate any help identifying these.
  7. SS. Mount Temple video

    I just found this on YouTube, and thought that it was something interesting to share.
  8. Dromeosaur vertebra centrum from Alberta?

    Hi, Is this a Dromeosaur vertebra centrum?, Is there anyway to tell If it is? It’s 1.56 inches long, and is from the Drumheller valley of the Horseshoe Canyon Formation of Alberta, Canada. Thank you!!
  9. A new theropod-related paper is available online: G. F. Funston & P. J. Currie (2020) New material of Chirostenotes pergracilis (Theropoda, Oviraptorosauria) from the Campanian Dinosaur Park Formation of Alberta, Canada. Historical Biology DOI: 10.1080/08912963.2020.1726908 For a long time, after it became clear that Caenagnathus and Chirostenotes belonged to Oviraptorosauria, and following the description of complete postcranial remains of Chirostenotes from the Dinosaur Park Formation of Canada, scientists debated whether or not Caenagnathus is a junior synonym of Chirostenotes, because CMN 2367, CMN 8538, and RTMP 79.20.1, despite overlapping with each other, lacked cranial material. A specimen from the Horseshoe Canyon Formation (ROM 43250, now recognized as distinct taxon Epichirostenotes curriei) found in 1923 was described by Hans-Dieter Sues in a paper published in 1997 and touted by him as confirming synonymy of Caenagnathus and Chirostenotes due to presence of cranial material in that specimen. Not all scientists, however, were convinced that Caenagnathus was the same genus as CMN 2367, and studies in the previous decade indicated that more than one caenagnathid mandibular morphotype existed in the Dinosaur Park Formation. Now, UALVP 59400, the first articulated Chirostenotes specimen to preserve cranial and postcranial material, shows that Caenagnathus and Chirostenotes are separate taxa, even though it's clear from the description of the younger genus Anzu that Chirostenotes and Caenagnathus belong in the same family (Caenagnathidae). That said, does anyone have a copy of the above-mentioned paper I could look at, given that UALVP 59400 is the first bonafide Chirostenotes specimen with cranial material that overlaps with the Caenagnathus holotype?
  10. Greetings! I spent my career as a research paleontologist with the U.S. Geological Survey (Menlo Park, California) and the California Academy of Sciences (San Francisco), specializing in Cenozoic marine mollusks of the North Pacific and Arctic oceans. My summer fieldwork for 34 years was in Alaska, Siberia and northern Canada up toward the North Pole. Several times I had the indescribable thrill of being the first collector, perhaps the first human being, to visit a remote fossil site, reached by bush plane or helicopter. I was often dropped off to spend the day alone at remote sites up to 60 miles (100 kms) away. I had a number of extreme adventures, including killing an attacking grizzly with my only bullet, fending off a pack of wolves circling me, crashing in a helicopter, escaping a landslide by jumping into a passing river raft, and near-drownings in icy rivers. Of course, it was all worth it because of the fossils! My main work was documenting Cenozoic faunal and climate changes in the Arctic. However, my most notable accomplishment was solving the age-old mystery of Bering Strait’s age, which was featured on the cover of Nature. Most satisfying was discovering an unnamed river in remotest Alaska and naming it the Spirit River. I’m happy to say that my friend Warren Allmon, Director of the Paleontological Research Institution, wrote, “This memoir is a can’t-put-down page-turner, equal parts Jack London and Marincovich’s idol Roy Chapman Andrews. It is not just a rip-roaring adventure story; it also eloquently communicates both the intellectual thrill of scientific discovery and the emotional (and spiritual) energy derived from genuine exploration in some of the most challenging — and beautiful — environments on Earth.” He and other reviewers commented on the laugh-out-loud humor in my book. My book won a Bronze Medal in the Adventure category of a national book contest, and it has become an Amazon #1 Best Seller in its category. Reviews of my memoir are on Amazon.com and Goodreads.com I hope that fossil enthusiasts here enjoy reading about my adventures and research. My web site at www.loumarincovich.com has an array of photos from my fieldwork days and a list of my larger publications. Lou
  11. My Tyrannosaur research

    Hi I decided to make a post about my main research project right now on Campanian Tyrannosaurs specifically Daspletosaurus. Today I have found something to tell teeth from the Judith River Formation and Dinosaur Park Formation. This could also do with the Tyrannosaurs prey or locality. I found out that Judith River Formation Tyrannosaur teeth serrations are more circular and more round compared to the same time Dinosaur Park Formation Tyrannosaur teeth serrations. The Dinosaur Park Formation Tyrannosaur teeth serrations are more longer skinner and more chiseled like but not like other Tyrannosaur teeth from other areas like T. rex’s teeth serrations. Certain Tyrannosaurs in different areas and times would/could of had unique serration morphology probably dew to there prey. I did this on multiple teeth from the Judith River Formation and Dinosaur Park Formation to strengthen my hypothesis. Any opinions on this topic would be great. I will post more on my research here on this and other topics on the Tyrannosaur/Daspletosaurus. I have been doing research on this Daspletosaurus from the Dinosaur Park Formation and it’s close relatives because it was the first dinosaur fossil I’ve ever found. I’ve liked fossils and dinosaurs since I was 2 but in 2018 I went to Alberta and found my first dinosaur fossil which was a fossil from the Dinosaur Park Formation Daspletosaurus sp. Thats why I have been researching on this topic. The serrations I found on Dinosaur Park Formation Tyrannosaur teeth. The serrations I found on Judith River Formation Tyrannosaur teeth.
  12. Sauropods in Canada?

    Hi I’m wondering are there any Sauropods found in Canada (Alberta)? Wouldn’t it be possible to have Sauropods in Canada? Is there anything found? Thank you!!
  13. British Columbia’s Tyrannosaur

    Hi I have a question, has there been anything on the Tumbler Ridge Tyrannosaur? And have they identified it in any way yet? Thank you!!
  14. Hi I found this with the rest of my fossil replicas and was wondering if it could be a Rex tooth or another type of Tyrannosaur tooth. I don’t know if I can post this here or get an ID on it since it’s a replica but I got it at the Royal Tyrell Museum in Drumheller, Canada it’s a replica of one of there specimens. And I just wanted to know what it could be since it seemed strange to me on how skinny and long it is, Thank you!!
  15. Hi I decided to make this since the new Tyrannosaur from Alberta’s Foremost Formation, Thanatotheristes deerootorum has just been named and described. Enjoy!! Tyrannosaur bearing Formations in Canada: Formations in Alberta but most of the Formations on my list are I Alberta anyway. Horseshoe Canyon Formation 74-68 million years ago, Alberta: Albertosaurus sarcophagus, possibly Daspletosaurus sp. but no compelling evidence so far. Oldman Formation 78.2-77 million years ago, Alberta: Daspletosaurus torosus, Gorgosaurus sp. Foremost Formation 80.5-78.2 million years ago, Alberta: Thanatotheristes deerootorum, possibly Gorgosaurus sp. Milk River Formation 84.5-83.4 million years ago, Alberta: Tyrannosaur. indet could be a species of Thanatotheristes, possibly Gorgosaurus sp. Scollard Formation 68-66 million years ago, Alberta: T. rex, possibly Nanotyrannus Formations in British Columbia: Wapiti Formation 76.8-70 million years ago, Alberta, British Columbia: Unknown Albertosaurinae either Gorgosaurus or Albertosaurus, possibly Daspletosaurus sp. Tumbler Ridge 135-74 million years ago, British Columbia: Tyrannosaur. indet Formations in Saskatchewan and Manitoba: Dinosaur Park Formation 77-75.5 million years ago, Alberta, Saskatchewan: Daspletosaurus sp., Gorgosaurus libratus Frenchmen Formation, 68-66 million years ago, Saskatchewan: T. rex, possibly Nanotyrannus Bearpaw Formation 75-72 million years ago, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba: Daspletosaurus sp. one specimen from Daspletosaurus sp. that drowned. For now these are all the Tyrannosaurs known from Canada. No Eastern Tyrannosaurs in Canada yet either but maybe someday. I will also update this and add as more information comes available.
  16. Hello all, Here are a few Diplichnites incertipies specimens that I found on a 2019 expedition in Nova Scotia. It is illegal to collect fossils in NS without a permit, however all the fossils found at this site (see large arthropluera tracks and tetrapod footprints in prior posts) have been brought to the local museums attention. Stay tuned for more! I hope you enjoy, FossilsNS
  17. I have recently been looking at some of my photos from trips and found photos of when I was in Alberta in 2018. I saw a photo of a Hadrosaur footprint from a trackway in Dinosaur Provincial Park that me and my brother found. I also read not to long ago that no big trackways have been found in this area so I decided to give the information and location to the Palaeontologist at the Royal Tyrrell Museum in Drumheller, Alberta. I was responded by Dr. Caleb Brown, he told me that I was most likely right and it was probably Hadrosaur. I am currently waiting for him to reply again to see what he thinks about the other information of the trackway and footprint that I gave him. One of the footprints outlined in the photo with pen.
  18. Hi I found some of my photos from when I went to Alberta in 2018. I will post more tomorrow but I found this in particular really cool. It’s a comparison of the Dinosaur Park Formation, Dinosaur Provincial Park and the Horseshoe Canyon Formation, Horseshoe Canyon Drumheller. Both photos by me in 2018 I had them side by side each other. It just shows the different Ecosystems that where here millions of years ago!!
  19. Alberta Fossil Hunting

    My husband and I are driving from Texas to Canada. We are both Science teachers and avid fossil hunters in TX. Could someone advise us on where we could collect fossils. I just want a few to bring back for my classroom and to my students. I educate about 350 students in the 6th grade each year with rocks and fossils found all over the US. Would love to find a few to show them. I would even be willing to bring some with me to exchange with you.
  20. My Canada fossil project of 2020

    After getting my Horseshoe canyon formation Hadrosaur and Ceratopsian fossils I decided to set a goal for 2020. To get dinosaur and and other fossils from the Carboniferous to the Cretaceous from around Canada formations. If anyone could help me out with this please PM me, it would be much appreciated. Thank you!!
  21. Widder Fm.: This is not Tornoceras

    I came home this afternoon in some ridiculously warm weather for January (50F, 10C) and happened to look at a rock I'd collected from the Widder formation about two or three years ago that I had sitting out weathering. It was one that @Kane had quarried from his Gonaitite perch out of the Widder formation and kicked down to me. I'd originally kept the rock because it had a bunch of Mucrospirifer thedfordensis in it and I wanted to see what else would erode out of it. When I turned the rock over I spotted a small round fossil that was brownish... a different color than most fossils. It was pyritized so I chipped it out of the rock and took a look at it. It was a Gonaitite and one that I had never seen before! Most Gonaitites that I have found at Arkona are from the Arkona formation and fall into the Tornoceras arkonense genus, but this one is different. Tornoceras arkonense above, mystery Gonaitite below. I used a new tool that I recently purchased, a home tattoo pen, to clean out one side of it. The pen is quite effective on softer shale or limestone as long as the fossil is much harder. In this case it was pyritized so I didn't have to worry about damaging the fossil. It turns out that this specimen has a smaller diameter phragmocone than Tornoceras arkonense as there are prominent ridges (rather than gaps as in T. arkonense) along the sutures. The suture pattern is plain with a sweeping parabola facing backwards, a straightish line across the keel and then another parabola. I've looked into the usual sources ("CHECK LIST OF FOSSIL INVERTEBRATES DESCRIBED FROM THE MIDDLE DEVONIAN ROCKS OF THE THEDFORD-ARKONA REGION OF SOUTHWESTERN ONTARIO", Stumm and Wright, Paleontology of New York, Hall) and don't see much that correlates to what I've found. Anyone have an idea? The fossil itself is 7/16" (11mm) at it's widest and 2/16" (4mm) thick. It comes from the Middle Devonian aged (Givetian stage) Widder formation at Hungry Hollow, Ontario, Canada. Thanks for looking!
  22. Hi sometime later this year I will be going out West in Alberta, B.C and Saskatchewan. And I will be going down to Montana for 2 days to collect fossils since I can’t really do that in Alberta. I am wondering would I be able to bring those fossils into Alberta and then fly with them, and take them back to Ontario? Thank you!!
  23. Nanotyrannus in Canada

    Hi the debate about Nanotyrannus got me thinking is Nanotyrannus found in Alberta Canada in the Scollard or Frenchmen Formations. If not then it could be valid since T-Rex is found there and if it’s a juvenile Rex then there should be a least some evidence for It there, since T-rex’s are found there. And if so this could provide Nanotyrannus’s range.
  24. Can I confirm my ID on this?

    I think it’s Favositid Tabulate Coral Found in Eganville Canada
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