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Found 178 results

  1. Fossil?

    Appears to be mineral deposits of some sort, however the spiral shape of the mineral makes it look fossily. Matrix is 4"x4"x6", very dense, hardness around 5. Found in a river near Grand Cache, Alberta. Any ideas?
  2. Honeycomb tube-like structures?

    Keep finding examples of these honeycomb/tubular structures, what could they be?
  3. Is this a type of coral?

    Something I've found around Clear Creek while hiking. Any ideas as to what this might be? Obviously some sort of shell, but from when?
  4. Another fossil ID from Ontario

    One of my most recent finds, nothing I can recognize, is it some sort of plant?
  5. Fossils found in southern Ontario

    A selection of one of the fossils I've found in and around Clear Creek while hiking. Any ideas as to what this might be?
  6. A new, startling revelation you may find interesting: https://canadianmuseumofnature.wordpress.com/2018/12/12/triceratops-skull/ The skin impression found on a Triceratops skull found by Charles Sternberg in Saskatchewan, Canada, is quite a surprising discovery, potentially giving people an idea of what the skin of Triceratops looked like, because no other Triceratops specimen has skin impressions preserved. The Tyrannosaurus rex skin impression found last year isn't too far from how T. rex is depicted in children's movies, and the newly discovered Triceratops skin impression may or may not be close to how kids illustrate Triceratops, while giving clues to what ceratopsid skin looked like.
  7. Vertebrae fossil ID help

    Was looking for some input and ideas on what this would belong to. Not much information available and the pictures are not the best. But even your “best guess” is appreciated. The entire specimen is about 3 feet in length. The possible collection location is guessed to be around the Milk River area in Canada close to the Montana border. That’s all I have available to me. So please let me know your thoughts. Thank you.
  8. Canadian Hadrosaurid ungual

    From the album Dinosaurs and Reptiles

    Saurolophinae? (Saurolophus osborni?)
  9. Brachiopod from Canada

    Hey everyone, Nearly forgot to post this little beautiful dude in the Fossil ID section. I got this as a gift from the Geo-Oss fair some time ago. The only info I have on this little spiriferid brachiopod is that it’s from Canada. Now, this is probably a long shot, but I was wondering if anyone maybe recognized which location, formation and age correspond to this little dude? If the species is also recognizable that’s awesome. There were a LOT of the spiriferids in that box, all seemingly of the same species, so it’s a location at which these brachiopods are common. Anyone have a clue? Maybe one of you guys @Tidgy's Dad @Wrangellian @Peat Burns? Thanks in advance! Max
  10. Strange rock

    I found this rock in Southern Ontario buried in the dirt in my front yard. I kept it because it thought it had a neat design and now I am wondering whether it is a fossil and what type. The size is 3 cm tall with a 3 cm diameter.
  11. Triarthrus eatoni

    Found associated with T. rougensis, T. spinosus, brachiopods, cephalopods, and graptolites. Included in multi plate alongside eight other complete or near complete T. eatoni.
  12. Triarthrus eatoni

    Included in multi plate alongside eight other complete or near complete T. eatoni. Found in association with T. rougensis, T. spinosus, Brachiopods, Cephalopods, and Graptolites. The Cephalon is slightly disarticulated, likely from molting.
  13. Triarthrus eatoni

    Found associated with T. rougensis, T. spinosus, brachiopods, cephalopods, and graptolites. Included in multi plate alongside three other T. eatoni and one T. rougensis. Both eyes are preserved.
  14. Triarthrus rougensis

    Both genal spines are present. Right side of cephalon is slightly pyritized. Found associated with T. spinosus, T. eatoni, cephalopods, and graptolites.
  15. Triarthrus spinosus

    Ventrally preserved. Both genal spines and one thoracic spine are present. Hyostome slightly visible. Found associated with T. eatoni, T. rougensis, cephalopods and graptolites.
  16. Triarthrus spinosus

    Found associated with T. eatoni, T. rougensis, cephalopods, and graptolites. Impression of right genal spine is present. Right side of cephalon is slightly pyritized.
  17. Corals? Echinoid?

    Either corals or echinoids are my best guess here. More of mom's stuff from Pelee Island, Canada.
  18. Hi there, Posting here after hours and hours of research and not being able to find any answers. In around 1974, my mother was walking up a small river on or near the border between southern Alberta and southern BC, Canada, and she stumbled across what looked like a smooth, polished rock. She picked it up, and realized it was a rather large canine tooth from an animal. She thought it was a bear tooth, which I don't agree with - doesn't seem to be the right shape. She brought it to a jeweller and had it capped with silver and made into a pendant. The jeweller said it was the hardest thing he'd ever drilled into and broke several bits trying... The curvature and strange twist of the tooth have thrown me off in my search, but I have a suspicion that its potentially from a large Mountain Lion, or possibly a large Wolf. Any help here would be greatly appreciated! Attached are photos. Thank you!
  19. Good afternoon Paleontology afficiandos! A long time ago my friends and I were hanging out in an old open pit quarry in Nepean, Ontario, Canada (South Ottawa) and I found this little fossil. The quarry was quite deep, about 10-15 meters, so its difficult to put a depth for the find, especially since it came from a rock pile near the upper rim. Originally this find had been sitting flat on a much larger piece of rock however there were no other visible fossils on the surface layer. When I pointed this out to my friends, they 'hilariously' decided it should be pushed over the edge to explode on the quarry floor below -.- Luckily I was able to pick through the chunks and find it eventually, unscathed. What is shown in the picture is everything that was found in situ on the original rock. I then brought it home and promptly forgot about it for several years. I unearthed it again while doing a thorough house cleaning and figured I should ask the experts!
  20. This report is a bit late, but better late than never! During late July through to mid August 2018 i was on a research trip to study a new Canadian dinosaur footprint site for my Masters degree project. I am based in Australia, and this was the first time i had been to Canada! So of course i had to make the most of it and pay a visit to the world renowned Dinosaur Provincial Park in southern Alberta, arguably the richest site in the world for dinosaur fossils. The park is the best exposure of the Dinosaur Park Formation (which it is now named after), which dates to about 76.5 million years ago during the mid-Campanian. I had long read about this location and watched it on documentaries for so many years growing up as a kid. Finally being there in person was very surreal! I was quite lucky and managed to go on a long, extended walk through the park with one of the guides for about 6 hours in total. In this relatively short amount of time i observed so many amazing fossils. I must have been completely desensitised within the first 30 minutes! It really is incredible how much fossil material there is lying all over the park. In Australia, whole scientific papers are written about isolated or fragmentary dinosaur bones, yet here they were just lying everywhere! The pictures really speak for themselves. As said, all of these fossils were observed in the field during a single days visit to the park. As this is a World Heritage site, nothing was taken, all finds were put straight back onto the ground after i took these photos. It's a VERY hard thing to do, but rules are rules. The only thing that was removed from the park on my trip was my best find of the day... a near-perfect 5.3 cm tyrannosaur tooth from Gorgosaurus!!!! This find was too special to leave behind, so the park tour guide GPS marked the location and brought it back for display, likely at the visitor centre or as a demonstration piece for their guided tours. To say that i have found a tyrannosaur tooth is a great honour! You may remember it from the July 2018 VFOTM poll. Without further ado, here are the pics! It is going to take multiple posts to fit them all in, so scroll all the way down to see them all! Various dinosaur vertebrae. Everything from hadrosaurs (duck billed dinosaurs) and ceratopsians (horned dinosaurs) to theropods (two legged meat eaters) and ankylosaurs (armoured dinosaurs). These were so common! I would probably pick a new one up every 5 minutes or so. Ankylosaur tooth
  21. Hi, can anyone lead me on determining this species of brachiopod? This brachiopod originates from the Reynales Formation, Clinton Group of Hamilton, Ontario from the Niagara Escarpment. A name I found for this shell is Stricklandia canadensis when I was reading a document about the Escarpment, though when I went to the fossiilid.info and the fossilworks websites there is no mention of the species. I began to think this could be a Stricklandia lens. The shell in the centre is approximately 4 cm long.
  22. After going around in Hamilton, Ontario looking for a river/creek to check out the iconic Niagara Escarpment of the city, I decided to check out the Devil’s Punch Bowl which is located in Stoney Creek, Hamilton. Most of the waterfalls located in the old city of Hamilton are out of reach/barricaded/no-go zones with fines for trespassing because of safety reasons. Nearby Albion Falls and other waterfalls like Tiffany and Chedoke in the old city of Hamilton cannot be explored close up because of the tourists and locals that have died and severely injured themselves from falling while on the cascading waterfall. Today I was surprised to realize that the bottom of the Devil’s Punch Bowl was unbarricaded and so off I went to explore it. It seems the only place that tourists and people go to when visiting the Devil’s Punch Bowl is the observation deck at the top of the falls which offers a nice view of the falls. This is evident as I noticed that there was barely any trash at the bottom of the gorge and down river. The height of this falls is 37 metres. Today the fall is dry with no water. Theres a large Timmy’s cup on the bottom right for size comparison (it isn’t mine though!). There are various formation in this rock exposure of the falls and assigning loose rocks from the ground to the right formation can be a hassle.
  23. A Fossilized Thing

    Hi again! I’m totally stumped with this one. The rock is limestone, so its not the Billings formation. There is still some matrix on it, but most of the surface is exposed. It’s spherical and slightly faceted. Fossil pearl?
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