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Found 43 results

  1. Canine Tooth?

    Here is a tooth that I unknowingly found while digging up possible Proboscidean fossils. From what I was able to research, I believe it belongs to a canine ancestry, but the root growth makes me lean towards there bear side of the canine ancestry. Overall the flattened ridges on top do not match any of my theories. What do you all think?
  2. Coyote canine?

    Hi, i purchased this canine today as a coyote canine, but it’s 1 3/4 inches long which seems big to me, I’m torn between red wolf and coyote. @Shellseeker @Bone Daddy @PODIGGER @Harry Pristis. TIA
  3. Trip from corolla beach, NC

    Ok so to start off with this, I’m going to post my finds from a recent trip to the outer banks of North Carolina. I was very disappointed to be going to this location at first, because I had no idea of its fossil significance. I wanted to go further down south where the sharks teeth get huge, but the cases further down for Covid 19 were very high and I didn’t want to risk catching the virus so the whole group (who were all my neighbors) decided to head here instead. The first day on the beach, I found a lot of fish fossils (including those vertebrae’s) but it was the second day that was the best. I came across a canine jaw! With the teeth still inside it. It was just sitting in the gravel where I searched for shark teeth and I was so happy of my find because I knew it was something good. As the days went on, I kept finding more evidence of land mammal fossils here, including an astragalus, a scute for a mammal of some sort, crab fragments, fish bone, and a lot more! I have to say, in my years of collecting North Carolina I’ve never come across such an abundance of land mammal fossils in one week. The one question I have, however, is if there is any way you guys could help me identify the species of the jaw? I tried to look for fossil formations off shore but I can’t find any links leading to what this came from. I tried looking at land mammal fauna’s of N.C. but it pulled up nothing. Is there any way to get a specific ID on this jaw?
  4. Hi everyone, some time ago I got this fossil tooth from a European collector, the only thing the seller was able to tell me is that it was a canine of a carnivore (quite evident) and that it had been found in the most recent sediments of the Linxia basin in the HeZheng area (corresponding to late Pliocene-early Pleistocene age). Intrigued by the fossil, I decided to buy it and find out what animal it was. The first thing to do (in addition to hoping that the seller has given you correct information) is to search for articles regarding the fossil fauna and the ecology of the area where the fossil was found. In my case I found a very interesting article by paleontologist Deng Tao (Character, Age and Ecology of the Hezheng Biota, 2005) who gave me an overall view of the variety of carnivorous mammals that characterize the fossil association. Then we move on to carefully observe the fossil, based on the curvature of the tooth this would seem to be a left upper canine. Another important detail is the presence of evident grooves on the crown of the tooth, this feature suggests that the tooth belongs to a feline. Which felines were present in the fossil fauna of the area? -Panthera palaeosinensis = one of the oldest known species of Panthera, but its relationship to other Pantherinae is still debated -Felis teilhardi = an enigmatic lynx like cat -Lynx shansius (Lynx issiodorensis) = an ancestor of the current lynxes, generally it had larger size and with a more elongated snout -Sivapanthera linxaensis (Acinonyx pardinensis) = ancestor of today's cheetahs, it could reach much larger dimensions. Then we proceed by exclusion, the tooth is too slender to be a tooth from Pantherinae and also too big (62+ mm) to be Felis teilhardi's. There are therefore two options, Lynx shansius and Sivapanthera linxaensis, here the analysis becomes more complex because it is necessary to obtain precise measurements of the tooth. Therefore, the length and width of the tooth (mediolateral breadth and anteroposterior length) are obtained. The height is not important because it can be compromised by wearing or possible fractures. Using a digital caliber, I obtained a length of 12.2 mm and a width of 10.1 mm (the measurements are probably inferior than the real dimensions because the presence of the matrix and the skull did not allow a correct estimation. Probably the tooth is larger by 1-2 mm). Comparing the measurements obtained with those reported in numerous articles, we can observed that the dimensions of the tooth are slightly greater than those of a large specimen of Lynx shansius while they fall within the size range (very close to the lower limit, see graph) of Sivapanthera linxaensis. To conclude, considering the underestimation of the measures, either it is a large lynx (unlikely hypothesis due to the lack of wear on the tooth) or it is a young specimen of Sivapanthera linxaensis. Thanks for making it this far, I hope this little recognition exercise of mine can serve as a little guide on how to go about trying to identify a fossil. Clearly, if someone has a different hypothesis or a different theory, they can explain it.
  5. Oligocene Canine Lower Jaws

    This June I went hunting the Oligocene White River formation in Wyoming and found two lower Canine jaws. I could us a little help in identifying them. I was thing the second one could be a bear dog. Its a juvenile with new eye teeth starting to erupt but the front of the jaw is missing.
  6. Real or not? 15 inches long. "Expertly prepared"
  7. Predator Canine

    64 mm Canine. I keep flip_flopping. Wolf, Bear, Jaguar are the likely candidates.
  8. A 2nd look

    Fossils with questions are tossed in a special bucket for thinking about when hunting opportunities start drying up. That time has come. Here a couple: The question: Mastodon or Gomph; I have found Gomph fragments in this location. Another 2 inch fossil, that I almost threw away!! Laying in the sieve, I thought it was unidentifiable bone, but then noted the odd ends. So Bone or Tooth .... If you decided tooth for this 2nd one, you might check out the fossils in this old thread!!! Thanks for all responses.
  9. Santa Fe carnivore canine

    Hey guys, Here's a partial canine that I got from Cris & Kyle around 2 and a half years ago. It's from the Santa Fe River in Florida, so Pleistocene in age. I've compared it to several canines online, and my best guess right now is spectacled bear (Tremarctos floridanus), but I feel like it could also be a lower canine from a dire wolf (Canis dirus). It doesn't seem cat-like to me. What do you think? I can provide more angles if necessary. Thanks in advance, Max
  10. Jaguar canine?

    Found this in port Charlotte Florida on a job site. I've looked around at all possiblities and I'm thinking it maybe a jaguar canine
  11. Unidentified Florida Canine

    Hey everyone! I am thinking about purchasing this unidentified canid canine! Before I do, I was wondering if anyone has any idea of what animal this tooth came from? It was found in Florida (there was no specific locality) and below you can see a picture with measurements. Any response is appreciated! Thanks!
  12. A curious Tooth

    Found last week in a "mixture" environment that has Pleistocene and Miocene fossils, more of the latter. Curious because the root end (photo #1) seems to have an odd dentine, cementum circular pattern. Curious because the tip (photo #2) seems to have a narrow enamel or dentine covering over a core Curious because in photo #3 , right at the break, there appear to be small "crimps" Curious because I have not seen a fossil tooth like this one. My initial reaction was canine, but incisor is a possibility. All assistance and/or suggestions are greatly appreciated. Jack
  13. Unidentified Jaw, Mammal?

    Hello everyone. Ive got a tough one for you guys. So I have a fossil jaw with a single canine tooth that I’ve had in my collection for a couple years. It was a gift from my boyfriend, so no locality. I tried to have it identified on the fossil forum Facebook group when I first got it, but no one knew what it was for sure. I had a paleontologist post a response and this is what he had to say: ”Hi Marielle Krenzelak, I'm a palaeontologist but I'm not entirely sure what you have there. I'm not concerned with the material that others don't think is bone. It looks to me like the canine tooth (the only tooth you have) is broken. I think the jaw is mammalian based on its overall morphology. I don't think that it is a horse, based on the shape of the symphysis (area where the left and right jaws would have connected) and its position relative to the canine. It is interesting that it has a long post-canine diastema (the smooth area after the canine and before the alveoli, or holes, where the next teeth would have gone). I also think the other suggestions (boar and goat) are also incorrect, again based on the length of the diastema and the shape of the symphysis. Finally, the age constraint someone gave you of less than 20,000 years is not supportable. I've worked on mammals back to ~ 55,000,000 years that have similar preservation. Barring that, I'm just not sure what it is you have there.” So I thought I’d try again on this forum to see if anyone has any idea what it might be? I know we have many experts and actual paleontologists on here. If anyone could help me out, it would be greatly appreciated. Here is a link to the post about it on Facebook in case anyone is in the fossil forum Facebook group and wants to take a look at it: https://www.facebook.com/groups/135008766530423/permalink/1768488489849101?sfns=mo Thank you for any thoughts or insights you have to share!
  14. Small Canine

    One of the guys hunting with me today found this canine and asked me to identify. I was surprised how laterally thin the tooth is. I am pretty sure we will identify. Please state the characteristic that makes your ID correct. i.e what differentiates from similar sized mammal canines? The standard experts: @Harry Pristis @PrehistoricFlorida. EDITED, sorry. The top edge close to the tip (Photo #3) is worn presumably by grinding against the opposing canine. All comments & suggestions appreciated. Jack
  15. A visit to a cool SW Florida location Found a bunch of small teeth, a really nice shark vert, a fat Meg, a good size Mako, and maybe a Beardog canine? Can anyone confirm that one?! Anyone know? Good day hunting!
  16. Basilosaur lower frontal jaw section

    From the album Marine reptiles and mammals

    Basilosaur(us?) frontal lower jaw seyction, from Boujdour, in Morocco. Hopefully the species can be distinguished with some more info
  17. Basilosaur frontal lower jaw section

    From the album Marine reptiles and mammals

    Almost the entire frontal canine portion of the lower jaw of a Basilosaur. As you can see, the area where the absent front canines were, at the tip of the piece is visible, as well as where the missing last canines were situated. Although it was labeled as a Basilosaurus, I’m a little hesitant to consider that the case until I can personally corroborate the information. Apparently from Boujdour, I’m just having trouble finding information about which whales are, or are not found there, so until then I’ll leave it more open with just Basilosaur.
  18. Hey guys. So my friend recently gave me this awesome fossil canine tooth from China. Unfortunately the tooth has been very badly glued back in 2 different places after it was broken. I would like if possible to know how to remove glue, superglue in this case so I can reglue it properly. I would not like to risk the tooth being irreversibly damaged... Do you guys know how and if I could do that? Thanks for any imput. Kind regards, Thomas
  19. Found in South of France

    Found two of these similar shaped stones. They both have the resemblance a tooth. Curious if anyone has any insight. They were found in Charente, France. They seem to be possible internal molds of crustacean. I would greatly appreciate if anyone has any information on this. Thank you!
  20. 2 Canines

    Continuing a streak of good luck. Recently, I was digging in a semi-productive location and a small canine showed up. I recall that it was the last fossil I noted while searching the sieve. An interesting find. Not a clue of what it might be. At 40.5 mm, little too large for small mammals like raccoon. I did see the curious bump at the base of the root. Late in the day from the same spot, a 54 mm canine missing half of its tip. Too small for Jaguar. I have a 2.9 inch canine that looks a lot like this one. All comments, suggestions, identifications appreciated.
  21. Rockhound Finds Fossil Rhino Bone

    Pooch sniffs out prehistoric prize: Canine discovers 250,000-year-old woolly rhino bone By Today, Today news, April 5, 2019 https://www.todaychan.com/2019/04/05/pooch-sniffs-out-prehistoric-prize-dog-discovers-250000-year-old-woolly-rhino-bone-2/ Yours, Paul H.
  22. ID needed

    Hey guys. Saw this and I have absolutely no idea of what it could be. No location either... Two canines I believe? Serrated?! Please help... Thanks so much.
  23. tiger5.jpg

    From the album My fossil

    tiger canine tooth Age:? Locality:Nakhon Si Thammarat,Thailand Length:3.09 inch ps.bought from seller
  24. tiger4.jpg

    From the album My fossil

    tiger canine tooth Age:? Locality:Nakhon Si Thammarat,Thailand Length:3.09 inch ps.bought from seller
  25. tiger3.jpg

    From the album My fossil

    tiger canine tooth Age:? Locality:Nakhon Si Thammarat,Thailand Length:3.09 inch ps.bought from seller
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