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Found 745 results

  1. My great grandfather majorly shaped who I am today by getting me introduced to biology, paleontology, and earth sciences at a young age. He left me with many fossils that he had gone out and found himself, picking about in the Mazon Creek Formation of the Carboniferous. Among the ferns and leaves I had found this one, it looks a lot like a negative impression of an invert to me, although I could also see it being a leaf impression. I'm pretty immature so I'd appreciate any help, thank you
  2. Black Shale things

    Not sure what these are. There was loose shale near where I dig scattered on the ground. It had different things in it than I’m used to seeing. Maybe it was dumped from a different part of the strata, but shouldn’t be much further away. I’m not great with fish parts, are they maybe fish parts? Should I scratch them out or maybe some vinegar? There are a few other pieces that look tooth/horn shaped.
  3. Seed Pod #5, Cardiocarpon

    Here is #5 in my seed pod ID verification request effort. It was listed as Cardiocarpon rare seed fossils, Carboniferous, Upper Silesia, Westphalian "C", Poland. It contains two seed pods. Is this description correct?
  4. Plant! V3

    Betteshanger a Carboniferous area
  5. Plant! V2

    Found at Betteshanger, a Carboniferous area. About 4-5 cm in height. Leaves are less that 1 cm.
  6. About a year ago, I took a trip to go collect at Corys Lane, Portsmouth, Rhode Island. Today I was super bored so I decided to finally unwrap and photo my collections! I have a vague idea of some of these, but a lot of them are well beyond my experience. I have positive/negative of two of these pieces. Any input on genera etc is welcome i have larger filesize photos of all these but i had to ensmallen them to fit here
  7. I went in my fav sites to look after new carboniferous plants
  8. Good morning folks. I have a Dolorthocera pseudorthocerid, nautiloid cephalopod. It's Carboniferous period from Serpuhovian Stage, Brontsy quarry, Kaluga region of Russia. Can anyone confirm the ID or provide a link where I can perform some additional research? Thanks in advance.
  9. Hunting at Malahide Beach

    Hi everyone! During the X-Mas/New Year holidays my family and I went to Dublin (Ireland) to celebrate the New Year there (we don't enjoy NYE in The Hague much lol). Obviously, seeing opportunity to go hunt at a new location, I did some googling around and found an accessible location not far away from Dublin: Malahide Beach. LINK It's a Carboniferous location, an age that I'd never hunted before and had very few fossils of, so I was looking forward to it. We got there in the early afternoon and started looking for stuff immediately. The spot where we arrived didn't have any of the rocks that I was expecting, so we couldn't find any of the Carboniferous fossils just yet. However I noticed some small dark-grey cliffs further along the beach, so we decided to head there by walking along the coastline where there were a lot of shells to be found. While most of them are definitely modern, some of them remind me of the fossil specimens that are found in Zeeland (namely some of the Arctica islandica fragments). Here's our shell haul of the day: I don't think any of them are actually fossilized, but I'll do some research just to make sure. From approximately left to right, we have: Pecten maximus, Nucella lapillus, Dosinia exoleta (?), Euspira catena, Spisula solida, Cerastoderma edule, Gari fervensis, Aequipecten opercularis, Scrobicularia plana, Mimachlamys varia, Ostrea edulis, Lutraria lutraria, Zirfaea crispata, Acanthocardia tuberculata, Arctica islandica, Anomia ephippium, Buccinum undatum, and some kind of fish bone (skull piece?). I was particularly happy with the Gari fervensis, I have a bit of a soft spot for that species As we were collecting shells the sun was quickly setting on us, so at some point we decided to hurry up if we wanted to actually get to the fossiliferous spot of the beach. We got there when it was already getting kinda dark...
  10. Limestone Mystery

    I'm working on my fossil limestone sink and there are a handful of fossils showing up in the polished bowl. Most are horn corals or shells, but this particular one caught my eye. It might just be a shell or something, but I figured I'd let trained eyes give it a shot. It's about 1inch long.
  11. Antiquatonia maybe? (Brachiopod)

    I think this is the genus Antiquatonia, but I’m looking for some confirmation. I found this back in April, going through my finds and trying to ID. Found in Limestone. Glenshaw Formation (Conemaugh Group)
  12. Hello all, Here are a few Diplichnites incertipies specimens that I found on a 2019 expedition in Nova Scotia. It is illegal to collect fossils in NS without a permit, however all the fossils found at this site (see large arthropluera tracks and tetrapod footprints in prior posts) have been brought to the local museums attention. Stay tuned for more! I hope you enjoy, FossilsNS
  13. I found this strange Composita subtilita at the Paleo Site bear Kohls Ranch, Arizona. It is from the Middle Pennsylvanian Naco Formation. Does anyone know what’s going on with the strange pattern? Flip side I also should be able to provide slightly higher quality photos if needed, I just reduced the quality to be able to post several PS-I wasn’t sure if I should post this here since I have an ID, so please move it if it shouldn’t be
  14. Hi all, I have seen and heard from multiple different sources that the cephalic spines of Xenacanthid sharks are considered to have been venomous. This is usually supported by the serrated nature of these spines and a canal that runs down the middle of them. Has any research been done to prove or disprove this hypothesis. I know that we can never know for sure but I am curious if there is any scientific support to these claims. Thanks in advance, Zach
  15. I have been slacking in my posts the past couple of trips, so I figured I would catch up. First up are carboniferous plant fossils from McIntyre Mountain, PA:
  16. Pennsylvanian mystery of Arizona!

    Hey all, last week I was visiting my grandma in Arizona, and of course I had to stop at a local fossil spot! I’m just now cleaning up everything we collected (I’ll hopefully post a trip report tonight !!!) and I revealed this little thing from the mud. I believe the brachiopods on the flip side are Derbyia crassa. If you could help me with my little mystery, I’d really appreciate it! From the Pennsylvanian Naco Formation of Arizona.
  17. Mazon Creek Microfossils

    I had a few duds pop open yesterday but saw one had a tiny speck of something on it, no more than a millimeter long. I had my digital microscope out for other microfossiling activities and decided to take a look. Nothing super interesting, just a tiny plant fragment. But it did get me curious if anyone has done micropaleontology work on Mazon Creek material? I would think there would be quite a bit to explore, but that said I've never really seen the topic mentioned. The only microfossil I've seen discussed from Mazon Creek is a species of ostracod, but usually the only specimens you see are nodules containing hundreds of ostracods as they are readily apparent to the naked eye in that case.
  18. My Best Carboniferous Finds

    Hi all, I’ve posted a few topics on the forum but have yet to show my entire collection, or my best finds. So here goes. A little background on me. I’ve been fossil hunting since I was very young, probably since I was 4 when I found a plant fossil in my backyard. Over the past few years as I have ventured into adulthood I have gotten very interested in the fossils of the Pittsburgh area. I will display my best finds here and periodically update the thread with new finds. As a note, many of the vertebrate fossils I have found are rare and may be important to science. I have been in contact with @jdp about this and will most likely be donating the most important ones to the Carnegie Museum of Natural History. If any of my IDs seem strange or wrong please let me know, I am always learning and value new info. I guess I’ll start with the marine invertebrates. To start out we can start small, with brachiopods, cephalopods and horn corals. The first is a Linoproductus from the Ames Limestone, a classic Pittsburgh marine zone.
  19. Fossils of Parks Township

    https://fossil.15656.com/ Here is my personal website that targets fossils I have found locally. I try to post articles about particular finds, especially when it highlights a new genus or species for me, or a better specimen than I had before. I am highly interested in providing content for people searching online to find, especially about local specimens. I do my best to photograph each specimen to maximize detail and to satisfy curiosity. In keeping finds organized, I keep a catalog page and created a local numbering system: https://fossil.15656.com/about/fossil-catalog/ As I read research papers, I tend to post links to them and add commentary. https://fossil.15656.com/about/research/ I've done my best to provide a description of the local geology here: https://fossil.15656.com/local-geology/ And as I find interesting things along the way, sometimes I will create a live research article as I learn about it. Example: https://fossil.15656.com/research-pages/fedexia-striegeli/ I've only been collecting fossils for a year at this point. I'm still overwhelmed with how much there is to learn about fossil taxonomy and geology in general. This is a relaxing hobby for me that keeps me excited with the thrill of discovery. Thank you! Clint
  20. Managed to stop in for a little Mazon Creek style Easter egg hunt when I was up in Chicago last June. Brought back maybe a gallon or so of concretions and I've been cycling them in my freezer (when I remember). I like to give them a bit of a (gentle) tap around the edges from time to time. This often helps the concretion to shed an outer layer or to coax a split that is nearly there and just begging to pop. As expected, I've had a number (the majority) of concretions open up to reveal a complete lack of anything at all within. The only thing that revealed itself to be of interest was this little concretion that measures 3.5 x 4.0 cm. I pulled out my copy of The Mazon Creek Fossil Fauna book and you think with that information at my fingertips that I'd be able to make a coherent guess as to the identity of this fossil but I am at a loss to match it up convincingly to any of the taxa described there. Hoping some of the members here with more experience can chime in. @Nimravis @RCFossils @stats @Mark Kmiecik
  21. Over the past year, I've become fascinated with the often bizarre fish and sharks of the Pennsylvanian. Fortunately, my home state of Illinois is a great place to hunt for such fossils. I've shared several of these in other posts before, but wanted to put everything together in one thread. Probably won't have much to post for a few months after this, but once summer rolls around, I should hopefully have plenty of new finds to share. I would say there are three major settings in which you can find fish fossils in Illinois: Mazon Creek, black shales, and limestone. I have not had luck at Mazon Creek yet, but hopefully that will change. So I'll start out with the black shales. These specimens, my first fish fossils, were collected in August 2019 from the Mecca Quarry Shale exposed at a clay quarry in Utica, IL. This shale directly overlies the Francis Creek Shale (i.e. Mazon Creek) at this location. The three specimens below are stomach ejecta from some kind of fish, and are composed mostly of partially digested fish scales. In addition, I found this very nice pair of associated acanthodian fin spines. The top fin has an area showing damage, possibly due to predation.
  22. Pit spoil 2020

    My first hunt of 2020 was to the pit spoil in the Derbyshire UK coal measures that is local to me. If you have ever seen the film "Holes" that is me ! I am digging lots of holes in a big spoil heap looking for my gold (fossils) . Most of the time the holes draw a blank with just a glimpse of what i'm looking for and I dig till I feel the twinges in my back ( my back is older now ) these are the bits from my first hunt of the year. and this small find that has a jagged calcite look but shows segments ( all nodules whacked on site ) I used a black light for the last photo. The black light seems to show up the segments (this black light is something that is new and i'm trying out) . Happy New Year John
  23. Pennsylvanian unknown

    I found this fossil last year in the Mecca Quarry Shale (Pennsylvanian) of Illinois. I posted it previously but no definitive answer. I got a new digital microscope recently and decided to snap a few photos of this specimen up close. Hopefully they might help, though I still have no idea what it is. Thoughts?
  24. Conditions in Western PA have been unusually warm recently, with highs in the 40s and 50s. I decided to take advantage of this warm spell by getting a little bit of fossil hunting in. I decided to do a hunt focused on plants as I’ve been hunting for vertebrates for the better part of the last year and a half and, although I could never get tired of vertebrates I thought some variety was well overdue. So I headed to one of my favorite plant localities in the area. It is located in the Connellsville Sandstone of the Casselman Formation, which is in turn the upper half of the Conemaugh Group. The sandstone is around 305 million years old. The Casselman Formation holds the record of the tail end of one of the largest plant extinctions in our earths history. The prolonged wetness that had existed for much of the Pennsylvanian gave way to dryer conditions, and, as a result, the lycopsid forests fragmented. Many of these lycopsids went extinct during this event, which is known as the Carboniferous Rainforest Collapse. Conifers took advantage of these newly opened ecological niches. Their fossils have been found in this area, although I have never personally found them. Anyway, on to the fossils. Today I mostly found partial Pecopteris fronds, Neuropteris pinnules and Annularia leaflets. I’m going to include some of my better finds from other trips as well, as this trip was rather unproductive. Pictured below is the best Annularia I found today. Or Asterophyllites. I’m not sure. We’ll just go with Calamites leaves for now.
  25. Alethopteris sp?

    I recently obtained this plant fossil in a trade. It comes from the Kent coal measures (UK), upper Carboniferous. I suspect it is Alethopteris sp, though the pinnules are smaller than any species of Alethopteris I can find. Any ideas what it may be? Thanks, Daniel
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