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Found 307 results

  1. I received this relatively large fossil about 4 years ago as a Christmas present from a friend. All the information I have about this specimen is that "it comes from the Carboniferous", it was bought from a peddler at the local Christmas market without asking for the provenance. Now I am trying to definitively identify it. I compared it to all my fossil ferns and to many pics online, and some photos of Pecopteris polymorpha are particularly similar in shape. ^This is one of the images I found online. There is a surprising similarity even with the surrounding matrix, could my fossil come from the same formation? My specimen measures about 180 x 140 mm.
  2. I bought this specimen many years ago in a small museum in Austria. The fossil itself is a very fragile flat piece of coal, was collected locally and sold by the same paleontologist who works in the museum itself. I cleaned it by myself since it was not prepared and covered in soil fragments, the real shape of the fossil had remained hidden behind a black layer of dust. When purchasing, I was told that it probably was a bark fragment from Alethopteris, but looking at it now I have the heavy suspect that it is instead a small Lepidodendron branch (excluding all the surrounding undefined plant material). More detailed information: found on mount Königsstuhl in Nockalm, southern Austria dated 330 million years, Middle Mississippian, Carboniferous measures approximately 21,7 x 14,2 cm This additional photo can be found on my Deviantart page, (am I allowed to post this link here?)
  3. Bourbonnella fourrieri POPLIN, 2001

    From the album Vertebrates

    Bourbonnella fourrieri POPLIN, 2001 Upper Seams Formation (assise des carrières) Late Carboniferous Late Pennsylvanian Gzhelian Montceau-les-Mines Département Loire et Saône France Lit.: Perrier, V., Charbonnier, S., The Montceau-les-Mines Lagerstätte (Late Carboniferous, France). C. R. Palevol (2014), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.crpv.2014.03.002 C. Poplin (2001) Le genre Bourbonnella (Actinopterygii, Aeduellidae) : révision et description d’une nouvelle espèce du Stéphanien (Carbonifère supérieur) de Montceau-les-Mines (Massif Central, France) Le genre Bourbonnella Actinopterygii Aeduellidae revision et description d'une nouvelle espece du Stephanien Carbonifere superieur.pdf
  4. Liomesaspis laevis RAYMOND, 1944

    From the album Invertebrates

    Liomesaspis laevis RAYMOND, 1944 Late Carboniferous Duckmantian Pennine Middle Coal Measures Formation Coseley, Clay Croft open-cast works Staffordshire West Midlands United Kingdom
  5. Schizolepis manzanitaensis GOTTFRIED, 1992

    From the album Vertebrates

    Schizolepis manzanitaensis GOTTFRIED, 1992 Carboniferous Late Pennsylvanian Early Kasimovian Atrasado Formation Kinney Brick Quarry New Mexico USA Length 8cm / 3"
  6. The deep-scaled, fusiform-bodied actinopterygian Schizolepis manzanitaensis is the third most common fish at Kinney (Gottfried, 1992; Williams and Lucas, 2013). The deep scale morphology of Schizolepis formed a stiff “jacket” for locomotion stability for efficient caudal action and suggests the tail was the main organ of propulsion (Gottfried, 1992). Lit.: Precise age and biostratigraphic significance of the Kinney Brick Quarry Lagerstätte Pennsylvanian of New Mexico.pdf Lucas, S. G. and Sullivan, R. M., eds., 2015, Fossil Vertebrates in New Mexico. New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science Bulletin 68. Edited by Jiri Zidek: Geology and paleontology of the Kinney Brick Quarry, Late Pennsylvanian, central New Mexico. New Mexico Bureau of Mines & Mineral Resources.Bulletin 138. M. D. Gottfried (1992): A new deep-scaled 'palaeoniscoid' from the Kinney Quarry, Late Pennsylvanian of New Mexico. New Mexico Bureau of Mines & Mineral Resources Bulletin, No. 138 1992: 189-203.
  7. Schizolepis manzanitaensis GOTTFRIED, 1992

    From the album Vertebrates

    Schizolepis manzanitaensis GOTTFRIED, 1992 Carboniferous Late Pennsylvanian Early Kasimovian Atrasado Formation Kinney Brick Quarry New Mexico USA Length 7cm / 3" Precise age and biostratigraphic significance of the Kinney Brick Quarry Lagerstätte Pennsylvanian of New Mexico.pdf
  8. Lit.: Hook, Robert W. and Baird, Donald (1988): An Overview of the Upper Carboniferous Fossil Deposit at Linton, Ohio. The Ohio Journal of Science. v88, n1 (March, 1988), 55-60. R.W. Hook and J. C. Ferm (1985) A depositional model for the Linton tetrapod assemblage (Westphalian D, Upper Carboniferous) and its paleoenvironmental significance. Phil. Trans. R. Soc. Lond. B 311, 101-109 (1985) Robert W. Hook and Donald Baird (1986) The Diamond Coal Mine of Linton, Ohio, and its Pennsylvanian-age vertebrates. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, Vol. 6, 1986, pp. 174-190 Westoll, T. Stanley (1944): The Haplolepidae, a new family of late Carboniferous bony fishes : a study in taxonomy and evolution. Bulletin of the AMNH ; v. 83, article 1 dshamilla: Identifying Linton Paleoniscoid Fish
  9. Found this the other night while looking for points. Any input would be appreciated. Austin, Texas
  10. I found this rock in France at a fossil site called Graissesac and it seems to have two strange spots on it (maybe a third one too, but it is faded). The texture of the spots is smoothe unlike the surrounding matrix, and their colour is brownish. Any ideas on what this could be?
  11. Rhabdoderma elegans Newberry, 1856

    Lit.: Hook, Robert W. and Baird, Donald (1988): An Overview of the Upper Carboniferous Fossil Deposit at Linton, Ohio. The Ohio Journal of Science. v88, n1 (March, 1988), 55-60. R.W. Hook and J. C. Ferm (1985) A depositional model for the Linton tetrapod assemblage (Westphalian D, Upper Carboniferous) and its paleoenvironmental significance. Phil. Trans. R. Soc. Lond. B 311, 101-109 (1985) Robert W. Hook and Donald Baird (1986) The Diamond Coal Mine of Linton, Ohio, and its Pennsylvanian-age vertebrates. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, Vol. 6, 1986, pp. 174-190
  12. This is from the Wabaunsee Group (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Carboniferous Pennsylvanian-Late [Virgilian]) Includes: Wood Siding FM, Root Shale, Stotler Limestone (base ST), Pillsbury Shale, Zeandale Limestone (base Z), Willard Shale, Emporia Limestone (base E), Auburn Shale, Bern Limestone (base BR), Scranton Shale, Howard Limestone (base H), and Severy Shale. Found these unknown objects attached to the interior of a myalina clam shell. This is a marine environment but I'm not sure which layer of the Wabaunsee Group this is from. I've never seen this before so would appreciate any help with ID. I'd be happy to furnish more photos of layer and fossil. Thanks
  13. Can someone help me read this beautifully hand written note to describe these Blastiods please.
  14. Would anyone have any sort of idea of how much this Stigmaria fossil might be worth? It is approximately 12 in. x 6 in., I do not know where it originally is from. It was found within the landscape rocks of my sisters house, which is in southwest Ohio. From what I know of these, they are Carboniferous and not typically found around here, since most of the fossils found here (Cincinnati, OH) are usually Ordovician. I was thinking this stigmaria might have been transported with rocks from a quarry for landscaping purposes. The house is over 50 years old, so I have no way of knowing where the rocks came from. I was thinking of offering my brother in law something for this fossilized tree root (He does not collect fossils by the way.) What would this stigmaria be worth to someone who collects fossils like me? Thanks to anyone who replies, your opinions will be appreciated.
  15. Psammodus porosus.

    From the album Scottish Lower Carboniferous marine shark teeth

    Psammodus porosus. Charlestown Main Limestone Lower Carboniferous, Visean Midland Valley of Scotland
  16. Polyrhizodus lingual view

    From the album Scottish Lower Carboniferous marine shark teeth

    Polyrhizodus sp. Lower Carboniferous, Visean Charlestown Main Limestone Central Belt of Scotland 330 mya 20.5x18mm
  17. Lit.: EDWIN K. MAUGHAN and ALBERT E. ROBERTS (1967): Big Snowy and Amsden Groups and the Mississippian-Pennsylvanian Boundary in Montana. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY PROFESSIONAL PAPER 554 7 B Lutz-Garihan, A.B. (1979). Brachiopods from the Upper Mississippian Bear Gulch Limestone of Montana. Neuvieme Congres International de Stratigraphie et de Geologie du Carbonifere. Compte Rendu Vol. 5: 457-467 pp.
  18. I find the time to make a hunt today and was rewarded by a real unexpected find,a big grey rock with a strange round shape,i split it to see further(the rock is very hard)an when it open i saw a orthoceras! i split more and find two others ,and brachiopods various tracks,other shells,i never found sea fossils in the carboniferous before only very little shells one time(in more than 20 hunts!)! a real surprise for me
  19. Lit.: Lund R. & Poplin C. 1997. — The Rhadinichthyids (Palaeoniscoid, Actinopterygians) from the Bear Gulch Limestone of Montana (USA, Lower Carboniferous). Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology 17: 466-486.
  20. Lit.: Lund R. & Poplin C. (1997): The Rhadinichthyids (Palaeoniscoid, Actinopterygians) from the Bear Gulch Limestone of Montana (USA, Lower Carboniferous). Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology 17: 466-486.
  21. Rhizodont jaw

    From the album Scottish Carboniferous Sarcopterygians

    Rhizodont jaw Fife Coal Field, Midland Valley of Scotland Upper Carboniferous Westphalian A 310 mya
  22. Today I broke a little more the stone from the Silurian Devonian Stone i have found few days ago,with several Orthoceras in it and find this,could it be a aptychus or only a shell?
  23. Scottish fossils tell story of first life on land, BBC News http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-38186397 Evolution: First four-legged animals to walk on land found in 20 million year gap in fossil record, International Business Times UK – http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/mystery-20-million-years-missing-fossils-solved-five-new-species-1594933 The paper is: Clack, J. A., C. E. Bennett, ad many others, 2016, Phylogenetic and environmental context of a Tournaisian tetrapod fauna. Nature Ecology & Evolution 1, Article number: 0002 (2016) doi:10.1038/s41559-016-0002 http://www.nature.com/articles/s41559-016-0002 Yours, Paul H.
  24. Kues, B. S., 1982, Pennsylvanian trilobites from the Madera Formation, Cedro Canyon, New Mexico. in: Wells, S. G.; Grambling, J. A.; Callender, J. F.; [eds.], pp. 239-243, Albuquerque Country II, New Mexico Geological Society 33rd Annual Fall Field Conference Guidebook, 370 p. https://nmgs.nmt.edu/publications/guidebooks/downloads/33/33_p0239_p0243.pdf http://nmgs.nmt.edu/publications/guidebooks/33/ Kues, B. S., 2004, Pennsylvanian trilobites from the Sangre de Cristo and Jemez Mountains, north-central New Mexico. in: Brister, Brian; Bauer, Paul W.; Read, Adam S.; Lueth, Virgil W.; [eds.], pp. 326-334, Geology of the Taos Region, New Mexico Geological Society 55th Annual Fall Field Conference Guidebook, 440 p. https://nmgs.nmt.edu/publications/guidebooks/downloads/55/55_p0326_p0334.pdf http://nmgs.nmt.edu/publications/guidebooks/55/ Yours, Paul H.