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Found 679 results

  1. Spoil find

    Found this on Monday in a British Coal Measures pit spoil in Derbyshire UK , I think it might be a Calamostachys but i would like to know what you think it might be. Cheers John
  2. Yesterday I went on a combined field trip with ESCONI and LOESS to the Starved Rock Clay Products pit in Utica, Illinois. ( @connorp was there too!) This open pit exposes the Pennsylvanian Mecca Quarry black shale, Francis Creek shale, Colchester Coal, and an underclay below the coal- an assembly of strata that have produced world-renowned fossils elsewhere, including Mazon Creek fossils further east and complete sharks from the Mecca Quarry Shale in Indiana. At this location, unfortunately, the concretions are almost all blanks but the black shale does produce isolated fauna including bivalves, brachiopods, cephalopods, and shark teeth and scales. The underclay also contains petrified and pyritized wood and root traces. About 30 of us gathered at a nearby McDonalds before heading to the pit- dark clouds on the horizon brought intermittent hard rain that kindly let up by the time we reached the pit floor. My interest for this trip was in the black shale, with hopes of finding shark material in particular. With the recent rains everything was muddy, and the black shale could be found in chunks strewn along the slumping highwall. Some folks were splitting the shale, but I did not have any luck with that-all of my finds were already exposed. The mud really made it hard to see whether or not there were fossils in the exposed black shale, but I was happy to be able to find a few pieces worth taking home- as often seems to be the case for me when fossil hunting, I found my best stuff in the first hour and virtually nothing the rest of the time I was there.
  3. Hello everyone, I have noticed that I have almost no fossils from the Carboniferous period and would really love to add some to my collection. I have decided to start out with the Mazon creek as it had many fascinating inhabitants. I am interested in pretty much everything from there and am not looking for anything spectacular. For what I have, there are Thalassina anomala mud lobsters from Australia, Devonian fossils from New York such as trilos and brachiopods, Jurassic Ostracods from CT, a few echinoids and probably other things too.
  4. preserving fossils in coal.

    Hello, On a recent holiday to Kent I picked up some carboniferous plant fossils from a disused coal pit. Being in coal however they are rather crumbly and will not survive in their present state. Are there any methods for treatment suitable for a lightweight beginner to stabilise fossils in coal that I could use to prevent deterioration?
  5. From the westphalian of Northern France,I would trade these large plates for other fossils i still not have:) A Lepidodendron trunk imprint and a stem
  6. Help with large Carboniferous fish tooth

    Hey guys. I'm looking for some help with this large mystery fish tooth from the late Carboniferous of Illinois. The closest match i can find is from the Devonian lobed finned fish Hyneria. But this is late Carboniferous almost Permian. Another contender just based on size is the Rhizodont. But it's not rounded. This tooth flattens out to two cutting edges that are very sharp. It honestly reminds me of a Barracuda tooth. This broken tooth measures about 20mm, but would have most likey been around 30mm if complete. It is associated with a Megalichthys scale and Orthanthus teeth. Any thoughts?
  7. carboniferous, plant, coal,

    Hello Fossil Fans, I found this recently at a disused coal pit in Kent (Thanet). I believe it to be carboniferous plant material. Can anyone be more specific? Also because of the nature of the coal it is very crumbly so any advice on preservation would be welcome.
  8. So for some time, I've had an interesting idea of displaying multiple types of fossils from the same area together in the same display case. I ended coming up with this quick and easy idea, though it was many months in the making. I found the box itself on Amazon. LINK It's nice because it has a soft velvet lining with the grid itself being removable and customizable, so you can display things how you want. A lot of my finds here in Missouri are smaller marine invertebrates, so this box worked well. I'm rather proud of myself on how this turned out. Brachiopods, bryozoans, blastoids, gastropods, corals, and crinoids all made it in this display, and were all found at the same location. All of these fossils came from a little town called Tightwad, Missouri. Missouri has a variety of Carboniferous fossils here, and almost nobody collects them around here from what I see. (I often get weird looks from people when they see me with my pick and my eyes fixed to the ground.) But alas, fossil hunting is a great addiction to have in my eyes because every day is a treasure hunt.
  9. Efforts are ramping up to have this region added to the Canadian geopark family. The UNESCO folks just finished their visit. Let's wish them all the success! Possible Nova Scotian United Nations geopark a hidden gem - Keenan
  10. Carboniferous Arthropod?

    Evenin' all! Am I going a little bit doolally, or is this impression a fossil? It's situated between a couple of thin plant fossils either side, on a piece of siderite from Duckmantian Carboniferous deposits in North Wales, UK. I've played with the lighting a bit to try and bring the details out.... It's not noticeable to the naked eye, but the photos seem to be showing up spines/protrusions in one area? It's probably nothing, but worth a double check. Cheers!
  11. Again I'm not sure what kind of bark this is? Found on old mine pit in Gelsenkirchen. Thanks!
  12. Hi all! I've been active in the field for a bit but I've been MIA for a while, dealing with personal life. BUT I have come back online. Have some adventures I have yet to post. So if you're curious about the geology of that part of the world from the eyes of this Canadian hobbit, swing by my blog. Don't be shy and subscribe if you want to keep updated. I'll try to add some of the blog info in this forum too so that I can reach as many folks as possible so they can see the amazing stuff in my backyard. Blog URL: https://redleafz.blogspot.com Thanks!! - Keenan p.s. Little preview:
  13. Goniatites sp. (Haan 1825)

    From the album Slices

    14x6cm. From Winterberg quarry near Bad Grund in Harz, Lower Saxony, Germany. The stratigraphy is interesting. Although the micrite sediments in which they and other fauna were found are early carbiniferous, they were deposited in a tectonic fissure within the local devonian reef limestone, which made for a bit of riddle work when they were first discovered.
  14. Goniatites sp. (Haan 1825)

    From the album Slices

    6x5cm. Slices at two different angles. From Winterberg quarry near Bad Grund in Harz, Lower Saxony, Germany. The stratigraphy is interesting. Although the micrite sediments in which they and other fauna were found are early carbiniferous, they were deposited in a tectonic fissure within the local devonian reef limestone, which made for a bit of riddle work when they were first discovered.
  15. Goniatites sp. (Haan 1825)

    From the album Cephalopods Worldwide

    4cm. A slice through the middle of a goniatite from Winterberg quarry near Bad Grund in Harz, Lower Saxony, Germany. The stratigraphy is interesting. Although the micrite sediments in which they and other fauna were found are early carbiniferous, they were deposited in a tectonic fissure within the local devonian reef limestone, which made for a bit of riddle work when they were first discovered. Below is another one of them.
  16. Unknown Mazon Creek

    Hi! I just recently found this piece for sale, with no identification. The bumpy texture made me think of Arthropleura, but could also be something like a Stigmaria root. Please let me know what you think!
  17. Hi everybody. I friend of mine entrusted me with his fossils and minerals because he wants to make tradings against carboniferous items. If you have coal to trade he'd like something with a mineral Inside (he's from the north of France, so he has plenty of coal). Please, PM me your proposals, i'll show him your photos. A : Saint Germain de Joux, department of Ain, Kimmeridgian 1 2 3 4 5 6
  18. Plant Fossil ID

    Hope someone can help with an ID British Coal Measures - Upper Carboniferous, Silesian Length approx 5cm
  19. I found these bits in the LaSalle Limestone member of the Bond Formation (Pennsylvanian). They were in a huge boulder and I could not remove them unfortunately. No clue what they could be. Any thoughts?
  20. Late Carboniferous Oyster or Clam II

    A second large Clam or Oyster? I dug a huge piece of limestone out of the hill and split it into three with a sledge hammer so that I could actually pick pieces up. After the heat this weekend, they were easy to pick apart once I got them home. Yesterday, I found the first piece. This is the one I found today. When it came out of the rock I was a bit shocked at how large it was. I carefully tapped around the specimen and was able to remove most of the surrounding rock carefully. This is the larger of the two pieces I found this weekend. I have less confidence in identifying it as has less features than the first piece. You can see shell material flaking off in the 3rd and 4th photos below. The fossil after I found it: Then, once I removed it from the rock:
  21. 310 million-year-old tree fossils to reveal new ancient animals by Hillary Maddin, The Conversation, July 16, 2019 https://theconversation.com/310-million-year-old-tree-fossils-to-reveal-new-ancient-animals-120195 https://phys.org/news/2019-07-million-year-old-tree-fossils-reveal-ancient.html Old science, new technology combine to unlock mysteries of Joggins Fossil Cliffs by Scott Doherty, Amherst News, April 18, 2019 https://www.cumberlandnewsnow.com/news/local/old-science-new-technology-combine-to-unlock-mysteries-of-joggins-fossil-cliffs-303536/ Yours, Paul H.
  22. Late Carboniferous Oyster or Clam

    I love and hate finding large fossils. They are really interesting and striking to look at, but I have a hard time getting an ID on them. I dug a huge piece of limestone out of the hill and split it into three with a sledge hammer. After the heat this weekend, they were easy to pick apart. Yesterday, out popped this piece. There is another one I found today that I will be posting after this one. This piece has several wavy ridges. The shell material looks pearly, and perhaps some calcite replacement has happened. There was a piece of shell stuck on the mold portion as well. I'm seeing about 6 distinct ridges. Anyone know what it might be? Before I removed it from the rock: Several views after removing, trying to show the ridges:
  23. fossilized wood

    Hi, i have that piece of wood from the Carboniferous of Poland. Is it a lepidodendron or something else ? My finger tips are the scale. Thank you very much for your input.
  24. Prior to today, the sites I have checked out were from the Devonian in the Mahantango Formation, but had heard of a spot around Centralia (yikes) PA, and decided to venture out. Carboniferous, not sure what formation? These were the most interesting items I found and wasn’t there for a very long time. Any help at ID would be great, there is a lot of leaf patterns in the slabs but they, for the most part seem identical, and also what appears to be a stem or bark of some sort. Thanks!
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