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Found 525 results

  1. Megalichthys Linocut Print

    On finding a Megalichthys scale fossil from the Late Carboniferous in my local stream I designed, carved and printed a lino-block of the carnivorous freshwater fish. In the same slab of rock that the scale was found were Lepidodendron and Calamites fossils that would have been deposited at the bottom of the coal swamp. I would like to have thought of this fish hiding in the murky waters alongside these plants and I based my reconstruction on this. I plan to do a series of three including Rhizodopsis and Rhabdoderma, alongside their respective surrounding vegetation. Credit where credit is due the general proportions and pose of the fish are based on a reconstruction by ДиБгд as seen on Megalichthys' Wikipedia page.
  2. Mazon Creek ID

    An unknown I found at Braidwood, IL, Mazon Creek material. Forgot scale but about 2" wide and 1" long. It was in a marine area.
  3. LINK Sedimentary context and palaeoecology of Gigantoproductus shell beds in the Mississippian Eyam Limestone Formation, Derbyshire carbonate platform, central England L. S. P. Nolan1*, L. Angiolini2, F. Jadoul2, G. Della Porta2, S. J. Davies1, V. J. Banks3, M. H. Stephenson3 & M. J. Leng4,5 Proceedings of the Yorkshire Geological Society Published online July 25, 2017 https://doi.org/10.1144/pygs2017-393 | Vol. 61 | 2017 | pp. 239–257 ABOUT 12 MB,RECOMMENDED,not in the least for all those interested in the Carboniferous("Dinantian")of Europe and brachiopod ecology
  4. Graissessac

    HI, as some of you knows i went in the South of France, at Graissessac and found some fossil of plants (French Carboniferous). I believe some of them are Pecopteris : (or Alethopteris for this one ?)
  5. Edestus teeth

    From the album Sharks and fish

    The shark relative is genus of eugenodontia holocephalid from the Carboniferous-Pennsylvanian age Anna shale formation, Carbondale group, found in different Illinois coal mines. I dont know(yet)which mine these were found in. This unidentified species is of the "vorax-serratus- crenulatus-heinrichi" or "E. heinrichi group", with the teeth being more of a standard triangular shape, as opposed to being thinner and pointed at a forward angle as in the "E. minor" group http://www.thefossilforum.com/applications/core/interface/file/attachment.php?id=501751
  6. This afternoon I was able to shoot down to North Attleborough to spend a few hours digging through carboniferous aged rock outcrops. It was a nice change of pace from my usual spots down in Rhode Island! The plant fossils here also preserve much better. My favorite find of the day was a plate covered in various Neuropterids. I'll have to explore southern MA more.
  7. Mazonia 2018 short (re)view

    http://jgs.lyellcollection.org/content/jgs/early/2018/07/30/jgs2018-088.full.pdf. THIS IS: The Mazon Creek Lagerstätte: a diverse late Palaeozoic ecosystem entombed within siderite concretions View ORCID ProfileThomas Clements, View ORCID ProfileMark Purnell and Sarah Gabbott Journal of the Geological Society, https://doi.org/10.1144/jgs2018-088 about 2,1 MB and the usual JGSL quality
  8. Lovenechinus lacazei (Julien) (most likely this species but I'm not sure if there's really enough diagnostic detail). Lower Carboniferous, probably Tournaisian. Very rare anyway but of especial interest as it is from the Jurassic Doulting Stone (Bajocian, Inferior Oolite) of Somerset, UK. This is a limestone full of Carboniferous detritus, formed when the Jurassic sea was washing up against the Mendip Hills Carboniferous high ground. (Just acquired via a dealer from an old collection that included Carboniferous coral and crinoid fragments from the same location. No other echinoids though!) 2.3cm across
  9. Good afternoon everybody! During a fieldtrip in Silesia (Poland) last year I visited a rather large spoiltip looking for plant fossils. The spoils left behind by the mining company indicate they still use (or used) the old method to separate the coal from the surrounding debris, allowing the coal to be 'baked' (e. g. the presence of pyrite that turns into sulphuric acid -h2so4- under the influence of wind and rain, ...) something typical for the majority of spoiltips I visited in Western Europe. Unfortunately I have no detailed geological data on the age of the debris in the spoiltip but there is no doubt this is Silesian (upper Carboniferous) in age. I even tend to think this is Westphalian in age based on the fossils found, but let's keep it to upper Carboniferous to be sure. I found several species of Lepidodendron, some Eusphenopterids, both Stigmaria ficoides and S. stellata, etc... And this never-seen-before 'thing'. My initial thought was that this could be some sort stem/branch but, in my 20 years of collecting Paleozoic plants, I have never seen the repetative triangular pattern that covers the branch (or tube if you like). Perhaps this could be some sort of tracefossil? Since my ichnofossil-knowledge is extremely limited someone here can help me out? The height of the 'tubes' varies between 2 and 3mm. Have a nice day! Sven
  10. I was a lucky recipient of a wonderfully CRAPPY package from @Nimravis a couple of months ago. Now I need some educating. 1. The only recognizable inclusions in this coprolite are plant fragments, most of which appear to be woody debris. There is one relatively intact "leaf?" that may be recognizable to some of you experienced Mazon Creek folks. My educated guess is it is from a lycopod. Can anyone confirm this. From what I have read, the only herbivores large enough to have produced a mass of this size are Arthropleura, the giant millipede arthropods. How exciting is that!?! 2. This one looks like some sort of stem fragment. Would this be from a lycopod as well?
  11. Last Weekend, August 18th and 19th 2018, was the annual Canal Corridor Mazon River Fossil Field Trip. The weather was perfect! There was a great presentation by Andrew Young on August 18th and Dave Dolak on August 19th. Afterwards, the dinner was excellent, as usual. It was a very productive outing for all involved. I have a couple buckets of concretions to freeze/thaw throughout the winter. It's always a fun trip, can't wait for it again next year! Saturday's lecture before collecting A perfect day! An amazing Alethopteris serlii, which was brought by one of the participants. I believe this was collected from the Dresden area, as it was known for large concretions. Concretions Everyone was tired at the end of the day! A few examples of what was found...
  12. Edestus "shark"

    Does anyone know much about the edestus? Ive always wondered about their teeth as they age. All sharks and fish(and animals), when they're young their teeth are also small. Edestus are supposed to never lose their teeth, like their buddy helicoprion(right?), and just have their jaws continue to extend out from their mouths over time. That being the case, how are the oldest teeth, from when they were little young things, full sized, or almost full sized, as they always are? The jaw bone starts off small at the tip, but quickly thickens, but the teeth start large. Also, does that mean that they are born with just a single tooth on the top and bottom, and grow new teeth at an unheard of slow rate?
  13. PDF Request

    Does anyone have a PDF copy of this paper and are willing to send it to me? If so, please PM me. V. E. Ruzhentsev and M. F. Bogoslovskaya. 1971. Namurskiy etap v evolyutsii ammonoidey. Rannenamyurskie ammonoidei. Akademiya Nauk SSSR, Trudy Paleontologicheskogo Instituta 133:1-382
  14. Mazon Creek Unknown

    I need some help with a pit 11 unknown. Reminders me oy a “Y” but it has bulbous ends on the appendages. Any thoughts? Pat
  15. Pennsylvanian Nodules

    We went up to Terre Haute, IN for a wedding this past weekend. I was looking forward to us being able to actually hunt for some fossils of our own as I had read online about Fowler Park/Griffin Bike Park and its nodules. I decided to check out the park rules after we got up there and lo and behold, Vigo County doesn't allow fossil collecting. I didn't want to set a bad example for my daughter so we refrained, much to our dismay. On the way home we stopped at an antique mall and happened to find someone selling jars of split nodules! So, we didn't come home empty-handed after all. Below are the better pieces that were in our jar. I used this guide and decided we had some pecopteris and macroneuropteris, but I'm not sure what all of them are, especially the blobby thing on the upper right. See detail photos of blob.
  16. No idea what this is.

    I have several fossils like the one shown here. My collection is approx 300-350 years old, Cahaba River Valley, central Alabama, carboniferous. The size is about the same as a shoe sole. Any idea what it is? Leave comment if more info is needed.
  17. Found my best Psaronius sp.

    Just wanted to share the beauty of this recent carboniferous find. I just sliced this yesterday. It still needs some work and i need to finish the other half, but take a look at the vascular cell structures of this fern tree (psaronius sp.). There is pyrite throughtout this piece, giving it a real luster (it's hard to see in the pictures).
  18. Fossils from Brean Down, Somerset

    I was at Brean Down on the Somerset coast of England last week, and found various fossils on the beach there. From what it appears, most of the samples I have are from the black rock limestone of the Carboniferous period, although others are differently coloured. They may come from other parts of the coast via longshore drift, or from a point higher up in the cliff, where there are mudstones and sandstones from the upper Carboniferous. Some banded samples, although I have the suspicion at least one of them is actually striped flint. Are these some kind of burrow, or is it coral? Is this coral? (front and back images) (continued below)
  19. Tubular Bryozoan?

    I had posted this piece in General Fossil Discussion area since it had my first trilobite on it. Someone message me saying that they thought it may be an echinoderm. The person said “that looks like an echinoderm ("calcichordate")fragment. Possibly the M1-M4 of a stylophoran(marginale elements)” I thought it was a form of bryozoan. However, I do not know the Mississippian or any Carboniferous fossils very well. So I’m willing to admit complete ignorance. Can anyone ID it and educate me as what it is? I found it in Siloam Springs, Arkansas in an area which Mancos identified as the Pitkin Limestone, which is Mississippian. ROCKD ID’d the area as St. Joe’s limestone. This is the item in question. I can’t say that I have seen segmented Bryozoa. The segments aren’t uniform in size. Although, I’m not sure if the segments are endemic or an artifact of being broken. I believe they are breaks. It is about 1.25 inches long and 7 mm wide. Just a slightly zoomed in pic of the same thing. A pic of the end. This is is a pic of the back side of the other side of the plate and other end of it, where there is a cross section honeycomb looking view. Your thoughts and comments would would be greatly appreciated. Kim
  20. Dorchester Cape (July 2018)

    I hadn't blogged in a while, but here's my latest excursion (I have more but I'll have to dig up the information, and some are still pending field work/research) On July 5th I went for a drive down Beaumont, in the Memramcook region in South-Eastern New Brunswick (Canada), to check how bad the road along the coast had eroded with time since the last time I went down there rock picking. I stopped in a few places to check on the rocks down the beach wherever I could go down, and spotted the cliffs of Dorchester Cape across the Memramcook river. Hopped in the car and proceeded to make the short few kilometers trek to the other side. Location indicator shows Dorchester Cape on the map (Google Maps) Location of the cliffs The geology of the area is mostly formed of Upper Carboniferous rocks, and the location I was at is mostly Boss Point formation. The Boss Point formation is also found in Cape Enrage, Rockport, and Upper Joggins, to name a few places. The fossils that I find at the Dorchester Cape site is mostly discombobulate plant material, with dark grey to tan sandstones with some sandy conglomerate boulders lying about. Chunks of gypsum and some Albertite can be seen on the beach, as evaporites abound in the Albert Mines area, and some other unspecified locations in the Memramcook area. Albertite, and then gypsum, were an important part of the local economy, especially in Hillsborough across the river, as the geology of the surrounding area sees large deposits of various evaporites, a relic of the ancient Windsor Sea which would have receeded, giving way to vast forests and rivers. But what was most important for Dorchester Cape was the copper found in the sedimentary rocks. This copper ore, chalcocite, was discovered in the late 1860s and mined until all operations came to a stop before the First Great War. Dorchester Copper Mine. K. Vanderwolf. New Brunswick Museum. From Memramcook, I drove down the 106 towards Dorchester. Once in the village, you take the 935, which is Cape Road, heading towards Dorchester Cape. The road turns into a dirt road about 2 clicks after the train tracks. Turn into the dirt road across the Atlantic Industries Limited business site. Make your way down the road, avoiding pot holes and man made roadblocks, and you'll eventually reach the old wharf. Make your way South (left of the wharf) and head towards the cliffs near Cole Point. Looking back, view of Fort Folly Point slicing Shepody Bay. As we get closer to the rock cliffs, you can already spot coal and petrified wood on the beach. The plant fossils are mostly fragmented, showing signs of turbulence. There's some micro faulting in some places, and large sections of the cliffs are coming down in large segments. Plastered with plants/tree parts (hat for scale) The beach is littered with petrified wood, plant fossils, and chunks of coal. Middle section replaced with orange calcite crystals Some pieces are quite large (dirty hat for scale) Common theme: plants sticking out to catch some Sun One of the few holes where trees used to lie in situ The cliffs have coal seams that can reach a few inches thick. Tree imprint Nice tree sticking out (squished hat for scale) Close to the tree NOT sand (chances of lithification?)
  21. Hi all, My friends recently visited Sydney Mines, Nova Scotia. While they were there they went on a fossil hunt with a geologist who curates the local museum. They were told that they could collect the small, loose stuff, and so brought back plenty of nice fossils. They gave a couple specimens to me, and I’m just wondering about IDing them. There are a lot of Calamites fossils among what they brought back, but I’m having trouble with the rest. I live in the Ordovician and don’t have a lot of experience with Carboniferous flora except finding a few pretties in Pittsburgh. First pic (1) has what they were told is an early seed cone. Can anyone corroborate and specify species? I was looking at Lepidostrobus but the shape seems different. Second pic (2) is one of the fossils they gave me. They thought that the top left might be part of a seed cone but I think it’s Annularia. Thoughts? And are those oval-shaped leaves Pecopteris ? Alethopteris ? And just for fun, I’ll add a couple more pictures (see comments) if anyone wants to have at it. Anyways, thanks!
  22. Alabama veggies?

    So, I'm looking to get a good week-ish long trip in before July. Can't head out to Green River as planned, so I have to stick to the southeast. I have heard quite a bit about Pennsylvanian plants from 'bama, so I've decided to take a trip there while I have the chance. Any pointers as to good localities?
  23. In the last two weeks i have found two new very promising fossil sites. They are on private land that i have permission to be on. And please don't ask where. There are so many things that i have to leave many behind. I hope i am lucky enough to find something truly amazing from these sites and share them with science and ultimately all of us. I believe this to be the first Orthacanthus sp. specimen ever found in this area of Illinois. It would be pretty neat to add this awesome predator to this fauna. As found: After prep: On the same trip i found a bone block associated with crinoids, a Metacoceras, a shark denticle, possible shark cartilage and what i believe are tetrapod bones. Please feel free and let me know what you guys think about the bones. A deep water environment with tetrapod material???? This strangely shaped bone has a thin outer layer on the "ornamental" end, almost like tooth enamel, but it's not thick enough. Continued..........
  24. Saturday was a good day to make a new hunt in my carboniferous sites first site
  25. Been trying to prep what i believe is a Carboniferous shark skeleton and it is just......well.....hair pulling. My severe colorblindness really does not help and my tools are very limited. This is truly a prepping nightmare on such a rare piece. Thinking of just sending this to someone who knows what the heck they are doing. So, anyone deal with cartilage before?
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