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Found 474 results

  1. No opinion

    Hi everybody! Who can recognize what's that? Carboniferous, probably plant.
  2. Coal Formation and Near-global Glaciation

    Feulner, G., 2017. Formation of most of our coal brought Earth close to global glaciation. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 114(43), pp. 11333-11337. Abstract: http://www.pnas.org/content/114/43/11333.short https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29073052 Paper: https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/0b23/8273be5a2b4f06d7fb1e5932b45f731944be.pdf Yours, Paul H.
  3. This 3" specimen was collected out of the Mazon Creek itself, near the Benson Farm. It was collected around 1998 and filed as Problematica. We are finally starting to identify these specimens. It is our specimen number S00051. At first, we thought it might be a shrimp similar to Kellibrooksia Macrogaster, but there isn't much evidence of the proper segmentation, and no legs.
  4. I’ve been running into some cool fossils at my study site in southeastern Ohio recently and thought I’d share some photos. This is deep in the hills of southeastern Ohio and most fossils I’ve seen in the area are weathered sandstone casts/impressions of Lepidodendron/Sigillaria trunks/bark in stream beds. Interestingly, these fossils seem to be clustered in 20-50 meter stream stretches. Pictures below are from one such stream stretch in the lower lying part of the ravine where some chert and limestone start showing up with the sandstone. I would love any additional information folks can provide on these rocks as many are too worn/indistinct. Also, does chert/flint ever contain fossils? The last picture is of a big chunk of chert (I think) that looked like petrified wood sort of to me. I will get around to posting some other/better ones from this area later! image2 by Andrew Hoffman, on Flickr image3 by Andrew Hoffman, on Flickr image4 by Andrew Hoffman, on Flickr image5 by Andrew Hoffman, on Flickr image6 by Andrew Hoffman, on Flickr image1 by Andrew Hoffman, on Flickr
  5. carboniferous Midcontinent

    Concise & clear.What more do you want? algeidcontin143.pdf About 1,5 Mb
  6. Could use some help on these 0.5cm - 1cm invertebrate(?) conical spines in the well known Salem Limestone, a marine limestone of the American Midcontinent. They appear to be solid calcite but do not quite match up with the shapes of crinoid spines and echinoid spines that I know from the Mississippian. I have looked at umpteen Salem Limestone samples but have seen these spines at only one small locality. Any insights appreciated! but please provide your reasoning or evidence.
  7. Fossil Imprints N.S

    Found two pieces of stone this weekend.. would like to know the timeframe and what they are ... if anything other than twigs. Found in Cape Jack, Nova Scotia A Beach on St George's Bay.
  8. Hippocardia herculea (De Koninck 1885)

    Calcified steinkern.
  9. This weekend was the first weekend that the Mazon Creek formation in Braceville, IL was open for collecting. Each year, visitors and avid collectors flock here every spring to gather concretions from this woodland, that potentially hold 300 million year old plants and animals. They are very difficult to find these days. It used to be a coal mine where fossils were gathered by the bucketload. These days, you would be very fortunate to gather 1/2 bucket in a full days collecting. I went the mornings of 3/3 and 3/4, for about 2 hours of collecting each. The haul was a total of 27.8 lbs of potentially fossiliferous material. Only 1/10 of the concretions will hold a good fossil. For my in-the-field trip report you can check out my blog: http://americanfossilhunt.com/2018/03/04/mazon-creek-opener-2018-day-1/ ...there I post some field photos and the day's collecting vibe. Below is what I came home with. Not much to show off in regards to already opened concretions, a few jellyfish and worn out ferns, but the closed ones will hold the treasures. Here is the collecting terrain, at the South Unit, just before the bend in the trail. I also collected the North end of Monster Lake. Here is the ~28lbs in full There were some very nice symmetrical shapes within the finds. Another close up of some of the more promising ones. And the ones that were already opened in the field. Will post updates as these crack open! for now, they are out for processing.... AKA soaking in water for 5 days, then freezing, then thawing, then freezing... for about a dozen times. I was fortunate enough to run into some ESCONI and FF members on my way out on Sunday. I wish it wasnt an early call for me, would have loved to been out there with them! Updating this thread as the finds open, but it may take a week or 2. And will likely be out collecting again before then.
  10. Hi everyone. I recently visited a quarry at the north of Spain (more specifically a geographical area called "El Bierzo", famous for its fossils from the carboniferous era) and I found this one, which looks like tree bark with some particular marks. I have found several well preserved fossils at the same quarry but I will upload the pictures later. I have been looking for information about this one in particular but I haven't found out what type of tree it is, has anybody seen this before? Thank you very much!
  11. Carboniferous Nut?

    After hunting through some loose sediment a few days ago, I dug up something that looks very much like an acorn/nut at first glance. I come across lots of compressed plant material and the occasional 3D fossil, but this is a pretty unique one. The area is very close to a soft rock site of Duckmantian deposits from Carboniferous limestone in north Wales, UK. I can't find much to identify exactly what it might be....so over to you guys!
  12. Coal mountain

    I went back today to my fav coal mountain (not after war but before Christmas ;)) Santa was very generous before time have a Merry Christmas!
  13. Tiny gastropod for id

    Hi. Found this small guy on the beach in Galway , Ireland. Upper Visean it's all I can say because beach find. Diameter is 8.2 mm. 4 whorls plain surface. I doubt it's Glabrocingulum sp. It's more like recent Natica shells. Any ideas?
  14. stratigraphic problem.

    Hi. Around year ago I was exploring the area around Lough Hackett 20 km north from Galway. I found few fossils on the shore with much different fauna than typical late Visean fauna in Co. Galway. The main problem here is stratigraphy. It's similar to british Avon group of Mendips. I think all of them are Tournaisian. Fig1. Large piece of iron-stained black crinoidal limestone.
  15. Carboniferous tree fern

    Two days ago I bought this nice fossil for a very convenient price at a local shop. Unfortunately, the seller could not remember key informations about this specimen, but he told me that it probably was Pecopteris and came from Germany. I want to identify it for a proper display alongside my other Carboniferous fossils, but I need again some help from a more experienced collector. In my opinion it is very similar, if not identical, to an other Acitheca (Pecopteris) polymorpha specimen I previously identified on an old topic thanks to this wonderful community. It may be the same plant, but I'm not sure. I am also skeptical about its German origin, is it reliable? Here is the upper side of the fossil: Pinnules detail from the other side (not exceptional quality, but I tried to make them more clear with a flashlight) Thanks in advance for your help!
  16. Fern non det.

    From the album Plants

    Fern non det. Upper Carboniferous Llewellyn Formation St. Clair Pennsylvania USA
  17. Fern non det.

    From the album Plants

    Fern non det. Upper Carboniferous Llewellyn Formation St. Clair Pennsylvania USA
  18. Mystery Petalodont

    I found this little tooth a few months ago in the Coal Measures (Westphalian A) of Scotland in a fresh/brackish water deposit and thought it might be a Janassa sp. of some sort but now I'm not so sure, the only other Petalodont genus's I'm aware of in the British Coal Measures are Ageleodus and Ctenoptychius but they both have multicuspid crowns, the tooth is in labial view and is 11mm across. Any thoughts would be greatly appreciated!
  19. I've not had a chance to post my finds here in a while but over the past few months I've found some new specimens of Lower Carboniferous/Mississippian marine shark teeth I wanted to share! These were collected at various sites in the Midland Valley of Scotland from the Blackhall Limestone, an extensive formation with interesting variations in fauna at each different locality. Ctenoptychius sp. Anterior tooth in lingual view, 6mmx7mm.
  20. CORAL COLONY

    Now, i found this when i was seven or eight years old, on the cut down to the beach at Kilve in Somerset, South West England. It was buried in a band of blue/ grey clay in the Psiloceras planorbis zone of the Blue Lias , Lower Jurassic. Although i'd found many lovely fossils before this was my first exceptional, "WOW!" find. I still don't know what it is and that was 45 years ago. A colonial coral colony yes, but i don't think it can be Liassic? A derived fossil from the Devonian or Carboniferous seems likely, but which one? And it shows very little signs of having been transported huge distances, as it's quite a way to the nearest relevant outcrops of those ages. Here it is :
  21. Alright everyone I'm pretty excited about this one. It's about an inch long and 1 1/2 inches wide.
  22. Palaeoniscidae indet

    From the album Vertebrates

    Palaeoniscidae indet. "Bigeye" Early Carboniferous Serpukhovian Heath Shale Formation Bear Gulch Fergus County Montana USA
  23. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    FOSSIL STEM CALAMITES SITE LOCATION: Westphalian deposits in the area around Mons in Belgium TIME PERIOD: Carboniferous (311-315 Million Years Ago) Data: Calamites is a genus of extinct arborescent (tree-like) horsetails to which the modern horsetails (genus Equisetum) are closely related. Unlike their herbaceous modern cousins, these plants were medium-sized trees, growing to heights of more than 30 meters (100 feet). They were components of the understories of coal swamps of the Carboniferous Period (around 360 to 300 million years ago). A number of organ taxa have been identified as part of a united organism, which has inherited the name Calamites in popular culture. Calamites correctly refers only to casts of the stem of Carboniferous/Permian sphenophytes, and as such is a form genus of little taxonomic value. There are two forms of casts, which can give mistaken impressions of the organisms. The most common is an internal cast of the hollow (or pith-filled) void in the centre of the trunk. This can cause some confusion: firstly, it must be remembered that a fossil was probably surrounded with 4-5 times its width in (unpreserved) vascular tissue, so the organisms were much wider than the internal casts preserved. Further, the fossil gets narrower as it attaches to a rhizoid, a place where one would expect there to be the highest concentration of vascular tissue (as this is where the peak transport occurs). However, because the fossil is a cast, the narrowing in fact represents a constriction of the cavity, into which vascular tubes encroach as they widen. The trunks of Calamites had a distinctive segmented, bamboo-like appearance and vertical ribbing. The branches, leaves and cones were all borne in whorls. The leaves were needle-shaped, with up to 25 per whorl. Their trunks produced secondary xylem, meaning they were made of wood. The vascular cambium of Calamites was unifacial, producing secondary xylem towards the stem center, but not secondary phloem. The stems of modern horsetails are typically hollow or contain numerous elongated air-filled sacs. Calamites was similar in that its trunk and stems were hollow, like wooden tubes. When these trunks buckled and broke, they could fill with sediment. This is the reason pith casts of the inside of Calamites stems are so common as fossils. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Pteridophyta Class: Equisetopsida Order: Equisetales Family: †Calamitaceae Genus: †Calamites
  24. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    FOSSIL STEM CALAMITES SITE LOCATION: Westphalian deposits in the area around Mons in Belgium TIME PERIOD: Carboniferous (311-315 Million Years Ago) Data: Calamites is a genus of extinct arborescent (tree-like) horsetails to which the modern horsetails (genus Equisetum) are closely related. Unlike their herbaceous modern cousins, these plants were medium-sized trees, growing to heights of more than 30 meters (100 feet). They were components of the understories of coal swamps of the Carboniferous Period (around 360 to 300 million years ago). A number of organ taxa have been identified as part of a united organism, which has inherited the name Calamites in popular culture. Calamites correctly refers only to casts of the stem of Carboniferous/Permian sphenophytes, and as such is a form genus of little taxonomic value. There are two forms of casts, which can give mistaken impressions of the organisms. The most common is an internal cast of the hollow (or pith-filled) void in the centre of the trunk. This can cause some confusion: firstly, it must be remembered that a fossil was probably surrounded with 4-5 times its width in (unpreserved) vascular tissue, so the organisms were much wider than the internal casts preserved. Further, the fossil gets narrower as it attaches to a rhizoid, a place where one would expect there to be the highest concentration of vascular tissue (as this is where the peak transport occurs). However, because the fossil is a cast, the narrowing in fact represents a constriction of the cavity, into which vascular tubes encroach as they widen. The trunks of Calamites had a distinctive segmented, bamboo-like appearance and vertical ribbing. The branches, leaves and cones were all borne in whorls. The leaves were needle-shaped, with up to 25 per whorl. Their trunks produced secondary xylem, meaning they were made of wood. The vascular cambium of Calamites was unifacial, producing secondary xylem towards the stem center, but not secondary phloem. The stems of modern horsetails are typically hollow or contain numerous elongated air-filled sacs. Calamites was similar in that its trunk and stems were hollow, like wooden tubes. When these trunks buckled and broke, they could fill with sediment. This is the reason pith casts of the inside of Calamites stems are so common as fossils. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Pteridophyta Class: Equisetopsida Order: Equisetales Family: †Calamitaceae Genus: †Calamites
  25. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    FOSSIL STEM CALAMITES SITE LOCATION: Westphalian deposits in the area around Mons in Belgium TIME PERIOD: Carboniferous (311-315 Million Years Ago) Data: Calamites is a genus of extinct arborescent (tree-like) horsetails to which the modern horsetails (genus Equisetum) are closely related. Unlike their herbaceous modern cousins, these plants were medium-sized trees, growing to heights of more than 30 meters (100 feet). They were components of the understories of coal swamps of the Carboniferous Period (around 360 to 300 million years ago). A number of organ taxa have been identified as part of a united organism, which has inherited the name Calamites in popular culture. Calamites correctly refers only to casts of the stem of Carboniferous/Permian sphenophytes, and as such is a form genus of little taxonomic value. There are two forms of casts, which can give mistaken impressions of the organisms. The most common is an internal cast of the hollow (or pith-filled) void in the centre of the trunk. This can cause some confusion: firstly, it must be remembered that a fossil was probably surrounded with 4-5 times its width in (unpreserved) vascular tissue, so the organisms were much wider than the internal casts preserved. Further, the fossil gets narrower as it attaches to a rhizoid, a place where one would expect there to be the highest concentration of vascular tissue (as this is where the peak transport occurs). However, because the fossil is a cast, the narrowing in fact represents a constriction of the cavity, into which vascular tubes encroach as they widen. The trunks of Calamites had a distinctive segmented, bamboo-like appearance and vertical ribbing. The branches, leaves and cones were all borne in whorls. The leaves were needle-shaped, with up to 25 per whorl. Their trunks produced secondary xylem, meaning they were made of wood. The vascular cambium of Calamites was unifacial, producing secondary xylem towards the stem center, but not secondary phloem. The stems of modern horsetails are typically hollow or contain numerous elongated air-filled sacs. Calamites was similar in that its trunk and stems were hollow, like wooden tubes. When these trunks buckled and broke, they could fill with sediment. This is the reason pith casts of the inside of Calamites stems are so common as fossils. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Pteridophyta Class: Equisetopsida Order: Equisetales Family: †Calamitaceae Genus: †Calamites
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