Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'carboniferous'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
    Tags should be keywords or key phrases. e.g. carcharodon, pliocene, cypresshead formation, florida.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Fossil Discussion
    • General Fossil Discussion
    • Fossil Hunting Trips
    • Fossil ID
    • Is It Real? How to Recognize Fossil Fabrications
    • Partners in Paleontology - Member Contributions to Science
    • Questions & Answers
    • Fossil of the Month
    • Member Collections
    • A Trip to the Museum
    • Paleo Re-creations
    • Collecting Gear
    • Fossil Preparation
    • Member Fossil Trades Bulletin Board
    • Member-to-Member Fossil Sales
    • Fossil News
  • Gallery
  • Fossil Sites
    • Africa
    • Asia
    • Australia - New Zealand
    • Canada
    • Europe
    • Middle East
    • South America
    • United States
  • Fossil Media
    • Members Websites
    • Fossils On The Web
    • Fossil Photography
    • Fossil Literature
    • Documents

Blogs

  • Anson's Blog
  • Mudding Around
  • Nicholas' Blog
  • dinosaur50's Blog
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • Seldom's Blog
  • tracer's tidbits
  • Sacredsin's Blog
  • fossilfacetheprospector's Blog
  • jax world
  • echinoman's Blog
  • Ammonoidea
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • Adventures with a Paddle
  • Caveat emptor
  • -------
  • Fig Rocks' Blog
  • placoderms
  • mosasaurs
  • ozzyrules244's Blog
  • Sir Knightia's Blog
  • Terry Dactyll's Blog
  • shakinchevy2008's Blog
  • MaHa's Blog
  • Stratio's Blog
  • ROOKMANDON's Blog
  • Phoenixflood's Blog
  • Brett Breakin' Rocks' Blog
  • Seattleguy's Blog
  • jkfoam's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Lindsey's Blog
  • marksfossils' Blog
  • ibanda89's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Back of Beyond
  • St. Johns River Shark Teeth/Florida
  • Ameenah's Blog
  • gordon's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • Pennsylvania Perspectives
  • michigantim's Blog
  • michigantim's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • GPeach129's Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • Olenellus' Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • maybe a nest fossil?
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • bear-dog's Blog
  • javidal's Blog
  • Digging America
  • John Sun's Blog
  • John Sun's Blog
  • Ravsiden's Blog
  • Jurassic park
  • The Hunt for Fossils
  • The Fury's Grand Blog
  • julie's ??
  • Hunt'n 'odonts!
  • falcondob's Blog
  • Monkeyfuss' Blog
  • cyndy's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • nola's Blog
  • mercyrcfans88's Blog
  • Emily's PRI Adventure
  • trilobite guy's Blog
  • xenacanthus' Blog
  • barnes' Blog
  • myfossiltrips.blogspot.com
  • HeritageFossils' Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Emily's MotE Adventure
  • farfarawy's Blog
  • Microfossil Mania!
  • A Novice Geologist
  • Southern Comfort
  • Eli's Blog
  • andreas' Blog
  • Recent Collecting Trips
  • retired blog
  • Stocksdale's Blog
  • andreas' Blog test
  • fossilman7's Blog
  • Hey Everyone :P
  • fossil maniac's Blog
  • Piranha Blog
  • xonenine's blog
  • xonenine's Blog
  • Fossil collecting and SAFETY
  • Detrius
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Kehbe's Kwips
  • RomanK's Blog
  • Prehistoric Planet Trilogy
  • mikeymig's Blog
  • Western NY Explorer's Blog
  • Regg Cato's Blog
  • VisionXray23's Blog
  • Carcharodontosaurus' Blog
  • What is the largest dragonfly fossil? What are the top contenders?
  • Hihimanu Hale
  • Test Blog
  • jsnrice's blog
  • Lise MacFadden's Poetry Blog
  • BluffCountryFossils Adventure Blog
  • meadow's Blog
  • Makeing The Unlikley Happen
  • KansasFossilHunter's Blog
  • DarrenElliot's Blog
  • jesus' Blog
  • A Mesozoic Mosaic
  • Dinosaur comic
  • Zookeeperfossils
  • Cameronballislife31's Blog
  • My Blog
  • TomKoss' Blog
  • A guide to calcanea and astragali
  • Group Blog Test
  • Paleo Rantings of a Blockhead
  • Dead Dino is Art
  • The Amber Blog
  • TyrannosaurusRex's Facts
  • PaleoWilliam's Blog
  • The Paleo-Tourist
  • The Community Post
  • Lyndon D Agate Johnson's Blog
  • BRobinson7's Blog
  • Eastern NC Trip Reports
  • Toofuntahh's Blog
  • Pterodactyl's Blog
  • A Beginner's Foray into Fossiling
  • Micropaleontology blog
  • Pondering on Dinosaurs
  • Fossil Preparation Blog
  • On Dinosaurs and Media
  • cheney416's fossil story
  • jpc
  • Red-Headed Red-Neck Rock-Hound w/ My Trusty HellHound Cerberus
  • Red Headed
  • Paleo-Profiles
  • Walt's Blog
  • Between A Rock And A Hard Place
  • Rudist digging at "Point 25", St. Bartholomä, Styria, Austria (Campanian, Gosau-group)
  • Prognathodon saturator 101

Calendars

  • Calendar

Categories

  • Annelids
  • Arthropods
    • Crustaceans
    • Insects
    • Trilobites
    • Other Arthropods
  • Brachiopods
  • Cnidarians (Corals, Jellyfish, Conulariids )
    • Corals
    • Jellyfish, Conulariids, etc.
  • Echinoderms
    • Crinoids & Blastoids
    • Echinoids
    • Other Echinoderms
    • Starfish and Brittlestars
  • Forams
  • Graptolites
  • Molluscs
    • Bivalves
    • Cephalopods (Ammonites, Belemnites, Nautiloids)
    • Gastropods
    • Other Molluscs
  • Sponges
  • Bryozoans
  • Other Invertebrates
  • Ichnofossils
  • Plants
  • Chordata
    • Amphibians & Reptiles
    • Birds
    • Dinosaurs
    • Fishes
    • Mammals
    • Sharks & Rays
    • Other Chordates
  • *Pseudofossils ( Inorganic objects , markings, or impressions that resemble fossils.)

Found 555 results

  1. Trigonocarpus3a.jpg

    From the album Carboniferous Plant Fossils in My Collection

    This is another large Trigonocarpus from St. Clair, which is contained intact in the shale substrate. The entire seed is visible.
  2. Trigonocarpus3b.jpg

    From the album Carboniferous Plant Fossils in My Collection

    This is another view of the same Trigonocarpus, this view showing the open end of the seed. Seeds of seed ferns - this was probably from Medullosa - had open ends to allow pollen to enter. It is thought they were fertilized by pollen when they dropped into the water although a few paleobiologists believe insects may have pollinated them through the opening. Also why were the seeds encased in a fruit like covering (like avocados)? To be consumed by creatures that lived in the shallow swamp water?
  3. From the album Carboniferous Plant Fossils in My Collection

    This 2 inch Trigonocarpus is a seed of a Medullosa (pteridosperms seed plants) which grew in shallow swamps abour 306-308 million years ago when St. Clair, PA was located near the Equator. Leaves associated with this seed & tree include Alethopteris and Neuropteris. It is thought that these seeds were encased in fleshy "fruit" like an avocado. The seeds were open at the pointed end to allow pollen to enter when the seeds dropped into the water in the shallow swamps where these trees grew. These were the largest Carboniferous seeds, growing up to 4 inches.
  4. Can also be found in Mazon Creek. Lit.: F. R. Schram (1979): Worms of the Mississippian Bear Gulch Limestone of central Montana, USA. Transactions of the San Diego Society of Natural History. Volume 19, No 9, pp 107-120
  5. Grand Canyon Paleontology

    Hey y'all, hope you're all having a good time! This recently published report by Hodnett & Elliott (2018) describes two fairly diverse chondrichthyan faunas from the late Mississippian/early Pennsylvanian of western Grand Canyon (Arizona). The assemblages, from 2 separate formations, are described on the basis of quite many tooth specimens, and other material (i.e. denticles). Differences between those faunas and other similar-aged Euro-American faunas indicate paleogeographical implications relating to the formation of Pangaea. Hodnett, J. P. M., & Elliott, D. K. (2018). Carboniferous chondrichthyan assemblages from the Surprise Canyon and Watahomigi formations (latest Mississippian–Early Pennsylvanian) of the western Grand Canyon, Northern Arizona. Journal of Paleontology, 92(S77), 1-33. Abstract: Two chondrichthyan assemblages of Late Mississippian/Early Pennsylvanian age are now recognized from the western Grand Canyon of northern Arizona. The latest Serpukhovian Surprise Canyon Formation has yielded thirty one taxa from teeth and dermal elements, which include members of the Phoebodontiformes, Symmoriiformes, Bransonelliformes, Ctenacanthiformes, Protacrodontoidea, Hybodontiformes, Neoselachii (Anachronistidae), Paraselachii (Gregoriidae, Deeberiidae, Orodontiformes, and Eugeneodontiformes), Petalodontiformes, and Holocephali. The euselachian grade taxa are remarkably diverse with four new taxa recognized here; the Protacrodontidae: Microklomax carrieae new genus new species and Novaculodus billingsleyi new genus new species, and the Anchronistidae: Cooleyella platera new species and Amaradontus santucii new genus new species. The Surprise Canyon assemblage also has the youngest occurrence of the elasmobranch Clairina, previously only known from the Upper Devonian. The Surprise Canyon Formation represents a nearshore fluvial infilling of karstic channels, followed by a shallow marine bioherm reef, and finally deeper open water deposition. The early Bashkirian Watahomigi Formation represents open marine deposition and contains only two taxa: a new xenacanthiform, Hokomata parva new genus new species, and the holocephalan Deltodus. The relationship between the Surprise Canyon and Watahomigi chondrichthyan assemblages and other significant coeval chondrichthyan assemblages suggests that there may have been eastern and western distinctions among the Euamerican assemblages during the Serpukhovian due to geographic separation by the formation of Pangea. Here's the paper Hodnett & Elliott 2018 Grand Canyon chondr. fauna.pdf Happy New Year to you all!! -Christian
  6. I was surprised to see this specimen for auction and pleased to win it. It's Anguloserra thomasi, a rare tooth from an ophiocistioid echinoderm and comes from the same locality as the holotype described here (abstract only): Haude & Langenstrassen 1976. I've been interested in these since finding three similar specimens in the UK that took a while to identify - shown in the next post. It's preserved as an impression - most material in this matrix is decalcified. Carboniferous, upper Mississippian, Culm beds (equivalent of Brigantian and Arnsbergian beds in UK), Aprath, Germany. Scale in mm. Here's the holotype from the linked paper (a latex cast):
  7. I went saturday on my fav carbobiniferous sites to find few fossils,a lot of mud and water,but few good rewards
  8. Small Pinnules

    In a previous post i showed some finds from the British Coal Measures of Derbyshire , this is a small nodule from there it measures 21mm long x 12mm wide and the longest pinnule is just 4mm . I have tried to show it's size in these 4 pictures. and just so you don't get bored looking at the same fossil here is a.... Asterophyllites Equisetiformis Cheers John
  9. Montana, a shortish faunal review

    EASTON W.H.Easton: Carboniferous Faunas and Formation of Central Montana A study of the stratigraphic and ecologic associations and significance of fossils from the Big Snowy group of Mississippian and Pennsylvanian rocks Geological suvey Proferssional paper n.348/1962 Number of pages 157 PLATE two: stratidistribplate-2.pdf PLATE ONE(correlation/logs) plate-1.pdf to be used with some care with regard to (at least)the taxonomic aspects
  10. Mazon Creek fossil plants: Part 1

    Hi guys! Long story short, a rather large collection of Mazon Creek fossils has been donated to my university. I thought I'd share some pictures of the collection and confirm some preliminary identifications. There are a lot of specimens so I will probably split this into two posts. Annularia radiata Annularia stellata A whole bunch of Annularia stellata?
  11. This morning a paper was published about a find I made a couple of years ago. Beckemeyer-Engel-2018-Archaemegatptilus (1).pdf
  12. Pit spoil finds

    Some spoil finds from a few outings into the British Coal measures of Derbyshire. Sphenophyllum Emarginatum Mariopteris more finds too follow.........
  13. Fossil or geological?

    A friend of mine recently brought some property southwest of Brownwood, Texas. The land is largely Pennsylvanian. The formation is Garner, which he says the description says it is marine with megafauna. He sent me these pics (below) this morning. He found this last week. He said it was just laying on the ground and didn’t see the source of it nearby. At first I thought it looked like some weird type of wood I had never seen before, but now I’m wondering if it could be geological. I have requested an end view, side and back side pics of it. He won’t be able to get them till this evening though. I think it’s pretty cool looking whatever it is. I appreciate your thoughts and comments on it.
  14. Trilobites from Belgian carbonates

    hahncarboniflimestrilobitefaciesecolgeogrdistributbsbg_nr97_1988_077-093.pdf The Biostratigraphical distribution of Carboniferous Limestone Trilobites in Belgium and Adjacent Areas Bulletin de La Societe Belge de Geologie,T.97,fasc.1,1988 outtake(one of several pretty nice line drawings): size: about 2,9 MB
  15. very old news

    LINK A Peach*:Monograph of the Higher Crustacea of the Carboniferous Rocks of Scotland memoirs of the Geological Survey of Great Britain/Paleontology Published : 1908 *EUHHH:unintentional pun? 5,12 Mb,or thereabouts Localities:Glencartholm,Granton "editorial note": Granton is a bit of a lagerstatt,but curiously enough I'm somehow hesitant about adding that to the tags
  16. Fish Tooth?

    Was up at Lake St. Clair, NSW looking for late(?) Carboniferous marine fossils and came across this thing. I am thinking that its a fish tooth but not too sure as no vertebrate material has been reported from the site to my knowledge. Please let me know if clearer photos are needed This specimen is aprox. 7 mm long Thanks,
  17. Hello everyone! I found this specimen also in a creek on a walk through a local park north of Pittsburgh. Thinking it may be a burrow fossil, but if it is, was wondering if there is an actual scientific name for it, so I know how to file it away accordingly under the proper name. Found the term Cruziana online, and wondering if this would qualify. Does anyone have any opinions? Or, if it is a burrow, is there any way of narrowing down what might have made it i.e. trilobites/arthropods etc? Details: 1) Found in isolation/there were no other similar pieces nearby. 2) Measures about 8-12 inches long. Burrow notches are about the width of a penny. 3) Again, found in Carboniferous territory in Western Pennsylvania found in a creek. Thanks everyone!
  18. Reticycloceras sp.

    From the album Invertebrates

    Reticycloceras sp. Early Carboniferous Serpukhovian Heath Shale Formation Bear Gulch Montana USA
  19. Carbondale PA

    Hello everyone! I am in the process of investigating the fossil site in Carbondale PA but can't seem to find the exact place where to go or any directions, there were some things I saw on the forum but they look like they are on private property. If anybody knows about it new insight would be greatly appreciated. Thank you.
  20. Arthropleura

    Width = 8 cm (field of view).
  21. Diplotmema dissectum

    Scale on photograph. The following classification scheme was adopted: Anderson, J.M., Anderson, H.M., and Cleal, C.J. (2007), Brief history of the gymnosperms: classification, biodiversity, phytogeography and ecology, Strelitzia 20, South African National Biodiversity Institute, Pretoria (LINK).
  22. Coral?

    I found it near Chelyabinsk limestone quarry
  23. Just reassembled, crinoid stem with a bit of character. Probably Poteriocrinus sp., or maybe Rhabdocrinus, 20cm long, 10-12mm diameter, in a high energy deposit full of crinoid, bryozoan and brachiopod débris. It's unusually well articulated for this bed which mostly contains smaller broken bits of stems, arms and plates. There's a probably pathological swelling towards the top, above the radices. Last photo shows it as collected - very fragile and the main stem had largely broken into calcite cleavage fragments. Prepping so far was just a matter of letting it dry, then gluing, poking off shale with a needle and scrubbing (wet again) with a toothbrush. I'm letting it dry thoroughly and will then consolidate the sides and base of the block with thin paraloid solution. I might then air abrade a bit. Brigantian, Co. Durham, UK.
  24. Rockin' Ric's Website Collection

    Hello Y'all! It's been awhile since I posted anything on The Fossil Forum. I have been able to put together a website of my collection which is still a work in progress. I will be adding more pictures and making more changes as I go along. Please check it out. I went Carboniferous fossil hunting last week but haven't had the chance to post any of the finds much less than wash them to get them ready to photograph. Stay tuned? www.rockinric81.wixsite.com/fossils
  25. St. Clair Fossils

    Hi fossil friends - I've been away from the board for a couple of years, settling into retirement, now getting back to some fossil fun. I'm sorting through my St. Clair inventory which is now pretty large since that was where my wife and I did most of our collecting when the site was still open. So now I have quite a few plant fossils and am organizing and prepping them - not sure what I'll do with them. These two items are the last fossils we collected from St. Clair before they closed the site - the large one is 25 inches long and was cut by someone (probably the idiots who ruined the site access). Most pieces are smaller and individual specimens. I'm organizing, labeling and putting in Riker mounts now. Interested in any suggestions how to proceed? I also have a collection of unique mangal shoots we collected at a secret site in central New York which are unique and probably somewhat rare.
×