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Found 538 results

  1. Hello everyone! I found this specimen also in a creek on a walk through a local park north of Pittsburgh. Thinking it may be a burrow fossil, but if it is, was wondering if there is an actual scientific name for it, so I know how to file it away accordingly under the proper name. Found the term Cruziana online, and wondering if this would qualify. Does anyone have any opinions? Or, if it is a burrow, is there any way of narrowing down what might have made it i.e. trilobites/arthropods etc? Details: 1) Found in isolation/there were no other similar pieces nearby. 2) Measures about 8-12 inches long. Burrow notches are about the width of a penny. 3) Again, found in Carboniferous territory in Western Pennsylvania found in a creek. Thanks everyone!
  2. Reticycloceras sp.

    From the album Invertebrates

    Reticycloceras sp. Early Carboniferous Serpukhovian Heath Shale Formation Bear Gulch Montana USA
  3. Carbondale PA

    Hello everyone! I am in the process of investigating the fossil site in Carbondale PA but can't seem to find the exact place where to go or any directions, there were some things I saw on the forum but they look like they are on private property. If anybody knows about it new insight would be greatly appreciated. Thank you.
  4. Arthropleura

    Width = 8 cm (field of view).
  5. Diplotmema dissectum

    Scale on photograph. The following classification scheme was adopted: Anderson, J.M., Anderson, H.M., and Cleal, C.J. (2007), Brief history of the gymnosperms: classification, biodiversity, phytogeography and ecology, Strelitzia 20, South African National Biodiversity Institute, Pretoria (LINK).
  6. Coral?

    I found it near Chelyabinsk limestone quarry
  7. Just reassembled, crinoid stem with a bit of character. Probably Poteriocrinus sp., or maybe Rhabdocrinus, 20cm long, 10-12mm diameter, in a high energy deposit full of crinoid, bryozoan and brachiopod débris. It's unusually well articulated for this bed which mostly contains smaller broken bits of stems, arms and plates. There's a probably pathological swelling towards the top, above the radices. Last photo shows it as collected - very fragile and the main stem had largely broken into calcite cleavage fragments. Prepping so far was just a matter of letting it dry, then gluing, poking off shale with a needle and scrubbing (wet again) with a toothbrush. I'm letting it dry thoroughly and will then consolidate the sides and base of the block with thin paraloid solution. I might then air abrade a bit. Brigantian, Co. Durham, UK.
  8. Rockin' Ric's Website Collection

    Hello Y'all! It's been awhile since I posted anything on The Fossil Forum. I have been able to put together a website of my collection which is still a work in progress. I will be adding more pictures and making more changes as I go along. Please check it out. I went Carboniferous fossil hunting last week but haven't had the chance to post any of the finds much less than wash them to get them ready to photograph. Stay tuned? www.rockinric81.wixsite.com/fossils
  9. St. Clair Fossils

    Hi fossil fiends - I've been away from the board for a couple of years, settling into retirement, now getting back to some fossil fun. I'm sorting through my St. Clair inventory which is now pretty large since that was where my wife and I did most of our collecting when the site was still open. So now I have quite a few plant fossils and am organizing and prepping them - not sure what I'll do with them, maybe offer a few for sale although I don't need the income so not doing it for profit if I do this. These two items are the last fossils we collected from St. Clair before they closed the site - the large one is 25 inches long and was cut by someone (probably the idiots who ruined the site access). Most pieces are smaller and individual specimens. I'm organizing, labeling and putting in Riker mounts now. Interested in any suggestions how to proceed? I also have a collection of unique mangal shoots we collected at a secret site in central New York which are unique and probably somewhat rare.
  10. Unknown cave fossil

    In situ fossil (?) in roof of the UK cave. Carboniferous limestone. Anyone know what this might be. its around 18 inches in diameter. thanks
  11. Late Carboniferous fish or Tetrapod bit?

    Just finished the prep on this guy. When i first found this i thought it was a jaw. Now after it's finished it looks more like a possible pectoral girdle or gill plate/skull element from a lobed finned fish/tetrapod. What do you guys see? I can not find anything like it on thee ol' interwebs. It's late Carboniferous and i have found everything from micro to large fish scales, flora, Orthacanthus teeth and other bone chunks in this same layer. Also there is a neat impression of a Lepidodendron on the underside of this piece. Kinda a nice touch when fish were evolving to walk on land. And pictures really don't do this thing justice. It's very detailed and three dimensional. As Found After some prep and still thinking 'jaw' Finished prep. It's not a jaw. Haha Lepidodendron Any help or direction is much appreicated! @Fossildude19 @Archie @jdp @Carl any thoughts?
  12. I'm happy to announce i possibly found the most complete Listracanthus to date. And we may finally get a proper ID for this strange creature. I thought this was regurgitation, but while prepping i believe i ran into cartilage. So i will stop prepping and give this to a professional, or at least let someone with more experience look at this. Unfortunately the rest is in a giant wall of black shale that i won't be able to get back to until next Spring/Summer. The denticles are up to 6mm thick and associated with smaller denticles. I will get more pictures under a scope when i get a chance. God willing i will recover the rest of this creature in 2019. Happy hunting! Possible cartilage
  13. I found this large fish scale from the late Carboniferous. When i originally found this i thought it was a shark crush tooth, but after more and more prep it turned out to be a large fish scale that i can not identify. Any help or direction is much appreciated. The scale is about 21mm x 24mm As found with a bit of prep. After prep under 10x stereoscope
  14. Megalichthys Linocut Print

    On finding a Megalichthys scale fossil from the Late Carboniferous in my local stream I designed, carved and printed a lino-block of the carnivorous freshwater fish. In the same slab of rock that the scale was found were Lepidodendron and Calamites fossils that would have been deposited at the bottom of the coal swamp. I would like to have thought of this fish hiding in the murky waters alongside these plants and I based my reconstruction on this. I plan to do a series of three including Rhizodopsis and Rhabdoderma, alongside their respective surrounding vegetation. Credit where credit is due the general proportions and pose of the fish are based on a reconstruction by ДиБгд as seen on Megalichthys' Wikipedia page.
  15. Mazon Creek ID

    An unknown I found at Braidwood, IL, Mazon Creek material. Forgot scale but about 2" wide and 1" long. It was in a marine area.
  16. LINK Sedimentary context and palaeoecology of Gigantoproductus shell beds in the Mississippian Eyam Limestone Formation, Derbyshire carbonate platform, central England L. S. P. Nolan1*, L. Angiolini2, F. Jadoul2, G. Della Porta2, S. J. Davies1, V. J. Banks3, M. H. Stephenson3 & M. J. Leng4,5 Proceedings of the Yorkshire Geological Society Published online July 25, 2017 https://doi.org/10.1144/pygs2017-393 | Vol. 61 | 2017 | pp. 239–257 ABOUT 12 MB,RECOMMENDED,not in the least for all those interested in the Carboniferous("Dinantian")of Europe and brachiopod ecology
  17. Graissessac

    HI, as some of you knows i went in the South of France, at Graissessac and found some fossil of plants (French Carboniferous). I believe some of them are Pecopteris : (or Alethopteris for this one ?)
  18. Edestus teeth

    From the album Sharks and fish

    The shark relative is genus of eugenodontia holocephalid from the Carboniferous-Pennsylvanian age Anna shale formation, Carbondale group, found in different Illinois coal mines. I dont know(yet)which mine these were found in. This unidentified species is of the "vorax-serratus- crenulatus-heinrichi" or "E. heinrichi group", with the teeth being more of a standard triangular shape, as opposed to being thinner and pointed at a forward angle as in the "E. minor" group http://www.thefossilforum.com/applications/core/interface/file/attachment.php?id=501751
  19. This afternoon I was able to shoot down to North Attleborough to spend a few hours digging through carboniferous aged rock outcrops. It was a nice change of pace from my usual spots down in Rhode Island! The plant fossils here also preserve much better. My favorite find of the day was a plate covered in various Neuropterids. I'll have to explore southern MA more.
  20. Mazonia 2018 short (re)view

    http://jgs.lyellcollection.org/content/jgs/early/2018/07/30/jgs2018-088.full.pdf. THIS IS: The Mazon Creek Lagerstätte: a diverse late Palaeozoic ecosystem entombed within siderite concretions View ORCID ProfileThomas Clements, View ORCID ProfileMark Purnell and Sarah Gabbott Journal of the Geological Society, https://doi.org/10.1144/jgs2018-088 about 2,1 MB and the usual JGSL quality
  21. Lovenechinus lacazei (Julien) (most likely this species but I'm not sure if there's really enough diagnostic detail). Lower Carboniferous, probably Tournaisian. Very rare anyway but of especial interest as it is from the Jurassic Doulting Stone (Bajocian, Inferior Oolite) of Somerset, UK. This is a limestone full of Carboniferous detritus, formed when the Jurassic sea was washing up against the Mendip Hills Carboniferous high ground. (Just acquired via a dealer from an old collection that included Carboniferous coral and crinoid fragments from the same location. No other echinoids though!) 2.3cm across
  22. Good afternoon everybody! During a fieldtrip in Silesia (Poland) last year I visited a rather large spoiltip looking for plant fossils. The spoils left behind by the mining company indicate they still use (or used) the old method to separate the coal from the surrounding debris, allowing the coal to be 'baked' (e. g. the presence of pyrite that turns into sulphuric acid -h2so4- under the influence of wind and rain, ...) something typical for the majority of spoiltips I visited in Western Europe. Unfortunately I have no detailed geological data on the age of the debris in the spoiltip but there is no doubt this is Silesian (upper Carboniferous) in age. I even tend to think this is Westphalian in age based on the fossils found, but let's keep it to upper Carboniferous to be sure. I found several species of Lepidodendron, some Eusphenopterids, both Stigmaria ficoides and S. stellata, etc... And this never-seen-before 'thing'. My initial thought was that this could be some sort stem/branch but, in my 20 years of collecting Paleozoic plants, I have never seen the repetative triangular pattern that covers the branch (or tube if you like). Perhaps this could be some sort of tracefossil? Since my ichnofossil-knowledge is extremely limited someone here can help me out? The height of the 'tubes' varies between 2 and 3mm. Have a nice day! Sven
  23. I was a lucky recipient of a wonderfully CRAPPY package from @Nimravis a couple of months ago. Now I need some educating. 1. The only recognizable inclusions in this coprolite are plant fragments, most of which appear to be woody debris. There is one relatively intact "leaf?" that may be recognizable to some of you experienced Mazon Creek folks. My educated guess is it is from a lycopod. Can anyone confirm this. From what I have read, the only herbivores large enough to have produced a mass of this size are Arthropleura, the giant millipede arthropods. How exciting is that!?! 2. This one looks like some sort of stem fragment. Would this be from a lycopod as well?
  24. Last Weekend, August 18th and 19th 2018, was the annual Canal Corridor Mazon River Fossil Field Trip. The weather was perfect! There was a great presentation by Andrew Young on August 18th and Dave Dolak on August 19th. Afterwards, the dinner was excellent, as usual. It was a very productive outing for all involved. I have a couple buckets of concretions to freeze/thaw throughout the winter. It's always a fun trip, can't wait for it again next year! Saturday's lecture before collecting A perfect day! An amazing Alethopteris serlii, which was brought by one of the participants. I believe this was collected from the Dresden area, as it was known for large concretions. Concretions Everyone was tired at the end of the day! A few examples of what was found...
  25. Edestus "shark"

    Does anyone know much about the edestus? Ive always wondered about their teeth as they age. All sharks and fish(and animals), when they're young their teeth are also small. Edestus are supposed to never lose their teeth, like their buddy helicoprion(right?), and just have their jaws continue to extend out from their mouths over time. That being the case, how are the oldest teeth, from when they were little young things, full sized, or almost full sized, as they always are? The jaw bone starts off small at the tip, but quickly thickens, but the teeth start large. Also, does that mean that they are born with just a single tooth on the top and bottom, and grow new teeth at an unheard of slow rate?
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