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Found 16 results

  1. Mammalian Tooth ID for misc. find

    I found this specimen in VA, USA. Any help identifying is greatly appreciated. Thank you, all.
  2. unknown carnivore

    Here is a fossil carnivore (I assume) that I purchased with no information at an online auction. I know little about fossils but the double pair of incisors seems odd to me. Or maybe they are not incisors. I assumed this is a mammal but maybe not? Hopeful for an identification and any information; thanks. I can post more detailed photos if necessaary.
  3. Small Mammal Molar

    Cute little molar I found on my shovel while shark tooth huntin'. No idea if it can be classified into species but seems to be from a small terrestrial carnivore/omnivore. Thanks!
  4. Hell Creek Coprolites

    Hi all, I just got back from a fantastic dig near Marmarth, ND. I was in coprolite heaven! I am wondering if anyone has any clues about the round inclusion in the first photo. It is phosphatic. I thought it was particularly interesting because I rarely see inclusions in this type of coprolite. I am also including photos of some of the more interesting coprolites I found along with a really cool ichnofossil found by another member of our group. What is interesting about this one is that it is furrowed on both the rounded and concave ends.
  5. Possibly tapir tooth?

    We found this tooth diving off Venice - the captain thought it might be from a carnivore like a direwolf. I thought perhaps it is a tapir tooth - the top looks right but the root is throwing me off. Thoughts?
  6. I found this in a creek bottom in central Ohio after a flood that caused extensive erosion. I'm thinking it might be a fox or coyote, but really don't know. I was hoping someone with more expertise in this area could assist me in identifying it. Thanks, Mark
  7. I work in a small museum and occasionally have people stop by to ask what kind of fossil they've found. About half the time I know or can find out with a little research- the other half I am clueless. So, I've decided to start leaning on people who are vastly smarter than I on this topic (i.e. you people). A guy came in with these photos and said he came across this lower jaw while hiking in an area known for middle to late Eocene fossils in SW Wyoming. He estimated it was maybe 7 inches in length and was just a couple of feet above some fossil turtle scutes. I don't really know much about the area or much about vertebrate fossils. I am guessing it is some sort of Creodonta or Carnivora, but I am way out of my element (I just learned what Creodonta are). Some known Creodonta from the area (1992): Sinopa, Limnocyon, Thinocyon, Partiofelis Some known Carnivora from the area (1992): Miacis, Viverravus, Vulpavus Any help is greatly appreciated. Thanks!
  8. Are there any theropod dinosaur fossils that can be found in Ontario, Canda that is in a public collecting site that is Legal? examples of theropod dinosaurs: tyrannosaurids, dromaeosaurids, etc.
  9. The location where this was found contains both aquatic and terrestrial animals from floodplain habitat. In this coprolite, a small tooth plate impression with residual fragments can be seen on the surface. Since a similar tooth plate was not found within the coprolite itself, it is unclear whether this is an undigested prey remnant or if it was embedded upon deposition. An unidentified bone and numerous fish scale inclusions were revealed using X-ray computed tomography. This specimen was scanned in April 2016 by the University of Minnesota X-ray Computed Tomography Lab using a X5000 high resolution microCT system with a twin head 225 kV x-ray source and a Dexela area detector (3073 x 3889 pixels).
  10. Possible carnivore phalanx?

    Suspect phalanax of a larger mammal possibly carnivore? Thanks justin
  11. Peruvian Expedition

    Hello, I am interested in going to Peru to look at carnivourous fossils in the Talara tar pits and to look at shark and whale fossils in the Ica region. However, I am currently an American citizen. How can I go to Peru and do these things? Thank you.
  12. Hi guys! These two teeth in jaws arrived the other day. They are from Gansu, China and the seller wasn't sure what they are from. He simply said "cat or dog". Lol. I'm not expert on Miocene mammals and at first glance I believe the big molar/carnassial maybe some sort of big cat? Its a massive tooth! When I compare it to a similar tooth in a Hyaenodon horridus jaw I have from Nebraska, its MUCH bigger. Maybe the smaller is from a hyena? I really don't know and appreciate if anyone can shed a little light on the "cats and dogs". I have not cleaned the teeth and some matrix is still stuck on the large tooth. I figure this may help a little with ID. I understand that at Gansu there are two distinctly coloured formations. Thanx in advance! (more pics in comments)
  13. 200-Million Year Old Theropod from Wales

    Here is an article from Paleontology News about the new theropod, Dracoraptor http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/01/160120202414.htm A new carnivorous dinosaur species named Dracoraptor hanigani uncovered in the south of Wales is possibly the oldest known Jurassic dinosaur from the UK, according to a study published January 20, 2016 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by David Martill from the University of Portsmouth, England, and colleagues from National Museum Wales and University of Manchester. The authors of this study that analyzed the dinosaur skull and bones, discovered in 2014 on a beach near Penarth, Wales, conclude it is a new species that they have named Dracoraptor hanigani. The name Dracoraptor means 'dragon robber.' Draco, meaning dragon, is the national symbol of Wales. The species name honors Nick and Rob Hanigan, who discovered the fossil. From their analysis, the researchers believe this dinosaur was meat-eating, from the theropod group. They also suggested that it may have been a juvenile animal, as most of its bones were not yet fully formed or fused. Compared to its distant relative the T. rex, it appears to be a small, agile animal, probably only about 70 cm tall and about 200 cm long, with a long tail, likely to help it balance. It lived at the beginning of the Jurassic Period (201 million years ago), at the time when south Wales was a coastal region like it is today. However, at the time, the climate was much warmer, and dinosaurs were just starting to diversify. The new specimen represents the most complete theropod from Wales, and may possibly represent one of the oldest known Jurassic dinosaurs in the UK or even in the world. Co-author Mr. Vidovic adds, "The Triassic-Jurassic extinction event is often credited for the later success of dinosaurs through the Jurassic and Cretaceous, but previously we knew very little about dinosaurs at the start of this diversification and rise to dominance. Now we have Dracoraptor, a relatively complete two meter long juvenile theropod from the very earliest days of the Jurassic in Wales."
  14. Hi all, Here is a large tooth with root from Solo River of Java, Indonesia that is supposedly 1.8 million to 200,000 years old. It is identified only as being a carnivorous tooth. My guess would be a crocodile. Anyone can help shed more light on this? Thank you!
  15. Possible Carnivore Tooth?

    I'm sorry that I skipped the introduction thread, but I wanted to post this in the appropriate area. I am an amateur arrowhead/artifact hunter that just got back into searching after taking a break from it for about 25 years. I am visiting family in San Antonio, Texas and recently while jogging, I saw some flint chips and eventually found a piece identified as a unifacial scraper This restored my interest in searching for more things. Today I went into an adjacent neighborhood where new construction is going on to see if I could find any any other artifacts, and I found what appears to be a large tooth of a carnivore. I do not know the correct terminology as to the layer it was found or what not, but I did include photos of where it was found. The piece measures 3.9 inches in length and approx. 1.6 inches at its widest part. I kept it because the point was a bit more exposed and covered in less sediment than the rest of the "tooth". There were other curious pieces that I dug out close to this piece that I kept also, but nothing looked like an obvious bone or tooth like this one. If I am completely off base, I just need to know. Thanks for taking a look, and spending some time on an amateur like me.
  16. Carnivore Skull, Gansu, China

    Hello, this is a carnivore skull from China (I bought it many years ago in Germany). All I know is that it was found in the Gansu area, though I don't know how certain this information is. The overall length is 18 cm. The first pictures are from the left side, the last ones from the right side of the skull. The distal part of the molar on the right side is broken off. I have an idea what it could be, but I'm not sure. (I'll tell about it later, but I don't want to influence brainstorming with this information at the moment). Any suggestions? Thanks, araucaria1959
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