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Found 7 results

  1. If there's one thing that really makes me gasp, it's cartilage. Especially a whole darn skeleton (a shark, sturgeon, paddlefish, anything with a skeleton composed largely of cartilage.....) I find cartilage to be so amazing because of how difficult it is to be preserved. Plus, I find anything fossilized with cartilage also maintains other minute details (sensory pores, skin pigment, really fine details.) this is is a thread for anybody who wants to share their cartilage! I just realized the irony here, my name is Bone guy.....Anywho here is my contribution. A paddlefish named Protosephurus liui from the Early Cretaceous shale of the Yixian Formation (same place they found the Yutyrannus) in China. These fish are very cool, they do have a good amount of bones in their skeleton but there's also lots of cartilage. Hairs lined along the rostrum can sense the tiniest bit of underwater disturbance. You can see the skin is covered in tiny dimples which are sensory pores. Overall this animal is armed with a high tech radar system, perfect for hunting the smallest of invertebrates.
  2. Apologies since this is modern versus fossil. But was my first ever experience with ray cartilage and I am excited. The vertebrae were found in different locations as were the 2 snouts I found. I also came across a ray's carcass that was intact but beginning to deteriorate. It's snout was skin covered but appeared to be the same. The vertebrae also looked identical to the ones I found. It was humped up I guess because of the drying and shrinkage of the skeleton. It had claspers so it was a male. About a foot and a half body with a long tail. The tail had hooked denticles? all along the top dorsal side curved toward the end. I was not as observant as I should have been to gather more details. I really wanted that tail! but I was unable to remove it and the body had a quite offensive smell. Also I did not have a camera so no pictures. Looking online the snout looks very much like an Atlantic guitarfish and its habitat is north Carolina and south US. Any help to confirm or point me in another direction would be greatly appreciated. Thanks
  3. Well I am shipping my most recent shark cartilage to the "American Museum of Natural History" today. They said it is most likely another partial skull and since this stuff is pretty rare they would like to have in their collection. Maybe this partial can be used with other material for a study for someone.
  4. I found this associated cartilage on one of my outings a couple years ago near Lake Brownwood here in central Texas. It is Pennsylvanian age like most of my stuff. I have been removing matrix and gluing together pieces off and on for over a year but I am about as far as I can go on this puzzle. I was just to late in finding this before the weather had scattered it and softened the edges. As far as ID I am supposing parts of skull or jaw. Still the second most cartilage I have ever found together or at least almost together.
  5. I have been finding a lot of inclusions in a batch of coprolites from the Smoky Hill Chalk that assumed were bits of cartilage. One of the newer specimens from that batch had a piece of the material in question on the surface; enabling me to view it from the side. They look like little teeth, so now I don't know what I have. I have one other specimen that has a couple of the little tooth-like structures intact (one that I posted a while back that has possible Ptychodus tooth fragments). Is this skin with denticles, cartilage, a skull part or some sort of tooth plate? As always, any help is greatly appreciated.
  6. Help with details and ID please - Went out with DPS to Brownwood, Texas this past weekend - Pennsylvanian - Missourian and Virgilian Stages. Had a great time - found my first 2 trilobites so I was doing the happy dance. Found a very small 1/2 inch piece of what I thought was coral because of the unusual pattern at Wilson's Clay Pit. Filed it with my corals for that day. The next day we hunted a road cut that seemed to be older material than Wilson's. Found three more larger chunks of this - 1 1/4 inches, 2 5/8 inches and 3 inches wide that had the same unusual pattern and some curvature. Still thought it was a coral. Before we went home, took one of the chunks to an expert to ask what it was and he said that it was Shark Cartilage. When I got home, looked at all of the pieces under a microscope - they are the same stuff. Anyone know more details? Don't have a good camera (dropped it in the Trinity on a previous trip) so this is from my iPad.
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