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Found 11 results

  1. Smilodon tooth ID help

    Hello all, i am new to this forum and trying to learn the ins outs. I have posted a couple of threads and I am in process of learning best ways of doing so . I found this piece in Eastern Tennessee at an estate sale. I am always looking for something that catches my eye in this realm so I was surprised to see this piece. I new it was some type of claw or tooth but not for sure when I bought it. After more research I found it to be a tooth of a Sabre tooth tiger . tooth has serrated edges on 2 side of tooth and is 11” long I thought I would upload pictures and see what y’all thought as this is in charted territory for me . I took tooth to one of my business clients that was a retired geologist professor and he reviewed and he thought was real based on texture, weight and appearance . So I thought I would sign up to try to get more info from people that are in this field day to day. Thank you!
  2. Smilodon tooth ID help

    This is the tooth I mentioned in last email. Has serrated edges on side and back 11” long.... I know if it’s real it’s very rare as I have researched a lot and have a good idea what it came from if it’s real but I haven’t got a definitive answer.
  3. A possible cat claw?

    Hi guys! I have something new here and it's very interesting, i think i found a cat claw. You already know that i found in my garden many stuff from Neolithic Vinca culture, such as figurines, pottery, stones tools, microliths and animal bones and teeth as well. So again, i found some cool bones as this claw, but i'm unsure if it belongs to some bigger carnivorous mammal. I compared it with Felis silvestris claw core but it's bigger. I don't know much about carnivorous mammals from Neolithic period but i think that they are the same as today like wolves, bears, lynx, jackals ... If someone would like to help me out identifying this claw it would be much appreciated. Btw, near the claw is i believe some paw bone as well ... Both are quite small and smaller than this battery which i put as a scale . Please help ! Darko
  4. Mystery Jaw

    So I have a new mystery. I found this jawbone in miocene gravel. I found mastodon enamel right next to this. I believe this jaw to either be a cat of some kind or raccoon. It shows signs of being both fossilized and not. It's hard a little heavy and sounds like stone when hit against other stone objects, with a slightly less hard tink sound than that of my sharks teeth but it still sounds like stone. The teeth are still white though, however the two smaller teeth have hard sediment still attached to them and the larger tooth has similar sediment stuck in the part of the tooth that is missing. It's hard to tell if this is a fossil or not. Is it possible for something to be half fossilized?
  5. Fossil Mammal Skull ID

    Hi, I recently purchased this fossil on everyone's favorite auction site. The seller didn't know where it was found or of its provenance. I was thinking it could be by its size and teeth, however I would like input from others on the site. I've been collecting fossil for some time now and haven't seen anything like it. Thanks!
  6. Hello everyone, this is not a fossil but since there is so much knowledge in this forum I thought I'd ask here first. Please delete or move if not appropriate for the Fossil ID section. This is a modern skull. The size puzzles me as well as the dental not quite a house cat. Bob cat? Other ideas? It is tiny!! Scale in inches. Found in North Texas, near to a Coyote remains. Lot of wildlife, including bob cats, raccoons. Any way to tell what this is exactly? Thanks in advance!
  7. large cat medial phalanx

    I recently got this large cat medial phalanx, the info I got along with it isn't the most trust worthy, so I'm just looking to get other opinions from more experienced folks. The info I got is as follows, hometherium serum medial phalanx, st Mary's river. Pleistocene. I know it's from a large cat, either jaguar or smilodon/hometherium. Any opinions would be appreciated. I'm only about to upload one picture at a time, so I will reply with more pictures. It measures 1.48" long.
  8. Who does this bone belong to?????

    This is a Pleistocene metatarsal from what I believe is a cat like creature found in the N. Sulphur River, Lamar Co. south of Paris, Tx. Would like one of our bone experts to shed a little light on this. It is approx. 2 3/4 inches in length. highly mineralized so not present day. I have a thought as to ID but need to have other opinions, believe this is from a young animal---maybe. Thank you for your help Tom
  9. Pogonodon platycopis

    This is an amazing Pogonodon platycopis skull from the John Day Formation in Oregon. These are some of the most rare of the Nimravidae, as well as some of the oldest. See also Eaton 1922, Fremd et al. 1994, Macdonald 1970, Matthew 1910, Scott and Jepsen 1936 and Thorpe 1920
  10. Book Review: Sabertooth

    a book review of: "Sabertooth" written and illustrated by Mauricio Anton. 2013. Indiana University Press. 243 pages. Suggested Retail: $50 USD. By the time the ancestors of humans were walking upright, saber-toothed cats had already established themselves as apex predators in Africa, Europe, Asia, and North America. Early humans tried to keep a safe distance but we can imagine that sabercats sometimes preyed upon them. As humans evolved over the next few million years, developing increasingly advanced tools, they began to compete successfully with them and other large predators. However, our species, Homo sapiens, which dates back about 100 thousand years, has no cultural memory of sabercats - not even a cave painting. The last of the them died out in that phantom zone sometime after the last ice age and just before our recorded history. The cover artwork is a photo-realistic portrait of Megantereon, a Pliocene-Pleistocene sabercat. However, this book is not about only one group within the cat family nor does it expand its coverage just enough to include the other saber-toothed mammal groups. It focuses on the adaptation itself, the elongated canine teeth. It is a specialization bearing a history longer than that of the cat family - even more ancient than any of the mammals from the age of dinosaurs. The author, Mauricio Anton, is one of the premier paleoartists in the publishing and scientific worlds. He was already well-known for his sharp eye for anatomical detail and realistic backgrounds by the time of his first mainstream collaboration with paleontologist Alan Turner (1947-2012). That 1997 book, "The Big Cats and Their Fossil Relatives," added science enthusiasts, amateur fossil collectors, and wildlife art aficionados to his ever-increasing fan base. Since then, he has authored and co-authored a number of popular books as well as technical articles. The book is divided into five chapters. The first one defines terms and introduces the various saber-toothed groups while Chapter 2 reviews the fossil deposits that have yielded their remains. Anton also offers the big picture - a walk through time with drifting continents, transitioning environments, evolving ecosystems, and disrupting extinctions. Chapter 3 profiles the known groups of sabertooths going into some detail when they are known from at least nearly-complete skeletons. The reader begins to understand the anatomical differences and evolutionary distances between groups that might have been previously thought of as very similar and closely-related. Anton fleshes-out his subjects in Chapter 4. The reader is shown how well-preserved fossil bones can lead to a clear idea of the physical abilities and limitations of the animals when they were alive. It is an education in how the elongated canine teeth evolved in concert with other adaptations to allow sabertooths to specialize in quickly subduing and killing certain prey. Examples from the fossil record testify to what a tough life that could be. The last chapter addresses the extinctions of the various groups. It looks back on how scientists have interpreted the effectiveness of the sabertooth adaptation and reviews the episodes of extinction for each of the groups before considering the causes in each case. It was a given that this book was going to be beautifully-illustrated. It is also abundantly-illustrated with several of Anton’s paintings and drawings. He shows a variety of animals on the attack, in retreat, and at rest. He also shows a standing animal from different angles. He demonstrates how skeletal and muscular details lead to noticeable differences in head and body shapes. Restoring the in-life appearance of sabercats is not simply a matter of painting sabers onto a leopard's or lion's head. In this book Anton writes for the layman and he is good at it. He mixes in technical terms within a flow of everyday language so the inexperienced but engaged reader will be able to follow along. It is hard to find fault with this book and the missteps are minor. He employs "dispersions" when he should have said "dispersals." He uses the word "apparition" instead of "appearance" on pages 73, 76, and 178. It could be said that these were his mistakes but this is also the kind of error that should have been caught by an editor at the publishing company. Less of an error and more of a dying tendency among many paleontologists is Anton's use of "Tertiary" as a time unit. "Tertiary" is an old-fashioned term that accounted for about 97% of the Cenozoic Era - everything minus the Pleistocene and Holocene Epochs. It is about as logical as dividing the last two thousand years of human history into two units: one from the year 0 to 1950; the second from 1950 to the current year. Therefore, most scientists have switched to using "Paleogene" and "Neogene" as the broader time divisions because they are more equal in time span and more useful as backgrounds for discussing longterm geologic, biologic, and climatic trends. I recommend Mauricio Anton’s ”Sabertooth" to readers interested in mammals and carnivores of any class. It will help an amateur fossil collector or budding paleontologist to understand a little more of the wider diversity of animals that have existed across time - the numerous families that no human ever saw alive. It clarifies the distinction between "cat" and "cat-like,” illustrating it in more detail than other popular science books. This book also underlines the fragility of life at any level in the food chain. Jess
  11. These are a few of the pdf files (and a few Microsoft Word documents) that I've accumulated in my web browsing. MOST of these are hyperlinked to their source. If you want one that is not hyperlinked or if the link isn't working, e-mail me at joegallo1954@gmail.com and I'll be happy to send it to you. Please note that this list will be updated continuously as I find more available resources. All of these files are freely available on the Internet so there should be no copyright issues. Articles with author names in RED are new additions since May 12, 2018. Family Felidae - The Cats and Their Allies. Subfamily Proailurinae *No literature currently available* Subfamily Machairodontinae (†) - Saber-toothed Cats and Their Relatives Tribe Homotherini Homotherini - Africa/Middle East Werdelin, L. and R. Sardella (2006). The "Homotherium" from Langebaanweg, South Africa and the Origin of Homotherium. Palaeontographica Abt.A, 277(1-6). Homotherini - Asia/Malaysia/Pacific Islands Volmer, R., C. Hertler and A. van der Geer (2016). Niche overlap and competition among tigers (Panthera tigris), sabertoothed cats (Homotherium ultimum, Hemimachairodus zwierzyckii) and Merriam's dog (Megacyon merriami) in the Pleistocene of Java. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 441. Homotherini - Europe (including Greenland) Antón, M. and H. Galobart (1999). Neck Function and Predatory Behavior in the Scimitar Toothed Cat Homotherium latidens (Owen). Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 19(4). Antón, M., et al. (2009). Soft tissue reconstruction of Homotherium latidens (Mammalia, Carnivora, Felidae). Implications for the possibility of representations in Palaeolithic art. Geobios, 42. Barnett, R. (2014). An inventory of British remains of Homotherium (Mammalia, Carnivora, Felidae), with special reference to the material from Kent's Cavern. Geobios, 47. Bona, F. and R. Sardella (2014). Co-occurrence of a sabertoothed cat (Homotherium sp.) with a large lion-like cat (Panthera sp.) in the Middle Pleistocene karst infill from nuova <<Cava Zanola>> (Paitone, Brescia, Lombardy, Northern Italy). Bollettino della Societa Paleontologica Italiana, 53(2). Bona, F. and R. Sardella (2012). The Middle Pleistocene Large Felids (Mammalia) from Brecce Di Soave (Verona, N-E Italy). Revista Italiana di Paleontologia e Stratigrafia, Vol.118, Number 1. Diedrich, C.G. and D.A. McFarlane (2017). Homotherium from Middle Pleistocene archaeological and carnivore den sites of Germany - Taxonomy, taphonomy and a revision of the Schoningen, West Runton and other saber-tooth cat sites. Quaternary International, 436. McFarlane, D.A. and J. Lundberg (2013). On the occurrence of the scimitar-toothed cat, Homotherium latidens (Carnivora; Felidae), at Kents Cavern, England. Journal of Archaeological Science, 40. Mol, D. and W. van Logchem (2009). A humerus of the saber-toothed cat, Homotherium crenatidens (Weithofer, 1889) dredged from the seabed between the British Islands and The Netherlands. PalArch, 6(1). Reumer, J.W.F., et al. (2003). Late Pleistocene Survival of the Saber-toothed Cat Homotherium in Northwestern Europe.Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 23(1). Sardella, R. and D.A. Iurino (2012). The latest Early Pleistocene sabertoothed cat Homotherium (Felidae, Mammalia) from Monte Peglia (Umbria, central Italy). Bollettino della Societa Paleontologica Italiana, 51(1). Serangeli, J., et al. (2015). The European saber-toothed cat (Homotherium latidens) found in the "Spear Horizon" at Schoningen (Germany). Journal of Human Evolution, 89. Homotherini - North America Dundas,R.G. (1992). A scimitar cat (Homotherium serum) from the Late Pleistocene Merrell locality, southwestern Montana. PaleoBios, 14(1). Ewald, T., et al. (2017). Scimitar Cat (Homotherium serum Cope) from Southwestern Alberta, Canada. Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Draft manuscript. Jefferson, G.T. and A.E. Tejada-Flores (1993). The Late Pleistocene Record of Homotherium (Felidae: Machairodontinae) in the Southwestern United States. PaleoBios, Vol.15, Number 3. Martin, L.D., C.B. Schultz and M.R. Schultz (1988). Saber-Toothed Cats from the Plio-Pleistocene of Nebraska. Transactions of the Nebraska Academy of Sciences, XVI. Rawn-Schatzinger, V.M. and R.L. Collins (1981). Scimitar Cats, Homotherium serum Cope from Gassaway Fissure, Cannon County, Tennessee and the North American Distribution of Homotherium. Journal of the Tennessee Academy of Science, Vol.56, Number 1. Widga, C., et al. (2012). Homotherium serum and Cervalces from the Great Lakes Region, USA: geochronology, morphology and ancient DNA. Boreas, 10. Homotherini - South America/Central America/Caribbean Mones, A. and A. Rinderknecht (2004). The First South American Homotheriini (Mammalia: Carnivora: Felidae). Comunicaciones Paleontologicas, Vol.II, Number 35. Rincon, A.D., F.J. Prevosti and G.E. Parra (2011). New Saber-Toothed Cat Records (Felidae: Machairodontinae) for the Pleistocene of Venezuela, and the Great American Biotic Interchange. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 31(2). General Homotherini Antón, M., et al. (2013). The Plio-Pleistocene scimitar-toothed felid genus Homotherium Fabrini, 1890 (Machairodontinae, Homotherini): diversity, palaeogeography and taxonomic implications. Quaternary Science Reviews, xxx. Feranec, R.S. (2008). Growth Differences in the Saber-Tooth of Three Felid Species. Palaios, Vol.23. Tribe Machairodontini Machairodontini - Africa/Middle East de Bonis, L., et al. (2018). New sabre toothed Felidae (Carnivora, Mammalia) in the hominid-bearing sites of Toros Menalla (late Miocene, Chad). Geodiversitas, 40(3). Geraads, D. A skull of Machairodus giganteus (Felidae, Mammalia) from the Late Miocene of Turkey. Peigne, S., et al. (2005). A new machairodontine (Carnivora, Felidae) from the Late Miocene hominid locality of TM 266, Toros-Menalla, Chad. C.R.Palevol. Sardella, R. and L. Werdelin (2007). Amphimachairodus (Felidae, Mammalia) from Sahabi (Latest Miocene-Earliest Pliocene), With a Review of African Miocene Machairodontinae. Revista Italiana di Paleontologia e Stratigrafia, Vol.113, Number 1. Machairodontini - Asia/Malaysia/Pacific Islands Deng, T., et al. (2016). A skull of Machairodus horribilis and new evidence for gigantism as a mode of mosaic evolution in machairodonts (Felidae, Carnivora). Vertebrata PalAsiatica, 54(4). Qiu, Z.-X., Q.-Q. Shi and J.-Y. Liu (2008). Description of Skull Material of Machairodus horribilis Schlosser, 1903. Vertebrata PalAsiatica, 46(4). Shikama, T. (1934). 137. Note on an Occurrence of Machairodus in Korea. Proceedings of the Imperial Academy, Vol.10, Number 8. Sotnikova, M.V. (1992). A new species of Machairodus from the late Miocene Kalmakpai locality in eastern Kazakhstan (USSR). Ann.Zool.Fennici, 28. Volmer, R., C. Hertler and A. van der Geer (2016). Niche overlap and competition among tigers (Panthera tigris), sabertoothed cats (Homotherium ultimum, Hemimachairodus zwierzyckii) and Merriam's dog (Megacyon merriami) in the Pleistocene of Java. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 441. Machairodontini - Europe (including Greenland and Siberia) Antón, M., et al. (2004). First Known Complete Skulls of the Scimitar-Toothed Cat Machairodus aphanistus (Felidae, Carnivora) from the Spanish Late Miocene Site of Batallones-1. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 24(4). Dybka, H. (1990). Machairodus sp. from the Lower Pliocene Bone Breccia of Weze (Poland). Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 35(1-2). Fernandez-Monescillo, M., M. Anton and M.J. Salesa (2017). Palaeoecological implications of the sympatic distribution of two species of Machairodus (Felidae, Machairodontinae, Homotherini) in the Late Miocene of Los Valles de Fuentiduena (Segovia, Spain). Historical Biology, 2017. Madurell-Malapeira, J., et al. (2014). The scimitar-toothed cat Machaerodus aphanistus (Carnivora: Felidae) in the Valles-Penedes Basin (NE Iberian Peninsula). C.R. Palevol, 13. Monescillo, M.F.G., et al. (2014). Machairodus aphanistus (Felidae, Machairodontidae, Homotherini) from the Late Miocene (Vallesian, MN10) Site of Batallones-3 (Torrejón De Velasco, Madrid, Spain). Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 34(3). Morlo, M. and Y. Semenov (2004). New dental remains of Machairodus KAUP 1833 (Felidae, Carnivora, Mammalia) from the Turolian of Ukraine: significance for the evolution of the genus. kaupia, Vol.13. Spassov, N. and G.D. Koufos (2002). The first appearance of Dinocrocuta gigantea and Machairodus aphanistus (Mammalia, Carnivora) in the Miocene of Bulgaria. Mitt.Bayer.Staatsslg.Palaont.hist.Geol., 42. Machairodontini - North America Antón, M., M.J. Salesa and G. Siliceo (2013). Machairodont Adaptations and Affinities in the Holarctic Late Miocene Homotherin Machairodus (Mammalia, Carnivora, Felidae): The Case of Machairodus catocopis Cope, 1887. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 33(5). General Machairodontini Turner, A. and M. Antón (1998). Climate and Evolution: Implications of Some Extinction Patterns in African and European Machairodontine Cats of the Plio-Pleistocene. Estudios Geol., 54. Turner, A., et al. (2011). Changing ideas about the evolution and functional morphology of Machairodontine felids. Estudios Geologicos, 67(2). Tribe Metaliurini Chang, H.-C. (1958). On the Skull of Metailurus of Pontian Age from Shansi. Vertebrata PalAsiatica, 2(1). Cooke, H.B.S. (1991). Dinofelis barlowi (Mammalia, Carnivora, Felidae) Cranial Material from Bolt's Farm, Collected by the University of California Africa Expedition. Palaeont.afr., 28. Geraads, D. First record of Dinofelis (Felidae, Mammalia) from North Africa. Lacruz, R., A. Turner and L.R. Berger (2006). New Dinofelis (Machairodontinae) remains from Sterkfontein Valley sites and a taxonomic revision of the genus in southern Africa. Annals of the Transvaal Museum, Vol.43. Li, Y. (2014). Restudy of Metailurus major from Yushe Basin, Shanxi Province reported by Teilhard de Chardin and Leroy. Vertebrata PalAsiatica, 52(4). Roussiakis, S.J. (2001). Metailurus major Zdansky, 1924 (Carnivora, Mammalia) from the classical locality of Pikermi (Attica, Greece). Ann. Paléontol., 87,2. Roussiakis, S.J., G.E. Theodorou and G. Iliopoulos (2006). An almost complete skeleton of Metailurus parvulus (Carnivora, Felidae) from the late Miocene of Kerassia (Northern Euboea, Greece). Geobios, 39. Werdelin, L. and M.E. Lewis (2001). A revision of the genus Dinofelis (Mammalia, Felidae). Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, 132. 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