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Found 141 results

  1. Kem Kem Leptostyrax macrorhiza

    From the album Cretaceous Shark Teeth

    One of only 6 known Leptostyrax from the Kem Kem beds of Morocco. Lower Upper-Cenomanian in age.
  2. Kem Kem Leptostyrax macrorhiza

    From the album Cretaceous Shark Teeth

    Very rare Leptostyrax from the Kem Kem beds of Morocco. Lower Upper-Cenomanian in age.
  3. Hello, I recently made a post about some finds collected from a marine Cenomanian bonebed, but I was so distracted with identifying the hesperornithine bones from the mix of vertebrate remains that I haven't had a chance to positively ID some of the marine reptile teeth found in the assemblage... The teeth in the top row all appear to be from the same species, and are highly compressed, lingually. They appear striated, but are actually completely smooth, and have no occurences of serrations on the edges. I had another really nice one about the same length as that long one but a friend is holding on to it now, so regretably no pics. The second row are also all superficially similar. Notice the prominent, striated ridges which occur only on the middle portion of the tooth, from the end of the root to about 3/4 to the tip. This occurs on all but the middle tooth, which is completely smooth, leading me to believe that it might have belonged to a different species entirely. All of the teeth are more or less round at the bottom. Marine reptiles reported from this formation include indeterminate elasmosaurs and pliosaurs, as well as a dolichosaur suspected to be a certain Coniasaurus crassidens. I suppose my two main questions are as follows, -Do the teeth at the top belong to an elasmosaur or pliosaur? They quite appear different from examples I've looked at online from either group, so I'm a little stumped. -Do the teeth from the bottom row belong to Coniasaurus, and if so, does the tooth without ridges come from a different group than the one with ridges? (it's the only one I found that looks like that, by the way, from among the hundreds of teeth recovered from the bonebed)... As always, any extra input is always welcome. Thanks for your attention.
  4. Newborn? Cretoxyrhina mantelli Russia

    From the album Cretaceous Shark Teeth

    Beautiful and very small, cusped Cretoxyrhina mantelli from Ryazan Region of Russia. Cenomanian in age.
  5. Newborn? Cretoxyrhina mantelli Russia

    From the album Cretaceous Shark Teeth

    Beautiful and very small, cusped Cretoxyrhina mantelli from Ryazan Region of Russia. Cenomanian in age.
  6. After numerous attempts to locate a certain elusive and geographically remote late Cenomanian bonebed in the Pasquia Hills of Saskatchewan, I was recently successful at finding some of the material and bringing it home. This bonebed was deposited approximately 94 million years ago near the north-eastern margins of the Western Interior Seaway during a period of sediment starvation, resulting in the accumulation and formation of a bioclastic conglomerate made mostly of teeth, bones, and coprolites. Most striking is the abundance of Hesperornithiform bird fossils from the site, namely Pasquiaornis. More information can be found in this study here. Individual bones and teeth are easy to extract from the relatively soft matrix which can usually be broken down either with hand tools, water, or vinegar. The most commonly occuring fossils are shark and fish teeth, including Hybodus, Ptychodus, Carcharias, Squalicorax and Enchodus. Other teeth include those of birds and reptiles, mostly plesiosaurs. Besides the teeth, bone fragments, coprolites, chunks of bentonite, pebbles, fish scales and fish vertebrae are also abundant. My question is whether the bones I have tentatively identified are from Pasquiaornis, and also if anyone has other opinions and conclusive IDs on some of the other miscellaneous fossils I've included. If necessary I can take more photos, and may keep this thread updated with further discoveries as more material is sifted. Photo 1: A sample of the bonebed before prepping. This particular chunk features relatively small fossils, others were made primarily of larger inclusions, Photos 2, 3: Some complete and fragmented long bones, suspected to be from Pasquiaornis, Photo 4: Teeth suspected to originate from Pasquiaornis, along with a suspected claw at the bottom left of the photo, Photo 5: Other miscellaneous fossils from the bonebed, including an assortment of shark, fish, and plesiosaur (?) teeth. Also a sample of some of the bone fragments, vertebrae and coprolites commonly found within the material, Thanks for your attention. Any additional information or questions are greatly appreciated.
  7. Hello, I recently acquired some fossils from the Vallecillo member of the Agua Nueva formation. The Agua Nueva Lagerstätten is famous for its perfectly preserved fish and marine reptiles. It is late cenomanian in age about 90-93 million years old. I got two large ammonites from one of my trips to Mexico. I was wondering if someone can identify it to the family, and possibly the genus level. They are preserved in a finely bedded shale. This one one is the largest one it is about 8 inches long.
  8. Betulites sp.

    From the album Plants

    Betulites sp. Upper Cretaceous Cenomanian Dakota Formation Ellsworth Kansas USA Length 6cm / 2 inch
  9. Pterosaur Fossils are a rarity, and few ever are on the public market, but the Pterosaurs from the Kem Kem Beds are seen most commonly on the market, this is rather not due to an unusally high Pterosaur abundance, but rather because almost every Fossil is being collected at this locality. Currently, there are 4 named species from the Kem Kem Beds, but the actual number is far higher. The Named Taxa are Alanqa saharica, Xericeps curvirostris, Sirrocopteryx morrocanus and Coloborhynchus fluviferox. Some unnamed ones im allowed to talk about are the Kem Kem Tapejarid, a small Chaoyangopterid species and a 3rd Ornithocheirid. The small Chaoyangopterid originally was identified as a Pteranodontid, but it is a Chaoyangopterid. There are up to 4 more Pterosaurs from this Locality, but I am not allowed to talk about them, all of them Azhdarchoids though. The 3rd Ornithocheirid wont affect the identification of any of the Ornithocheirid teeth, but that's all I can say. Sirrocopteryx and Coloborhynchus The Identification of Pterosaur Teeth from Kem Kem has recently become impossible to the genus level, for the most part that. C. fluviferox is a gigantic Ornithocheirid, and any Teeth of greater size might be referable to it, cf. Coloborhynchus fluviferox. Another thing notable is that the Identification can be restricted to a subfamily, Coloborhynchinae indet. instead of Ornithocheiridae/Anhangueridae indet., although this is rather Nitpicky. Alanqa and Xericeps Both of these Taxa are primarily known from Mandible and Rostral Tips, identification of these is rather easy, with the one of Alanqa being triangular in crossection, and the ones of Xericeps curving upward. Loads of Postcrania is also often refered the either of the two, referal is inconclusive though, especially considering there are more than just those two. The Chaoyangopterid and Tapejarid I have never seen either two on sale, but I will be mentioning them further too. The Tapejarid is a large Taxon related to Sinopterus, it's the first image. But there is more Material I cant mention. The small Chaoyangopterid is just a mandible fragment, but it has a rather deep crest. What about the Dsungaripterid? The Material of the Dsungaripterid most likely represents Xericeps.
  10. Heterodontus sp. Russia

    From the album Odd and Rare Shark Teeth

    A Cenomanian aged Heterodontus sp. from the Ryazan Region of Russia.
  11. Heterodontus sp. Russia

    From the album Odd and Rare Shark Teeth

    A Cenomanian aged Heterodontus sp. from the Ryazan Region of Russia.
  12. Chasing Opal and Fossils in the Australian Outback An ambitious collaboration between scientists and a local mining community seeks to preserve one-of-a-kind opalized fossils. BY Clare Watson, Undark https://undark.org/article/chasing-opal-fossils-australian-outback/ A recent paper is: Bell, P.R., Fanti, F., Hart, L.J., Milan, L.A., Craven, S.J., Brougham, T. and Smith, E., 2019. Revised geology, age, and vertebrate diversity of the dinosaur-bearing Griman Creek Formation (Cenomanian), Lightning Ridge, New South Wales, Australia. Palaeogeography, palaeoclimatology, palaeoecology, 514, pp.655-671. Yours, Paul H.
  13. Fish & fossils

    Although we didnt realy plan for a fossil field trip, we did go to Boulogne sur mer yesterday to visit the aquarium "Nausica". and since the chalk cliffs of cap blanc nez are only 20min away from there we did make a stop for a couple of hours at the beach at the cliffs. I can recomend a visit to the aquarium to enyone who visit's the are, it is definitely worth a visit, although the entrence fee is quite expensive. On our visit at the beach we were only equiped with a small hammer, but lots of boulders shore were already broken through the waves and still deliverd quite a lot of fossils. I also picked up a pice of chalk with a bone fragment in it. this was something I haven't found there before, we are still prepping this to see what we can make out of it: Visit at the aqurium: the vieuw at the top of the "Grand Blanc Nez", You can see the UK from there Vieuw on the coastline: ammonite in the boulders: the finds: the mystery bone:
  14. Bone ID from the cenomanian chalk of France.

    I'm used to find ammonites and invertebrates, but this time I took home piece of chalk from the beach with a bone inside. I have totaly no Idea of what kind of bone this is or even from what kind of creature. I am still prepping the piece, but those are already the 1st few pictures. hopefully someone got more info on this: Cenomanian from cap-blanc-nez France ( marine chalk deposits)
  15. O. dunkeli Kem Kem?

    Hello all I recently bought a tooth from the Kem Kem beds that clearly belongs to the genus Onchopristis. The weird thing about the tooth is that it has two hooks instead of just one. I know the species Onchopristis dunkeli has two (or more) hooks, but I don't find any official rapports metioning them in the Kem Kem beds. The tooth has yet to arrive, but I already wanted to ask the question. What do you think? Is there a chance O. dunkeli occurs in the Kem Kem beds or would it just be a pathological example. I have been searching a long time for a specimen like this. The tooth has not yet arrived so sorry, no photo's yet. @LordTrilobite, @Haravex Greetings Thijs
  16. Epibionts on ammonites

    This weekend Natalie found an intriguing fossil: a Hypoturrillites whit an epibiont on the shell. I've rarely seen this kind of association and it makes me wonder if the epibiont was already on the shell when the ammonite was alive or dit it grow on it after it fell on the sea floor. If anyone has papers on the subject it would be greatly apriciated ( @doushantuo maybe? )
  17. I just spend the evening cleaning and preping some of the cephalopods I found last weekend. those are all from the cenomanian at the French coast. A couple of nautiloids ( Eutrephoceras sp. ) A couple of turrelites and a Manteliceras sp.
  18. Coprolites?

    Coprolites? Collected near scales, teeth and fish vertebras. It sticks on tongue but aren't visible biological inclusions. Your opinion please.
  19. Ammonite hunt in Northern France

    We are back from a very windy fieldtrip to Cap blanc Nez in France. The wind covered a lot of the rocks with sand and sea foam ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sea_foam ) which made fossil hunting rather difficult. We were helped by a local collector in the morning who guided us through the Turonian deposits of this site where we rarely colect, here we got 2 big ammonites. One of them was a Mamites nodosoides, this species as been on my wishlist for a while, so I am very happy with it In the afternoon we prospected the Cenomanian side. her we found the usual Mantelliceras and Scloenbachia ammonites. The prospecting site: ( we did see the coast of the UK on the other side of the channel ) Some of the ammonites we found: The Mammites: pictures of the prepped specimens will follow during the next week.
  20. Rudist ?

    Hi, a friend of mine told me he found some Placentyceras in a place where the geologic ages go from the Albian to the Turonian-Santonian, but most of the stratas of that place are Cenomanian. I believe this fossil is not an ammonite, but rather an Oyster or a rudist. I mostly think about Requienia or Toucasia. The geologic file mention the name of Toncasia bayleia. Do you know if Toncasia is a synonym of Toucasia and do you think i'm right thinking this is a rudist ? Lenght : 7 centimeters.
  21. on the last fieldtrip from this saturday I got a new batch of ammonites to prepp: the first one was realy easy to prepp, it was a small but well preserved Schloenbachia varians. next up is a Mantelliceras, I broke it in 3 pieces when extracting it from the chalk. I let the specimen dry at home and glued the pieces back together, I then prepped the specimen. After this step I grinded the some matrix residue left from the matrix and mixed it with a little bit of water and PVA glue, I used this mixture to fill and restaur the gaps in the ammonite. once dry I gave the ammonite a Paraloid B72 treatment for consolidation. I'm very pleased with the results
  22. This saturday the tides were ideal for a whole day of prospection at the foot of the chalk cliffs near Calais. We got there early in the morning when the water was going away from the cliffs. At the parking we were greeted by a veteran collector from this location, he took us along to the northern part of the site in search of big Turonian ammonites. A first for us since we've only collected more to the south in the cenomanian deposits. With his help we did find a couple of ammonites including a big specimen. around 1pm after lunch we parted ways and we went to the southern part of the site in search of cenomanian fossils, most of the beach was covered in sand, making it harder to find some decent boulders on the beach to break open. but the usual Schloenbachia and Mantelliceras ammonites did show up. we ended the day with dinner in a local tavern before heading back home whit a new load of fossils to clean and prepp. A Lewisceras Ammonite: A large Ammonite, I still have to prepp and Id it propperly: the extraction of the large ammonite: A nice find from Natalie: under the sand on the beach Albian deposits are present, but not visible, from time to time som fossils from those banks are washed out deeper in the sea and washed ashore. She found a nice Hoplites ammonite lying around on the beach: more pictures of the area: Schloenbachia varians: Mantelliceras specimens in situ: part of the fossils that made it back home: Pictures of prepped specimens will follow later
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