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Found 147 results

  1. A new fossil hunt on the French coast this weekend. The winter storms from the past week battered the coastline and this resulted of course in a few really nice finds. This time we weren’t prospecting alone, but two friends who recently started to collect fossils tagged along . The Saturday morning we prospected the late Jurassic beaches, we started with a slow start, but we finally did find 3 really nice echinoids, and a big ( heavy ) ammonite. At noon we went to the 2nd spot with late cretaceous chalk ( Cenomanian), here the storms really did their work, the recent scree piles were completely washed out and loos fossiliferous boulders were scattered all around. I did found some quite nice ammonites ( Acanthoceras rhotomagense and Cunningtoniceras inerme ), but Natalie hit the jackpot with 2 terrific finds. First up she found a huge and complete nautilus ( Cymatoceras elegans ) only slightly weathered on the side from peeking out of the boulder. A little bit further she found a big turillites ( Hypoturillites tuberculatus) from 25cm, the best part was that it came out in one piece, those heteromorphs usually break in fragments if you try to remove them. On Saturday we went to some Kimmeridgian exposures, but the storm on that day made it really difficult to search and we had to go back to the car’s after a couple of hours due to the terrible weather. But we did find quite a few Aspidoceras sp. ammonites. the saturday morning: saturday afternoon: The stunning Cymatoceras the turillites: The haul from this weekend:
  2. Hi there, I'm working at the moment on cataloguing my collection. 98% or so has been self collected over the years. Lately i've cataloguing my fossils from "les Vaches noires" cliffs in normandy / France. Im not finished yet, but i think i should share. So heres my flickr galery "les Vaches Noires " : https://flic.kr/s/aHsmKUCQse i hope you will enjoy.
  3. Kem Kem Vertebra: Crocodile?

    Hello all I've had this vertebra for about a year now and I always thought it was from a crocodile. What do you guys think? It's about 22 cm wide, but would be bigger if the left was complete. It's from the Kem Kem beds, Morocco. Early late Cretaceous. Kind regards
  4. A new fieldtrip to the coast of northern France this Saturday. In the morning we prospected the beaches with Jurassic deposits whit a few friends. Not an easy place to look for fossils, but Natalie fond a large Ichthyosaur vert and I found a neat little echinoid in the shingle. At noon our local friends hat to go, so Natalie and I made a stop a little more up North on our way home. We went to the beaches at the chalky Cretaceous cliffs. Here we had a lot of luck, the sea had cleaned up the cliff falls that had occurred a few weeks back. In a short amount of time we managed to find around 6 complete Acanthoceras ammonites scattered on the beach. Time to hit the prep table again The jurassic ( Titonian ) site: The Cretaceous ( Cenomanian )site Prepping pictures will follow
  5. as a connoisseur of Pterosaurs, I wanted to ask the Community here to show me it's pterosaur fossils from the Kem Kem Formation. After seeing a rare Tapejarid Premaxilla recently get sold on a Fossil Dealing site (labeled incorrectly as Alanqa), I wondered what treasures could be present in Private Collections in this Community. Teeth are just as welcome as Bones are.
  6. Acanthoceras prepparation

    On our Christmas fossil hunting trip Natalie found a nice Acanthoceras rothamagense in a loose boulder on the beach, All we had to do is reduce the size of the boulder to make it fit in the backpack. A few days ago I removed a large chunk of exces matrix with a powertool. Today I took the time to prepp the whole ammonite. this is the result after 4 to 5 hours of prepwork: The final result: Acanthoceras rothamagense Upper Cenomanian Cap-Blanc-Nez ( France ) 20cm in diameter
  7. a christmas fossil trip

    Like last year Natalie and I spent 4 days on a fossil hunting trip on a few different locations on the northern coast of France. Each day a different location. The stormy weather conditions made the beaches realy favorable foor fossil hunting as lots of specimens could be found loose on the beaches. We started Saturday with Turonian sea urchins, sunday Kimmeridge clay and limestone, monday turonian ammonites and the last day mostly cenomanian fossils. Highlights of the trip were a few large ammonites ( Lewisceras and Acanthoceras ) and a rare tooth of a marine reptile from the Kimmeridge deposits.
  8. Kem Kem Leptostyrax macrorhiza

    From the album Cretaceous Shark Teeth

    One of only 6 known Leptostyrax from the Kem Kem beds of Morocco. Lower Upper-Cenomanian in age.
  9. Kem Kem Leptostyrax macrorhiza

    From the album Cretaceous Shark Teeth

    Very rare Leptostyrax from the Kem Kem beds of Morocco. Lower Upper-Cenomanian in age.
  10. Newborn? Cretoxyrhina mantelli Russia

    From the album Cretaceous Shark Teeth

    Beautiful and very small, cusped Cretoxyrhina mantelli from Ryazan Region of Russia. Cenomanian in age.
  11. Newborn? Cretoxyrhina mantelli Russia

    From the album Cretaceous Shark Teeth

    Beautiful and very small, cusped Cretoxyrhina mantelli from Ryazan Region of Russia. Cenomanian in age.
  12. Hello, I recently acquired some fossils from the Vallecillo member of the Agua Nueva formation. The Agua Nueva Lagerstätten is famous for its perfectly preserved fish and marine reptiles. It is late cenomanian in age about 90-93 million years old. I got two large ammonites from one of my trips to Mexico. I was wondering if someone can identify it to the family, and possibly the genus level. They are preserved in a finely bedded shale. This one one is the largest one it is about 8 inches long.
  13. Betulites sp.

    From the album Plants

    Betulites sp. Upper Cretaceous Cenomanian Dakota Formation Ellsworth Kansas USA Length 6cm / 2 inch
  14. Pterosaur Fossils are a rarity, and few ever are on the public market, but the Pterosaurs from the Kem Kem Beds are seen most commonly on the market, this is rather not due to an unusally high Pterosaur abundance, but rather because almost every Fossil is being collected at this locality. Currently, there are 4 named species from the Kem Kem Beds, but the actual number is far higher. The Named Taxa are Alanqa saharica, Xericeps curvirostris, Sirrocopteryx morrocanus and Coloborhynchus fluviferox. Some unnamed ones im allowed to talk about are the Kem Kem Tapejarid, a small Chaoyangopterid species and a 3rd Ornithocheirid. The small Chaoyangopterid originally was identified as a Pteranodontid, but it is a Chaoyangopterid. There are up to 4 more Pterosaurs from this Locality, but I am not allowed to talk about them, all of them Azhdarchoids though. The 3rd Ornithocheirid wont affect the identification of any of the Ornithocheirid teeth, but that's all I can say. Sirrocopteryx and Coloborhynchus The Identification of Pterosaur Teeth from Kem Kem has recently become impossible to the genus level, for the most part that. C. fluviferox is a gigantic Ornithocheirid, and any Teeth of greater size might be referable to it, cf. Coloborhynchus fluviferox. Another thing notable is that the Identification can be restricted to a subfamily, Coloborhynchinae indet. instead of Ornithocheiridae/Anhangueridae indet., although this is rather Nitpicky. Alanqa and Xericeps Both of these Taxa are primarily known from Mandible and Rostral Tips, identification of these is rather easy, with the one of Alanqa being triangular in crossection, and the ones of Xericeps curving upward. Loads of Postcrania is also often refered the either of the two, referal is inconclusive though, especially considering there are more than just those two. The Chaoyangopterid and Tapejarid I have never seen either two on sale, but I will be mentioning them further too. The Tapejarid is a large Taxon related to Sinopterus, it's the first image. But there is more Material I cant mention. The small Chaoyangopterid is just a mandible fragment, but it has a rather deep crest. What about the Dsungaripterid? The Material of the Dsungaripterid most likely represents Xericeps.
  15. Heterodontus sp. Russia

    From the album Odd and Rare Shark Teeth

    A Cenomanian aged Heterodontus sp. from the Ryazan Region of Russia.
  16. Heterodontus sp. Russia

    From the album Odd and Rare Shark Teeth

    A Cenomanian aged Heterodontus sp. from the Ryazan Region of Russia.
  17. Chasing Opal and Fossils in the Australian Outback An ambitious collaboration between scientists and a local mining community seeks to preserve one-of-a-kind opalized fossils. BY Clare Watson, Undark https://undark.org/article/chasing-opal-fossils-australian-outback/ A recent paper is: Bell, P.R., Fanti, F., Hart, L.J., Milan, L.A., Craven, S.J., Brougham, T. and Smith, E., 2019. Revised geology, age, and vertebrate diversity of the dinosaur-bearing Griman Creek Formation (Cenomanian), Lightning Ridge, New South Wales, Australia. Palaeogeography, palaeoclimatology, palaeoecology, 514, pp.655-671. Yours, Paul H.
  18. Fish & fossils

    Although we didnt realy plan for a fossil field trip, we did go to Boulogne sur mer yesterday to visit the aquarium "Nausica". and since the chalk cliffs of cap blanc nez are only 20min away from there we did make a stop for a couple of hours at the beach at the cliffs. I can recomend a visit to the aquarium to enyone who visit's the are, it is definitely worth a visit, although the entrence fee is quite expensive. On our visit at the beach we were only equiped with a small hammer, but lots of boulders shore were already broken through the waves and still deliverd quite a lot of fossils. I also picked up a pice of chalk with a bone fragment in it. this was something I haven't found there before, we are still prepping this to see what we can make out of it: Visit at the aqurium: the vieuw at the top of the "Grand Blanc Nez", You can see the UK from there Vieuw on the coastline: ammonite in the boulders: the finds: the mystery bone:
  19. Bone ID from the cenomanian chalk of France.

    I'm used to find ammonites and invertebrates, but this time I took home piece of chalk from the beach with a bone inside. I have totaly no Idea of what kind of bone this is or even from what kind of creature. I am still prepping the piece, but those are already the 1st few pictures. hopefully someone got more info on this: Cenomanian from cap-blanc-nez France ( marine chalk deposits)
  20. O. dunkeli Kem Kem?

    Hello all I recently bought a tooth from the Kem Kem beds that clearly belongs to the genus Onchopristis. The weird thing about the tooth is that it has two hooks instead of just one. I know the species Onchopristis dunkeli has two (or more) hooks, but I don't find any official rapports metioning them in the Kem Kem beds. The tooth has yet to arrive, but I already wanted to ask the question. What do you think? Is there a chance O. dunkeli occurs in the Kem Kem beds or would it just be a pathological example. I have been searching a long time for a specimen like this. The tooth has not yet arrived so sorry, no photo's yet. @LordTrilobite, @Haravex Greetings Thijs
  21. Epibionts on ammonites

    This weekend Natalie found an intriguing fossil: a Hypoturrillites whit an epibiont on the shell. I've rarely seen this kind of association and it makes me wonder if the epibiont was already on the shell when the ammonite was alive or dit it grow on it after it fell on the sea floor. If anyone has papers on the subject it would be greatly apriciated ( @doushantuo maybe? )
  22. I just spend the evening cleaning and preping some of the cephalopods I found last weekend. those are all from the cenomanian at the French coast. A couple of nautiloids ( Eutrephoceras sp. ) A couple of turrelites and a Manteliceras sp.
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