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Found 79 results

  1. I'm virtually certain this tooth is an upper intermediate tooth of Parotodus benedeni from the Middle Miocene Sharktooth Hill Bonebed, Bakersfield, Kern County, CA. It's about 1 1/4 inches high (32mm) and an inch wide (25mm). It could be a juvenile tooth but I think the less-expanded root lobes indicate a tooth position between larger teeth. It's too big to be a symphyseal and the root is wrong for that anyway. The root is too high to be a posterior. The pallial dentine is worn away but you can see the depression of the bourlette. It isn't serrated and not the shape of Carcharocles megalodon. It's definitely not a Carcharodon hastalis nor planus tooth and it's not Isurus. I'm wondering if anyone else has a tooth like this - maybe a Lee Creek collector or another STH collector. Jess
  2. What do you think about this Cave bear paw? The seller said that it's 100% genuine and authentic but i'm not sure.
  3. Books on Extinct Elephants

    I've taken a great intreast in the subject of extinct elephants and wondered if there were any interesting books on them? Books with other megafauna and the Cenozoic in general included are fine.
  4. Fossillarry's Mammals

    As Larry familiarizes himself with how to attach photos to his posts, I will be posting for him. Larry is a humble collector of mammals but he is very experienced. He is one of the rare mammal collectors with knowledge of Eocene-Pleistocene groups. Most collectors specialize in Oligocene or Miocene-Pleistocene of North America but he knows a wide variety of forms specializing in ungulates (hoofed mammals of the Perissodactyla and Artiodactyla. He's hunted from California to Nebraska and South Dakota to Texas. The first specimen he'd like to share with the forum is a 2-tooth maxilla section of Cardiolophus, an early tapiroid from the Early Eocene, Willwood Formation of Bighorn Basin, Wyoming. A tapiroid is a perissodactyl (odd-toed ungulate) that currently appears to be part of the lineage that connects to modern tapirs or is likely related to that lineage. Larry might ask me to clarify that further. One thing to remember about Cardiolophus is that it was part of a great radiation of mammals that appeared at the base of the Eocene. It was the time of the earliest horse, tapir, chalicothere, and titanothere.. These animals were very much alike in form and dentition as they descended from a common ancestor in the Late Paleocene. Also attached is a photo of jaw sections of Cardiolophus. Jess
  5. Anyone good with amber?

    I got this amber when I was a small kid. It used to have a tag with its source listed, but it's been lost for 12+ years, and I can't for the life of me remember what it said. Looking at it, does anyone know whether it's more likely to be Dominican, or Baltic? It is yellow, but has a slight gold tint, and is slightly translucent. There's a couple of small buggos in it.
  6. A revised Cenozoic global sea-level curve is discussed in an open access paper with associated numerical time series for plotting. the Cenozoic global sea-level curve. it is: Miller, K.G., Browning, J.V., Schmelz, W.J., Kopp, R.E., Mountain, G.S. and Wright, J.D., 2020. Cenozoic sea-level and cryospheric evolution from deep-sea geochemical and continental margin records. Science Advances, 6(20), p.eaaz1346. Open access PDF of paper Time series for plotting the Cenozoic sea-level curve Yours, Paul H.
  7. What is it?

    Hi all, I'm recently retired and I live in NW Wyoming and was wondering if anyone could shed some light on these specimens? Im particularly interested in the big rock/fossil? at the top of the picture. I found all of these on the surface in a sandstone, drab mudstone formation. Possibly Eocene, Paleocene time frame based on some quick geologic research. Looks like a foot to me but I suppose it could be about anything. The other items were found in the same area with the larger one. The area would have once been the near the edge or boundary of Lake Gosiute an/or the inland seaway I think. I have enjoyed reading some of the posts, seems like a good forum! Thanks, WyoProspector
  8. Colorado Phanerozoic Stratigraphy https://www.coloradostratigraphy.org/strat-chart/main-strat-chart https://uploads-ssl.webflow.com/5b4d0939b0652926fd03628b/5c8199695979564cce8da9f5_Colorado Stratigraphy Chart.pdf Fossils - Colorado Phanerozoic Stratigraphy https://www.coloradostratigraphy.org/strat-chart/fossils Colorado Cretaceous Stratigraphy https://www.coloradostratigraphy.org/strat-chart/cretaceous-chart https://uploads-ssl.webflow.com/5b4d0939b0652926fd03628b/5c74604fb2a27c4217bd3f77_Colorado Cretaceous Chart.pdf Colorado Cenozic Stratigraphy https://www.coloradostratigraphy.org/strat-chart/cenozoic-chart https://uploads-ssl.webflow.com/5b4d0939b0652926fd03628b/5c81993671795501757340f2_Colorado Cenozoic Chart.pdf Colorado Stratigraphy https://www.coloradostratigraphy.org Site Map https://www.coloradostratigraphy.org/site-map Yours, Paul H.
  9. I have been photographing my collection of Pliocene gastropods from the Southeastern US, but I realize that I will never be able to completely picture every specimen within my collection. On a Facebook page about fossil crabs, @MB has been showing individual drawers within his collection. I like what he is doing so I thought I would do something similar here with drawers within my collection of fossil gastropods. My display collection is organized chronologically, the first seven drawers being Pleistocene. Since many of the formations within the southeast share species and I have limited room within my drawers, I display the two best specimens from any formation within the group so there should be no duplicates unless the same species from different formations demonstrate noticeable variation. Within my Pleistocene drawers, the following formations are represented: Upper Pleistocene Fort Thompson (Florida) Flanner Beach (North Carolina) Chibania (Middle) Bermont Formation (Florida) Calabrian (Lower) Caloosahatchee (Florida) Nashua (Florida) Waccamaw (North and South Carolina) James City (North Carolina) Gelasian (Lowest) Chowan River (North Carolina) Pleistocene Drawer 1 contains the Families Fissurellidae, Calliostomidae, Turbinidae, Epitoniidae, Eulimidae, Cerithiidae, Potamididae, Turrritellidae, and Vermetidae. Quarter for scale.
  10. Hello all Up for trade is this set of South-American teeth. It includes 11 Chilean and 4 Peruvian teeth. The C. chubutensis, Isurus desori and Carcharhinus cf. brachyurus (the last three are on the right side) are from Peru. The others (Megachasma pelagios, C. hastalis, Carcharhinus cf. brachyurus, Isurus retroflexus and a fish tooth labelled as dog fish (not sure if correct) and some unidentified teeth. The C. hastalis is just over 2 inch. The Megachasma pelagios is around 2 cm. The C. chubutensis is just under 2 inch and has a crack in the root, but is broken. More precise location is available with every tooth. I prefer to trade this as a set. Also up for trade are these partial teeth from the Santonian of Israel. Certainly an unusual location. What do I want in return? Squalicorax teeth from unusual locations, any Kem Kem stuff I find cool (teeth, bones, scutes, unknow stuff), reptile, amphibian or dinosaur stuff, Mosasaur teeth from Unusual locations or I'm open for any offer I like Due to Corona I can only ship after the end of the lockdown.
  11. Hi, Even in this hard times of corona virus outbreak I couldn't resist the urge to visit again a cave that I found a few weeks ago, but couldn't explore it fully. So I went again and this last time I went in the cave I found a great number of bones scattered around the cave. I think they are probably modern, but it is weird because the cave isn't very easily accessible for animals since it has a few big drops. I found this tooth in a small ,,room,, which was barely big enough to squeeze in to. In that same place there were a small broken skull and many bones, but this is just one of the many places with such bones. At first I even thought that some explorers ate a chicken or something like that in there, but the bones are just too many and THIS WOULD HAVE BEEN A CHICKEN SLAUGHTER FEST. I would be glad to hear your opinions on what creature is this toot from and if it is modern or ancient. The color I guess would suggest modern but i am no expert on how are bones preserved in caves and sadly I have no information on the age of the cave. I hope you are all fine and the virus never gets to you!
  12. Greetings! I spent my career as a research paleontologist with the U.S. Geological Survey (Menlo Park, California) and the California Academy of Sciences (San Francisco), specializing in Cenozoic marine mollusks of the North Pacific and Arctic oceans. My summer fieldwork for 34 years was in Alaska, Siberia and northern Canada up toward the North Pole. Several times I had the indescribable thrill of being the first collector, perhaps the first human being, to visit a remote fossil site, reached by bush plane or helicopter. I was often dropped off to spend the day alone at remote sites up to 60 miles (100 kms) away. I had a number of extreme adventures, including killing an attacking grizzly with my only bullet, fending off a pack of wolves circling me, crashing in a helicopter, escaping a landslide by jumping into a passing river raft, and near-drownings in icy rivers. Of course, it was all worth it because of the fossils! My main work was documenting Cenozoic faunal and climate changes in the Arctic. However, my most notable accomplishment was solving the age-old mystery of Bering Strait’s age, which was featured on the cover of Nature. Most satisfying was discovering an unnamed river in remotest Alaska and naming it the Spirit River. I’m happy to say that my friend Warren Allmon, Director of the Paleontological Research Institution, wrote, “This memoir is a can’t-put-down page-turner, equal parts Jack London and Marincovich’s idol Roy Chapman Andrews. It is not just a rip-roaring adventure story; it also eloquently communicates both the intellectual thrill of scientific discovery and the emotional (and spiritual) energy derived from genuine exploration in some of the most challenging — and beautiful — environments on Earth.” He and other reviewers commented on the laugh-out-loud humor in my book. My book won a Bronze Medal in the Adventure category of a national book contest, and it has become an Amazon #1 Best Seller in its category. Reviews of my memoir are on Amazon.com and Goodreads.com I hope that fossil enthusiasts here enjoy reading about my adventures and research. My web site at www.loumarincovich.com has an array of photos from my fieldwork days and a list of my larger publications. Lou
  13. Hello everyone, I have decided a while ago that I would focus on collecting Paleozoic material, because of this there are quite a few fossils I have that I purchased a long time ago and do not have an interest in keeping, these guys are not that special and I am not looking for much of anyone even does want to trade with me, but I do prefer Paleozoic material. I will post what I have here. 1.Lebanese shrimp fossil Cretaceous GONE/TRADED 2. Geocoma carinata I believe from the Solnhofen 3. Chunkosaurus 4.some cretaceous teeth, spinosaurus, Squalicorax, scapanorynchus, enchodus 5. Some gastropods 6.otodus obliquus Morocco eocene
  14. Hi my name is Elias and I am new to the Forum! About a week ago I found a large piece of what looked to be fossilized bone, on Folly Beach SC. Upon further examination I noticed that it seemed to have a solid light gray center surrounded by a ring of bone. Further research has led me to believe this may be a chunk of Mastadon tusk, however the specimen is so beaten up it is hard to identify any Schreger lines. I am much more experienced in Cambrian and Ordovician fossils, and have just recently begun exploring fossils of the Pleistocene Epoch. I would appreciate any help on identifying what this is, and can send more or clearer photos if necessary! Thank you so much for your help! Elias
  15. I recently saw a wonderful diagram showing the fossil ranges of various scleractinian coral architectures, or at least the ranges of genera typical of those architectures. But now I can't seems to find it again... The diagram included images of the various coral growth forms and was simpler than but otherwise similar to this: If anyone knows where I might have seen such a diagram, please post the url here -- thanks!
  16. hexapoda/mantoidae/Oise /Pseudomantoida

    New Paleogene mantises from the Oise amberand their evolutionary importance THOMAS SCHUBNEL and ANDRE NEL Acta Palaeontologica Polonica 64 (4): 779–786. schuNELinsemantilagersthexapoapp006282019.pdf @Coco @fifbrindacier
  17. A couple of weeks ago, I was in Barnes & Noble bookstore and spotted this book in the science section. It's too close to Christmas to get it for myself but I was content to look through it there. I was familiar with the artwork of Jay Matternes (and I'd seen the cover of the book two months before it was published in October) from various publications especially a small souvenir booklet I bought at the visitor center at Agate Fossil Beds National Monument back in the 90's. In that little book there are mini versions of murals he painted for the halls of the Smithsonian along with reconstructions to show the skeleton, musculature, and body exterior based on fossils and modern animal comparisons. It's beautiful work. In "Visions of Lost Worlds" I saw the same kind of artwork and reconstructions but this new book also has preliminary sketches to show his process from idea to finished work. If I don't get it from Santa, I'm going to get it and eventually write a review for the forum (although maybe I just did). I already love this book. Jess
  18. Cenozoic Giant Reptile Material?

    In recent years, I have become just as interested, if not more so, in non-dinosaurian prehistoric large reptiles than in dinosaurs themselves. Especially giant reptiles of the Cenozoic. Right now one of my prize pieces is a partial Megalania vertebra from Australia. However, I would like to acquire more large Cenozoic reptile fossils in the future, such as sebecosuchians, palaeophiids, giant crocodiles and giant tortoises. What material of this kind have TFF members seen available commercially? Would also like to have information on Triassic non-dinosaur reptiles. And Palaeosaniwa, Hell Creek's Komodo dragon.
  19. petrified bone? petrified wood?

    Any help on identifying what these might be would be great. Found near Reno, Nevada in an area stated as being from the Cenozoic period. They appear to be bone to me and I did use the "stick to tongue" test and they do stick to my tongue for a second. Thank you for any help or a push in the right direction for me to find out more specifically what they are. I will add more pics in comment section.
  20. Mystery Mammal Tooth

    I saw this tooth at a gem and mineral show a few years ago. Unfortunately, it didn't have a label. Normally, I pass on fossils with no info no matter how cheap and intriguing they are but it was unlike anything I've had in my collection so I bought it. I just found it again this year while trying to clear and clean up some space. It's a mostly-complete crown, perhaps a lower molar, with perhaps some root but the base of the tooth is almost completely obscured by restoration which appears to be plaster. A little plaster was also used to restore part of a cusp and part of a side. The plaster appears off-white to a yellow-orange against the brown enamel in the photos. That indicates it's an old collection piece as almost nobody uses plaster anymore, various types of putty having been the preferred material for at least the past couple of decades. It's about 1 1/2 x 1 11/16 inches in occlusal view and the crown is about 5/16 to 11/16 inches high. I showed it to a fossil dealer with a lot of experience with a range of mammals. He thought it could be something unusual from the Eocene and more likely the later Eocene. I think it might be an early gomphothere tooth and one most likely from North America (as it came out of a private collection in California but that's really just a guess) which would make it Middle-Late Miocene in age. I guess it could be some kind of anthracothere. I don't know. I was wondering what any of the "mammal people" think of it. @fossillarry @Harry Pristis Jess
  21. Hey Everyone - I hope someone can provide some insight and help me identify this fossil. I would really appreciate it! I found this strange looking tooth (at least I think it is) a few years ago in San Antonio, Texas. It feels and looks like a rock as far as texture goes but it's shaped very similar to an animal tooth. I've attached photos for reference and labeled each one: Front Back Side Front Height - 5 inches (12.7 centimeters) Front Width - 4.5 inches (11.43 centimeters) I've also attached a Geology Map of Texas which outlines where rocks of various geologic ages are visible on the surface of Texas today. On the map, I circled in yellow the location of where San Antonio, Texas is for reference. Hopefully it can provide more insight for you. I'm not even close to a geology expert but limestone is very prominent in San Antonio. The city is also home to The Edwards Aquifer which may or may not be useful. I'd be happy to answer any questions and I can also take additional pictures if needed. Looking forward to hearing back from you all!
  22. Hello everyone, I have enjoyed trading fossils with people on the forum so here are two more I have to offer. This is a nice pair of Thalassina anomalas from Australia, the larger one is missing most of the tail but has pretty nice pincers which are not commonly found intact. Their sizes are around 8 and 5 cm. The smaller one also has an incomplete tail. I myself am looking for Paleozoic fossils especially trilobites. Thank you, Misha.
  23. I watched a show on PBS last night, "When Whales Walked: Journeys in Deep Time." I just happened to notice it on the guide about 45 minutes before it was on. It is actually about more than the evolution of whales, the group having four-footed Early Eocene ancestors. There is a long segment roughly twenty minutes long each on crocodilians, birds, whales, and elephants. I thought it was a good show overall with interviews of researchers I know from their technical articles ( Hans-Dieter Sues, Philip Gingerich, Emmanel Gheerbrant, Christian de Muizon). However, each segment was also a little light on content for the topic and one was especially unclear. The one on birds made it appear that Deinonychus was an ancestor of later birds. They should have showed a chart showing when it lived in the Cretaceous with Archaeopteryx and the Liaoning birds millions of years before. There was a quick view of a family tree that seemed to illustrate that but it went by in a second or two. The segment on whales showed a lot of footage of modern whales and some great background on the "first whale," Pakicetus, but it didn't show any of the whales described in the past twenty years. It just mentioned that there had been recent discoveries. I thought there should have been at least a quick look at Ambulocetus and a few of the increasingly more marine-adapted forms that lived before Basilosaurus. They pretty much jumped from Pakicetus to Basilosaurus to the divergence of toothed and baleen whales. I think they could have spent the two hours just on the whales just as the title of the show led me to believe. I liked the segment on elephants because just as I was expecting the show to skip the earliest known members of the group, they go to Morocco and then talk to Emmanuel Gheerbrant who described Phosphatherium, the first probiscidean, which is known from the same early Eocene phosphate layer as a lot of the shark teeth we see at shows are from. Other extinct forms were descussed as well. Here's a link that takes to an online notice and website: https://www.pbs.org/show/when-whales-walked-journeys-deep-time/ Jess
  24. Recently I’ve found some strange fossils from an area in Simi Valley (Southern California). I had thought there were only shells, but turns out there is vertebrate material! Among other fragments, I found a couple big whale vertebrae as well as this piece here that I am unsure about. I’ve seen some mentions of fossils from smaller marine mammals like dolphins and pinnipeds, maybe it’s one of those? Unfortunately there only one end present, so I’m not expecting to get anything too specific. The formation is about 5 million to 11 thousand years more. Hopefully I can get some more interesting things from that spot. Thanks!
  25. I was on a hike on top of a hill (about 700 feet in elevation) in Chino Hills (roughly 50 miles inland from the Southern California coast line) and I picked up a few loose sedimentary slabs and looked under them. I found this clear fossil of a seashell. I’m wondering how old it could be? What period was a sea covering Southern California and this high up from sea level?
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