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Found 55 results

  1. I was on a hike on top of a hill (about 700 feet in elevation) in Chino Hills (roughly 50 miles inland from the Southern California coast line) and I picked up a few loose sedimentary slabs and looked under them. I found this clear fossil of a seashell. I’m wondering how old it could be? What period was a sea covering Southern California and this high up from sea level?
  2. Whale Ear Bone

    I found this in a creek in the Charleston, South Carolina area where I often find sharks teeth and whale bones. I believe the site is Oligocene/Pliocene. If found anywhere else, I would have assumed it was a piece of gravel and tossed it, but it does look a little strange. Perhaps someone with more experience in the Cenozoic can help with the ID. The item is about 3 inches at its longest dimension. Like I said, I am thinking tumbled gravel on this one, but figured that I would check before throwing it in the garden.
  3. Fossil whale bone (specific bone ID)

    Hello all, So i've recently come into the possession of this chunk of bone, and based on the size, porosity, and locality (York River State Park) I believe it's a whale bone (Miocene-Pleistocene in age, likely a mysticete). My question is, which bone exactly is it? It seems to have some fairly distinctive features that seem to lend towards identification, but after around two days of research i'm stumped. I'm thinking it could be anything but some vertebral element, but i'm not sure. Any help is greatly appreciated.
  4. Maybe ancient mammal bone

    In addition to the possible orthocone fossil I found in the same creek, I found this mammal bone. I live about ten miles as the crow flies from Big Bone Lick State Park in Kentucky. I live on a cattle farm (have had horses on the farm before as well spanning at least 50 years). This bone struck me as looking quite old due to the coloration and the slight erosion on it. With me living on a cattle farm, I’m leaning towards it being some sort of bovid bone, but want to know your all’s opinion. Thanks!
  5. Fossil bone

    Bought this fossil bone from an old man, not sure what it is, guesses?
  6. Seasonal skate

    MArr A new Miocene skate from the Central Paratethys (Upper Austria): the first unambiguous skeletal record for the Rajiformes (Chondrichthyes: Batomorphii) Giuseppe Marramà, Ortwin Schultz & Jürgen Kriwet Journal of Systematic Palaeontology, DOI: 10.1080/14772019.2018.1486336 category: "stand well back when reading this" 10 out of ten
  7. Microgastropods of the USA

    p295-308GARVIE.pdf Microgastropod population changes from the early Cretaceous to the Recent in the Gulf Coastal Plain of the USA CHRISTOPHER L. GARVIE Zoosymposia(1),2008
  8. lucinids

    DIJK John.D.Taylor and Emily A.Glover Hanging on-lucinid bivalve survivors from the Paleocene and Eocene in the Western Indian Ocean(Bivalvia:Lucinidae) Zoosystema,2018/v.40-7 about 6.2 MB RECOMMENDED! New genus: Retrolucina(previously Eomiltha) http://zoobank.org/urn:lsid:zoobank.org:act:DAFC3EBA-0C19-4D63-8248-65A6F761670A
  9. Vacation Fossils

    Our first full day of sun, sand, and surf in Jamaica bumped up against some fossils, and pseudofossils. In this area (St Ann’s Parish), more than 75% of the rock here is limestone spanning from the Cretaceous to periods in the Cenozoic. Not far from me is the Blue Mountains, the highest altitude on the island (we’re planning on a day trip to see the coffee cultivators and a 12 mile downhill bike ride). Given the abundance of limestone, it is no surprise that it features prominently in a lot of building material. Here is some fossil coral in some large, raw blocks:
  10. Chinese fruit

    Spirematospermum_wetzlerilagerstertifloracarpolzingib_Heer_Chandler_Zingiberac.pdf Spirematospermum wetzleri (Heer) Chandler (Zingiberaceae) from the Miocene ofWeichang, Hebei Province, North China and the phytogeographic history of the genus Ya Li Tie-Mei Yi Journal of Palaeogeography (2018) 7:7,3, Yue-Zhuo Li4 and Cheng-Sen Li1* Fossil zingiberids( gingers,bananas) are rare,of course outtake:
  11. decapodal delights

    Carrie Schweitzer Additions to the Tertiary Decapod fauna of the Pacific Northwest of North America Journal of Crustacean Biology,21(2),521-537/2001 jcb0521.pdf newly designated species are mentioned in the tags size:0,245 MB,approximately an outtake:
  12. nuts to you

    geerodenmamma{climatessoetholCE!!03.x.pdf A Miocene Rodent Nut Cache in coastal Dunes from the Miocene Lower Rhine Embayment,Germany Carole T.Gee,P.Martin Sander,B Petzelberger/Palaeontology 46/6-2003 Read this one a couple of days ago. Less than 2 Mb,and very highly recommended the authors link micromammal functional ecology,paleophytogeograpy,paleoclimate and stratigraphy in an engaging way
  13. I don't read a lot about hominid fossils but I try to keep up with general knowledge of recent finds and discussions. Sometimes, the various science magazines will publish a special issue on the subject and I try to pick up a copy. The September issue of Natural History is devoted to human origins with a few articles with even one on the ancient primates of the Paleocene and Eocene along with a reprinted column by the late Stephen J. Gould. I haven't read it yet but leafed through it (nice artwork and fossil photos in it). I had seen it that month at a local Barnes & Noble but the last copy was all bent-up like an accordion. I looked for it at another store but couldn't find it. I went back to pick up the beat-up one I had seen but it was gone. After hunting around the magazine website, I found that back issues were available so I mailed away for it ($7 including shipping). Ten days later, it arrived. In case anyone else is interested, here's the link to page with the back issue address - just scroll down to it: http://www.naturalhistorymag.com/contact.html
  14. fossil wasps

    re I used this link because the PLOS link is too slow 76 Mb Citation: Spasojevic T, Wedmann S, Klopfstein S (2018) Seven remarkable new fossil species of parasitoid wasps (Hymenoptera, Ichneumonidae) from the Eocene Messel Pit. PLoS ONE 13(6): e0197477. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal. pone.0197477
  15. Bird ?

    I was walking in the beach (Sesimbra- Portugal) and I just found this nice fossil. I just know that is from Cenozoic age. Can anyone help me? thank you in advance best regards PG
  16. Just got back from the Orlando Fossil Fair 2018, I bought some nice fossils but many were not identified and I want to confirm ID's for ones that were. There's a lot of fossils so I'll label each one with information and my own opinon on them. All the fossils shown are allegedly carnivores and found in the Suwannee River in Florida (excluding two of them). The furthest on the left will be #1, and the furthest on the right will be #4. I'm not convinced that 1 is a carnivore but besides that I don't have any hypothesis on what the others could be. The left one in this picture is 5, the one on the right is 6. Five reminds me of a bear, and I don't have any idea what 6 is or if it's even a carnivore. The tooth will be 7 the jaw will be 8, both are allegedly dire wolves (they're not associated) from 'Northern Florida', I don't have an exact locality unfortunately. I suspect these both belong to dire wolves. The furthest left will be 9, and the furthest right is 11. I suspect 9 and 10 to be racoon teeth, but I'm not sure if racoons are found in the Suwannee river. At first I thought 11 was a canid, but after looking at it for awhile it looks more like a feline. This last specimen will be 12, right now I'm stuck between a primitive canid (possibly leptocyon) a feline, or some sort of fox. This specimen was also found in the Suwannee, like the rest except the dire wolves. If you need more pictures I can take some and post them within the hour. Thanks in advance!
  17. Mammal Jaw Fragment

    I obtained this mammal jaw at the Colorado School of Mines Geology Garage Sale a couple of years ago in a box of rocks that had been detached from their labels and so lost much of their scientific value. That made the box of rocks cheap, but it means that I am on my own to figure out what all of it is and have no location information at all. I am hoping that someone on here will maybe recognize it enough to steer me in the right direction for even a higher taxonomic level identification. I am more than happy to provide photographs from any additional angles that would be helpful so please just ask! Any thoughts are greatly appreciated!
  18. intriguing Sarmatian bryozoan

    pauldtayontoanbryozLBB_0038_1_0055-0064.pdf About 0,71 MB Recommended ,not in the least because of the stature of the first author. Short,well illustrated,informative Taylor et al:Unusual Early Development in A cyclostome bryozoan from the Ukrainian Miocene Linzer Biol.Beitr.38/1,2006
  19. Rahmat_phocarnivmammamarinel_2017_New_Miocene_Monachinae_from_the_Chesapeake_Bay.pdf Vestnik zoologii, 51(3): 221–242, 2017 NEW MIOCENE MONACHINAE FROM THE WESTERN SHORE OF THE CHESAPEAKE BAY (MARYLAND, USA) S. J. Rahmat¹*, I. A. Koretsky¹, J. E. Osborne², A. A. Alford² species decribed:Terranectes,Leptophoca,mostly postcranial material about 2,4 Mb ->urn:lsid:zoobank.org:pub:F727C8DF-EE1F-4A99-8EA5-647859C72E58 outtake:
  20. In the current (July-August 2018) issue of American Scientist magazine there's an article on champsosaurs. Anyone who's collected Late Cretaceous fossils in Montana, the Dakotas, Wyoming, or southern Canada has probably found a few. You tend to get just a paragraph or two about the group in mainstream science articles about animals that survived the K/T extinctions but there's a whole article about them. Check out your local Barnes & Noble if you don't have online access.
  21. So, I found this today in the Paleocene Aquia Formation of Maryland. Obviously it can't be an ammonite, because they were already extinct. It's a Nautilus steinkern, right, not some sort of gastropod? Thanks! Matt
  22. NALMA, SALMA, GABI

    FLYKOwswish this article has some bearing on the following issues: Mammal biochronology,the precise timing and/or speed of the G(reat)A(merican)B(iotic)I(nterchange),it contains some remarks on mammal taxa(however brief), magnetostratigraphic resolution from the Miocene to the Pleistocene, the closing of the Panama isthmus, and the possible diachroneity of mammal taxon appearances. There are NO taxa illustrated,and the authors' (infrequent)use of "heterochroneity " is unfortunate . If you have Woodburne(2012): this might be up your alley I liked it,but I'm weird that way
  23. Hi, It's been a while since I've put anything up on here so it figured it would a good time to share some of my finds from this spring so far. With such a productive winter the start of this spring on the Bouldnor Fm. coast was a bit slow with several trips in which little was found (odd for what is usually a heavily productive site) but as March and April came round the finds started coming in faster and better. Access at Bouldnor is now very dangerous and pretty much impassable due to thick and deep silt and mud which has covered part of the beach (which I found out the hard way trying to get through), along with two recent cliff falls which have brought several oak trees down onto the beach. Hamstead and Cranmore are as good as ever with a lot of the winter's mudflows now eroding away and making the foreshore a lot easier. (Hamstead Ledge on a spring low tide) Mammal finds have been pretty nice so far this spring, as usual all Bothriodon, and alongside them I've also made some nice alligator and turtle finds including two partial Emys in-situ in the Upper Hamstead Mbr. Here are some of the highlights: 1. More pieces of the large Bothriodon mandible I first found in January have turned up scattered over the same area. I now have part of the hinge, two sections with P2 - M3 and a part of the underside of the mandible from further forward. I regularly check the site on my collecting trips so hopefully yet more of the jaw will turn up. (The positions of the fragments may be slightly off in the image below but it gives a general idea) 2. Bothriodon caudal vertebra. This is one of my favourite finds from this spring. I was originally excavating a small micro-vertebrate site when I felt the tool make contact with a large bone, I dug a bit deeper into the clay and found this vertebra with the processes fragmented around it. Luckily with a bit of super glue the processes were easily reunited with the vertebral body, after 33 million years apart. Unfortunately I couldn't locate the other transverse process or neural spine in the matrix nearby so I think they may have been broken off on the Oligocene coastal plain. 3. Bothriodon upper molar in a fragment of maxilla 4. Section of Bothriodon mandible with a nice mental foramen. Unfortunately no in-situ teeth with this one. 5. Section of mammalian limb bone with evidence of rodent gnawing. This was an in-situ find eroding out of the Upper Hamstead Mbr. on the foreshore. Gnaw marks like these are really common on in-situ material especially on limb bones. I don't think the rodents were scavenging the flesh off the bones, more likely they were extracting calcium and phosphate or were simply using it to grind down their continually growing incisors. Either way it shows that for at least a period a lot of these bones were exposed to the elements and accessible to the variety of rodents present on the coastal plain. 6. Nice quality Bothriodon intermedial phalange 7. Large Diplocynodon alligator frontal bone Thanks for reading, and I hope you enjoyed the finds! Theo
  24. All hail the snail/revisionary tactics

    the diehard cladist will like this anyway,but there's slightly more to this article than just that bacomurici279193.pdf less than 1 Mb
  25. King of the Dugong

    Happy March break TTF! I hope you all had a fantastic holiday! I have just gotten back from a fantastic trip to Florida. Thanks to TTF, I was lucky to discover the peace river. This discovery caused an entire re-write of my family's vacation plans. My father, who was also looking forward to walking through a swamp, agreed to join me on an expedition there. This was my first fossil hunting trip in Florida. I would also like to give my thanks and free advertising to Fossil Funatics, the tour operator who organized the hunt and provided the resources for us. We had a very successful two days. The guy is truly helpful, knowledgable, and fun to be around. He kindly gave all of his Dugong ribs and some of his shark teeth to me. We actually went to a stream which feeds into the actual peace river. As soon as we arrived there, I found myself overtaken by a sudden obsession with Dugong bones, earning my the titular nickname given to me by my dad. Since I have literally hundreds fossils from the river, this post will be dedicated to the Dugong bones. More posts on this are to follow! Enjoy!
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