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Found 25 results

  1. Dirk the Triceratops in Leiden

    So the new museum of Naturalis Biodiversity Centre in Leiden, the Netherlands was opened the past weekend and besides having a completely new building and a bunch of new stuff. The T. rex Trix is also back from being on tour in our new dedicated dinosaur hall. But I wanted to share something particular and I'll leave showing the rest of the new museum to others. I volunteer at the museum in the dinosaur prep lab, and over the past years the dino lab team has been prepping away at a whole bunch of Triceratops horridus specimens. It was originally found in 2013 when the museum was looking for a T. rex. Instead they found a number of Triceratops bones in Wyoming. Still wanting a T. rex they looked on. Eventually this T. rex was to be what became the Trix specimen. One of the most complete T. rexes in the world. After getting the T. rex the museum went back to the first location to start digging up those Triceratops bones. It later turned out to be probably the biggest collection of post cranial bones of Triceratops ever found divided between two sites right next to each other. I joined the team about 3 years ago. At first we were just prepping a variety of the bones to see just what we had. It was soon decided that we'd prep one of the skeletons from the upper site and mount that in the new upcoming museum. In the upper site we only had 2 individuals so that it would be easier to distinguish between the different individuals as one of them was much smaller. And now the skeleton is done and standing proud in the new museum. The specimen, now named Dirk, was named for one of the volunteers. There's quite a few bones present. All of the remains were found disarticulated and we don't have a complete skull. We have the braincase, one brow horn, left squamosal, left quadrate, right quadratojugal, both nasals and both dentaries, left articular complex as well as the rostral beak. For the large limb bones we have almost all of them. We're only missing the coracoids and the left ulna. Most of the toe bones as missing but we have a few of the hind toe bones. We have partial vertebrae of most of the back and around half the ribs. The sacrum is missing but the rest of the pelvis has all the real bones. For the tail we only have a single vert and chevron. Personally I've mostly worked on the skull bones such as the nasals and dentary as well as vertebrae. I also did some putty work on the arm bones. All of the missing bones were 3d printed. The scans are mostly based on the Lane specimen. And who knows, maybe we'll have a few more Triceratops skeletons mounted in the future. But there's still a lot of prepping to do.
  2. Milk River Ridge Reservoir

    Hello all, Early part of June this year I was able to get, for the first time, to a place I hadn't picked before. Nicknamed "Dino Beach" at the south end of Milk River Ridge Reservoir (MMR) a little south and east of the community of Raymond, Alberta. I was told the fossil bones would be black compared to those found at Dinosaur Provincial Park (DPP) and they weren't wrong. The water washes bones from the base of the wall and all we had to do was walk along and fine what was available. We made it there late afternoon so only had a few hours to pick around but it was fun and rewarding. A couple verts, a piece of rib and a larger piece of undetermined bone. We spent the next day picking pieces of dino bone fragments from a dry gully south of DPP and you can see the difference in color and preservation.
  3. I purchased these two fossils a while ago. Both are from the Hell Creek Formation in South Dakota, and both were described as hadrosaur jaws. They definitely seem to resemble the jaws of hadrosaurs, however I've noticed that the empty tooth rows of ceratopsians look extremely similar (to my untrained eyes), which is making me reconsider the seller's ID. I am hoping that someone out there with more knowledge can state confidently if these are ceratopsian or hadrosaur, and preferably if they can briefly explain why they think so. Bonus points if you can state if these are from the upper or lower jaws, or confidently state the genus. (From my limited research, it seems Edmontosaurus is the only hadrosaur described for the Hell Creek in South Dakota; the most abundant ceratopsian is Triceratops, but Torosaurus is also possible, as is Tatankaceratops, and of course the always popular "not yet described".) Let me know if additional photos would help your ID.
  4. Can anyone indentify the species of hadrosaur or ceratopsian left this leg bone in dinosaur provincial park Alberta Canada?
  5. Ceratopsian Parietal Spike

    Hey guys! So about four years ago, someone sold me a really cheap batch of unprepped fossils they dug up in the US; which included a large piece of rib bone (or so the seller thought). I started prepping the 'rib', and thought it looked a little strange. It had a tendon running along the bottom; which seemed weird as it was supposed to be a rib. However, I was still pretty new to fossil prep/ID, and I trusted the seller's ID better than my own. I wound up setting it on the shelf for...a couple years. Fast forward to about a week ago. I was cleaning out my fossil storage 'area' and I came upon this bone again. I again thought it didn't look much like a rib, and decided to google different kinds of dinosaur spikes. After scrolling through all kinds of ankylosaurs, stegosaurs, triceratops, etc. I came upon Styracosaurus. It bore a passing resemblance to the parietal spike on its frill, and I figured I better start prepping it. After prepping it, I was blown away. Not only does the bone have a tendon attached, but there are all kinds of subtle curvatures you couldn't see with the layer of dirt that had covered it. The texture is very unusual too, and the bone is actually really thin! The tip comes to a point and gradually twists. It's hard to describe, so I've included a bunch of pictures. Anyway, after researching more about the sub-family Centrosaurinae, I came across Rubeosaurus and Einiosaurus; which both have spikes that are EXTREMELY similar to the bone I have. If this thing is a rib I'll eat my foot. Please let me know what you think! Any thoughts are much appreciated. -Lauren
  6. I am super excited to say we are adding a couple of fossils from Canada. Part of working on getting a 501c3 is making sure we operate within our own bi laws and working with any laws that govern whatever it is you do in your non profit. I saw a dealer with some Canadian fossils from the Horseshoe Canyon formation that came with a disposition from the Canadian government. I saw an opportunity to grab a few fossils that not only add something to our presentations but gave us legally obtained fossils from our neighbors to the north. The dealer was kind enough to work with us on holding a couple of items that were within our budget. There are some really interesting dinosaurs in Horseshoe Canyon and while we did not add anything rare or spectacular, I am quite happy with what we did pick up. We got our Ankylosaurus scute. We had been looking to pick one up and we were not finding anything affordable. Not only is the one we picked up from Horseshoe Canyon, it was quite affordable for us. I am not yet sure which Anky we will talk about in our program but either way this was a great addition. I think it compliments our "Zuul" tooth very nicely and the kids will really like seeing some of that Anky armor. We also picked up a toe bone from a Ceratopsian. The kids really liked learning about animals other than Triceratops so I jumped at the chance to add one from this formation. Like the Anky scute, the genus and species is indet but I am pretty sure we will talk about Pachyrhinosaurus when we show this fossil. It is a cool critter with a cool name. We talk a lot about Ceratopsians so this was an easy choice. We also added something really cool. We got a Dromaeosaurid tooth. When I purchased it, the seller had said it was from Judith River and labeled it as Dromaeosaurus albertensis. It is not from Judith River. It was actually collected from Red Deer River Badlands near Drumheller in Alberta. I am pretty sure it is actually from Horseshoe Canyon which means it is not Dromaeosaurus. The only described raptor from that formation is Atrociraptor. I will get around to posting better pictures and seeking an ID from TFF members eventually but for now am quite good with going with Atrociraptor for education programs. It was a pretty fearsome looking creature and also pretty different from the other raptors we present. Sure, I whiffed on Dromaeosaurus again but I am not complaining. It is another really nice tooth and we add another dinosaur to educate the kiddos about. This also gives us a theropod from the formation which rounds out the presentation nicely. I am pretty sure the tooth is also legal as it was collected in the 60's and has been in the US since the 70's. Anyway, here are the fossils minus the toe bone which I do not have a picture of yet.
  7. So not too long ago, I acquired a Protoceratops tooth from a German fossil gallery. And I have been looking for more fossils of the species for comparison both in price-range and rarity, but cannot seem to find any other protoceratops fossils anywhere. Does anyone know if these teeth are ever sold online? And have I perhaps made a heck of a buy? I'm not sure if the fossils from the Gobi Desert are rare or just hard to come by, unless you live in Asia. Any information would be appreciated, thanks! (Will put up some pictures of the tooth when I get home later)
  8. A Dynamite Dino Donation

    A few months ago we purchased a T-Rex tooth from TFF member @Troodon and he also gave us a super nice Nano tooth. I never got his permission to mention that sale or the gift so I get that anonymous. That is our only T-Rex material and it was also the first fossil donation to our program from a Fossil Forum member. Those teeth really helped us get started becasue it allowed us to use our small budget to fill in other parts of the dinosaur program around having T-Rex stuff. We owe him a huge thank you for that and I wanted to share this on the forum. Well we now have another gigantic THANK YOU to give Frank. I arrived home from work yesterday to find a package from him and it was beautiful dinosaur fossils and some additional non dinosaur Hell Creek material. There were some fantastic fossils in that box and he helped us really strengthen not only the Hell Creek part of dino program but also our African dinosaur section as well. I say this in most of our posts now because it is true. We could not do what we are doing without the support of The Fossil Forum and the members here. @Troodon shares his knowledge and his identification skills with everybody here and that has been invaluable to me. Our dinosaur program is heavily influenced by the knowledge I have gotten from him and bolstered by his generous donations. Thank you Troodon and all of TFF members who donate fossils, share the knowledge and offer encouragement. We really could not do this without you The box o' dinos..... Thescelosaurus fossils (toe bone, vert, two teeth), a beautiful Ceratopsian tooth from HC, an Edmontosaurus tendon, some awesome HC croc teeth, an R.isosceles tooth, a really nice Spino tooth, an abelisaurid tooth,a beautiful Titanosaur indet tooth, and a Ornithomimid toe bone (possibly a juvie Struthiomimus).
  9. Today is my last day off before I go back to work and I was supposed to spend the day making fossil starter kits. I have a cold though and I do not want the kids to think that 12 million year old shark teeth gave them a cold lol I am pretty bored so I thought I would post about our Judith River dinosaur fossils and how we are going to get discuss this formation. I am really surprised how much I am enjoying learning about these dinosaurs and this will be a formation that we spend a good bit of time on. It must have had some very productive ecosystems and there is a great diversity here to discuss. The kids will also get to see some familiar dinosaur families while learning about species that are new to them. I think during adaptation related presentations, this formation lets us get into ecological niches and discuss how two Tyrannosaurids existed as did at least two species of Dromaeosaurids and a Troodonitd plus other predators including non dinos. That is a lot of hungry mouths so niche selection and adaptations become very important. THere is also a great diversity of herbivores in this formation. I love the Ceratopsians from this formation and the diversity gives my son a lot of artistic options. We currently have one tooth but by the time we present we will have a couple more I think. This allows us to present a few species and say the teeth are not diagnostic so the teeth could have belonged to one or more really cool looking horned dinosaurs. This also gives the kids knowledge that there other Ceratopsians besides Triceratops. This will also be the point where we introduce Dromaeosaurids. Raptors are just iconic and this formation gives us the chance to really hit on adaptations. We have a Saurornitholestes tooth and will soon have a Dormaeosaurid caudal vertebra. While not assigned specifically to Dromaeosaurus, the vert will presented that way so we can talk about the differences between the two raptors. Of particular interest is the larger skull, more robust teeth, and specific wear patterns on the teeth of Dromaeosaurus. We will also have a small tooth tip from a Tyrannosaur indet. The kids will love learning about other Tyrannosaurids and I will leave it to the kids to imagine which one it belonged to. The real owner of the tooth is not important. That two existed in this formation is what is important. They must have occupied different niches plus a lot of kids may think T-Rex was the only member of that family. The last fossil I know we will have from Judith River is one of my favorites. It is an Ankylosaurus tooth and thanks to some help from TFF members, I spotted this among a few Nodosaur teeth. In our inventory, this is Ankylosaurus indet. However, in every single dinosaur presentation we do this will be Zuul and it will be a rock star. We want the kids to understand that there are many new discoveries being made and there will be a lot of new dinosaur discoveries made by THEIR generation. Everything about Zuul will be cool to kids. It is the one of the most incredible fossils ever found, armored dinosaurs are just cool, and it even has a pop culture name that a lot of kids will recognize from Ghostbusters lol Only 5 fossils but we can do A LOT of quality education with these fossils. I also have a very clear idea of the next items to find from Judith River. #1 on that list is a Dromaeosaurus tooth. A tooth gives us the perfect way of illustrating the difference between the raptors. We have two more purchases to complete before I buy again so I will save up and in the spring I start searching for that tooth. I also would love to add a hadrosaur bone from this formation and eventually I will track down a frill piece. Anyway, here a couple of the fossils... Pic 1- our Saurornitholestes tooth. Not a great picture but a really nice tooth. Pic 2- the Dormaeosaurid indet vert. Not here yet but will be right around my B-day. Pic 3- the Anky tooth. It is just a cool tooth and Zuul is a great dinosaur to teach kids about so Zuul is what this tooth is for Fossils on Wheels. Our only fossil from an armored dinosaur.
  10. Back in November of last year, my son and I decided to start our own education non-profit. We wanted to combine his artwork, my teaching skills, and real fossils to create a museum on wheels that takes fun field trips to the classrooms. We had shark teeth and marine mammal fossils so we started building education programs around those. I am very satisfied where those two programs are at though I would love to expand the number of shark species we can present but that is a story for a different day. We knew we would need to get a dinosaur program going at some point but I know nothing about dinosaur fossils so I did not want to start collecting yet. My plan was to wait until late spring or early summer to start building our collection. A friend gave us two hadrosaur teeth and a Hypselosaurus egg shell piece in December so our program got started earlier than planned. As we do with every decision, my son and I talked about picking up a few bargain dinosaur fossils while we tightened up the other programs which are debuting in March. One of the first things I did was join TFF. I was very intimidated by dinosaur fossils and I hoped this place would help me educate myself. I have been a quiet observer so far and have not engaged very much with the dinosaur experts here. I have read a lot of posts and this has been so incredibly helpful. Utilizing the expertise of the members here has also saved me money and stopped me from making one unwise purchase. I have only picked up a few dinosaur items up to this point but without being on this site, I doubt I would have made any attempt at starting this particular collection so soon. I am very grateful for the forum and its members because a lot of people really want to help. I quickly learned that our presentation will be centered on the Hell Creek fauna and we can augment it with some African dinosaurs. After a bit of window shopping, it became apparent right away that Jurassic period dinosaurs were simply too expensive for us. There is no way we will be able to purchase any and trades are unlikely as we just do not have much material that would have much trade value. I can live with this though. If we focus on the T-rex/Ceratopsian fauna of Hell Creek we are giving kids species they know plus introducing them to new species which I am totally cool with. We also decided we could talk Triassic dinosaurs with kids using Bull Canyon fossils. Now I am an avid reader here so I am aware that there is some debate about the species that are found in Bull Canyon and how things are labeled by dealers but I did pick some up because we want to teach kids about the evolution of dinosaurs and to give them a few species that have never heard of. I can not be sure if the teeth I have are Coelophysis teeth but we are still going to present them as such to the students because it is an opportunity to get to early dinosaurs. Same goes for a "prosauropod" tooth we purchased. We are not going to sell the fossils so the correct ID is less important to us than being able to at least have a representation of early dinosaurs for the kiddos. Our early efforts were given a huge boost when a member here helped broker a transaction between another member which resulted in us having a very nice partial T-rex and a Nano. This was huge for us. We got the centerpiece species and it was super affordable. I am still in a bit of shock to be honest and incredibly grateful. We also picked up some inexpensive Hell Creek Triceratops teeth. I found a nice Saurornitholestes from Judith River which gives us a "raptor" fossil for the kids. I got an inexpensive Moroccan sauropod tooth which gives us a "long neck" that we can use. It is really not a bad start in my eyes. We picked some species that we really wanted to include. We also have begun to find some teeth that kids can handle in the form of partial or shed Ceratopsian teeth and inexpensive Spinosaurus teeth from Morocco. I only made one questionable decision. I did not use TFF and ended up misidentifying a tooth. This led us to having two Richardoesstesia gilmorei teeth. We really did not need two fossils from this species but it was a learning experience. I learned that I need keep studying, learning and using the forum. Had I put it here first, instead of testing my own skills, I would not have picked it up . I would have filled another need in the program. Lesson learned and the upside is that I do have a dinosaur fossil I can possibly trade. It is not much for trade I am sure, but maybe I can use it to get a fossil that fills a hole in the program. The most important thing I have learned so far is that I really enjoy collecting dinosaur fossils. I am hooked. I was never a dinosaur kid myself. I preferred sharks and whales but I am really captivated by dinosaurs now. I have been cramming my brain with scientific information about dinosaurs and my son is really enjoying getting a start on his dino artwork. We have a long way to go before we are ready to unleash our budding dino education program. I have a long way to go with my own knowledge too. I do know it will be a lot of fun to learn and I am looking forward to getting more interactive with the dinosaur collectors here. We have settled on the next round of dinosaurs to add (Acheroraptor, Ankylosaur, Pachycephalosaurus, a Troodontid, plus more Ceratopsian material) and they seem attainable so I am excited to get to work on those in the near future. I also learned there are species from the Hell Creek formation that are awesome but we will never have due to price or rarity lol Dakotaraptor is #1 on that list but the avian dinosaurs are not far behind. All things considered, I am super happy with our tiny dinosaur collection and I am really enjoying the hunt for more !!
  11. This report is a bit late, but better late than never! During late July through to mid August 2018 i was on a research trip to study a new Canadian dinosaur footprint site for my Masters degree project. I am based in Australia, and this was the first time i had been to Canada! So of course i had to make the most of it and pay a visit to the world renowned Dinosaur Provincial Park in southern Alberta, arguably the richest site in the world for dinosaur fossils. The park is the best exposure of the Dinosaur Park Formation (which it is now named after), which dates to about 76.5 million years ago during the mid-Campanian. I had long read about this location and watched it on documentaries for so many years growing up as a kid. Finally being there in person was very surreal! I was quite lucky and managed to go on a long, extended walk through the park with one of the guides for about 6 hours in total. In this relatively short amount of time i observed so many amazing fossils. I must have been completely desensitised within the first 30 minutes! It really is incredible how much fossil material there is lying all over the park. In Australia, whole scientific papers are written about isolated or fragmentary dinosaur bones, yet here they were just lying everywhere! The pictures really speak for themselves. As said, all of these fossils were observed in the field during a single days visit to the park. As this is a World Heritage site, nothing was taken, all finds were put straight back onto the ground after i took these photos. It's a VERY hard thing to do, but rules are rules. The only thing that was removed from the park on my trip was my best find of the day... a near-perfect 5.3 cm tyrannosaur tooth from Gorgosaurus!!!! This find was too special to leave behind, so the park tour guide GPS marked the location and brought it back for display, likely at the visitor centre or as a demonstration piece for their guided tours. To say that i have found a tyrannosaur tooth is a great honour! You may remember it from the July 2018 VFOTM poll. Without further ado, here are the pics! It is going to take multiple posts to fit them all in, so scroll all the way down to see them all! Various dinosaur vertebrae. Everything from hadrosaurs (duck billed dinosaurs) and ceratopsians (horned dinosaurs) to theropods (two legged meat eaters) and ankylosaurs (armoured dinosaurs). These were so common! I would probably pick a new one up every 5 minutes or so. Ankylosaur tooth
  12. Ceratopsian tooth from Montana

    I bought this ceratopsian tooth. Is from Northwest Montana (two medicine formation) and is 0.8" in size. Species is unidentified.
  13. My new ceratopsian tooth

    Species: Unidentified Age: Late cretaceous Location: Montana Formation: Two Medicine Formation, Judith River Group Size: 0.8"
  14. Hello, these teeth were sold to me as a mix of Triceratops and hadrosaur spitter teeth from Hell Creek Formation of Montana. Thanks to @Troodon, I now know these kinda teeth are ceratopsian spitter. Is there any way to tell if they belong to Triceratops, or any of ceratopsians such as Leptoceratops? Also, teeth 4 and 5 are unusually shiny. At the right angle, parts of them almost seem to be bronze. Are they pyritized? If so, is this common for Hell Creek teeth? Thank you for your time. Teeth 4 Teeth 5
  15. Long Horned Ceratopsidae

    Here, two postorbital horncores from the upper Foremost Formation (Campanian) of Alberta are described, and at ∼78.5 Ma represent some of the geologically oldest ceratopsid material. https://peerj.com/articles/4265/
  16. Rare dino tooth found in Mississippi!

    https://www.msn.com/en-us/video/wonder/rare-dinosaur-tooth-discovery-sheds-light-on-history-of-north-america/vi-BBBsJL7?ocid=edgsp Check out his cool video! Basically a Ceratopsian tooth discovered in Mississippi. From the Owl Creek Formation of sediments roughly 68-66 myo The gentleman that found it stated that ceratopsid fossils have never been found in the eastern US before!!
  17. Pentaceratops

    Just thought I would show Sam Noble's 'trophy' specimen-a Pentaceratops with the largest skull of any animal ever found Apparently, this specimen had been hidden away in the collection for awhile before its significance was realized. Unfortunately, it was a big restoration project, as it had lots of plaster, bolts, and rods throughout in a prior attempt to keep it together. Considering its past, it proudly stands on display today with nary an indication that it was once a "Pentaborg"
  18. My work as a paleoartist

    I would like to introduce myself and my work. I grew up on a small farm in southwestern Ohio loaded with great locations for the collection of ordovician fossils. I earned my BA in geology and taught fro approximately 30 years. I retired from education in 2015 and have been working as a sculptor since. I do some animal and wildlife work, some fantasy sculptures and some paleontology themed pieces. I aways try to have my pieces looking and behaving in a lifelike and believable fashion as well as being technically accurate. My sculptures are created in clay, I then make rubber molds, cast a wax in the mold and then have the wax cast in bronze in a foundry. Sculpting in bronze is more expensive than resin but the material is strong and incredibly durable. I am currently working on another sculpture of a heteromorphic ammonite that I also need help with. Let me first attach sample of my sculptures to show you my work. Thank you.
  19. Hard to keep up to new discoveries and when I see one from the Judith River Formation from Montana even though its a year old it attracts my attention. Material from this fauna is constantly being offered for sale and can be collected with access to ranches. A new ceratopsid, Spiclypeus shipporum from the lower Coal Ridge Member of the Judith River Formation was described and I've attached the article for viewing. I want to remind collectors that its not possible to know the species of teeth, horns and unguals being sold from large bodied ceratopsians. So be careful of sellers trying to put species names to their offerings. This figure was included in the paper and what's interesting is it shows what dinosaurs have been described from this fauna and material that as only been identified to a family level. Article: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0154218
  20. Triceratops toe bone?

    Hi everyone! I found this in Montana this summer, and I'm pretty sure it's a triceratops digit. If so, is there a way to tell which it is? Just bored and curious. Also, which side would the vale core have attached to? The bumpy, textured side? It was pretty shattered when I found it, so I pieced it together. The white stuff is pales putty I just haven't painted yet. Thank you! -Lauren
  21. Triceratops tooth

    Rooted worn tooth of a triceratops.
  22. Rare dinosaur fossil found in New Albany, Mississippi By Lacey Russell, WTVA News, Sept. 8, 2016 http://www.wtva.com/news/local/392804491.html and http://www.wtva.com/news/local/392804491.html New Albany, Mississippi - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Albany,_Mississippi Yours, Paul N.
  23. A member of the forum asked if I cam put a topic together to help identify claws from the Hell Creek/Lance formation. Its fraught with difficulty since so little has been published and described from these faunas but will attempt to put something together. All subject to discussion and mistakes. Although the focus there is with the dinosaurs of the Upper Maastrichtian its applicable to most of the other faunas of the Campanian and Lower Maastrichtian ages. Ceratopsian indet. This family of dinosaurs include Triceratops, Torosaurus and other large bodied Ceratopsaian yet to be described. Identifying unguals to a Genus/Species level is impossible and these are best identified as Ceratopsian indet. Ceratopsian unguals are best described as being rugose with many pits/holes on the front perimeter of the ungual. There is also a ledge (more pronounced on some than others) on the ventral side as shown by my red marks. I find it difficult to tell the difference between hand and foot unguals of the same size other than the wings are not has pronounced. The more symmetrical the wings are the closer the ungual is to the midline Digit III. Photos are the best way to show what they look like and here are some from my collection Dorsal view Ungual 1 Ventral View Ungual 1 Dorsal View Ungual 2 Ventral View Ungual 2 Dorsal View Ungual 3 Ventral View Ungual 3 An illustration of a Hand (Manus) A photo of a composite foot Leptoceratops indet. A small Ceratopsian in these faunas is a Leptoceratops. Teeth are the most common material found or sold but there are skeletal elements found. Here is an ungual I found in the Hell Creek. The dorsal view is like an isosceles triangle and very compressed. Dorsal View Ventral View Since these are extremely rare here is an additional photo of a associated set of unguals from the Two Medicine Formation An illustration of an campanian foot An illustration of a digit.
  24. Triceratops tooth

    From the album Reptile Fossils

    Triceratops horridus Marsh, 1889 Rooted worn tooth of a triceratops. Location: Hell Creek Formation, Carter County, Montana, USA Age: Maastrichtian, Upper Cretaceous

    © &copy Olof Moleman

  25. Psittacosaurus major

    From the album China

    Please DO NOT... 1) Repost this without my permission 2) Claim this as your own 3) Post it elsewhere without stating permission situation If you are planning to change this image in any way, please contact me before you do so. This image has been copyrighted. ------------------------------------------------------------------- This skull came from an adult. Apparently it was not found with an attached body. Came from the Early Cretaceous of Inner Mongolia.

    © ©2012 Sinopaleus

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