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Found 23 results

  1. Fossils on Wheels got our first donations of fossil materials for our education program this week. My son and I have donated some of our fossils and loaned the rest. Since we are applying for a 501c3, we have to keep careful track of our fossils. IF they are paid for by Fossils on Wheels money, they belong to Fossils on Wheels. If they are purchased with our money, we donate and loan. Donations belong to Fossils on Wheels, not my son and I. I think that clarification is a good thing to let people know about because donations come from our new friends private collections and they are given with the intention of being used for education and given to the kiddos we educate. My son and I do not sell fossils. Fossils on Wheels will not be legally able to sell fossils. We will also not be trading donated fossils. They are strictly for education purposes. If you do donate fossils, we can track how they are used and verify where they end up. We had two donations this week and we want to thank our donors. The first donation was from @JBMugu and included a lot of shark teeth and mammal bones from Sharktooth Hill a.k.a Round Mountain Silt. Most of the teeth will be given to students from Paradise and Chico schools. A small number will stay in the program for shark tooth ID labs. A couple dozen of the teeth are headed to the Gateway Science Museum as a separate donation. The mammal bones will be used in our intermediate school education programs that focus on classification and evolution. All of these fossils, except for one ear bone, will be used for hands on exploration of fossils. The ear bone, I think it is from a small Odontoceti, will be used as a presentation piece for the evolution lab. We also got a donation of some super cool shark teeth from @caldigger and information explaining some of the differences in the fossilization process and why different fossils from different locations look different. We do want to explore the process of fossilization and how geology lets us learn about the natural history of the planet. This donation included a super cool split tooth that shows in the process perfectly. These teeth are for the presentation and the kids will get to handle a few of them in ID labs as well. We just wanted to thank our donors and to let our fellow TFF members know how much these donations help us with our goal is bringing fossil education to our local children. The first picture is various verts from STH. The large one, bottom left, is a cetacean. It looks very similar to a couple of Tiphyocetus verts from STH that i have. There is another large one which I would think would be cetacean. The smaller mammal verts I am not sure about. There is also a shark vert. Second picture is STH shark teeth. There C. hastalis, planus, plus a few tiger sharks and a few I am unsure about right now. Some still have STH dirt on them and I am thinking about having kids clean them during a lab. The third picture is the shark teeth from @caldigger including our first Pygmy White Shark teeth from morocco, some beautiful mako teeth and a few others that I need to ID.
  2. Possible cetacean?

    Hi folks. I found this in a river in south Georgia where there are miocene/eocene fossils. Cetaceans are found here fairly regularly. The flat portion is broken in a weird way, but I'm thinking maybe this is part of a scapula? Thanks very much for looking at it.
  3. Sharktooth Hill Cetacean Ear Bone

    I know this is a cetacean ear bone and I know it is from Sharktooth Hill but that is ablut all I know for sure. It is pretty large at 3" long and 1.5'' wide which would seem to rule out of the smaller dolphin-like whales. My first thought was Aulophyseter morreci. It could also be a mysticeti as well. Regardless of species, it is a really nice addition to our STH whale collection.
  4. Rapp beach find

    Found a bone piece, maybe 2 1/2" at its longest, solid and heavy for its size. The 'bottom' is partly "stippled" (not part of the atlas vertebra, as I learned here recently). Different textures on different sides, the small protuberance is remarkable for the number of holes and channels (for blood vessels? nerve bundles?), at least one passing straight through. @Boesse you seem to be the acknowledged expert here. Do I have enough and are the photos (sorry!) clear enough to guess at an ID?
  5. Unknown Cetacean Fossil

    This is a fossil of unknown origin, it was allegedly found burried in sand near the shore of the Chesapeake Bay in Virginia; or possibly on the banks of the James River. The previous owner believed it to be an intervertebral disc of some kind of whale. It is clearly fossilized and has some areas encrusted with a sand like mineral. It also has a few spots where a shiny black mineral has been deposited. Can anyone provide an identification and possible an estimated age?
  6. My friend found a couple of interesting bone pieces while digging at Ernst Quarries last weekend. In the same hole, she found what may be two small cetacean periotic bones, as well as a small dolphin tooth. All three are included included in associated images. She wasn't digging a particularly large hole, so I can't help but wonder if they are all from the same animal. While there may be no way to tell, the possibility is intriguing to this newbie's mind. Of course, I may even be wrong about my ID of the bones. Any input regarding the donor species, etc., is greatly appreciated. Cheers.
  7. Dolphin/Whale Periotic Bone

    From the album Calvert Cliffs

    Choptank Formation Virginia Miocene Photographed exactly as found, with brilliant, polished surface when dry! Collected on private property with permission.
  8. Cetacean of some type?

    Guessing a dolphin?
  9. Possible Cetacean Jaw Fragment

    Hi Folks, I rediscovered this jaw fragment in my Collection recently and I thought You all on the forum may be able to ID this robust specimen. It measures in at 3.40” and is quite wide at about an inch. I found it at Brownies beach a few years ago as float material down here Calvert County MD. Regards Cliff Dweller
  10. Summerville August 25 2017

    From the album Summerville, SC Fossil Hunts

    Cetacean vert

    © Matthew Brett Rutland

  11. Hello everyone. Recently I went down to a fossil site in Beaumaris Australia and came home with some nice pieces of cetacean bone. As I was about to head home I found quite a large piece sticking out of the sand. When I took it home I tried cleaning it with hot water and a sponge, removing some of the junk off of it but not all of it. How should I go about removing the white algae/plant junk on it? The fossil is very sturdy. Thanks, Daniel
  12. Again in an own thread because I couldn´t add tags to old thread New print from the same source as this https://3d.si.edu/model/fullscreen/p1b-1474716020541-1478115462584-0 Odobenocetops! I planned to reconstruct all missing parts but stoped after the tusks because anything postcranial would become even more speculative than the missing skullparts. I´ll leave it as a fossil replica rather than a recontruction. Painting will follow.
  13. Bone or tooth fragment?

    Any thoughts? Found on a beach in Rhode Island. 6 inches long. Worn pretty smooth but some areas showing what may be cancellous texture. Thank you!
  14. As request by WhodamanHD, here is a post of my recent sperm whale tooth find from Brownies Beach over the weekend and some other cetacean teeth. I also included a very cool red squalodon tooth I found at Stratford hall along with another tooth which I believe is also Squalodon. I like how the Squalodon tooth is split in half, I wouldn't have found it if I didn't notice what looked like a root of a tooth underwater. I also included a cool dolphin vertebrae I found at Stratford Hall
  15. Whale tooth?

    Found today, near the peace river in Arcadia, my guess is whale tooth? *Sigh* one day, I may find a whole one?
  16. Cetacean vertebrae question

    I possess three vertebrae from Calvert county (I think they are all from plum point which I believe is Calvert formation, miocene) all cetacean. One of them is strange to me and I was wondering if anyone knew the answer to these questions: •why does it have such a large spinal cord opening (pardon my lack of anatomically accurate terms) is this because of placement or species? I vaguely remember it being called a porpoise vert. • the other two possess a channel at the bottoms but this one dosent, why is this so? The first picture is the vert I speak of. Thanks!
  17. Cetacean tooth?

    Hi folks Any idea on this tooth? Loos cetacean to me but wasn't aware cetaceans were found in Kem Kem.
  18. Maybe a cetacean

    Hello. I found this piece the other day, and I think it's some kind of vertebra. What do you think? The coin is big, about 1 inch. The surface has small porous. The interior is solid. The weight is about 6 kg = 12 lb. I found it about 250 m above sea level, and 2 km from the coast, in a place with a lot of small marine fossil.Is it a cetacean ?. Thanks!
  19. My mother and I were visiting a pawn shop that I frequently visit for it's impressive taxidermy collection, and next to a ratty old elk's head and a vintage fur coat I spotted something I recognized immediately as a fossil. And not just any fossil, but a fossil from something very large indeed. The second I spotted the price tag, $49, I knew this was too good of an opportunity to be passed up and purchased it. I have no idea whereabouts the vertebrae came from, but there appears to be some moss and organic matter packed into a few of the openings that make me think it might have been found in a forest. There's even an old spider egg sac attached to the underside. My first (relatively) educated guess was of course that it came from a whale, due to it's sheer size. And after some quick research I do find many similarities between it and the vertebrae of toothed whales. But I'm no expert, I'd appreciate some second opinions and help before I positively identify it! I also spotted what look like tooth-scrape marks around the spinal cord opening, but I can't personally say for sure.
  20. Owner of this Inner Ear Bone?

    Who owns this Inner ear bone? I found this on Amelia Island, Florida. I also found some shark teeth and lots of bone fragments. These fossils come from the dredges that cut into Miocene? formations and probably other younger formations. I imagine it is from a cetacean or other aquatic mammal. It is in GREAT shape, with lots of detail, including the inner cochlea. It is my favorite find of the trip. Let me know what you all think! I am a noob with this younger stuff. Mammals were still a 200 million year old length of time away from my expertise. @Boesse
  21. Cetacean tooth id

    Recovered this Cetacean tooth last Saturday at Calvert Cliffs and wanted to know if anyone knew the species it comes from. Most teeth I have seen in the past are stubby, short, and resemble amushroom. This tooth has a deep thick root and a sharp thin narrow blade covered in enamel. I have no idea what this is but would like to classify it.
  22. Whale Vertebrae Help

    I recently acquired a fossil vertebrae that was dug up in Florida. I don't know too much about it, so I would love any info that could be given. I was told that it dates to the Miocene, and that it is a vertebrae from a whale. I've done a little research on the area, but haven't been able to narrow down what it might actually be from. The fossil is pretty large, about 5.5 inches across. It is quite worn though, and I know that it might make identifying the species impossible, but if someone could help me with any information, I'd appreciate it greatly. I have more pictures, and I will post them as soon as possible. Thanks a ton
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