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Found 130 results

  1. Cool rocks I found in Devine Texas

    Hi everyone! I haven’t been on here, or posted In FOREVER. These rocks were in a creek bed in Devine TX. When I found a pocket There was a soft sometimes liquidy sometimes dryer Chock like substance. There was three colors. Red, orange, and almost yellow. Is this what the cave drawings were made with?!?! I don’t have good pictures of the chalk stuff right now bat can get them later.
  2. Hunstanton fossil find

    Hi all, I was hoping for some help with this. Is it a fossil? It’s quite worn so I’m not expecting a detailed ID but some suggestions would be fantastic. I found it at Hunstanton which is chalk or Cretaceous age. I’ve also found lots of brachiopods and echinoids at this locality.
  3. flints or something more interesing?

    Hi We found these and picked them up on the basis they dont look anything like the flints in this ground. So not what they might be, any info would be appreciated like the other finds these were in a shallow valley in east suffolk under 1.5m of flinty sand and on top of or in the top layer of heavy grey clay with some chalk and slint in it.
  4. second find

    We found this in a pond we have dug on the site of an old pond at the juncture between the clay infill and the undisturbed clay under the old pond. depth 1.75m. Heavy clay with flint and chalk in it location Suffolk on boulder clay in the bottom of a very shallow valley I thought it was man made as it was so detailed but my my son and friend think it is a fossil so here are the pictures against a ruler showing inches and centimeters
  5. Hey everyone, hope you're all doing well! From what I've read, small shark/fish teeth can be occasionally encountered by dissolving samples of chalk/limestone in acid. I read Jeppsson et al's 1999 paper on using buffered acetic acid to extract phosphatic fossils (in my case shark teeth), but the method outlined is not that simple and requires access to certain laboratory equipment I don't really have access to right at the moment... All I have is some cheap white vinegar, and some trays and tins I've got some samples of chalk from the Late Cretaceous of Møns Klint, a fossil site in Denmark with relatively diverse fish and shark fauna. Here's the thing - would it be OK to put the samples of chalk in white vinegar (acetic acid)? If it is, I've just got some questions -- Should I dilute the vinegar? And if so, by how much? How long should I leave the chalk in the vinegar? Any suggestions and ideas would be much appreciated, I'd love to find some little fish and shark teeth. Christian
  6. Small but perfectly formed

    I live in Thanet, England - classic White Cliffs country, chalky and flinty. Found this amongst the gravel in my driveway, so may be local, might not. Centimetre rule, so about 3 cm by 2 cm by 2cm.
  7. Need help in identifying problematic fish bone

    Hey everyone Hope you're all doing well! While looking through unprepped/untouched blocks of chalk from last year's fieldwork session in the Late Cretaceous of Møns Klint (Denmark), I found one block that showed a little trace of fish bone. I scraped a bit around it with some dental tools, and managed to reveal the whole fossil. And I'm having quite some trouble identifying it... Could anyone help me? I've included pics and details of the specimen below. Pics: Note especially the 'ridges' in the upper half of the fossil Full details: -Location: Møns Klint, Isle of Møn, Denmark -Stratigraphy: Occidentalis belemnite zone, Hvidskud Member, Møns Klint Formation, White Chalk Group. -Age: Upper part of Lower Maastrichtian, Late Cretaceous; ~70 million years old -Measurements: ~5mm largest width; ~4mm height -Possible interpretations so far: partial fin element, partial scale. Most recently, I considered it to be the partial scute of a Dercetidae fish (based on Wallaard et al. 2019 and Friedman 2012)... But I'm really unsure... Taken from Wallaard et al. 2019 Taken from Friedman 2012 I'd be really grateful for any help identifying my specimen
  8. Fossil hunting in the shed like many of us - I thought I'd lost this nice globular rhynchonellid in a house move years ago. From the top Campanian/bottom Maastrichtian Chalk of Norfolk, UK. I think it's Cretirhynchia sp.
  9. Found this rock in Wisconsin US near Lake Michigan. At first I thought it was a collection of bones but looking closer I just don't know.
  10. Spring tide ammonite haul

    Since we have to avoid crowded places due to the current situation , it was a good excuse to go out fossil hunting in the open. We went to the beach at the Cenomanian chalk cliffs, and we were in for a big surprise. The day before we got there, there was a big spring tide, the high water levels cleaned up all of the scree piles from the winter landfalls. Lots of fossils were emerging from the lose boulders on the beach, sometimes even just laying around waiting to be picked up. We even got a few new species for our collection: Natalie found a nice Turillites scheuzerianus and I found a straight shelled Sciponoceras baculoides. And of course multiple large ammonites of the more common species like Acanthoceras and Cunningtoniceras. This might be one of the best field trips we ever got at this location. lots of ammo's: After spending most of the sunday prepping: Sciponoceras baculoides: Turillites scheuzerianus:
  11. Plant, animal

    Hi I. New here. I’ve been collecting for about 5 months in central Texas. I found something that I’ve not come across before. It looks like something from a palm like plant but it could be an animal... it’s 3.4inches long . Thank You.
  12. Help with identity

    I'd be grateful for advice on this item found high on the South Downs in West Sussex, England.. The Downs are chalk, the item found Flint. I would like to know if this is a fracture pattern or a fossil bivalve - or something else altogether. The surface is corrugated.
  13. Hey Everyone. I'm headed over to the Tuscaloosa area specifically to hunt some of the chalk banks along the Tombigbee. Instead of going on a wild goose chase, I was wondering if anyone knew of some spots around there where they had luck with shark and mosasaur teeth. Preferably, I am looking for spots that are not considered private property or hunting grounds. Thanks for the input!
  14. Late Cretaceous chalk in North America

    Hey everyone I know I've been lately rather inactive on TFF; I was held back by fieldwork and other reasons (though do expect some posts about the fieldwork next weekend ). But anyway, onto what I came to talk about... Would anyone know of some good exposures of Late Cretaceous chalk in Canada or USA? I'm thinking specifically about Campanian chalk or, even better, Maastrichtian chalk.. It would be great if the exposed chalk is very fossiliferous, of course. Thanks for any help! -Christian
  15. conical shell?

    Hi to all, I've been trying to find a positive id for this one for some time now, my guess is that it could be a partial conical shell with remains of the animal still inside it. The inner 'shell' and contents are pyrited (iron), found in Wiltshire,England in a predomately chalk and flint with a very thin topsoil area, iron pyrite nodules are very common in this location. Than you Tony
  16. Bone ID from the cenomanian chalk of France.

    I'm used to find ammonites and invertebrates, but this time I took home piece of chalk from the beach with a bone inside. I have totaly no Idea of what kind of bone this is or even from what kind of creature. I am still prepping the piece, but those are already the 1st few pictures. hopefully someone got more info on this: Cenomanian from cap-blanc-nez France ( marine chalk deposits)
  17. I was at the chalk cliffs at Seaford in April this year hunting for echinoids. However, I only found time to clean and prep these fossils this week, using a safety pin, a brush and water (Very low-tech, I know!). UKfossils.co.uk states the rocks here are Cretaceous, 89-86 million years old. I found a fist-sized chunk of chalk that yielded two enchinoderm plates (picture 4) and a very small, unknown fossil. Pictures 1-3 show the unknown fossil. 1 division on the ruler is 1mm. It is perfectly spherical, with a diameter of about 4mm and has raised dimples covering its surface. There are at least two holes, but they are not opposite each other, and I am unsure if these are biological features or just preservational artifacts. My thoughts are this is either a bryozoan or a small echinoid, but I am not sure.
  18. I just spend the evening cleaning and preping some of the cephalopods I found last weekend. those are all from the cenomanian at the French coast. A couple of nautiloids ( Eutrephoceras sp. ) A couple of turrelites and a Manteliceras sp.
  19. Help

    Found this while working in chalk pit in Kent, can you help me identify this as this is my first fossil find, also should i chip off the white crystally covering to reveal whole fossil many thanks
  20. Hey everyone - It's Christian. For the past few months, I was inactive on TFF as I had a lot of schoolwork.. But now, I've got a lot more time on my hands - which means that I can get back to all things fossil related This of course includes making preparations for my 3rd Møns Klint Fossil Excavation (MKFE - the fieldwork aspect of my Møns Klint Fossil Research Program). I'll be going for 2 weeks, in mid-August - I'm really excited! As I said in a post from a few months ago, the collection policy of this MKFE is essentially the same as last time's (cephalopod, crustacean, echinoderm and vertebrate material). This time, though, there'll be a bigger focus on articulated and/or associated material - eroded sea urchin spines and belemnite fragments are getting too numerous... On the first days of the field trip, I'll have to do quite a bit of prospecting for new sites to work at, because there's a chance that the landslide spoil heap from last year has most likely been washed away by the waves. I'm already having some ideas of particular projects for this field trip, which include a comprehensive collection of washout microfossils - to determine relative abundances of various faunal groups. Another project is the in-depth analysis of fossil material from different layers of chalk - which I hope will yield some zone fossils. Of course, I'm still hoping to find a lil' mosasaur tooth I'll also use this field trip as an opportunity to donate to the GeoCenter Møns Klint some of the fossils I found during the 2nd MKFE. I'll keep you guys posted! Stay tuned I'm so excited to getting back there! -Christian
  21. I recently bought these two ammonites from a seller who listed them as Kosmoceras sp from Khakassia, Russia, Jurassic period. Based on shape and size, I think these are likely the same species, but the white one has had more shell material removed; what's remaining looks super chalky with a lot of calcium in it. The more intact fossil has curvy ribbing and a slightly braided look to the keel, which has a distinct bevel. I haven't ever seen a Kosmoceras that looks like this - my other Kosmoceras specimens are pyritized fossils from near the Volga River and look much spinier. Can anyone confirm the ID or suggest a different one? Thank you!
  22. I find it interesting seeing how others collect and prep, so I thought others might like seeing how I do in the chalk of western Kansas. First though, let me say I dont claim to be an expert at all. I make lots of mistakes, and am still learning. I found this fish last summer, and I contacted fellow member "Xiphanctius" for advice. This was the biggest jacket I've ever done, and I am thankful for his advice. Now to the pictures! This first one is showing after removing some chalk over the skull. There was a little wash area that had exposed the front of the skull. One piece of the top jaw ( with no teeth) was found eroded out along with some pectoral fin pieces.
  23. Hello all! I recently moved into a fossil rich area and have found myself coming home from beach walks with arm-fulls of interesting rocks. I am still very new to this! Most of my finds have been echinoids and sponges (sometimes both in the same rock!). However this guy, while obviously an urchin, is still somewhat of a puzzle. The Details This was found on the beach near Saltdean, East Sussex, UK. That means it is likely late Cretaceous. The area is a couple of miles west of Peacehaven, home to several giant Parapuzosia ammonites, and a much richer seam of google hits / background information I found the fossil in a large chunk of chalk (photo #3). This is my first time extracting and cleaning a fossil. I mainly used a dental pic, tootbrush, water and a little distilled vinegar. The echinoid is about 5cm in diameter There are two features I would appreciate your expertise in identifying: The pale whorl of scales, which to my eye doesn't follow the natural shape / contours of the echinoid The small fin-like feature most clearly seen in photo #2 Thanks in advance! Photo #01 Photo #02 Photo #03
  24. nob covered bone

    I am hoping someone can provide some some guidance. The surface of this bone is covered with knobby protuberances. My inclination is fish but the bone cell structure is not fish flaky but more reptilian. Found in Alabama, Cretaceous chalk.
  25. From the album Best of 2018 finds - a year in review

    A set of different urshins (Micraster decipiens and Echinocorys Gravesi) from chalk cliffs of Normandy. Saint pierre en Port and Senneville sur Fécamp (Seine Maritine) - France - Cretaceous
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