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Found 113 results

  1. I just spend the evening cleaning and preping some of the cephalopods I found last weekend. those are all from the cenomanian at the French coast. A couple of nautiloids ( Eutrephoceras sp. ) A couple of turrelites and a Manteliceras sp.
  2. Help

    Found this while working in chalk pit in Kent, can you help me identify this as this is my first fossil find, also should i chip off the white crystally covering to reveal whole fossil many thanks
  3. Hey everyone - It's Christian. For the past few months, I was inactive on TFF as I had a lot of schoolwork.. But now, I've got a lot more time on my hands - which means that I can get back to all things fossil related This of course includes making preparations for my 3rd Møns Klint Fossil Excavation (MKFE - the fieldwork aspect of my Møns Klint Fossil Research Program). I'll be going for 2 weeks, in mid-August - I'm really excited! As I said in a post from a few months ago, the collection policy of this MKFE is essentially the same as last time's (cephalopod, crustacean, echinoderm and vertebrate material). This time, though, there'll be a bigger focus on articulated and/or associated material - eroded sea urchin spines and belemnite fragments are getting too numerous... On the first days of the field trip, I'll have to do quite a bit of prospecting for new sites to work at, because there's a chance that the landslide spoil heap from last year has most likely been washed away by the waves. I'm already having some ideas of particular projects for this field trip, which include a comprehensive collection of washout microfossils - to determine relative abundances of various faunal groups. Another project is the in-depth analysis of fossil material from different layers of chalk - which I hope will yield some zone fossils. Of course, I'm still hoping to find a lil' mosasaur tooth I'll also use this field trip as an opportunity to donate to the GeoCenter Møns Klint some of the fossils I found during the 2nd MKFE. I'll keep you guys posted! Stay tuned I'm so excited to getting back there! -Christian
  4. I recently bought these two ammonites from a seller who listed them as Kosmoceras sp from Khakassia, Russia, Jurassic period. Based on shape and size, I think these are likely the same species, but the white one has had more shell material removed; what's remaining looks super chalky with a lot of calcium in it. The more intact fossil has curvy ribbing and a slightly braided look to the keel, which has a distinct bevel. I haven't ever seen a Kosmoceras that looks like this - my other Kosmoceras specimens are pyritized fossils from near the Volga River and look much spinier. Can anyone confirm the ID or suggest a different one? Thank you!
  5. I find it interesting seeing how others collect and prep, so I thought others might like seeing how I do in the chalk of western Kansas. First though, let me say I dont claim to be an expert at all. I make lots of mistakes, and am still learning. I found this fish last summer, and I contacted fellow member "Xiphanctius" for advice. This was the biggest jacket I've ever done, and I am thankful for his advice. Now to the pictures! This first one is showing after removing some chalk over the skull. There was a little wash area that had exposed the front of the skull. One piece of the top jaw ( with no teeth) was found eroded out along with some pectoral fin pieces.
  6. Hello all! I recently moved into a fossil rich area and have found myself coming home from beach walks with arm-fulls of interesting rocks. I am still very new to this! Most of my finds have been echinoids and sponges (sometimes both in the same rock!). However this guy, while obviously an urchin, is still somewhat of a puzzle. The Details This was found on the beach near Saltdean, East Sussex, UK. That means it is likely late Cretaceous. The area is a couple of miles west of Peacehaven, home to several giant Parapuzosia ammonites, and a much richer seam of google hits / background information I found the fossil in a large chunk of chalk (photo #3). This is my first time extracting and cleaning a fossil. I mainly used a dental pic, tootbrush, water and a little distilled vinegar. The echinoid is about 5cm in diameter There are two features I would appreciate your expertise in identifying: The pale whorl of scales, which to my eye doesn't follow the natural shape / contours of the echinoid The small fin-like feature most clearly seen in photo #2 Thanks in advance! Photo #01 Photo #02 Photo #03
  7. nob covered bone

    I am hoping someone can provide some some guidance. The surface of this bone is covered with knobby protuberances. My inclination is fish but the bone cell structure is not fish flaky but more reptilian. Found in Alabama, Cretaceous chalk.
  8. From the album Best of 2018 finds - a year in review

    A set of different urshins (Micraster decipiens and Echinocorys Gravesi) from chalk cliffs of Normandy. Saint pierre en Port and Senneville sur Fécamp (Seine Maritine) - France - Cretaceous
  9. Ear Protection for Fossil Hunting?

    I know that eye protection, padded gloves for hammering to reduce harmful vibrations, and many other safety measures have been oft repeated on this forum to guard against injury, but I haven't seen much about ear protection specifically in regards to fossil hunting. First, an unnecessary backstory: I recently came to the realization that I have tinnitus and, being a bit of a hypochondriac, got myself freaked out over it. But that is, of course, silly since I can remember having tinnitus for years but just not really thinking about it. After calming down and realizing that I have had it for years, that it's very minimal tinnitus, and that it's not as bad as cancer, I have been considering ways that I can avoid making it any worse. Along with wearing earmuffs while vacuuming, I have begun to look for other strategies to avoid hearing damage. Now, some of these may be stupid questions (don't let anyone tell you, "there is no such thing as a stupid question."), but here it goes. The formation in which I hunt the most is the limestone/chalk Atco formation. One of my main means of finding fossils is just whacking on chunks of chalk, hoping to luck into some ammonites, echinoids, fish, or a perfectly articulated pterosaur clasping a new species of cretaceous mammal in its talons, and I have had much success (maybe not the last part). I mostly use an Estwing 4lb sledge and Stanely chisels with hand guards to do the job, but sometimes also use a 10 pound sledge for the harder and larger chunks. This works fine, but because I am dealing with relatively hard matrix the pinging of the sledge against the chisels can get annoying, but could it over time also cause tinnitus and hearing damage? Since I have gotten ear protection aware I have begun wearing EP3 Sonic Defenders when fossil hunting which have the great feature of allowing sounds like normal conversation and ambient noise in while reducing any noises above 85dB when the caps are off and greatly reducing all noise when the caps are in. Some of their other plugs like the EP4 and EP7 do the same thing and have more protection with the caps in, so I might get one of those too. So, my questions are: 1-When is it appropriate to wear ear protection while fossil hunting? 2-Could the pinging of my hammer against the chisel and/or chalk chunks cause hearing damage and thus tinnitus over time? 3-What kind of hearing protection do you recommend? Is what I am using ok? BONUS QUESTION-Any recommendations for padded gloves to get?
  10. bivalves that i don't know the species of

    1 sorry again, i dont know what the species of these specimens are and also sorry for some reason parts of the photos were cropped made smaller i think its because i put too much on there so they had to cut down the file size (:
  11. https://www.fhsu.edu/news/2018/08/fossil-data,-images-from-sternberg-museum-now-available-online This is pretty cool. Sternberg museum is putting everything on-line. The search function is awesome. They still have a lot of stuff to get scanned, but everything is at least listed now. This can be a great tool.
  12. I went to the Cretacious!

    I spent the day at Old Hunstanton, and these are mostly from the Hunstanton formation, with one from the Ferriby Chalk formation. These are the ones that stumped me, but thought were worth picking up. I found belemnites and brachiopods but sadly no echinoids or crinoids. 108-99 mya.
  13. A bit of quantitative paleoecology

    Just got this new idea for a future MKFRP research avenue Basically, on the beach near the cliffs, there is this area filled with small bits of fossils washed out from the chalk (the so-called "washout zone"). I'll make a sampling of that area, with a few control variables included (i.e. sampling area, maximum sampling depth, fossil size class, quantity of fossils). The sampling will be done by scooping washout material with a bucket & spade, bringing it home and then picking out individual fossils. Based on the fossils collected, I'll then establish relative faunal abundances based on percentages of particular fossil groups. The results obtained from the data will hopefully help to further understanding of the paleoecology of Møns Klint. Similar research has been done on places like Stevns Klint or Rügen, so I'd be expecting similar results for Møns Klint. Small preliminary hypothesis: fish remains won't have reach an abundance higher than ~5% Closeup picture of the "washout material"; taken from Meyer (2015) - "Fossilerne fra Møns Klint"
  14. During april i and a friend had the oportunity to spend a few days hunting in cretaceous of Normandy, hunting for echinoids. Day one : We drove from brittany through Le Havre to Saint Jouin de Bruneval and Antifer Cape. (3 hours and a half) We let the car on the beach parking lot and hiked south on the peeble shore looking for fossils in the boulders on the beach. The cliff is cenomanian with a bit of albian at the bottom. You have to look carefully on rocks surface for the familliar spherical shape. I found about 20 urchins but thats about it. No shark tooth, just a poorly preserved ammonite (mantelliceras) and a few rhynchonellas At some point we noticed tide was coming back faster than expected, most likely because of the wind pushing the water back. We had to quicken the pace, and made our way through the slippery covered with algae rocks. We finally managed our way back to the car and took the road to Fécamp where we had booked an hotel for the next 2 nights. some finds of the day : Crassiholaster subglobosus : Crassiholaster subglobosus : Cyclothyris difformis : See the all hunt gallery here http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/gallery/album/2849-haute-normandie-april-2018/ or on my flickr : https://flic.kr/s/aHsmiwWft6
  15. Micraster decipiens - 6

    From the album Haute normandie - April 2018

    Micraster decipiens : a cretaceous echinoid from Saint-Pierre en Port
  16. Micraster decipiens - 5

    From the album Haute normandie - April 2018

    Micraster decipiens : a cretaceous echinoid from Saint-Pierre en Port
  17. Micraster decipiens - 4

    From the album Haute normandie - April 2018

    Micraster decipiens : a cretaceous echinoid from Senneville sur Fécamp
  18. Micraster decipiens - 3

    From the album Haute normandie - April 2018

    Micraster decipiens : a cretaceous echinoid from Senneville sur Fécamp
  19. Micraster decipiens - 2

    From the album Haute normandie - April 2018

    Micraster decipiens : a cretaceous echinoid from Senneville sur Fécamp
  20. Micraster decipiens - 1

    From the album Haute normandie - April 2018

    Micraster decipiens : a cretaceous echinoid from Saint-Pierre en Port
  21. Kingena elegans group

    From the album Haute normandie - April 2018

    Kingena elegans : a cretaceous brachiopod from Senneville sur Fécamp
  22. Kingena elegans

    From the album Haute normandie - April 2018

    Kingena elegans : a cretaceous brachiopod from Senneville sur Fécamp
  23. Echinoids : best from the april 2018 hunt

    From the album Haute normandie - April 2018

    Last hunt from Normandy cretaceous : best of echinoids
  24. From the album Haute normandie - April 2018

    Last hunt in cretaceous from Normandy : the whole loot
  25. Echinocorys gravesii - 2

    From the album Haute normandie - April 2018

    Echinocorys gravesii : an echinoid from Normandy cretaceous.
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