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Found 42 results

  1. Need help identifying

    Please help me identify my pretty cool find
  2. I decided to work on my lighting setup & I think I am getting closer. These are some of my favorite teeth from the past year. The one on the right end is not leaning against the backdrop, it is actually 3-dimensional, almost as if it has a built in kickstand or tripod. I don't know which species it belongs too. The caramel colored one is my absolute favorite so far, I was shocked to find that one last fall on the beach, just barely on the edge of the waves..
  3. Needle like tooth

    Hi everyone, I went to Flag Ponds in Calvert County yesterday & found this interesting needle-like tooth. It is 2.5 cm long. It has a channel up one side that is just barely wide enough to get the edge of my fingernail into. Any idea what it is? I do love finding the oddball fossils! Thanks. Update, I uploaded a different photo. You would never know that this is sitting directly under a 60 watt bulb. Imagine a "crying emoji" sitting at the end of this sentence!!
  4. Best Locations?

    So... Okay, I just started getting into hunting for fossils. I've always loved fossils and gems and the lot. I went gem mining for the first time when I was about 10 or 11 in McKinley, VA, and since then - I've loved it! My family went on a trip to Cherokee and the Smoky Mtns when I was younger, and we found all kinds of unearthed fossilized things and gem mines. Saturday, we went to Westmoreland State Park up in Montross for the first time, and even though it was chilly and rainy, we found five or six decent shark teeth. I've done a little research, but I'd prefer what other people - and not articles - have to say. Where's the best places to find fossils in VA?
  5. Dolphin tooth?

    I found this tooth this week not far from Flag Pond Nature park. It is longer and has a curve so it doesn’t look like the dolphin teeth I have found before. Is it an aberration or something different?
  6. Brownie's Beach 11/25/17

    After some careful thought and many references to suggestions from TFF members, I decided that my first fossil site would be Bayfront Park aka Brownie’s Beach in Chesapeake Beach, Maryland. I packed up my newly bought expedition gear, sifter and all, and headed out. It was a little over an hour’s drive, which is not bad at all if you ask me. It was the day after Black Friday, so I had thought maybe everyone would just want to stay at home. But given it was a weekend, and families were in town for Thanksgiving and looking for something fun to do, my timing ended up not being ideal. When I showed up, the place was pretty busy, but I started collecting right away. There were quite a few other collectors, and in talking to them I learned that small teeth were a common find here, and in very large quantities. I actually didn’t find anything for a while, due to a number of things. The conditions were mediocre, considering how crowded it was and how the beach was riddled with those pesky autumn leaves that make combing the tide lines a real pain. Also, I was able to be at the park during low tide, but I would hardly call it that, as the water barely retreated at all. Must’ve just been the wind direction. But regardless of the imperfect circumstances, I was able to get a nice handful of small fossilized shark chompers and ray plates. My largest tooth, although still small, was actually the first one I found! A decent Physogaleus contortus I believe. Unlike the other teeth, I didn’t even have to sift for that one. Just found it chilling among some pebbles on the sand bank near the entrance of the park. The second I saw it I went “Ooh! That’s a tiger” and gladly picked up my first ever fossil. It will always hold a special place in my heart, even if it’s not the best find. Aside from my tiger, I found a bunch of Lemons, some real nice baby Sand Tigers, and I think some small Dusky. Again, I'm new so please correct my identifications. I also got my hands on some ray plates, and (although I had no idea what it was when I picked it up) a dolphin/porpoise tooth! I’m not quite sure what the black object next to it is, but I believe it to be something like a snail shell. If anyone has any clue what it is, let me know! Overall, I’d say I had a good first fossil hunting trip at a really beautiful site and I got to meet some nice people who share my passion. I got some cool finds and I can’t wait to hunt some more. I won’t let the small teeth scare me away from Brownie’s; I definitely plan on returning in better conditions to get some bigger, better finds. I actually plan on going in the winter, not too long from now! Hope you enjoy the trip report. Hoppe fossil hunting!
  7. Anticipation!

    In anticipation of the long Thanksgiving holiday weekend, and a trip back to the beach for more fossil hunting fun, I took some photographs from my last hunt on the Chesapeake.
  8. Top Sail

    Collected from matrix washed into the Chesapeake Bay by landslide. Donated to the Delaware Museum of Natural History.
  9. Snail

    This piece was excavated out of a block of matrix deposited in the Chesapeake Bay by a landslide. It was donated to the Delaware Museum of Natural History.
  10. Venus Clam

    Collected from matrix deposited in the Chesapeake Bay by landslide. These shells are extremely fragile and are not to be found loose on the beach. Most disintegrated when I was working the matrix. This specimen was donated to the Delaware Museum of Natural History.
  11. Ark Shell

    Excavated from matrix deposited in the Chesapeake Bay by landslide. Donated to the Delaware Museum of Natural History.
  12. Crassinella Clam

    Collected from matrix deposited in the Chesapeake Bay by landslide. Donated to the Delaware Museum of Natural History.
  13. Oyster

    I never knew if the oyster shells on the beach were fossil or modern until I pulled this out of a block of matrix deposited by landslide into the Chesapeake Bay. This specimen was donated to the Delaware Museum of Natural History. Genus changed from Parahyotissa.
  14. Venus Clam

    Collected from matrix deposited in the Chesapeake Bay by landslide. Donated to the Delaware Museum of Natural History.
  15. Tongue Shell

    Collected from matrix deposited in the Chesapeake Bay by landslide. Donated to the Delaware Museum of Natural History.
  16. Miocene Bone or Just a Rock..

    So, I found this last week in Southern MD. The question before my esteemed miocene experts is.. Did I find the ear drum of a whale..? or am I being fooled by a cleverly shaped rock? ( Also, this is before the specimen fully dried out. ) Thanks for any assistance!
  17. Geoduck Clam

    Excavated from a block of submerged martrix deposited in the Chesapeake Bay by landslide. The common name, geoduck, is pronounced "gooey-duck." This specimen was donated to the Delaware Museum of Natural History.
  18. Scallop

    Found on the beach near Matoaka Beach cabins. This specimen has several pearl buds, including some that developed around predation holes.
  19. Mussle Shell Steinkern

    This is a particularly fragile type of shell, made of many fine layers, and is prone to disintegrate as these did. This rare steinkern was found on a block of matrix submerged in the Chesapeake Bay. Dimensions are for the best-exposed steinkern on the block. The entire block is 14 cm wide x 10 cm high x 5 cm deep.
  20. Shark Trace Fossil

    There has been much debate about the identity of this strange item on the forum. I finally solved the mystery thanks to the (click next) Calvert Marine Museum web site . These are a reasonably common find on the beach near Matoaka Cabins. They vary in size and shape, owing to the different species and ages of the sharks that produced them as much as the teeth shed by the same sharks. What they all seem to have in common is the black, polished surface, the generally oval shape (which can vary in proportions), and the appearance of an outer coating that splits on one side.
  21. Barnacle

    Found on the beach near Matoaka Cabins. This is the largest one I have found to date.
  22. Geoduck Clam

    This was excavated from a block of matrix collected from submerged landslide material in the Chesapeake Bay. The common name of the shell is pronounced "gooey-duck." The height listed is the diameter of the opening between valves on the posterior side, where the siphon extended.
  23. Scallop

    Chesapectin nefrens is an index fossil for the Drum Cliff Member of the Choptank Formation. This example is particularly nice because the interior is almost completely layered in pearl.
  24. Turret Shell

    I erroneously identified this earlier as the similar Turritella plebian, until looking at one more reference! Mariacolpus octonaria is an index fossil for the Drum Cliff Member of the Choptank Formation. Donated to the Delaware Museum of Natural History
  25. Astarte Clam

    This specimen and dozens like it were collected from matrix material deposited in the waters of the Chesapeake Bay by a landslide. It is one of only a few species that consistently survived intact in the matrix samples I collected. Most specimens were single, unbroken valves, but several had both valves together and intact. A. tisphila is considered the most abundant find in the Choptank Formation. It is an index fossil for the Drum Cliff Member. This specimen was donated to the Delaware Museum of Natural History.