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Found 23 results

  1. Never identified a fossil before!

    Hello, I am very new to this. I am a bio teacher with no experience in paleontology but I have to teach it! I recently found an intact top and bottom scallop shell off the James River, in Surry county, Virginia. I know it belongs to the Chesapecten genus, but not sure what species it is. Some friends have tried to help but I don’t understand what they are talking about. Possibly found in either the Yorktown formation or Eastover formation. Please help!
  2. Matoaka Beach - 12-02-18

    Took a trip to Matoaka Beach for the first time today. Alot of bivalves, barnacles, couple pieces of coral, and one snail. Here's a pic! No sharks teeth but I will keep trying! IMG_1322.HEIC
  3. So I've been looking around at the pile in the garage, trying to get rid of some of the junk and taking some photos that I thought you all might be interested in. I think some of you may have picked on my fascination with earbones...If you dont have that fascination keep scrolling....Well, here's one partial example with multiple views that was a little more different than most but I think its a whale bulla. Its preservation is a little different and there is an extra cavity where normally you would have solid bone...just my guess anyways. Also another shot of it on the very left showing some of the other bullas and its relative difference. Maybe its something completely different. Here's a neat little blob of casts of sponge borings and I've been trying to get a real sharp close up of what I think is a bryozoan in the same matrix but its the best I can do. The unknown is really cool but I just cant capture the real coolness with my cell phone..The scaley looking fragment is approximately 6mm long.The preservation detail is remarkable given its only a fragment. I suppose I really should put this in the ID section as I was wondering if these are all same Sconsia species. S. hodgii? Not that important...Didnt realize I had 4 of them until recently. A couple of them have taller spires and I just cant decide if they are all the same or not. Here's a Chesapecten. C madisonius I think. (photos of after and before) that I put in 2-3 hrs here and there trying to clean. Was using dental picks and a brass brush to remove the sandy matrix and endless soaking. I could do more I suppose but I dont have the patience for prepping. I had ideas of separating the valves but maybe in another lifetime. It has all kinds of very small sponge boring holes and grooves that make me absolute crazy. LOL. Was hoping to find that it had attached barnacles but they were gone and I only had scars left. Those of you who have that patience to prep I applaud you! Lastly for all you barnacle and brach fans...I know there are thousands of you..I am one..LOL. So a complete brach Discinisca lugrubris around here is pretty rare. I only have a few and this is the 2nd of 2 brach/barnacle associations I have. What makes this barnacle on top of a brach extra special special was that when I recently was looking for plates/stuff inside the barnacle (which had no plates and mostly just sand) I found another brach...a tiny juvenile! Yeah! So its time for breakfast...Continued hunting success! Regards, Chris
  4. So 2018 has been on a roller coaster of sorts. The east coast was hit with a prolonged cold snap to start the year which froze all the beaches up and most of the Chesapeake Bay too. So there was no hunting at all for the first week and a half of the year. The weather finally broke and i hit the beach i was luck enough to find a nice 2" meg/chub and the tripmaker was a pathological hubbell megalodon i was super stoked. Then the cold came back and once again the beaches froze right back up, so I was back off the beach again. The weather broke and all the ice went away and i hit the beach yesterday and killed it. Found the beautiful lower lateral meg that is just under 3.5", a couple nice makos, the 2 1/4' chub and a super sharp little meg. I also cleaned up on cetecean verts and chesapectens and an inner earbone it has been an up and down kind of month. Here is to a productive 2018. Hope everyone does well.
  5. Dug these out yesterday

    First time i was ever able to dig out the whole shells. Top and bottom on both. Very exciting. Sorry for the "non-technical" terms. I can't seem so upload any more pictures. Just this one. Im new and clueless. Thanks
  6. Chesapecten santamaria

    From the album Calvert Cliffs

    Extremely rare C. santamaria gifted from an associate in Maryland.
  7. James River Weekend - VA

    Mrs. SA2, @MikeR & I guided a trip for 12 along the lower James River in Virginia this weekend. Started out with very iffy weather Saturday morning with 2 foot swells and white caps from an unfriendly westerly wind. She and I were both quite busy tending our boats even when on the beach so we didn't get many photos. Mike was busy helping the folks with IDs and stratigraphy, so he didn't get many either. There were some taken though. Later in the day we did find a very nice, large Eastover Formation slough (upper Miocene). @Fossil-Hound Mrs. SA2 said she "had the feeling" as we approached in the boats. Not to disappoint, the slough produced at least 10 Ecphora between the different members of the group, most were whole or almost whole. @Daleksec still has hold of the lucky horseshoe and found about 6 foot of whale jaw. (After initial inspections last night it appears to be 3 foot of both sides of the lower jaw / mandible. Lots of further work is required.) I will post more photos of Saturday in next couple days. Today was much nicer on the river and we hunted a section of beach with the Rushmere Member of the Yorktown Formation (Upper Pliocene) in the bottom 2 - 3 feet of the cliff. It's very shelly and it too produced large #s of Ecphora. @Fossil-Hound, I'm not exaggerating when I say the group got over 20 on the day, cause I found Mrs. SA2 7 by myself, she found a couple, @Daleksec had 4 or 5 and other members of the group had some too. Here is a photo of my 1st of today, lying there waiting to pose with 2 of @aerogrower's custom scale cube. We were testing out the metric one to make sure Ray put some magic in it. Here is a photo showing the Rushmere Member exposure at the base of the cliff. We had about 600 yards of exposure today. Paleo pick for scale. Here is a photo of my last Ecphora of the day. @Fossil-Hound, calm down. YES, it really is "that big!" @MikeR can vouch for it, he saw it and photographed it, with his brand new metric scale from @aerogrower. Obviously, I have some prep work ahead of me. Speaking of the world famous @MikeR, ladies and gentlemen - here he is coming back to the boat with his bucket of trophies after a few hours in the sun! One of the nicest, most knowledgeable guys you would ever want to meet. I'll post photos of all of Mrs. SA2'S Ecphora from the weekend, @Daleksec's jaw and his gorgeous ~2 inch hastalis with red hues in the next few days. Gorgeous tooth! Cheers, SA2
  8. Chesapecten madisonius

    These pectens are very common in the Rushmere Member of the Yorktown Formation in cuts and bluffs along certain portions of the Tar River in North Carolina. Many are extremely worn and even crumble to pieces when handles. Specimens with double valves are not uncommon. This specimen is in exceptional shape. The final picture of the 3 specimens is to illustrate the growth of the species. They are all double valves, and range from 1 /4 inch long to 5 5/8 inch long.
  9. Chesapecten nefrens

    Discovered along the Choptank Formation near the surf as is.
  10. Chesapecten nefrens

    From the album WhodamanHD's Fossil collection.

    Bought from online, was originally from tag sale and strangely enough was labeled "Cambrian".
  11. Calvert Cliffs

    Had a phenomenal trip down at Calvert Cliffs on Wednesday with my three month old daughter strapped to my chest. This trip makes up for my failed attempts in March where the sandbars where at an all time high and made it difficult to find anything. The sandbars pushed up from the storms a few months back even helped me to get to some hard to reach locations. Here's some finds and a scouting report for May of the cliffs. Also recovered a nearly perfect decently sized Ecphora gardenae that is still undergoing some preparation work. I'll take a picture of that and post it later along with some very large clams with Ecphora burrow holes. The blood red Mako as found in the sand. I rarely sift as the waves and storms (from the weekend) are constantly exposing the fossil record. Some of the nicer specimens of the day. Two makos on the left, snaggletooth bottom right and top middle. Cow shark with eight blades top right, and a decent sized tiger shark top middle. Recovered more Chesapecten nefrens that I could carry out. This is just a fragment of the shells recovered and layed out neatly in the trunk of my car. Some of the C. nefrens where about 5-6 inches in diameter and impressive to find intact as there were so many large shell fragments. These should make for some beautiful display pieces and gifts once they are cleaned up. Notice the right fins of the C. nefrens are larger than the left fins. This is a noticeable characteristic of this fossil scallop. Approaching the cliffs. The tides where up much higher this time but the waves where very gentle. This photo was taken around 7:00 am. The vegetation overgrowth should help to keep the cliffs from falling. Another shot of the blood red mako. I'll take a closeup of the other Mako later as it's a green-yellow cream color. Somebody found this stranded snapper turtle and carried him 3 miles back up to a freshwater pond. What a nice guy and what a cool looking turtle. A bunch of teeth, turritella, shark vertebrae, ray plates, makos, sand tiger, tiger, requiem, ecphora gardenae, crab claw tip, Megalodon root, and snaggletooth teeth collected by a local collector and myself combined from this trip and a recent trip. Matoaka cabins beach shore. The winds here were very strong and kicked up a lot of dust with some impressive waves. I had to protect my newborn in my chest as I braved the winds. Image 8: Female blue crab that appears to have deposited her eggs and passed away to be washed up on the shore. This is a good sign that the bay is recovering from over-crabbing. Crabs are vital to the bay's overall health as they are scavengers and eat decaying fish and other decomposing critters on the bottom of the bay. Male blue crab. You can tell it's a male by the "state capitol" on the underside. Perhaps his mate was the female that just layed her eggs.
  12. Chesapecten

    A small specimen of this species, but a nice one. They get quite a bit larger. I have one pushing 160 mm wide but it is in poor shape.
  13. This might prove very easy for more advanced fossil collectors to answer. In 2004, the floodwaters from Hurricane Gaston swept away a large amount of soil and clay from an existing stream near the backyard of our suburban house near Mechanicsville, Virginia, exposing a clay bed littered with numerous fossils. The turritella you see in the picture occurs the most frequently of all our finds, and the small clam fossils are a close second. We've recently started to find more of the kind of scallop fossil in the image, which we guessed was a chesapecten jeffersonius, Virginia's state fossil. I found one moonsnail fossil in the same clay, but it's the only fossil of that kind that we've found. Anyway, I'm not much of a geologist, so I haven't been able to precisely date these, or identify them with a specific epoch. I have what I think is a reasonable guess, but I'd like to get a specific date on just how many years worth of soil Gaston scrubbed away from our backyard. Thanks!
  14. I have some shells I collected from the cliffs off the Tar River that I would greatly appreciate some ID assistance on. I got into books and websites and see they are Chesapecten and probably mostly Jeffersonius... but there are some features I don't know enough about to feel 100% in my research - I hope these photos will be clear enough but I can provide more if not. Any assistance/direction would be great! I have several so I will just number them and hopefully that will make replies easier. 1.
  15. Hello! Has anyone collected from the Windmill Point Member of the St. Marys Formation in Maryland or Virginia? I've collected the Chesapecten scallops for years and would LOVE to find a Chesapecten santamaria and finally fill that major gap in my collection. C. santamaria is common in these exposures but I don't know of any on public property - are there? Has anyone collected on private property - if so would you mind sharing contact info of the person/organization involved? Thanks so much!
  16. Does anyone have a copy/working link to T.G. Gibson's Miocene and Pliocene Pectinidae from the Lee Creek Mine and Adjacent areas? It's paper from C.E Ray's 1987 Geology and Paleontology of the Lee Creek Mine, North Carolina. If so, would you so kindly share with me? According to Lyle Campbell's Pliocene Molluscs from the Yorktown and Chowan River Formations in Virginia, there's some good info and lots of pics of Chesapecten septenarius. Thanks!
  17. Chesapecten nefrens.top

    From the album Recent Finds in VA

    Name: Chesapecten nefrens (both valves of specimen) Formation: Yorktown / Rushmere Member Age: Pliocene Location: James River, James City County, VA, left bank, downstream of Jamestown
  18. Chesapecten nefrens.right

    From the album Recent Finds in VA

    Name: Chesapecten nefrens Formation: Yorktown / Rushmere Member Age: Pliocene Location: James River, James City County, VA, left bank, downstream of Jamestown
  19. Chesapecten nefrens.left

    From the album Recent Finds in VA

    Name: Chesapecten nefrens Formation: Yorktown / Rushmere Member Age: Pliocene Location: James River, James City County, VA, left bank, downstream of Jamestown
  20. Chesapecten nefrens.1

    From the album Recent Finds in VA

    Name: Chesapecten nefrens (both valves of specimen) Formation: Yorktown / Rushmere Member Age: Pliocene Location: James River, James City County, VA, left bank, downstream of Jamestown
  21. C.jeffersonius with clintonius

    From the album Recent Finds in VA

    Name: C. jeffersonius with Placopecten clintonius (naturally concreted together) Formation: Yorktown / Rushmere Member Age: Pliocene Location: James River, Surry County, VA, right bank, downstream of Sunken Meadow
  22. James River Chesapectens

    From the album Recent Finds in VA

    Name: Chesapecten jeffersonius Formation: Yorktown / Rushmere Member Age: Pliocene Location: James River, Surry County, VA, right bank, near Cobhams Wharf
  23. assortment3

    From the album Chesapeake Western Shore - Miocene

    - At top and left, Chesapecten scallop shells - At center-right, possible cetacean metacarpal/phalanx bone? - At right, extinct mako shark tooth - At bottom, four various marine mammal epiphyses ("cookies") - Also includes ray dental plate, fish/shark vertebrae fragments (one turned on side)

    © rpw/sew 2013

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