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Found 5 results

  1. It is with a good bit of giddy enthusiasm that we share our very first Jurassic dinosaur fossils. We have a start to our Morrison Formation collection and I am so excited to take these into class. This is also a proud moment because my son and I earned these fossils with our hard work. This is a gift to our program from us and a gift to the kids we want to educate. They are also big hunks of dino bone. We needed a couple of larger bones for these programs for visual flair and these fit the bill for our budget. It will be a week before they arrive but I am too excited to wait lol One of the things we learned from our first dinosaur program was that 2nd graders learn about Diplodocus when they study dinosaurs. It was a species they knew. So we purchased a partial Diplo coracoid bone. It is a 15" x 11" x 9" hunk of dinosaur bone that weighs 12 lbs. Our largest and heaviest fossil. This one will really get the attention of the kids I think and gives us a the opportunity to feature Diplo in the program We also added two partial Camarasaurus ribs that fused together during fossilization. It is 14" x 9" so it is good sized and is a great example of the geological process they are learning about. This gives us an additional Sauropod to cover in the program and lest us talk more about niches. This will be a great fossil for the kids to touch as well. We are also adding a few pounds of chunkasaurus bones. Perfect dino fossils for hands on exploration and a few special give away dino bones too. The pictures are not great, not sure why but I will upload more when they arrive. Here are the big ones.... Picture 1- Diplo coracoid Picture 2 Cam ribs
  2. For the most part I am pretty happy with our collection so far and pretty satisfied with the fossils for our presentation. I know we are lacking a couple of items that kids will really dig. I am working on picking up a low quality, cheap Tyrannosaur tooth that the kids can handle. I know that is something kids will LOVE. I am close to having a Jurassic sauropod bone so we will have something soon that represents the massive size of a dino. Beyond that, I know what I want to add but not the order. Most of the next round of purchases will be bone not teeth. Dromaeosaurid teeth are an exception but the next few additions really need to be bones. Part of why kids dig dinosaurs so much is they were huge animals. Bones give a much better representation of that size than teeth do. I picked up on the basics of identifying dinosaur teeth pretty quickly but bones are a different. I am working on a basic anatomy lesson on dinosaurs for myself. I study for about a half a night as that is all the time I have right now. Feeling okay about basic dinosaur anatomy is a good thing but learning about the fossil bones as collectibles is pretty scary. I see bones all over the place so I am not worried about finding them. It is EVERYTHING else about that worries me. Figuring out if they are even dinosaur bones is pretty hard for me at this point. I see bones that look to be chunkasaurus to me but are labeled with a species. I also see a lot of fragments that have not only have species but are labeled as ribs or verts or limb bones. Where are the ID"S coming from? How does anybody know that fragment is a Triceratops limb bone? To me it seems a clear cut case of dealers wanting a species to move product. I get why it occurs but it is not helpful. For somebody new to this, it is pretty crazy to see so many bones with species attached. I avoid most of the bones I am seeing right now. I simply do not trust my knowledge and I do not trust a lot of what I see. I have taken to assuming most of what I see is not identified correctly. I may not know a lot about dinosaur bones but it has to be snarge near impossible to ID a fragment of bone to species level or even family level. This makes it hard to trust peoples identifications when it comes to bones that are probably more diagnostic. I am doing my best to study my bones and I am putting in the time to really increase my knowledge. I have already learned not to rely on dealer ID's but the bones take time to learn. Each dinosaur is different so you have to know quite a bit. I made a list of the bones we want to add and I study those 5 or 6 which I find helpful. I avoid impulse buys and I am very cautious. I will also use the forum more before I am ready to buy something. I plan on posting bones I see come up and get more informed opinions and developing resources. I have a few dealers that I do trust so that will help too. I think for the bones, developing connections and fostering relationships will be really helpful but I am still finding sources for fossils so my connections are limited. My advice to my fellow newbies is go slow and learn as much as you can. Invest your in knowledge before you invest in the fossils. Be careful and get ID's verified before you buy. I wish you all luck in your collections and good luck with dem bones
  3. I saw this for sale and this would be perfect for our program if they are dinosaur bones. I am not well versed in bones yet and some of these look very interesting. The bone in the lower left of the picture and the larger one to the right of that both caught my eye. I do not know what they are and I did look at some pictures before I posted it but I could find much in the way of help for myself so I thought I would put it to the forum. If they are dino bones, this would be a nice addition so if you have a thought on what these might be, please share ??
  4. N. Sulphur River ID

    Found this interesting piece over the weekend in the North Sulphur River. What has me curious is the tube on what I’m calling ‘the back’ that has calcified. Any ideas on what it is and what it came from?
  5. Polishing Some "Chunkasaurus"

    I had to listen to a couple lectures for a school assignment which ended up totaling over 2 hours of straight listening. I cannot just sit and do nothing while I listen so I decided to do a little fossil prep. I have had this piece of what is commonly called "chunkosaurus". Chunkosaurus is a chunk of dinosaur bone that has no defining features and many times doesn't have a location attached to said specimen for us to assign it to a species or genus and so is almost practically useless to scientific endeavors. But I saw a future for this little piece so I downloaded my lectures into my phone and grabbed my stack of various sandpaper grits. I started with the opposite side looking like this. First up was some 380 grit paper to get rid of the obvious saw marks the seller I bought it from had left. Here is right after I got done with the 380 paper. Most of the saw marks except for the absolute deepest ones were gone and a little shine was showing up. I then moved onto a intermediate grit around 500 I can't tell for sure as it was old and faded on the back but I could tell the approximate grit from feeling it. This paper promptly fell apart but I got the results out of it I wanted. I then moved up to a 1200 grit then 1500 and finally 2000. I forgot to take pictures as I was getting excited to see it start to gain a mirror finish. My lectures had drawn to a close so here is my final product. Please forgive my photography, my camera is acting wonky.
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