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Found 5 results

  1. Hello all! It's almost spring, and that means it's time for @Kane and me to alter the geography of New York state once again! Current plans are to start at Penn Dixie on April 26th, then off to the DSR area on Saturday. Sunday is a mystery still, but we're working on it. As always, anyone is welcome to come out and join in the destruction, er... fossil hunting. Last year was a heck of a thing, lots of good stuff was found, and I think everyone had a pretty good time. @Pagurus, @JamesAndTheFossilPeach , @Fossildude19 , @Malcolmt, @Jeffrey P (I'm sure there are more I'm forgetting off-hand.)
  2. For a year, I've wanted to collect large rugose coral, sometimes known as horn coral. My girlfriend has one that was given to her by someone who lives on Skaneateles Lake, and in researching, I found that there is a lakeside exposure known as "Staghorn Point" because the plentiful coral resemble antlers, they are so large. This locale is accessible only via water, and unfortunately I am boatless and none of my boating friends are fossilers, so I put this dream away and dug into research. Last summer I found one huge (5") horn coral in the Tully Limestone (Mid-Devonian/Hamilton Group), which was graciously ID'd by Rick Batt on the Devonian FB page as Heliophyllum halli. I did some research into the Bellona coral layer and found plenty of candy-sized corals, but the true bonanza of the "big ones" eluded me. This winter we joined the Gem & Mineral Society of Syracuse and heard about a creek in the area with plentiful large horn corals. Unfortunately, we weren't able to pinpoint the location with the several feet of snow cover that overstayed its welcome (it's all just about gone now), so it wasn't until this month's meeting that we received more detailed directions. In the mean time, I researched more and found that the coral from Skaneateles and the coral from this location (some 9 miles northeast) are supposed to be part of the same horizon. It's hypothesized that at this point in the Devonian, the area abounded in huge coral reefs, based on the thousands/millions of extant specimens that have been found for the past 150 years. What's interesting to me is that the elevation of Skaneateles Lake, with its shoreline exposure is several hundred feet lower than the locale we hunted. Of course, the couple million years of glacial cover (which only retreated 12,000 years ago) certainly messed with the strata... So, here's a good selection of today's rugose & tabulate Mid-Devonian (all found loose in a creek) corals... (inches)
  3. I've been doing research into fossil locations for the Middle and Upper Devonian in the Finger Lakes area. I live just outside Cortland and I've collected mostly in Onondaga, Cortland and Madison counties in a few different places and I've visited Portland Point and Kashong Creek as well, Overall, I am happy with the various brachiopods, bivalves, gastropods, cephalopods, crinoids, horn corals and such, but I'm always on the hunt for trilobites and ammonoids and other more rare fossils. In the past couple weeks I've run across references to Ophiuroids (brittle stars) and Ptilonaster princeps (although one discovery on the Cornell campus was called the "second" ever discovered, so this specific ID may be in question) being found in the Cortland-Ithaca-Yates Co areas (what I would call the Lower Finger Lakes). I'm pretty good at research, I'm decent at geography and I'm not worried about taking the time to do this myself, but I'm wondering if either anyone else has already done some research or knows about locations? Does anyone want to collaborate on finding some of the more "rare" Devonian creatures?
  4. Megastrophia Concava

    I found this guy in a lump of Tully limestone that had broken and weathered out… the rim was visible above the matrix, so I knew it was a big one, and on the other side it was peeking through, though there was no way to tell for sure it was the same fossil. At home, I tapped lightly on it with the handle of a screwdriver and the matrix slid off. I flaked as much as I felt comfortable off, but the remaining piece sticking out is much harder than the rest was and I have neither the confidence nor the tools to take it off at the moment. But it looks pretty cool to me as is I thought it may have been Strophodonta demissa, but Steve P on the FB Devonian group was kind enough to point out the dimensions better suited M. concava. Megastrophia concava Mid-Devonian Hamilton Tully limestone (way at the top of the exposure per Baird/Brett) from Tully Center NY location 2.75" by 2.25" (with matrix 2.5") right profile "head" on
  5. Several weeks ago my daughter found an awesome hashplate in the creek at Tinker Falls in Tully, NY. The matrix is shale as opposed to limestone but other than that, I can't place the particular horizon. As I was reinspecting some finds in order to think about displaying them, I noticed this piece and thought that the long crinoid stem may lead to a calyx in the matrix. Upon closer inspection, I saw a small fault and wedged it with an old steak knife I had at hand. Instead of finding a calyx, I found... The negative is flipped over and displayed next to the positive. I can clearly see that it is an ammonoid, and looking at Linsley, I see Agoniatites vanuxemi? This one I found last week in a different creek in Cortland County, and it is in limestone. Linsley has an unspecified cephalopod that looks most like this. I'm having a blast this summer creek walking and finding all kinds of fossils. Thanks to everyone on TFF, I'm thinking more about origins and prep for display.
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