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Found 21 results

  1. Would anyone have any sort of idea of how much this Stigmaria fossil might be worth? It is approximately 12 in. x 6 in., I do not know where it originally is from. It was found within the landscape rocks of my sisters house, which is in southwest Ohio. From what I know of these, they are Carboniferous and not typically found around here, since most of the fossils found here (Cincinnati, OH) are usually Ordovician. I was thinking this stigmaria might have been transported with rocks from a quarry for landscaping purposes. The house is over 50 years old, so I have no way of knowing where the rocks came from. I was thinking of offering my brother in law something for this fossilized tree root (He does not collect fossils by the way.) What would this stigmaria be worth to someone who collects fossils like me? Thanks to anyone who replies, your opinions will be appreciated.
  2. A few pics of the fossils and other things we found at Folly yesterday morning (at high tide no less ). We also got a lot of great shells and shell pieces, two new horseshoe crab shells (complete), and a spider crab shell (I believe that's what it is), and some corals. One of the shells Toby found that is complete is the olive shell - SC's state shell! It appears that I found coal, and possible charcoal (looks like wood on one end), so that was pretty cool! I can safely say I've never found coal or charcoal washed up on any beaches before. As far as fossils go, we got some great bone frags! They are pretty big and one of them has matrix with something else stuck to it. Debating on possibly trying to remove the matrix to see what that something else is. We also found, at the same time (we almost dove for it once we saw it - instantly new what it was! LOL) a chunk of what would have been a HUGE meg! The chuck itself is 3 inches on the diag! WHAT! So that was exciting. Toby swears he had an angy as well but dropped it in the water by mistake (I think he was trying to clean it off). I went to look for it when the waves regressed but wasn't paying attention and got soaked from the knees down. LOL I also picked some great concretions I found interesting. I also found a sea urchin! It was completely emptied on the inside so no life left. We did rescue one horseshoe crab and a sea star that were still alive and returned them to the ocean. Hope they made it! But the best part is we had a great time - about a two hour walk on the beach. The weather was amazing! Slight breeze, but not windy so no sand blowing in our faces. Temperature was perfect! Sun was out... What an amazing day! Hoping to make it back out again this week so we can go during low tide and hit those low tide lines. We have too many plans w/family for parties and Xmas gatherings this weekend to hit low tide now.
  3. Greetings! I found this imprint on a large piece of what I assume is coal on the beach in SC. Sand was dredged from offshore to replenish the beach, and there are fossilized teeth of deer, mammoth, mastodon, tapir, megalodons, etc. Nothing nearly as old as a trilobite. A lot of heavy coal pieces were on the beach after hurricane Matthew and I found this imprint on one of them. Can anyone tell from this image if it's a nothing or a something? (Pics were tricky, but can take more if needed and if image file too big I can squish it down.) --Stilitano
  4. My wife and I went on a scouting trip in NC today. Unfortunately we found no shark teeth, but we did find a lot of mosquitos, looks like a piece of petrified wood and what I believe is a chunk of coal.? On to SC this weekend to check out some new sites.
  5. As I promised myself, this has now become a yearly trip for me. As I'm getting ready to head out soon, let's reminisce on a previous trip that happened on one, if not THE hottest day of June of 2014. ..as one comes down from the wave breakers near the wharf of Stonehaven I checked the weather for that day and I knew it was going to be a hot one, but I never anticipated what hot was in this area. I've prepared but soon to find out I could have been more careful. But I digress. Moving on. If you've been keeping tabs on my previous Clifton posts, you'll remember that these layers are mostly perpendicular to each other, almost perfectly horizontal observed in short distances. The Sandstone tends to meet with meandering bodies of water. When you walk, you'll mostly see the rock layers as shown from the pic above, and then bam, you'll get to see this: The lenses show bodies infilled with different clast size, forming sandstone and/or mudstone type filled channels. Here's what I see when I look at the photo above: Close up Water channels that move, in perpetual motion, migrating this way or that. Interesting features as one tends to keep a closer eye for any sign of trackways. The strata in Clifton also contain in situ wonderful tree specimens that rival the ones at Joggins, at least in size. I can't recall if I've encountered one tree in Clifton that had been scared by flames such as in its almost twin in Joggins, but I'll have to make note next trek. When you're lucky enough, you will get shale that can be split without destroying the whole sample. The fragility of some makes it tough to be able to conserve in one piece but it happens from time to time. The details on some of these plants are exquisite. There are a few other places in New Brunswick, such as Minto, where plants have been perserved in similar high contrast. I haven't had the time to delve into naming different members of specific genus or families, but that will come soon enough. This is an interesting fella Calamite, annularia... As the Sun started beating down on me and my water reserve severely depleting, I turned tail and made my way off the beach. These cliffs created a dead zone as no current was passing through and I could feel the full brunt of an almost 40 degree Celcius heat. By the time I had made my way up and recovered, I've realized how close I came to having a heat stroke. Hospitalization would have probably happened. On my way back to Moncton, which was about 3 hours drive back South of the province, the heat had taken its effects on me and luckily my parents lived on the road on the main stretch. I stopped and rested for a while to try to recuperate and gather some semblance of strength and finished my trip. I think it is in the cards to bring at least a partner next time I go. There is a whole lot to do in Clifton and there are many opportunities to explore in this locale. The main thing beside shining a spotlight in this geographical treasure trove, is to have locals made aware of how important this site is for not just New Brunswick, but for the entire scientific community. There is some work being done on some discoveries made in the recent years, but there is vast potential to make more. As long as there is interest, people will keep being drawn to this forgotten shore where once vast forests doted the land, offering life and shelter to its many denizens. The search continues. - Keenan
  6. Someone searching the Maritimes for nice articulated plants would ususally end up being referred to known fossil localities in Nova Scotia such as Sydney, Cape Breton. The ferns and other flora found in the coal rich cliffs of Cape Breton are of exceptional quality, but what if I tell you that there's a location in New Brunswick that yields specimens that matches in quality? This province has made many contributions to the field of geology and paleontology since Mitchell and Gesner in the 1850s and the days of the Stonehammer Club. There had been a lull for decades, but with the surging in geotourism and the newly founded Stonehammer Geopark, new research has been made on old and new sites alike. One such site is located in Clifton. Rule of thumb here is that West of Bathurst the rocks get older, and younger East. The sedimentary rocks at Clifton are pretty much around the same time period, late in the Carboniferous (~310 to 300 Mya), matching paleoenvironment. Clifton, New Brunswick (circled in red) As my list of grew longer, Clifton stayed on top of it. When Matt called me and asked if I had any plans that weekend, I suggested that we could head up North. He hasn't been in tha area either, so this was the perfect opportunity to go snoop around. We left Moncton Saturday morning and headed North for Bathurst. The car ride to reach Clifton took a little over 2 hours. Reaching Bathurst, we took Highway 11 and proceeded North-East. We passed Clifton to get to Stonehaven where there is a road leading to a wharf. I parked the car, got the gear ready, and went down the rocks forming a breakwater to get to the beach. It was a bit tricky and the tide had just started going out. Facing South-West, towards Clifton Facing North-East, towards Stonehaven We barely set foot on the beach that we came across these beauties. These tracks were probably made by an arthropod, most likely from a horseshoe crab (limulids). What's interesting is how these animals moved (seems to be more than one animal making these traces in the silty material). We'll have to look further into this, but its obvious that this paleoenvironment was influenced by some sort of salt water body, if these animals were indeed ocean dwelling organisms. Parallel prints with tail drag We carried on and stopped at a few easy accessible spots before having to crawl and tread carefully around slippery seaweed covered rocks. Me! After a few slips, bruises, bloody scratches, and wet boots, we made it to where we wanted to be. The cliffs are somewhat similar to other familiar sites such as Joggins in Nova Scotia. The strata of sedimentary rock have a marginal inclination of about 5 degrees. What surprised us was that we found some trees in situ, popping out from the cliffs. Several trees we've seen were pretty well preserved, and a couple up to a meter in diameter. Matt kneeling beside a big tree! Checking for trackways Within these cliffs are gorgeous ferns and other type of plants belonging to the Carboniferous Period. The plants are found on a light gray shale. There are sections of the cliffs that have talus piled up with lots of plant material. Clifton is an interesting site and may yet yield really important information that could form a more detailed picture of the paleoenvironment of the region. The plants, the trees, the terrain, the bodies of water dominating the landscape, and the animals leaving their traces. The information that we were able to gather that day will be shared with the rest of the community. Clifton has come up a few times in scientific literature, but has like most part New Brunswick, been understudied. We realize that the resources aren't always available, so people like me and you can be the foot soldiers and help the academic community by making these type of discoveries like we did today. Till next time. Cheers! - Keenan
  7. Continued from Part 1 After taking a moment to try to sum up some courage to go down the cable (stupid fear of heights), we made it down to the beach and proceeded to walk North and around Cranberry Point. Cranberry Point The strata of these cliffs, as of many of the coast in this area, have a small angle, making identification of specific layers traceable for long distances. Coal seams were numerous and shale layers very thick at some spots. Getting closer to the North-East section of the point, we could start seeing Carboniferous flora such as calamites and trees in situ, in their growth positions. Calamites in growth position, in situ The trees we found in situ were of different conditions, and some of them subject to a future paper. Amongst these big trees were all sorts of foliage of different state. For some reason I didn't take any photos of the ferns we found. Bleh! I'll be posting about another fossil site that has comparable articulated ferns, in Clifton, New Brunswick. What's important to notice is that some of the trees we've inspected showed traces of sooth, a sign of forest fires that would have created victims. Matt inspecting the base of a tree (tree root left of Matt) Impression on coal residue Annularia and/or Asterophylites (extention segments of calamites) Matt standing on top of a tree segment. Where did it come from? Possibly from this one! How big and tall you think this tree is? Tree segments on the beach, possibly from the same specimen When we were at the Fossil Center earlier in the day, we had a conversation with the staff. One thing we noticed was the lack of vertebrate fossils, or even trackways. I've read that back in the 1950s that vertebrate fossils had be found, even in trees, and several trackways. Guess the surprise I had when I came upon these! Tetrapod trackways! After a couple of hours, we wrapped up and picked up our gear. Our next stop on our list is Point Aconi, located a bit North West of Sydney Mines. Some of the best plant fossils came from this area. Folks at the Fossil Center in Sydney Mines occasionally bring people to this place. The coal seams are thick, but care should be taken when approaching the cliffs as shale and mud stone weathers away and leave these big chunks of coal ready to come crashing down. Point Aconi We went down the beach and before turning the corner to reach the point, we came across some fossil trees, matching some of the specimens found at Cranberry Point. We took some data for future reference and carried on. There was at one point some very nice plant fossils, but they've pretty much all been smashes to bits. We did find some nice fragments and nice articulated ferns, but not what I was expecting. I for some reason forgot to take pics of them, which was the purpose of me bringing my snarge camera! Coal breaking away from the cliffs Looking towards the Atlantic Ocean After a while we decided to call it quits for the day and head back to Sydney. We met up with one of Matt's friend and had supper in town. We were invited to crash and tent at another of his friend's grandparents house in the area. We arrived at the house and set our tents and had a nice quick chat with Kendra and her folks. On to Part 3!
  8. I have a bunch of petrified/coalified wood from Mazon Creek and have started a process to decrease the reactivity of the pyrite and sulphur in them. Thought I'd describe the process and results in case it is helpful to anyone else. Some of them are fairly quick to form decay and even create lovely hairy crystal gardens of possibly Pickeringite or Halotrichite. Here is an earlier post about that. Here's some images of the cool crystal hairs that formed awhile back. Anyway here's my process that I've started on a few items. Not at all sure if this is the best process but thought I'd try it as an experiment and see what happens. It is an adaptation of recommendations by Reiner Mielke. Any suggestions or critiques would be great. I'm currently at Step 4 with the first batch and debating about Step 5. Step 1: Neutralize in water with some baking soda. (I notice my pieces really fiz a lot and some of the material breaks a part in this reaction so one may need to be careful with fragile items.) Step 2: Dry in the oven at low temperature for several hours. Step 3: Immerse in WD-40 to displace all the water. Step 4: Let dry Step 5: Two options and I haven't decided between the two: One option is to immerse in motor oil. (This is the Mielke approach) The other option is to spray with Fluid Film (a lanolin product in a spray bottle to prevent rust) Then let dry.
  9. For those in the Illinois area. ESCONI's friday (June 13) meeting will feature an interesting talk about the large intact Fossilized Forests that have been found in Illinois recently. My understanding is that in 2007, the large fossil forest in the Herrin Coal was found and studied. And then in 2012, an even larger one was found in the Springfield Coal. I've linked articles about both of these forests. ESCONI General Meeting 8:00 p.m. College of Dupage, - Tech Ed (TEC) Building, Room 1038B (Map) Topic: Snapshot in time – Geologic Secrets of the Springfield Coal Fossilized Forests Scott Elrick, from the Illinois State Geological Survey, will describe a 300-million-year-old fossilized forest, found along the Galatia channel, an ancient river that flowed across southern Illinois. This ancient forest is the world’s largest intact rain forest from the Pennsylvanian Period ever to be discovered. Preserved along 150 miles of the Galatia channel river banks, the forest’s sheer size offers an unprecedented view of ancient forest life and diversity. Discovered in the roof of multiple underground coal mines, this rare find, opens a tantalizing window into the past. The forest plants and their encapsulating geology reveal much about the ancient environmental conditions during the time of their formation and about the coal they left behind. Scott will describe the geology surrounding this amazing underground discovery and the geologic and climatic factors that led to the remarkable preservation of this fossil forest. Some articles on the Springfield Coal Forest from 2012 Article with a nice slide show of images about the Springfield Coal Forest. New York Times Article http://archaeologynewsnetwork.blogspot.com/2012/05/worlds-largest-fossil-forest-found-in.html#.U5iPzC-KWKM Some articles on the earlier discovery of the Herrin Coal Forest (Riola Mine) from 2007/2008 http://www.sciencebuzz.org/blog/huge-underground-fossil-rainforests-discovered-illinois-coa http://www.mnh.si.edu/highlight/riola/ http://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/the-worlds-largest-fossil-wilderness-30745943/?no-ist The ISGS sites on the Herrin Coal Forest http://isgs.illinois.edu/research/coal/pennsylvanian-age-mire-forest Nice set of photo pages from ISGS about the different plants & trees in the Herrin Coal site. http://isgs.illinois.edu/research/coal/pennsylvanian-age-mire-forest
  10. I was wondering what this is! it looks like a piece of bark, with a pickle-like skin. It kind of resembles some kind of slug, as there's some symmetry. What I don't understand is why it hasn't coalified like the rest of the coal around it? It readily came out of the piece of coal, and the coal was compressed around it. I broke it in half (I was so curious as to what it would look like inside), and it's like stone. Thanks!
  11. From the album Dinosaur_Park Laurel MD

    Fossilized (carbon) fern that has metamorphed into coal.
  12. From the album Dinosaur_Park Laurel MD

    This is actually a piece of iron that cast itself over a fern twig.
  13. From the album Dinosaur_Park Laurel MD

    Fossilized fern embedded in outcrop.
  14. **NOTE** In Nova Scotia, it is illegal to collect fossils or archaeological artifacts without a Heritage Permit or proper authorization. You can message me if you want more info. Hang on tight, my posts are usually long winded! [Taken from my blog: http://redleafz.blogspot.ca] Not too long ago I had made a list of fossil locations I would like to visit when I felt more knowledgeable and honed some of my field work skills. I had told my friend Matt Stimson (who works in the field of palaeontology) that I thought of heading East in Cape Breton sometime in the Summer. He wanted to tag along as he's familiar with the area and wouldn't mind revisiting some of the great locales around Sydney. We decided that we'd spend 3 days in Nova Scotia (August 3rd to 5th, 2012). From Moncton (New Brunswick) to Sydney (Nova Scotia) is about a 5 hour drive one way. On our way to Cape Breton on Friday, we planned to take a little detour to Parrsboro and stop by to see Tim Feydak at Wasson Bluff. As I've mentioned in the past, Wasson Bluff has in its cliffs some of Canada's oldest dinosaurs, prosauropods. Many important scientific contributions were made in this small corner of the world. Tim has taken up the torch and continues the tradition by laboring under the shadow of these red sandstone Triassic cliffs. - Day 1 Matt Stimson (left) and Tim Feydak (center) We swung by and Tim was already at the location working at it. He's been sifting through material for bone fragments from a section of the cliff that was quickly eroding. Shortly after meeting Tim, we were joined by our friend Ken Adams, curator of the Fundy Geological Museum in Parrsboro, and some of its young staff. Some of the crew collecting material from target area Bone in sandstone The tide was coming in, so we decided to give Tim a hand sifting through the material that he had collected. Not only is there bone material from these primitive dinosaurs, but those of ancient reptiles such as crocodiles. Some layers of the cliffs contain bones and teeth of fish such as primitive sharks. We've made a few finds for the short time we were there. These will be brought back to the museum lab for cleaning and prep work. The "Two Brothers" in the background, basalt islands One of the teeth found that day (center, top of rock) After a few hours, we headed out for a bite to eat at one of the local restaurants before hitting the road. The plan was to at least take the 104 East towards Port Hawkesbury, and once crossing the Canso Causeway, to find a camping close to Sydney. Sydney Coal Fields (area of interest in red) We drove for a few hours and we came across the Ben Eoin Beach Resort and Camping Grounds, on the shores of Bras d'Or Lake. The entrance had areas where you could pitch your tent, picnic tables, and spots for starting your campfire. Closer to the lake was a long stretch of land where you could park your camper, with a cabin where you could take your shower. Price was reasonable, and the scenery was beautiful! We threw our tents out and settled for the night. - Day 2 We woke up as the Sun came up, grabbed a bite to eat, and planned our day. There was plenty of time before the tides were low enough to hit our fossil sites in the Sydney area, so Matt suggested we check a quarry before heading to town. Matt getting ready (Quartz vein , rock bearing rubies [center-right to right]) This abandoned quarry bears a regional treasure: Cape Breton rubies! This granite-type hard igneous has rubies which the quality is all over the spectrum. We took our tools and proceeded up the quarry, whacking pieces of this creamy colored ruby gemstone. I've seen one cut before, but its pretty cool to actually get them from the source. Along with the rubies, I also got my hands on some nice quartz crystals from a big vein jutting out vertically from the quarry. Some collected samples Ruby in the rough =) Taking a break, watching grasshoppers doing their business Satisfied with our haul of pretty rocks, we hopped back in the car and headed towards Sydney. Sydney region's areas of interest: 1- Cranberry Point; 2- Point Aconi; 3- Donkin Peninsula First order of business as soon as we rolled in to town was to grab some early dinner. There was still some time before the tides were down, so Matt suggested we go visit the Fossil Center in Sydney Mines. Displays at the Cape Breton Fossil Center, Sydney Mines It was nice to swing by the center to check the type of fossils first hand found in the region. Most of the fossils they have at the center are plants, but man are they nice. The specimens they have are numerous, and in well built displays. We also took a moment to head over their other museum that displayed Sydney's mining past. Megaphyton (tree fern) showing frond scars (elongated oval features) After our visit, we made our way towards Cranberry Point in the Sydney Mines area, stopping at a few places along the way. Many of the coast of the area is elevated, meaning that there are many cliff face to explore, exposing coal seams and various fossils. Fossilized tree This area that the greater Sydney area is located in is described of being part of the Sydney Coal Fields. This section of the island is dominated by Carboniferous Period topography (Nova Scotia Geological Map), contributing to Sydney's rich coal industry. The plants found in these shale are like no other. These articulated plants have been the subject of study since the mid-1860s. Even though there is a rich catalog of fossils, there are still big gaps in the record and much more studying to be done. We were hoping that our weekend would yield more secrets to us. Calamites First location on our list was Cranberry Point, North of Sydney Mines. We had some friends that were at this location recently and confirmed that there were upright trees, mostly bigger than the ones you'd usually see at Joggins, the world famous UNESCO site. Matt had been here in the past, so he knew which roads to take in this maze of houses and cottages. We made our way down Peck Street and Matt was surprised that the road that led to the Point had a brand new house built in its way. We parked the car and walked up to where the old road was and met with the very nice lady that owns the new home. She was very interested by our work and would love for us to drop by after our trek and share what we found. Remains of World War II's past Where Peck Street ends, there's an old dirt road that leads to an old WWII era building, or what's left of it. It sits on a piece of the cliff that is slowly becoming an island. The trail that used to connect the mainland and this quasi-island has eroded away. The only thing that's left is a sheer fall, with a cable dangling down for beach access. That was our way down. Rope access (Gulp!) On to Part 2!
  15. Continued from Part 2 - Day 3 Sunday was our last day in Cape Breton. We had decided that we'd do a little bit of free-styling around the Donkin Peninsula, and bring our friend Kendra along. Her family was heading back home, and proposed to drop her off at her parent's house on our way back. We spent the whole late morning and early afternoon exploring Cape Breton's Eastern shore. We made our way to Glace Bay for lunch within that drive, but I have a hard time to remember if we stopped in Donkin before or after. Heading towards the cliffs along the Donkin Peninsula This freestylin' drive paid off as we came upon a very nice spot with beautiful plant material, still in large pieces. The loose material yielded beautiful specimens. For some reason I didn't take any photo, go figure! This stop alone made the whole weekend worthwhile. So many various ferns, plants, fronds, annularia, and other that just slips my mind. Kendra heading to the sweet spot We headed back towards civilization and snooped around the shorelines of various towns in the area. We made a few more stops before making the decision to call it a successful trip and head back home. Coastal fortifications during the threat of WWII It was still fairly early in the afternoon and we opted to take the long way home by going around Bras d'Or Lake. We drove along beautiful vistas and when we reached Iona, we took the ferry across to get to the other side. On our drive back we stopped to drop Kendra at her folks' place in the Antigonish area (can't remember precisely where she lives) and headed back home. Cape Breton was always a place I wanted to visit and I don't know why I waited this long to do so. Maybe it just took me this long so that when I finally went, it made me appreciate the places we went, the people we met, and the gorgeous scenery this beautiful part of the province had to offer. I'm already planning another trip to this Celtic getaway for next year and I'll remind myself to take some pics of the actual plants next time. Till next time, cheers! - Keenan
  16. Since there's a section for sites, here's mine: http://redleafz.blogspot.ca/ Cheers! -Keenan
  17. Alright. This post is wholly dedicated to two seperate trips solely on Joggins. My previous posts in this forum included short trips to the site, but this post is 100% Joggins. This was taken off of 2 seperate posts from my blog back in June and August 2011 - http://redleafz.blogspot.ca. Cheers! June Trek to the Joggins Fossil Cliffs (June 27th, 2011) - Part 1 Last week I went back to the cliffs at Joggins, Nova Scotia to sniff around and see if I could discovery different finds from my previous ventures. June had been a very wet month, so the chances for the cliffs to be revealing new specimens were high as I'm sure lots of sediment must have eroded. When I left early in the morning it was raining; a light drizzle with a cloud ceiling consisting of multiple different shades of gray, but that didn't damper my spirit as I had heard that the sky would open up sometime during the day. By the time I had reached my destination, the Sun had come out in full force. Reaching the cliffs I could see the rain had done its work. There were heaps of eroded cliff tailing on the ground and new rock falls, showing freshly cracked sandstone. There was a lot of debris and by the end of my walk, a lot of new things to see. The name escapes me, but I'll find out and edit the post. Oyster-type fossils with tiny snails. Same type of fossils, with my thumb for size reference. Close up of a clam/bivalve type fossil. More oyster-like fossils. I found trees that I didn't photograph before. The rain had cleaned the silt and mud, causing these trees to pop out right off the cliff face. Tree with root exposed. I've been coming here for almost 2 years and I had never found any fern-like fossils, until now. There was a new rockfall and some sandstone boulders had cracked open. I was lucky to find several specimens at one location. More ferns. Here's an example of a tree with roots extending out. The tree itself is barely noticeable, except for the outlines on the edges (lines going up and inside above my hat). The the roots (stigmaria) of this lycopsid type tree, on the other hand, are very detailed. You can see bits of other stigmaria sticking out of the rock on the edge (right side) of this photo. Close-up of the roots. Pic showing multiple trees grouped together (showing dense foliage) Fog building up Hardscrabble Point, which at one time saw its innards flying due to some crazy geologists and some sticks of dynamite. =P This last image shows what I came to Joggins that day to look for: trace fossils of Arthropleura. Arthropleura was an ancestor to the modern day centipede and could grow to almost 3 meters (~9 feet) and dominated the floor of Carboniferous coniferous forests. I was happy to have found these trackways. The fact that more than one trackway is showing on the sandstone slab and crossing one another is amazing, but also showing that the forest floor was hosting living organisms. On to Part 2!
  18. Continued from Part 1... June Trek to the Joggins Fossil Cliffs (August 31st, 2011) - Part 2 Hurricane Irene came to the Maritimes as a downgraded tropical storm. Strong winds and lots of rain were forcast but in the end it wasn't as dire as the weather forecasters thought it would be. Knowing that accompanying strong winds and rain, was the inevitable process of extreme erosion due to strong forces. With that in mind, I thought immediately of the cliffs at Joggins. I couldn't go the day after the storm had done its thing, but I had the Wednesday off, a couple of days after the storm had gone through. The tides would have been low extremely early in the morning, so I decided to leave Moncton at around 6 AM. As soon as I arrived to my destination, the Sun was just peaking out to greet me. My favorite spot in the Joggins area to search the cliffs is from Lower Cove Road. I take the path down the little bridge that crosses Little River and walk South towards the cliffs. From the bridge its about 100 meters more or less before you reach the first cliffs. Water receeding as the tide is getting close to its low point. The rain from Irene did a good number on the cliffs. The rain had battered the cliffs and the loose sediment had started to come down. When I walked near the cliffs, I could see huge piles of loose till and mud at their base. The cliffs had also started to show signs where water had run off and where blocks of sandstone of various size had slid down, leaving drag marks on the soft and wet sediment. Stigmaria (tree root fossil) with rootlets spreading vertically outward Cast of a tree with visible features Although some of those trees might have already been exposed, the rain helped make them prop out of the cliff. The tree specimen on the far right is a good sample that could be identified and studied for possible bone fragments within its core. [coin added for proportion, bottom left] [coin added for proportion, bottom left] [coin added for proportion, center] This tree like I mentionned before could yield tiny animal bones. When the conditions are right, small animals would seek refuge in hollowed out trees. Trees in the Carboniferous period weren't the same as the trees we know of today, but were more common to club mosses. Their center were more of a fleshy pit and these would create cavities that animals could use as shelter, as do small animals do today. Dawson thought that, when he first found small animal bones in these trees, that they had fallen to their death or such similar situation, but today the feeling is that it could have been a circumstance of immediate environment (ie. forest fire, suffocating, extreme undesirable environment toxic and deadly to the animal, etc). Calamites Bark possibly from Sigillaria tree The layer of coal can be seen here, showing its shinny underside due to the erosion mostly caused by rain. Littered on the beach were blocks of coal that had broken off from veins similar to this, due to lack of support from the loose sediment that held them in place. Tree section [coin added for proportion] Tree sections, foreground and centered on each side [coin added for proportion] This tree cast is possibly what had held most of the tree segments found littered close to that location. The features that suggest size had been weathered but still offer an idea of its girth (diameter). The roots extending from the bottom of this tree are nice as they offer features in situ that are identifiable. The coin was added for size proportion. [coin added for proportion] Calamites This was an interesting find. Laying on the beach I found what I first thought were chopped wood. At closer inspection, come to find out it was a section of a fossilized tree! The colors kinda threw me off from afar. Picking them up to check their weight, they were definitly heavy to lift. Cheers! - Keenan
  19. hello guys, I found these stones which look to be some sort of indian axe head possibly and some sort of tool that looks to have used for scraping hides possibly. Also i found these shark teeth and what look to be be some sort of tooth from a dolphin, or reptile. I am not sure and new to collecting. I also found this really cool piece of coal 3 feet beneath a sand bed which has a fossil in the lower right hand corner. I would love any help indentifying these items. Thank you
  20. any help indentifying any of these items would be much appreciated! thank you in advance