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Found 41 results

  1. Holophagus penicilatus Egerton, 1861

    From the album Vertebrates

    Holophagus penicilatus Egerton, 1861 Late Jurassic Tithonian Painten Germany Length 32cm
  2. Schwimmer, D.R., 2002. Giant fossil coelacanths from the Late Cretaceous of the eastern USA. Fernbank Magazine. Faculty Bibliography. 514. http://csuepress.columbusstate.edu/bibliography_faculty/514 The paper is: Schwimmer, D.R., J.D. Stewart & G.D. Williams. Giant fossil coelacanths of the Late Cretaceous in the Eastern United States. Geology 22: 503-506. Nouv. Ser. 139: 187-190. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/252272908_Giant_fossil_coelacanths_of_the_Late_Cretaceous_in_the_eastern_United_States https://www.researchgate.net/profile/David_Schwimmer https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Joe_Stewart5 Yours, Paul H.
  3. Deesri, U., Cavin, L., Amiot, R., Bardet, N., Buffetaut, E., Cuny, G., Giner, S., Martin, J.E. and Suan, G., 2018. A mawsoniid coelacanth (Sarcopterygii: Actinistia) from the Rhaetian (Upper Triassic) of the Peygros quarry, Le Thoronet (Var, southeastern France). Geological Magazine, 155(1), pp. 187-192. PDF file: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/318863726_A_mawsoniid_coelacanth_Sarcopterygii_Actinistia_from_the_Rhaetian_Upper_Triassic_of_the_Peygros_quarry_Le_Thoronet_Var_southeastern_France https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Uthumporn_Deesri Abstract: https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/geological-magazine/article/mawsoniid-coelacanth-sarcopterygii-actinistia-from-the-rhaetian-upper-triassic-of-the-peygros-quarry-le-thoronet-var-southeastern-france/8F75DA3D17732195C397FB6F3C7AA4AF More Mesozoic fossil fish papers. https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Uthumporn_Deesri https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Lionel_Cavin Yours, Paul H.
  4. From the album Vertebrates

    Piveteauia madagascariensis Lehman 1952 Early Triassic Dienerian Sakamena Formation Ambilobe Madagascar J.-P. Lehman. 1952. Etude complémentaire des poissons de l'Eotrias de Madagascar. Kungliga Svenska Vetenskapsakademiens Handlingar 2:1-201
  5. Coelacanth fossil?

    The fossil shown in the attached photos is said to be a coelacanth from Madagascar? What do you think?
  6. Hi, I was wondering if permission was needed to collect at what is left of the Granton quarry in N. Bergen NJ? It sounds like a really cool spot but I am unsure if you need permission from Lowes or not. thanks, Dom
  7. I have one more small Triassic Diplurus coelacanth fish collected many years ago in North Bergen, New Jersey. The fish's head is slightly lifting off the shale matrix along its top and bottom, but remains well attached at the front and back of the head -- see the photos. The lift gap along top and bottom is at most 0.5 to 0.67 mm. Pressing on the head results in a micro-movement down. With careful handling, I don't believe that the head is in any danger of fully detaching. I have little background in prep work, so I would like to ask opinions on: Should anything be done to cement the head down? And a related question: what cementing technique can be used given that the gap is under one mm. I appreciate any thoughts on this.
  8. Diplurus Prep

    Here’s a before and after look at a small Diplurus newarki that I just finished for another TFF member, @LoneRanger. This is small and well preserved minus a nasty coating of pyrite on most of the fossil. This prep took 7 hours to complete. Tuesday, I started another specimen that is even smaller! These were collected before I was born! Can you find the fish? Hint, I scribed on it a bit before I thought to take a pic...
  9. Lit.: J. A. Moy-Thomas. 1935. The coelacanth fishes from Madagascar. Geological magazine 72:213-226 Lehmann, J.-P. (1952): Étude complémentaire des poissons de l’Eotrias de Madagascar. Kungliga Svenska Vetenskaps-akademiens Hangdlingar (4), 2 (6): 1-201; Stockholm
  10. Helllo friendly folks of the fossil forum, I have been searching for a coelacanth fossil on and off for years now. I finally found one that preserved all the characteristic fin "limbs" in profile from an Ebayer who acquired it while in Madagascar. I was pleased with the degree of preservation on both split halves. To my surprise, taking a hand lens to the more concave side revealed scale preservation. I know this is typical of bony fish with scutes like Gars from the Green River, WY - but! Is this unusually good for nodules in Madagascar? More to the point, am I keeping something away from the scientific eye that should be seeing this? I imagine 3-D scanning could reveal finer details for comparison to the living fossil ancestor today. Attached are photos taken with my iPhone and two photos through a regular light microscope at 2x magnification. Thank you for any advice or knowledge you may have on these classes of coelacanths. Warmly, Mark
  11. Quick question for the experts: I've found a number of marine fossils in Newark Supergroup locations- corals, crinoids, brachiopods, yet I've read that the formation is non-marine. I'm told they could be glacial deposits. I also recall that Coelacanths have been found which I assume were marine. Was the formation marine or not? Or both? Thanks in advance!
  12. Reconstruction

    From the album Late Triassic Lockatong Formation

    This is a reconstruction of the late Triassic coelacanth, Diplurus newarki. Reworked by me. (reverse black and white) FROM: FOSSILS AND FACIES OF THE CONNECTICUT VALLEY LOWLAND: ECOSYSTEM STRUCTURE AND SEDIMENTARY DYNAMICS ALONG THE FOOTWALL MARGIN OF AN ACTIVE RIFT. Peter M. LeTourneau1,4, Nicholas G. McDonald2, Paul E. Olsen3,4,*, Timothy C. Ku5, and Patrick R. Getty Available HERE.
  13. Diplurus partial

    From the album Late Triassic Lockatong Formation

    Diplurus newarki - partial coelacanth Late Triassic, Newark Supergroup, Newark Basin, Lockatong Formation, North Bergen, NJ, old Granton Quarry G-3 layer.
  14. Coelacanth duo

    From the album Late Triassic Lockatong Formation

    2 skulls of the Late Triassic coelacanth, Diplurus newarki. The larger of the two shows the front half of the fish, overlapping the body of a smaller coelacanth's body. from the Late Triassic, Lockatong Formation. Newark Basin, Newark Supergroup. Old Granton Quarry, North Bergen, NJ. The two fishes outlined in red:
  15. Skull,.... part and counterpart

    From the album Late Triassic Lockatong Formation

    Skull of Diplurus newarki coelacanth. Late Triassic, Newark Supergroup, Newark Basin, Lockatong Formation North Bergen, NJ. "Granton Quarry"

    © 2017 Tim Jones

  16. Triassic coelacanth

    From the album Late Triassic Lockatong Formation

    Late Triassic coelacanth, Diplurus newarki. Newark Supergroup, Newark Basin, Lockatong Formation, North Bergen NJ. Collected on 2/19/2017

    © 2017 Tim Jones

  17. A Field Trip To Granton Quarry

    Fossildude19, JefferyP, fossilsofnj and I went to Granton Quarry in North Bergen NJ to collect in the Lockatong Fm for Triassic fish. We had a great time and we all found some interesting specimens to add to our collections While the others were hard at work I came across a rather interesting flatten oval shaped sediment between two layers of the black shale in a small area I was working and at first I really didn't pay to much attention to it until one of them broke apart and I noticed that they seemed to be filled with tiny fish bones. I took the sections of slabs home and two days later took them to the NJSM to have someone look at them and one gentlemen told me that they maybe coprolites....interesting. As I was cleaning them up one of the other oval's flaked off exposing a fish tail and I was also able to expose another one without breaking apart. As you can see the two right section of slabs go on top of each other and the one to the far left slides into the middle slab. No 1 you can see a fish tale and No 1a was laying right next to it but don't seem to be a extension to the tail section when I slit this section apart in the field No 1a became exposed while No 1 remained intact until I got it home... No 1b are the pieces that cover No 1 and No 2 I also exposed without it breaking apart I'm going to leave these as is and when it dries out I will cover it with some type of stabilizer. In the second picture I have another fish that don't have the head attached. When I exposed it ,,it did appear to have the same matrix covering the specimen. Now the funny part about all this is that I never had come across this before while search for fish in this layer. Any Insight would be greatly appreciated.
  18. Caridosuctor populosum LUND & LUND, 1984

    Lit.: Lund, R., Lund, W. (1984): New genera and species of coelacanths from the Bear Gulch Limestone (Lower Carboniferous) of Montana (USA). Geobios, 17, fasc 2:237-244. Lund, R., Lund, W. (1985): Coelacanths from the Bear Gulch Limestone (Namurian) of Montana and the evolution of the Coelacanthiformes. Bull. Carnegie Mus. Nat. Hist. 25, pp 1-74. Fossil Fishes of Bear Gulch
  19. Possible coelacanth scales

    Dear Guys, I have found many strange scales with radial incisions but I do not know which kind of fish they belong to. The age of the continental limestone boulders with these scales should be Triassic. Might they belong to coelacanths? Any idea what is this? Kind regards Domas
  20. Allenypterus montanus Melton, 1969

    Taken from "Fossil Fishes of Bear Gulch" by Lund, Richard, and Grogan, E.D., 2005, Bear Gulch web site, www.sju.edu/research/bear_gulch, 1/11/2016 (last update from 2/1/2006): Allenypterus montanus is a coelacanth of relatively primitive skull osteology but with a unique, teardrop-shaped body form. They range in size from about 25 mm (1 inch) to 150 mm (6 1/4 inches) in length. Like other coelacanths, Allenypterus had a complete covering of thin, rounded, overlapping scales, and webbed fins with few, widely spaced rays. No teeth, thick lips, and a very small gape of the mouth show that this fish was a suction feeder on small prey. The body is very high relative to length. The paired fins are large with delicate webbing. The paired fins, second dorsal and anal fins are supported on long muscular lobes by segmental bony axes that are covered with fine rounded scales. There is a long, continuous dorsal lobe of the webbed caudal fin. The combination of all these fins, webs, and lobes indicates a superb maneuverer in weedy, sheltered environments but a fish that could not outswim any predator. It is noteworthy that the belly was armored, suggesting that Allenypterus may have swam and fed on and close to the bottom. The body form of Allenypterus is unique among known coelacanths — all others differ subtly only in proportions. The skull of Allenypterus is among the most primitive coelacanth skulls known. Allenypterus montanus was first described by Melton as a Dorypterid; in 1977 this fish was recognized by Lund as a coelacanth. Lit.: Melton, W. G. 1969. A new dorypterid fish from central Montana. Northwest Science 43:196-206 Glickman W. L. 1977: Allenypterus montanus (Crossopterygii: Coelacanthiformes) from the Bear Gulch Limestone of Montana. Adelphy University, 1977. Lund, R. & Lund, W. 1984: New genera and species of coelacanths from the Bear Gulch Limestone (Lower Carboniferous) of Montana (U.S.A.) Geobios, Volume 17, issue 2, p. 237-244. Lund, R., and W.L. Lund, 1985. "Coelacanths from the Bear Gulch Limestone (Namurian) of Montana and the evolution of the Coelacanthiformes." Bull. Carnegie Mus. Nat. Hist. 25: 1-74. Lund, W. L., R. Lund and G. Klein, 1985. "Coelacanth feeding mechanisms and the ecology of the Bear Gulch coelacanths." Compte Rendu, Neuvième Congrès International de Stratigraphie et de Géologie du Carbonifère, 5: 492-500 Friedman, M. & Coates, M. 2006: A newly recognized fossil coelacanth highlights the early morphological diversification of the clade Proc. R. Soc. B (2006) 273, 245–250. Hagadorn, J.: Bear Gulch: An Exceptional Upper Carboniferous Plattenkalk
  21. Whiteia woodwardi Moy-Thomas, 1935

    Lit.: J. A. Moy-Thomas. 1935. The coelacanth fishes from Madagascar. Geological magazine 72:213-226 Woodward, A.S. (1910): On some Permo-Carboniferous Fishes from Madagascar. Ann. Mag. Natur. Hist., ser. 8, 5: 1-6 Beltan, L. (1980a): Eotrias du Nord-Ouest de Madagascar: Etude de quelques poissons, don’t un est en parturition. Ann Soc. Geol. Nord, 99: 453-464; Lille
  22. Lit.: Wen, W. et al. (2013): Coelacanths from the Middle Triassic Luoping Biota, Yunnan, South China, with the earliest evidence of ovoviviparity. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica 58 (1): 175–193. Geng, B., Zhu, M. und Jin, F. (2009): A Revision and Phylogenetic Analysis of Guizhoucoelacanthus (Sarcopterygii, Actinistia) from the Triassic of China. Vertebrata PalAsiatica, 2009, Vol 47, 3, pp. 165-177.
  23. Coelacanthus granulatus Agassiz, 1839

    Lit.: H.-P. Schultze. 2004. Mesozoic sarcopterygians. Mesozoic Fishes 3 - Systematics, Paleoenvironments and Biodiversity 463-492 [G. Lloyd/G. Lloyd]
  24. Skull and dorsal

    From the album Late Triassic Lockatong Formation

    Diplurus newarki Skull and first dorsal fin. Late Triassic Lockatong Formation North Bergen, New Jersey. Granton Quarry

    © © 2016 Tim Jones

  25. Another skull

    From the album Late Triassic Lockatong Formation

    Another skull of the Late Triassic coelacanth, Diplurus newarki. The eye orbit, operculum, and lower jaw are clearly visible. Note the imprint of a conchostrachan, Estheria ovata, on the lower jaw, as well as the presence of some ostracods, Darwinula sp., to the right of the skull. Late Triassic Lockatong Formation North Bergen, New Jersey. Found on 3-21-2016 As always, right click the photo, and select "Large" for best viewing.

    © © 2016 Tim Jones

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