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Found 4 results

  1. The old Granton Quarry site, located in North Bergen, New Jersey was a working quarry that has produced fauna from the Upper Triassic Lockatong Formation part of the Newark Super Group. Underneath a basalt cap, in beds that are tilted, are shales and sandstones deposited in an ancient tropical lake bed. Biodiversity is far from rich. The most common vertebrate fossil found is Diplurus newarki, a small coelacanth, usually 2-4 inches in length. Other fossils include Estheria ovate, a clam-shaped shrimp-like crustacean. Rare remains of reptiles have also been found at the site. Development has claimed most of the quarry site, but an outcrop remains in an area that is unfortunately a repository for trash and graffiti and infested with poison ivy. Because of the poison ivy winter is the only time the site can be visited. I've been visiting the old Granton Quarry site once or twice a year since 2013. I've brought a number of TFF members to Granton, but Tim (fossildude19) has a been my companion for almost all of those trips since the first one. Last Sunday, the weather was mild and Tim and I accompanied by TFF members Dave (Shamalama) and Paul1719 visited once again. The site, always a difficult one to work, is becoming more challenging. The cliff is, I estimate 40-50 feet tall, but it is a less than one inch wide bed of black shale (called G-7) that is very fossiliferous. That bed is generally flush with or indented into the wall. All of the easily accessible G-7 has been already dug out. Where it is exposed and weathered it tends to splinter into fine shards obliterating any fossils that might have been present. Deeper in the wall it incredibly hard. Pulling out a decent size chunk to split is difficult to say the least. Finding a few already started cracks I was able penetrate deeper using my sledge and long chisel. Then I used my crowbar to wedge them out. In a full day of digging I was able to wedge out two chunks of G-7 , each several inches across. From these I got the majority of specimens I found. One piece appears to have two complete or nearly complete Diplurus which I sent to Ptychodus 04 in Texas to prep. In addition to fossils, Tim found a live red-backed salamander, our first amphibian siting of the spring. Here's Tim:
  2. Chinese Coelacanths

    This pair of coelacanths is from Luoping, Yunnan. Is it a Luopingcoelacanthus species? It measures about 28cm in length.
  3. Dear Guys, During the last several years i detected unknown truth talking about Lithuanian boulders- the Carboniferous and Permian marine rocks are very numerous and their age is various- there can be found almost each stage of Carboniferous and Permian. The main rock types are three- dolomite and limestone with masses of brachiopods that is various in color, stromatolite limestone with mollusks and unidentified cephalon like fossils, and the last- lacustrine limestone with coelacanth scales and possible plant remains (Carboniferous rhabdodermatids are very numerous). Carboniferous period and Early- Middle Permian was not known in Lithuanian glacial boulders so I very need the strong expert, especially who works on Carboniferous- Permian brachiopods. If my age determinations are correct then I will write the scientific book about this discovery and i think there is huge possibility that many of these boulders could be transported by someone glaciation from Northwestern Russia (or Northern Ural) because there are big areas of Devonian, Carboniferous, Permian and Triassic rocks near surface and Northern mountains potentially could be the cold center at some glaciation period in the Pleistocene. I will show all the pictures with fossil identifications and size, maybe someone will tell the opinion about the taxon and age possibilities. Any contact detail or other important information is very welcome! First image- Angiospirifer (Late Carboniferous), 1.1 cm length Second image- Anthracospirifer (Middle- Late Carboniferous), 1.8 cm length third image- Archaeocidaridae sea urchin plates (Carboniferous), 5- 8 mm diameter Fourth image- unidentified brachiopod species from Carboniferous- Early Permian (8 mm- 1 cm length) Fifth image- Atomodesma? bivalves from Kungurian boulder with Waagenoconcha brachiopod (1.7- 2.3 cm length)
  4. Coelacanth Skull from North Bergen, NJ.

    From the album Triassic

    Diplurus newarki (coelacanth skull) Upper Triassic Lockatong Formation Newark Supergroup Granton Quarry North Bergen, N.J. A gift from Fossildude19, collected 11/27/17
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