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Found 72 results

  1. My Collection

    Hi everyone on Fossil Forum, I am pretty new to fossil collection but I have decided to post what I have currently collected and will continue to update this page with new fossils that I acquire over time. I am now looking to acquire rarer teeth now! Details of Specimen: Triceratops Tooth Hell Creek Formation, Carter County, Montana Late Cretaceous Period (65 Million Years Old) Measurements: 1.5 inches long x 3/4 inch wide x5/8 inch thick Weight: 8.9 Grams No restoration at all. all natural specimen. I love the way this looks and its huge!
  2. My collection

    Hello all, I recently saw a whole lot of collections on this forum, and they were all beautifel. Now I cleaned up my room (what's a hell of a task to me, I spended 8 hours) and I deceided to take pictures of the nicest part of my fossil and mineral collection. It's by far not as nice as most members here, but I still have decades to get a nice collection . It's a bunch of everything older then the cenozoicum, because I find it hard to choose what group of fossils I want to collect, trilobites or dinosaurs/ reptiles. Dinosaurs are pretty hard to get here without paying high import and shipping costs. So let's start then. The trilobites are the firsts. Selenopeltis longispinus. Upper: Flexicalymene ouzregui 2 X Elrathia kingi Flexicalymene ouzregui Lower: Minicryphaeus sarirus Cyphaspis agayuara Crotalocephalina gibbus Upper: Cyphaspis walteri Boeckops boecki Combination of Cyphaspis sp., a very tiny kettneraspis sp. and two phacops sp. Coltraneia oufatenensis Lower: Kettneraspis pigra Cornuproetus sp. Gerastos tuberculatus Stapeleyella inconstans Trinueleus fimbriatus Elrathia kingi Phacops latifrons Foulonia sp. Right upper corner: Phacops sp. with bite mark A whole block with partials of Stenarocalymene celebra (I don't find much about this species so I'm still not 100 % sure if this is correct) and a ventral prepped Ogygiocarella debuchi The personal high-light of my trilobites (pictures don't do it justice). A Kettneraspis williamsi with a couple of free-standing spines. Personally the best I have ever seen. So far my trilobites. Next my Khouribga fossils: Lytoloma elegans ( a bit of restoration but most is real) A roothed Mosasaurus globidens tooth. Enchodus fang (there is a jaw in the stone also) Pretty big Mosasaurus sp. tooth Two verts of Otodus obliquus. Partial Mosasaurus globidens jaw Mosasaurus sp. partial jaw. 3 Weltonia ancistrodon teeth Otodus obliquus tooth Roothed Prognathodon tooth a box with misc fossils from Khouribga My two only teeth that are not from Morocco or Europe Denversaurus schlessmani Indet. Croc from Patagonia More to follow
  3. Hi all I just thought I would like to show my small shark teeth collection. I have only recently started collecting Sharks teeth manly because I have been given some very nice examples from different forum members . 1. Palaeocarcharodon orientalis ,Palaeocene, Khouribga, Morocco. 2. Shark Teeth ,Carcharias sp. - Sand Tiger Shark, Negaprion sp. - Lemon Shark, Miocene, Peace River Florida 3. Carcharodon carcharias , Norwich Crag .UK this is the only tooth I have purchased it was part of a Victorian collection of Norwich Crag find. I do really like this tooth , it has a nice hue. 4. Carcharodon carcharias from Chile 5. Crow shark Squalicorax pristodontis Morocco
  4. This is my fossil collection that i've acquired over the last few years. Some i've found my self but most i've purchased. My collection is not neat and most are not labelled sorry. It's a little crammed because i'm low on space. Firstly this large box is full of various fossils that i've decided to not put on display. Lots of bits and bobs. A large ammonite from Morocco, genuine mosasaur jaw and polished orthoceras. At the center back there is a iguanodon vertebrae. Then further to the left there are various labled fossils from kent. Some plant fossils, Crab from USA, ammonite and bivalves and a belemnite phragmocone. Here we have a starfish, ammonite, bivalve belemnites. At the far right there is two shark teeth. Lots of different ammonites. Some more ammonites and trilobites. My favourite reptile is the ichthyosaur. On the bottom right there are three bits of amber. Various bits here, some dinosaur teeth and three megalodon teeth. A Knightia fish, my smaller Keichousaurus and a ichthyosaur jaw section. Another Knightia fish and a fish negative impression from brazil. Shrimp fossil and two fish scales from Morocco. At the back there is my bigger Keichousaurus. Thanks for looking through my collection!
  5. My fossil collection

    Hello, Here is my entire fossils collection, it is very small but has some cool stuff. I started collecting fossils since I was about 9 years old but I really went in to fossils, interest and collection-wise 4 years ago. It is mainly my friend who motivated me and made me interested in these remains of our past, so a big thanks to him. My collection is growing every day,slowly but surely and I am always searching for the best deals. Please ask all sorts of questions and ask for information,This is the goal of my post. Ask me for more picture too! I will have the pleasure of answering and sharing all I know. A big thanks to The Fossil Forums for helping me through my decisions,giving me advice,identifying my unnown fossils and for being so kind. You are a great bunch. Cheers,Thomas
  6. Well, Shark Week has come early this year! I'm starting to photograph my collection for more "safekeeping" while I'm away, so I figured posting them here would be a good thing to do. Now, I can't really tell any species from another, so I don't really have any ids for any of these guys, but I know many members here would know, so I don't mind if some of you all id them (or correct the ones I do give) . These first ones are from Aurora, North Carolina, and come from the Miocene epoch. I think there's some hemis and tiger shark teeth in these, as well as "requiem sharks" (?).
  7. Show me your Sassy Sandtiger

    I figured that while we are on a show me your sharkteeth kick, why not show some of our specail sandtiger teeth The poor sandtiger hardly gets any press, but they can still be a nice addition to any collection. Here is my absolute favorite. It is another Brownies beach special. When I found it in the surf it was a dark black/grey color. But when it dried out I got a blue/tan mottled blade with a brown root. Also the root is kind of oversized for the blade. It has some wicked cusps as well.
  8. Hey guys. Since I'm a new collector I'm looking for some advice. Would it be best to start my collection by buying bulk fossils? The one pictured bellow I'm considering and it has a couple neat things: dolphin jaw, alligator scute, meg tooth, etc. Or should I save for quality stuff right from the getgo?
  9. I am definitely an amateur when it comes to collecting and need some advice: I recently purchased my first 'larger' Spinosaurus tooth from a small gem/fossil shop in Seattle. The owner told me that it had no repairs or restorations, and that it of course came from Morocco. I tested the tooth under a UV flashlight and there were no anomalies, but I just wanted some more experienced opinions. The enamel looks good- no apparent cracks or suspicious color variations, root still has some of the matrix on it, but the tip seems a little suspicious to me... maybe I'm just being paranoid, but I have read so much about fake fossils and just want to be sure! Let me know what you guys think- Thanks!
  10. Fossil Collecting Gloves

    Anybody have some good recommendations for great fossil collecting gloves. I'll be hammering hard nodules and will also need to have good grip.
  11. ID required (Possible Sea Urchin Spine)

    Another fossil from my collection. This fossil I don’t really know exactly what it is but my guess is a sea urchin spine. What’s yours?
  12. Some of my collection

    Hi all Brought some shelving and just starting to layout my fossils and minerals this has barely touched them and still have about 8 boxes to sort, think I'm going to need more shelves.
  13. Identification for Mosasaur and various sea fossils

    I had done a post about the tooth. So the info on the Mosasaur tooth is that it’s from Morocco. That’s all I know about it and if someone could figure out the specific species that’d be great. I also would like to know what the creature was for my other fossils.
  14. Hi all just wanted to do a show and tell on my small mammal collection. I will be updating the post over the holidays . Thanks for looking and have a very Merry Christmas . Bobby 1. Mammoth Tooth North Sea Brown Bank 2. Mammoth Bone North Sea Brown Bank 3. Very rare a Tip of a Strait Tusked elephant Tore Newton Cave Devon U.K. This and the next few are part of an old museum collection.
  15. Show us your Equus teeth!

    Hello again, Paleo friends! It's been a while. It was way back in my July trip to Summerville that I got this 2 14/16" horse tooth from the Hawthorne, the same formation producing the Megs in the area. Finally got around to finding an image compressor so I could actually show y'all: Flip side: Grinding surface: Root side (kinda blurry though): What do you guys have?
  16. Trilobite IDs

    All, I have a lot of different items in my collection but I am not a trilobite expert by any means. That's why I'm looking for help with ID here. If anyone knows more about Trilobites than I do that is. Photos 2,3 and 4 are Moroccan I believe. Specimens I have picked up over the years. Photos 1 and 5 were part of an old collection from a UK locality (Pembrokeshire, Wales?). Any help appreciated.
  17. Hi all I would like to show some of my favourite ammonites from my collection. 1. Dactylioceras toxophorum and Harpoceras Isle Skye uk 2. Dectylioceras Toxophorum with Bivalve Isle of Skye uk 3. Calcite Dectylioceras in a pebble Isle of Skye uk 4.Harpoceras Falciferum Ilminster Somerset uk 5. Promicroceras in a fragment of Caenesites Lyme Regis uk 6. Parkinsonia Parkinsoni Sengenthal Germany 7.Ceratites sublaevigatus Germany 8. Pseudolioceras, P.lythense Whitby Yorkshire 9. Polished Cleoniceras Mahajanga, Madagascar 10. , Bajocian? Ammonite from Burton Bradstock, Dorset, England 11. Stephanoceras and Belemnite Natural Association 12. Echioceras Radstock, Somerset. Uk 13. A close up of number 4 14. Chalk Nautilus Beer Head, Dorset uk 15. Dactylioceras Cf Athleticum with a worm tube Ilminster Somerset.uk 16. Hildocerss Lusitanicum Ilminster Somerset 17. Lytoceras Crenstum with a Belemnite and Shells Northampton
  18. Thought I might as well share even though is not much it still gives me a lot of joy even if there have been one or two miss purchases .
  19. I'd like to share my small Ichthyosaur collection. It includes Verts, ribs, a paddle bone and two teeth. These are from lots of different UK locations.
  20. One of the cardinal rules for making a fossil collection is "Labeling". Many collectors have Curios, Drawers, Cabinets, Boxes, Tabletops, Lit displays, Glass shelves and the common "cubby" somewhere in the den, the basement or garage to keep their fossil collection. I'm not going to address where you keep your fossils or how you admire them. I want to talk about what should be alongside your fossils. This post is strictly about labels; so no mention here of controlled climate conditions or expensive furnitures. The information we have about our fossils is the single most important part of the fossil. It doesn't matter if you found it, traded for it or bought it. A fossil without information is a neat thing to see, or use as a door stop, but falls short especially if the fossil is valuable to Science or in the market place. I thought I would share how you can meet information requirements, organize and customize your fossil collection for displaying or for just plain storage. Some collectors have electronic programs to store the fossil collection information. I have Trilobase; other programs can include other types of fossils. These are good filing systems. The actual physical fossil label with an index number is great too. Both physical records and electronic records would be best. Playing around with many styles and formats can give you a feel of how much info is needed or desired. The labels I keep with my specimens for display are more minimal. I will show how you can keep a specimen index number, name, age, strata, locality, species, acquisition, and display it well. Using labels to hold unique index #'s that correspond to the marked fossil specimens is the best system. I like to publicly display my collection in viewing display cabinets. Storing them in between showings, in plastic bins, the labels can be modified to keep things straight and keep the necessary info all at the same time. I see many styles of labels other collectors and institutions use and they are practical and pleasant to see. My ideas are just the start of possibilities to suggest organizing this important part of curating. I start with 60# cardstock; one can get many colors, textures, patterns and effects to print labels. Colors can be Neutrals, Earth Tones and Vibrants, it is all a matter of taste and personal style. The different types of formats and fonts that can make the labels, is equally wide open to taste and style. I coordinate different looking colored labels to separate groups by localities, types, kingdoms or which display I keep them together in. Most labels are coded each with (*,P or T). that notes if I found it, I purchased it or I traded for it. Your uniquely designed index numbers can have secret codes to keep a secret locality only you know the code for. One could start with a basic adopted label form on hand and then fill in the lines by handwriting the information on the label or have unique labels in a pdf file that can print one or many of that label. This is my filing card which holds more information. The file is designed to print four cards on a standard 8 X 10 sheet of paper. You are welcome to download and use my file if you wish. Fossil Catalogue Card.doc If labels are printed on an inkjet or bubble jet, the labels should get a protective coat to prevent moisture or liquids of any kind from wiping out the information. If laser printing labels it usually isn't necessary to coat. If anything is gained out of this post, make it be, labels are a must for any serious collection. If your collection is one or thousands just do the labeling; our memories aren't infallible.
  21. I'm not sure if this has been posted before. But I just found this cool page and found that it has a lot of very useful reference for identification. So I thought I'd share the link. On here you can just browse through their collections. They have some high quality photos. http://data.nhm.ac.uk/dataset/collection-specimens/resource/05ff2255-c38a-40c9-b657-4ccb55ab2feb?view_id=6ba121d1-da26-4ee1-81fa-7da11e68f68e
  22. Fossil collection

    Hello fosill lovers! After a long long time dreaming at last im starting my own fossil collection! So far i bought some ammonite and petrified wood,And im wandering what other fossils are a 'collector must have' Sadlly im on a really tight budget,so if someone know a good website to buy some i will be so Thankful
  23. Hello everyone, I'd like to share my extreme budget collection of megs for the US as requested, I've have been collecting shark teeth and other for a little over a year and a half now on a budget and have been surprised by what I was able to get a hold of so far. Condition doesn't bother me hence the budget but I have been able to find some megs from from interesting locations over the short period of time I've been collecting with a little bit of luck. I estimate I spent no more than $1,100 in total for this small collection. Tag me if there's any teeth you'd like to take a closer look at. In order: 1) Ace Basin, Ashepoo River SC 2) Lee Creek, Aurora, NC 3) Ocean teeth likely from offshore SC 4) Georgia??? 5) 7 inch+ meg fragment likely from offshore SC 6) Virginia Red Site (repaired) 7) Georgia??? 8) Virginia 9) St. Mary's??? 10) Georgia??? (repaired) 11) Summerville 12) Ocean teeth likely from offshore SC 13) St. Mary's Last photo: 6inch+ Calvert Cliffs, Maryland (restored) I'll do bone valleys for part 3 sometime soon! @ynot @WhodamanHD @snolly50 @sixgill pete
  24. Hello everyone, I'd like to share my extreme budget collection of exotic megs/shark teeth so far, I've have been collecting shark teeth and other for a little over a year and a half now on an extremely tight budget and have been surprised by what I was able to get a hold of so far. Condition doesn't bother me hence the budget but I have been able to find some megs from from interesting locations over the short period of time I've been collecting with a little bit of luck. Locations include Puerto Rico, Cuba, Japan, Hawaii, Morocco, Mexico, Peru, and The Phillipines. I estimate I spent no more than $430 in total for this small collection. Anyone else out there with extreme budget rare finds especially shark teeth (or from generally exotic locations), feel free to share and I'd love to see! In order of pictures: 1) Two megs and a hemi from Isabella, Puerto Rico 2) meg from Hawaii (Restored) 3) great white from Japan 4) meg from Morocco 5) meg from Cuba (unfortunately stuck on a wood plate but still a lovely display piece) 6) meg from the Phillipines 7) cubutensis from Peru 8) 2 Makos from Mexico 9 & 10) Heavily and horribly restored 5.9 inch Chilean meg (funny story with this one had an even worse restoration on it with made it look no different from a replica, was suspicious and bought it and when attempting a horrible derestoration process and a few slight touch ups of my own a large chilean meg was hiding under the mess, still needs a tad bit of work but I still love I was able to snag a large one cheap in this day and age ) @WhodamanHD Here we go uploaded !
  25. Building dioramas of past life from Edicaran through Pleistocene for educational dioramas. Can anyone suggest resources for SCALED sets/collections? Hate it when the veloceraptor is the same size as the sauropods. Also, for backgrounds, can anyone suggest current paleo artists that might participate in an educational product?
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