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Found 158 results

  1. Theres no way I'm the only one, but I think a fossil display with models incorporated take display and immersion to the next level. The creature alongside the evidence it left behind, makes such museum like feel in appearance and enhances the appreciation and wonder. Heres a thread to post any fossils you have on display alongside a model, statue, or toy. Here is a display from my collection of one of my favorite prehistoric creatures postosuchus alongside a giant 10inch+ chirotherium pos/neg footprint.
  2. My Fossil Collection

    I've been collecting fossils since 2011 and have since acquired a substantial number of specimens. The focus of my collection is mostly on fossils from the United States, including from my home state of Pennsylvania. To start things off, I'll show the highlights of my collection of fossils from the Kinzers formation, which runs through Lancaster and York counties in Pennsylvania, not far from where I live. It's known for trilobite and echinoderm fossils and dates back to 512ma, older than the Burgess Shale. I remember seeing trilobites from the Kinzers at a local museum when I was younger, which inspired my interest. Olenellus thompsoni is the most common trilobite of the Kinzers. These are from York (top three) and the Fruitville quarry in Lancaster (bottom). Wanneria walcottana is the other common trilobite of the Kinzer's formation. Both pictured were found in Lancaster. From near Millersville (top) and Brubaker's quarry (bottom). Mesonacis is a very rare trilobite in the Kinzers Formation, found only at Brubaker's quarry. Camptostroma roddyi is the echinoderm that the Kinzers is most known for. The lower one is a mortality plate of ten of them, and some have feeding appendages preserved. Both are from York. This is a very rare species from York. I believe it's some sort of Helicoplacoid. Salterella was an enigmatic animal of an extinct phylum that appears in the Kinzers as well. A plant, also from York: Finally, some sponges from the Donnerville quarry in Lancaster. Both sponges are on opposite sides of the same plate.
  3. Your "wish list"

    What is your "wish list"? My wish list, i think is this: 1) Morrison fm Sauropod tooth 2) Acrocanthosaurus (I know that is very, very rare and i will never get one) 3) Troodon tooth 4) Suchomimus 5) Ceratosaur tooth 6) Morrison theropod 7) Dimetrodon tooth 8) Tyrannosaurid tooth 9) Acheroraptor 10) Pliosaur tooth I write only about dinosaurs, reptiles and synapsid because if i will add more clade, is very hard to make the list.
  4. For your enjoyment. These are from another stockroom box. This one was an old Falstaff beer longneck case labeled “Assorted fos. Soix Emp Col geolog. 101” I suspect that means Sioux Empire College which closed in 1985.
  5. Here ya go! Neat stuff! Still haven’t found the teeth...
  6. Old collection

    I have here a medium collection of presumably dinosaur and rare or uncommon Stones and fossils and information would be much appreciated i have no idea what do with any of it. The collection was found in upstate NY no other information other than the newspaper being old is available.
  7. Hello. I finally got around to taking pictures of my collection. It took a while to identify and label everything. I hope you enjoy the pictures. I’ll update this topic as I add new fossils. My first shelf currently has fish and mammal fossils. Weird combination, but I have limited space. I think the Knightia look nice at the top of the bookcase. Pair of Knightia eocaena Diplomystus Sea robin nose bone. I found this while on a Peace River guided tour with Mark Renz. He kindly identified it for me.
  8. As I am very new here, I figure the best place to really start to introduce myself and my fossils (and related ephemera) would be to start a collection thread. I have picked up fossils off the ground since child hood. Sadly many of my early Brachiopods, Crinoid pieces, etc. and some Pleistocene bones? (Never knew for sure which exact time frame or animal, but definitely not mammoth, dad thought they were bison when they popped up while digging our farm pond) and such did not survive my fathers move from one home to another while I was in the Marine Corps. However since then I have picked up a few things , mostly from the ground, a little in trade, the occasional museum gift shop and maybe a few treasures off that online place in more recent times. I'm not particular about what I find in or on the ground, I love all my fossils from the wild, however when I buy fossils, they tend to be aquatic in nature. I have a growing fondness for fish fossils and shark teeth. I have quite a variety which will get posted here as I finally start the organization of it all. (Thank the Wuhan Covid-19 flu quarantine craze that is sweeping the world). The bulk of my finds are bugs and plants from Meeker, Colorado. I have two trunks of shale to sift through still and you all will get a front row seat as I do it! You will also see some other stuff, so don't wander far if your not a bug and leaf kind of person. And just to whet the appetite, here are some over all pics of what I have just started doing in my display area. Semper Fi, Rob
  9. Dinosaur tooth, or trilobite?

    I have 300$ for a fossil, and i don't know what is better to buy: a dinosaur tooth (diplodocus/camarasaurus), or a good trilobite (like huntonia from Oklahoma). What do you think?
  10. MusicnFossils’ Living Room

    Hello all, I was waiting a while to show my ever growing collection until I finally got this new shelf. I wanted to paint it to look similar to my other shelf, install these neat colour changing lights, organize things and move everything...then take photos! I had stored everything in my bedroom for a while but now everything is front & center for visitors. As has has been made obvious by my many ID posts and couple threads in the, “fossil hunting trips” section, I live in a fossil rich area have access to much land to collect from frequently, so I will use this thread for updates with future finds. I’m very proud to say that much of my collection, mostly the dinosaur stuff, has been found by me rather than been bought, though there is a lot of money invested here. If you would like more or better pictures, info or would like to help me ID anything in this collection that I’m unsure about (I’m severely lacking in physical labels at the moment) don’t hesitate to ask.
  11. Shark Tooth Collection

    9This is my shark tooth collection. Thought it would be cool to share here. My collection is a very small one, and is nothing compared to what some people have, but I am quite proud of it. (Image is in reply below)
  12. Like the title says. You've got the choice to choose any fossil from any museum or collection or from any collector in the world to have as your own. What would you pick? Mine would be the "fighting dinosaurs fossil -- velociraptor vs protoceratops. It was the fossil that got me hugely interested in dinosaurs and fossils when I saw it in some book.
  13. Hi all, I haven't been on the forum recently, which is a terrible shame, but I will make much more of an effort to be online in the future! I am currently sketching out a small project that, in part, addresses why people collect fossils. At this point I am mostly interested in very brief, oral-history style vignettes on what kinds of fossils you collect, your self-assessment of you collect them, and your knowledge of and experience with fake fossils. If anyone is interested I would love to hear from you!
  14. Collecting the Stages

    I've thought about doing this for some time, but only now during all this down time we're getting have I gotten around to seeing how many of the stages in the geologic timescale (the global version, at least) are represented by fossils in my collection. If a fossil collection can ever be said to be 'complete', this is one way of doing it - to try and get at least one specimen from every stage. Another would be to try and get a least one specimen from each group (phylum, class, order, etc) but I could see that quickly becoming difficult. I figure this one is within reach (at least relatively so). I guess some of you more serious collectors out there are ahead of me and it would be fun to compare notes. Of course it's complicated by factors such as knowing which stage your fossil is from. Some fossils come to you with a North American or European stage such as Stephanian or Richmondian, and if that stage overlaps two or more one of the Global ones then I can't be sure which one it is, without more research. Also an even greater number of fossils come to you that only say, eg. "Lower Devonian" or even just "Permian", and again, more research could enable me to fill in some more gaps with fossils already in my collection. I have already tried to research some of these and came up blank. Some of the entries here are educated guesses but if I'm really uncertain I'll leave it out until I've done more research (or question-asking). Turns out I've got just over half of the stages already (barring any mistakes. If I have made any mistakes, please let me know). The only Series that I am still missing are the Terreneuvian (Cambrian), Middle Permian and Lower Triassic. First, here is my timescale with the ones I have already, and I will follow that with pictures of the representative fossils I have chosen from my collection. Some of these are the only fossil I have from that stage so far. Others I have tons, especially the Santonian as that is what I have available to collect locally. I have marked off some of the North American stages where I have a North American fossil that is stated to be from a particular NA stage, or stated to be from a Global stage that I can confidently correlate with a NA stage. Maybe someday I'll have a fossil from all the NA stages as well as all the Global ones (or maybe not), but for now I'm going to focus on the Global. I have also marked off Pliocene and Pleistocene even though those are series (epochs) because I know I have fossils from those but not sure which stage exactly.
  15. Would anyone know if ADAM's SILURIAN collection is still available to view please on TFF.
  16. Hello all, I am running into a problem with organising my finds. Should I group them based on type, or specific location found? What should I include on their labels (I don't want to write on the fossils, so I place them on top of a piece of paper that states name, location, age ect.) Any additional information would also be helpful. Thanks in advance.
  17. Cataloging my Sharkteeth

    I have recently been inspired to finally make a serious attempt to organize and catalog my sharktooth collection. I made an attempt years ago but never finished it and I sabotaged my own work by not being able to keep from playing with my fossils. Ever since I started collecting sharkteeth I have used the gem jars with trays for smaller teeth and padded jewelry boxes for the bigger teeth. My first attempt was applying small stickers with specimen info on the bottom of the gem jars. This was fine except for the fact that back then I was always taking the teeth out of their respective jars and putting them back in the wrong ones. Or I kept changing which trays I would put certain teeth from certain locales in. I realize that the only way to have a nice organized collection is to do just that- organize it and KEEP IT THAT WAY! I recently bought a couple new gem jar trays to replace the ones that the foam has yellowed with age. These new trays have a glass lid that covers the top of the whole tray and these are now going to be kept in the new cabinet that I bought a couple months back. So tonight I put new labels on all of the new gem jars I put the abbreviated locale info, with a number on each sticker. On a piece of paper I wrote down the corresponding information like so.......
  18. I've always been fascinated by the Cretaceous sea and its myriad of terrifying carnivores, many that would've made Jaws look meek. After watching BBC's Sea Monsters, I made it my goal to compile a box of sea monster fossils. I started this journey 10 years ago, and finally completed the box recently. Allow me to present my Predators of the Cretaceous Sea collection, and take you on a journey to the most dangerous sea of all times. The box measures 20.25 inches long. Inside are 24 unique predator fossils. I will introduce them from left to right, top to bottom: Rhombodus binkhorsti Age: 70.6 - 66 mya | late Cretaceous Formation: Severn Formation Locality: Bowie, Maryland, USA Size: 1 meters Diet: Molluscs and crustaceans art by Nobu Tamura --------------- Polyptychodon interruptus Age: 105.3 - 94.3 mya | Cretaceous Formation: Stoilensky Quarry stratigraphic unit Locality: Stary-Oskol, Belgorod Oblast, Russia Size: Maybe 7 meters (This is a tooth taxon so size is not confirmed) Diet: Anything it could catch Note: If you consider Polytychodon a nomen dubium, then this is a Pliosauridae indet. art by Mark Witton ----------------- Prognathodon giganteus Age: 70.6 - 66 mya | late Cretaceous Formation: Ouled Abdoun Basin Locality: Khouribga Phosphate Deposits, Morocco Size: 10-14 meters Diet: Everything art by SYSTEM(ZBrushCentral) --------------- Coloborhynchinae indet. Age: 99.7 - 94.3 mya | late Cretaceous Formation: Kem Kem Beds Locality: Southeast Morocco Size: 7 meters (high estimate) Diet: Fish and cephalopods
  19. Here are my new fossils! And how my collection looks now. For size comparison the enchodus tooth to the right in the picture of the entire collection is 5,6cm long (2.2 Inches long)
  20. My collection

    I know it kinda stinks but this is my collection. This is all i have left from hundreds of fossils because they got lost when i moved
  21. Dinosaur collection

    Hey guys I have a few things in my collection(I’m still just an amateur collector), I want to know if anything in my collection is rare or valuable. My collection includes: 1/2 inch allosaurus tooth 4 inch spinosaurus tooth 1 inch dromaeosaur claw 4 inch megalodon tooth 1 1/2 inch sarcosuchus imperator tooth I hope to expand my collection soon but Right now I’m still lacking the money to collect to my desire.
  22. For those who know my love of the White River, there will be no surprise here. I was trying to reorganize my collection a bit and had a large portion laid out on the floor. In this photo, I counted roughly 37 Oreodont skulls, I'm wondering if I have a problem. Adding a few additional ones I know of on my prep bench and at other properties, I'm fairly sure I'm north of 50. What fossils do you all collect too many of? If there is such a thing.
  23. Hi there, I'm working at the moment on cataloguing my collection. 98% or so has been self collected over the years. Lately i've cataloguing my fossils from "les Vaches noires" cliffs in normandy / France. Im not finished yet, but i think i should share. So heres my flickr galery "les Vaches Noires " : https://flic.kr/s/aHsmKUCQse i hope you will enjoy.
  24. Yesterday I brought home a new display cabinet to show off my collection of sharkteeth. Today I had time to start fiddling with the set-up. This cabinet is on the small side but I liked the looks and the price was right. This is mainly to house my sharkteeth but I have added a few other items as well. Here is a pic of how it looks now. I am not sure if this is how it will stay. I do not want to have it too cluttered, but i also want to fit in as much as possible. This cabinet stands about 41 inches tall, 36 inches wide, and about 14 inches deep.
  25. My collection

    This is my current labelled collection. I have other stuff that I found on a fossil hunting holiday in the South West of England, but I’m very amateur so I don’t actually know the scientific names for a lot of them. Everything on this shelf was found except the teeth on the left and right, which were bought on the Isle of Wight. Essentially everything on this shelf was ID’d by members of this forum, except the pyrite and favositid, which were ID’d by friends, and the igneous rock and ammonites, which I didn’t feel i needed to have ID’d. The ammonites are my pride and joy, very detailed.
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