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Found 6 results

  1. Colorado Fossils Show How Mammals Raced to Fill Dinosaurs’ Void An unusually rich trove found in Colorado reveals the world in which our mammalian forebears evolved into larger creatures. https://www.nytimes.com/2019/10/24/science/fossils-mammals-dinosaurs-colorado.html Fossil trove shows life's fast recovery after big extinction by Malcolm Ritter, PhysOrg. October 24, 2019 https://phys.org/news/2019-10-fossil-trove-life-fast-recovery.html Yours, Paul H.
  2. I am originally from Black Forest just north of the Springs, but I've never really gone fossil hunting in the area. I've certainly done my share of hunting in road cuts and public lands as a kid on roadtrips and camping with my family, but that was years ago and I don't remember really where any of those places were (aside from Dotsero; that'd be difficult to forget). Regardless, I'll be heading there late this summer in August to visit family for maybe a week or week and a half. Reading strat columns and geologic maps is no problem; I have a pretty good idea of the rocks that could outcrop on the front range and the Denver-Julesberg Basin. I just don't know where to look exactly for fossils. Anyone know of some sites on public land in the region to do some hunting? I have plans for some rockhounding in the Pikes Peak Batholith but I'd be thrilled to have a fossil site or two to visit as well. I'd love to find some plant fossils or ammonites/other marine inverts. But I'm not picky about type or age. I'm really just starting to collect, so I'm not after anything in particular. I'm willing to drive a couple hours to somewhere. Also northern Colorado closer to Fort Collins into southeast Wyoming would be great, if anyone knows of something there. I live in Laramie, so sites near there are welcome, too.
  3. Colorado Fossils

    This summer, I am going on a trip to Colorado Springs. I am well aware that the state is filled with fossil sites but it seems like a lot of them prohibit collecting. I am wondering if anyone knows any sites in the area that allow public collecting. Preferably a site with lots of vertebrate material like Sharks or Dinosaurs. Thank You! (PS: I am still looking for some more information on fossils in St Georges Delaware. If you have any, please post it in my previous post.)
  4. took a recent trip to an old honey hole in the springs with reserved thoughts that it may...no longer exist. I was pleasantly surprised. When I was a kid it was essentially a mud hole and fairly exposed to the average passerby so I tried hard not to get my hopes up, plus it had been a while since I had attempted any type of fossil hunting. Following a creek bed, I pushed my way through surprisingly thick brush, thick with sticks and severely overgrown trees and bushes. Even the small game trails along the bank of the creek were difficult to discern. As I walked, my hopes began to climb and I started noticing strange wet, muddy, shale-like geology creeping up higher and higher along the river bank until a significant outcropping presented itself dead ahead of my line of sight. I immediately recognized several red-brown concretions sticking out of the wall of the muddy shale-like embankment. I pulled them loose, others unnoticed dropped to the ground and when I went to inspect I saw the dry creek bed below my feet littered with red-brown clam-like fossils. Many of the were poorly preserved in my newbie opinion but I began to hoard several on the side of the creekbed as I went back to dig out more and more. I began to notice that by following the small pockets of calcerous deposit in the muddy wall, soon to follow were more clams, some nicely preserved and covered in a brittle iridescent layer. Soon after I grew tired of pulling clams from the muddy wall, I looked up on the short, grassy cliff edge to notice a piece of some yet-to-be-identified ammonite. I picked it up and began digging carefully around it. My digging dislodged additional pieces of the ammonite and I began to speculate that it had fractured--its pieces scattered along a path nearby. I climbed up the short cliff face and walked up the grassy hill above, scanning the ground. I found a few more pieces of the same ammonite and was able to pull the largest piece from a nearby loose dirt wall. tine was running short so I carefully wrapped what I found interesting and brought it back to the car. Most of the specimens appear to be poorly preserved clams or maybe bubbles of mud? My research thus far has me suspecting the clams to be either inoceramus or ctenodonta. The ammonite, when assembled, appears to spiral up and away...difficult to describe, easier to see. I have a book that would suggest it to be turriltes but it lists the usual specimen size around 1 1/4". The partial specimen I have, when assembled is approx 4". A complete, similarly sized specimen would probably be around 6-10". Correct me here if I'm wrong and please, any advice, input, or insight would be greatly apprecoated. Thanks for reading More photos
  5. I found this amazing deposit of fossils here in the Springs. They appear to be sea fossils from the Pennsylvanian, really cool!
  6. Colorado Fossils

    Hello, I found this lot while working on a jobsite in Colorado Springs, CO. They were all in a layer of claystone at an elevation of approx. 5,600'. In addition to these there were lots of flat long fossils pieces that were approx 1.5" wide and 3/4" tall and varied in length. Unfortunately I did not photograph any of those. Any information would be appreicated. Thanks in advance and happy hunting!
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