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Found 2 results

  1. While visiting family in Georgia, I decided to take my older brother on a Cambrian Bug Hunt. There is no better place to go than a little exposure in Murray County, Georgia that lies under a bridge and next to the beautiful Conasauga River. The Upper Cambrian (Aphelaspis Zone) trilobites found here include Aphelaspis brachyphasis, and Agnostoids, among others. This is a relatively small exposure and depending on the height of the river, it can make the exposure that much smaller or not accessible at all. I was down her in May on my way back from Sanibel Island and I was not able to collect due to river conditions. The other thing that is small with this site is parking, if cars are parked correctly, you can fit 2, but no more that that. I also collect early and leave as much room as possible for any other collectors. Here are a couple pictures of the collecting area and the steep and often slippery descent. We were were only able to stay for two hours due to the fact that my brother got injured, but I will touch on that at the end. Here are some of my finds, I also collected matrix to work on later. Aphlelaspis brachyphasis Aphelaspis brachyphasis and a Agnostoid portion. Besides the mudstone, trilobites are also found in a harder grey shale. Here is a very large portion I found on the ground ( 35 pounds) and I will work on this piece at home. As you can see, there are trilobites found in it and many times they have excellent preservation. One handy tool to have there is this folding hacksaw, it allows me to trim pieces in the field for easier storage. As I stated above, my brother had an accident, really a slip and fall. Besides watching how you go up and down to your car, you have to watch the loose matrix. He went to adjust how he was sitting and the loose matrix caused him to slip. It appears he broke or dislocated his left pinky finger and we left so he could go to Urgent Care. Be careful collecting anywhere.
  2. Chlorophyte or Chloud Faces?

    Hello, all. After my last wonderfully successful Id effort on here, i thought I'd try again. This specimen was boshed free of some matrix that was sent to me by the unrivalled Ralph @Nimravisin a batch of matrix from the Conasauga Formation, Upper Cambrian, Georgia, USA and home to a multitude of the trilobite Aphelaspis brachyphasis as well as rarer agnostids and other even rarer trilos. I was looking at this paper https://www.researchgate.net/publication/250083071_Exceptional_fossil_preservation_in_the_Conasauga_Formation_Cambrian_Northwestern_Georgia_USA and thought my specimen below looks rather like the example D in Figure 3 (sorry, I don't know how to just post that image. It's a chlorophyte, so is mine ? They appear to be sort of tiny strings of sausages, the longest string being about 2 mm long, so each individual 'cell' is very tiny indeed. Thank you for any comments, ideas or suggestions. Adam.
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