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Found 157 results

  1. Found this nice coprolite with a tiny shark tooth visible. Found last week in the North Sulfur River. The pictures don't do it justice unfortunately...
  2. Miocene Coprolite

    Hi Folks, I found this suspiciously looking piece of something yesterday. Anyway with all the knowledge on this board I will throw this piece of something out there for you all to identify. It is quite a large specimen about 5” + 3” and over a pound in weight. Also I should add I found this specimen on Brownies beach in Chesapeake Beach Maryland. Thanks Cliff Dweller
  3. Pierre Shale Coprolite

    Here is another coprolite. Wondering if the class of organism that defecated it can be determined. I found it in a particularly desolate (in terms of fossils) exposure of Pierre Shale (late cretaceous) in NW Nebraska. It was the only fossil I found in 2 hours of hunting. Pic to left shows close-up with fish bone inclusions. @GeschWhat
  4. Niobrara Coprolite

    I am wondering if any more information can be gleaned from this specimen beyond "coprolite". Bony fish? Shark? Mosasaur? Niobrara fm., Cretaceous. NW Nebraska. @GeschWhat
  5. Good Night to everyone from my favorite Forum! I'm very curious about this specimen. According to the seller's description, this is a coprolite discovered in beds of Kem Kem. This is real? Is it from a carnivore or herbivore? Could it be a dinosaur?
  6. I have finally had a chance to start looking at the poop I won in @sixgill pete's shell game. Something about the inclusion in this little nugget looks familiar, but I can't quite place it. Maybe it's just because it looks a little like the dried and flattened frogs I see in my daughters driveway. It was found by the aforementioned esteemed forum member along the Cape Fear River and is believed to be from the Bladen Formation (Black Creek Group). Ideas?
  7. I picked up a new poo (at least I'm thinking it's poo) at our favorite auction site. The only think I know about it is that it was found in Mountain Creek, Texas. There is a shark tooth and bivalve impression on the bottom. I'm hoping this might be diaagnostic. Can someone identify the shark tooth and bivalve impression? Any idea what formation these are from? As always, thanks a bunch for your help!
  8. Coprolite? Jacksonville, Florida

    Title says it all. Never dealt with coprolites before. What do you guys think?
  9. I have a coprolite that has me somewhat puzzled. It was found in a river in South Carolina and dates Miocene-Pliocene. I picked it up at the Tucson Gem Show because I thought it resembled some east coast coprolites with longitudinal striations/furrows/grooves that @MarcoSr posted a while back. Now that I've looked at it for a while and done a little prep work, I'm not so sure the grooves are sphincter related. There are intestinal muscle marks visible on one side, but they don't seem to match up with the grooves. The grooves were filled with sandstone/limestone. I left matrix in the deeper portions to preserve the integrity of the specimen. Across from the grooves are what look like puncture marks. My first thought was that they were clam borings. However, they do line up with the grooves in question. Now I'm wondering if these could be tooth marks as well. Under magnification, I noticed smaller tooth marks and an impression that I can't figure out. My imagination is now getting the best of me, and I'm seeing food chain activity. I'm seeing a big fish nabbing a small fish that was nabbing an invertebrate that was feasting on feces. Do you think the larger grooves and holes could be tooth marks? Does anyone have any idea what could have left the impression? The only thing I could think of is some sort of mollusk. Love your thoughts on this. @Carl
  10. Poo Question

    Found a few chunks of coprolite at the NSR and noticed two of them have similar markings. Any idea what would have caused this?
  11. Possible Poop From Brownie's Beach

    Calling all poop people! This is from Brownie's Beach, so Miocene era. I actually thought it was dog poop at first, and had some choice thoughts about the person who didn't clean up after his/her dog. Then I looked closer, poked it, and discovered it was rock, so into my pocket it went. I find the whole field of coprolites to be really tough with IDing, as no two poops seem to be alike. I do a lot of my IDing by cross-comparing pictures online using my trusty pal Google, and this is one where I'm not finding anything that gives me an "aha!" moment. But it looks like feces, and I'm guessing shark based on where I found it. I'm not licking it because if someone comes back and tells me it's really dog poop then -- ugh! Let's not go there! So help me, experts of the Fossil Forum! You're my only hope!
  12. Bone Fragments and Possible Coprolite

    Some tiny bone fragments from the Harleyville Quarry. Possibly a coprolite as well.
  13. Dino poo?

    Possible poo?
  14. Fish coprolite?

    I've got an interesting knightia here. The fish is nice, but what's that mass? Organ? Coprolite?
  15. So these are the before and after of the bone fragment prep process. This material was found at Aust Cliff in the U.K it's from the Triassic. I'd love to get your opinions on what you think it could be, given that it's only a fragment it will be hard to tell. I've not left it in the sun before you ask haha that was just to take a clear picture, don't want it cracking. Thanks guys. I think ichthyosaur/plesiosaur bone fragment as these are some of the most common bones found from there. Plenty of coprolite and micro fossils visible here as well including some teeth. I prepped this myself over the course of an hour, the matrix is nice and soft and easy to get through
  16. Not all rocks that look like poop have a fecal origin. Here are a few things to consider when trying to determine whether or not you have a coprolite: 1. Location, Location, Location – If you haven’t guessed, the first and most important thing to consider is the location your rock was found. Don’t expect to find a coprolite unless you find it in geologic area/layer where other fossils are found. If you find things like bones, teeth and fish scales, or prehistoric tracks, you may just be in in luck. 2. Shape – While fecal matter can be rather free-form when exposed to the elements or when digestion issues arise, most coprolites are shaped like poo. As with modern extrusions, fossilized feces can be shaped like pellets, spirals, scrolls, logs, piles, etc. Their shape is dependent on shape of their producers intestinal and anal structure. Look for things like compaction folds and pinch marks. 3. Texture - Most coprolites are fine grained. If your specimen appears granular under magnification, it is most likely not a coprolite. There are some exceptions, such as marine creatures that feed on bottom sediments or coral. That is why knowing the location and geology of the area where it was discovered is so important. 4. Inclusions – Many times, coprolites will have visible inclusions. Things like fish scales, bone fragments, and teeth may not get fully digested, and can be visible on the surface. Some animals ingest stones for ballast or digestive purposes. These are known as gastroliths, and if present, are generally smooth. 5. Composition – Because herbivore scat tends to break a part and decompose rapidly, it rarely survives the fossilization process. So most fossil poo that is found is from carnivores. The reason for this is that their poo is usually high in calcium phosphate, the same mineral found in bone. This mineral can appear in many forms. It can be hard and dense or soft and porous. If the potential coprolite appears soft and porous, there is a quick test that is often used in the field. If you touch to stone to the tip of your tongue and it sticks, chances are, it is high in calcium phosphate and could be a coprolite. If you are not that brave, you can also touch it with wet fingers to see if it feels sticky, but this is not nearly as fun. If the calcium phosphate takes a harder, more dense form, the “lick test” won’t work. In some instances, chemical analysis is required to definitively identify the mineral composition.
  17. Interesting non the less

    Stumbled across this while looking for something to watch while eating Chicken madras (which i must say was awesome) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2rtIWL7qTYQ Its an old VHS copy which clearly shows in the audio quality but goes over some very interesting ideas and views especially considering this was done over 20 years ago, and also for you poo lovers out there about 40 minutes in they go over coprolites. Anyway hope you enjoy and its not too main stream. Thanks Matt
  18. Hello again! Finally took some pictures of the rocks I was referring to in previous posts. These are the reason I asked for help ID previous rocks. I never new what coprolite was until I tried to find a reason why these rocks look the way they do. In person, they look like they contain chunks of turtle/lizard/fish/eggs/shellfish/etc type stuff, I believe what is referred to as inclusions. But it could just be some funky conglomerate. Either way I’m hoping someone can explain why they look the way they do! There’s about 20 or so of these on my property, just grabbed some and snapped some photos. I wish I had better lighting/camera so detail could be seen. Thanks for your time in advance! And if you have any thoughts please let me know! Property is located in residential Menlo Park, California (between San Francisco and San Jose), very close to the San Francisquito Creek. some were just laying on top of the ground, others were below and found when doing some yard work digging. Easier to to see the individual parts when rocks are wet as the colors pop, as supposed to blending in as a slightly reddish brown mud. Some seem to have a “skin” if you will around them, like a layer that can be rubbed off, allthough i have noticed once i rub it off the inclusions, a couple days later the colors seem to have faded. Also many of The inclusions that stick out of the rock give the appearance that they have been scratched off or bitten off, possibly just from hitting other rocks as well. The black inclusions are the easiest to see in the photos, however they are only a small fraction of the reptilian/crustacean/fish/ i dont know shapes that you can see
  19. Possible coprolite? #2

    Hey guys, thanks for all the responses and info in my first post! Here is another. Located in Menlo Park, Ca. Found in yard, have been doing yard work , digging holes, weeding, etc. This was originally covered in thick, what i thought to be brown mud. I havnt removed this layer completely, you can still see a bit of it as i left some on. Its the poo brown color mud still on parts of it, the second picture shows the most of it. (best description of color I have, sorry) The one side looked like a face actually and its the only reason I decided to pick it up. After looking at it for a minute I noticed what appeared to be a shell or something of the sort sticking out the one side. Got sidetracked, didnt think much of it and put it down for about a week before I came across it again. Decided to brush/scrub off some 'mud' to see what was underneath. This was not very easy, didn't come off very well, and it also had a slight unpleasant odor, a new smell for me actually, from the fine dust that was slowly brushing off in the air. I did get it wet at one point and gave a scrub with an old toothbrush as more was revealed, as I was trying to figure what the it was. The brown stuff was not nice when wet, very mucky, but not like mud. I probably should not have removed as much as I did but curiosity got the best of me and I kept "cleaning" as it started to reveal more. The one side started to show visible, what I believe to be, decay, with burnt reds, yellows, and browns. Although again apologies, as I really am a newb to all this stuff and really dont know anything to be honest with you. I dont know how it could be turtles or what the shell type thing is or how this would possibly be on my property. and from when it could possibly be from and still be in this condition. there are many different locations of what seem to be reptile skin, and also several roundish oval turtle shell looking pieces? Theres no turtles in the immediate area. and if it is poop, theres also nothing big enough to excrete this around here. Strictly residential area, biggest creatures being raccoons and dogs but this cold come out of them. But then again who knows. If anyone could help me with this I'd greatly appreciate any feedback or thoughts! I wish the pictures were better but its as good as I can do. Let me know if theres any spot I can take another shot or two of close up or whatever. I really am curious what this is, as there are many more pieces I have questions about as well. This one just seemed more "fresh" if you will, where as the others seem like rocks with inclusions. Thanks in advance! Also, please just let me know if Im crazy and seeing things haha.
  20. Is this a coprolite?

    Hello all, Thanks for letting me post my inquiry. I was wondering if any of you could give your input on a large "rock" that I found in my yard. I live in Menlo Park, California which is about a mile north of Stanford University in the San Francisco Bay Area. Please excuse my ignorance when it comes to the fossil world. I have zero knowledge in this area, but i must say that after only a few days of investigating websites and forums I find it quite fascinating. And also a massive black hole lol.. I have spent all of my free time looking into the topic the past couple days. so many hours!! (not complaining, its been awesome!) Anyways I will attach pictures below. The only reason I think it is a coprolite is because of the many other "rocks" that I have also found on the property, about 20 or so, that fit many pictures I have seen on the internet. But this one doesn't really look like any of the others and is quite large, at least double the size of the others. At first glance I thought it to be chunk of a wood round, as i have found petrified wood on the property, at least what I believe to be petrified wood. When I picked it up I noticed that it was very heavy, probably 30+ pounds, so definitely not fresh wood as this is way to dense to be so. Gave it a knock and its rock hard. On most of the outside there are small flakes of something shiny, some metallicy and some more clear, some faintly yellow/green.. I dont know if its crystal or something else but they seem to be thin pieces of something, some layered on top of each other. What struck me at first was the green that was viewable in some spots. This is the reason I picked it up in the first place to investigate further. The one green spot is mostly white now actually. After I noticed the green I had a piece of sand paper handy and I gave a quick rub on the white part to see if more green was under it and there was. However a day later the green has gone back to white. Not sure if thats from oxygen exposure or possibly the abrasiveness of the sandpaper causing scratches which turned white with time. The outraged just looks really really old is the best way I can sum it up. There was a small section that was slightly sticks out and cracked a bit so I knew it would come of easy. Gave it a wack with a chisel and it popped off. I will attach pictures of that as well. I have scraped at a couple sections, trying to see what was inside, and it seems to be green and brown in most. Parts have a serpentine look to them, which was my second guess after wood. But the rock just seemed to be to "living" if that makes sense. There are vertical and horizontal cracks throughout some with some sort of white lining in them. I really want to crack it open as I think it might be quite beautiful, based on the weight and density. Anyways I could go on but I will just post some photos and hopefully you can help me out a bit, because at the end of the day I really have no clue and don't pretend to. Also, another question I have.. Is it possible to have undigested chances of reptiles/fish/eggs inside a coprolite? not this one, but many of the other pieces I have found seem to have pretty clear inclusions of things like turtles and other things. I could be crazy also, but some of the inclusions seem to have something like skin still on them, which after research i noticed could be just lichen, but its strange that the lichen would just be on the inclusion and be a believable color as well. There also appear to be many many bite marks or teeth marks on them. My understanding is that my part of California would have been under water, and wouldn't be possible for dinosaurs to leave the coprolite. And based off the inclusions in the other rocks, it would seem to be a water beast anyways, or possible a large bird, ore maybe just something that lived by water. but not sure because like I said my area was below the sea back then. It just seems so large for it to be from a sea creature and I would have thought if something pooped in the ocean. would not most of it disperse and break apart in the water before it sunk and was covered up? Again, i have no clue haha Let me know if you want to see some of the inlusion pieces or more1 photos of this one. Photo #4 shows what i thought to be skin on this one, but other pieces are more clear. But again I have no idea Thanks for your time and I hope that a least one of you can help me out a bit! Have a great day!
  21. Perhaps I have found something fossil or perhaps it's just eroded ironstone matrix looking like fossil.
  22. permian pooooooooooo

    Hey gang, here is a handful of permian amphibian and shark turds from a nifty swamp deposit.
  23. Coprolite

    From the album New Jersey Cretaceous

    Coprolite Wenonah Formation Late Cretaceous Monmouth County, NJ
  24. Coprolite - unpolished side.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    The unpolished side of the coprolite!
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