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Found 664 results

  1. ID? I presume its some type of coral

    Found on a beach in Lyme Regis (southern seaside town) UK. Approx 2cmx1cmx1cm. It looks to me like a kind of coral, but i dont know enough about coral to make that judgement. Thanks in advance!
  2. Fossils on the lake

    Hey guys! I’m currently out fishing on a lake (Champaign County, IL) and I noticed a bunch of fossils strewn about the rocks on the shore. I don’t think the rocks are from here, so I don’t know if I could give any geologic info unfortunately. If you could help me figure out what I’ve got, I’d really appreciate it! I’ll add more as I find more. Thanks! #1
  3. To celebrate the end of the semester, I decided to finally take the 2 hour trip down to the Paulding Fossil Gardens. The weather sucked as most of you in the Midwest probably noticed, but I managed to get a few hours in between storms. This made everything a bit flooded, but I wasn't too concerned.
  4. Is this coral?

    I presumed this to be just coral until I saw some pics of bryozoans that looked liked faces. Is this coral?
  5. Hello! Another colonial coral from St. Bartholomä. Contrast is poor and that´s the best I can to with my scrappy scrap. I think, I have not found such a coral before in this formation. And its the second largest colony I have found so far there. My guess is, that it could be Astraeofungia (g, h) or Dimorphastrea (a, b), all pics from Löser et al. (2015). But I am very probably wrong... Thank you very much for your help! Franz Bernhard
  6. deep sclerochronology

    robiproufliersclerogeochemDSRDSRII2014.pdf The geochemistry of deep-sea coral skeletons: A review of vital effects and applications for palaeoceanography Laura F. Robinson, Jess F. Adkins , Norbert Frank , Alexander C. Gagnon ,Nancy G. Prouty , E. Brendan Roark , Tina van de Flierdt Deep Sea Research 99,2013
  7. Just a short video of a quick trip to the beach last week to enjoy the spring sunshine!
  8. Beach fossil identification

    Hey everyone! I have a great selection of fossils at home but I still lack a great knowledge of my most local fossils. I rarely find more than Devil toenails here in the UK but have come across quite a few on my travels today. Initially they caught my eye because they look like my orthoceras but I also have crinoids that have similar markings. There are thousands on the beach with fresh finds every day. If anyone could confirm what I've found it'd be much appreciated. I assume I have a collection of various plant fossils?
  9. ???Cant figure this one out

    I found this today looking for driftwood along the Chesapeake Bay near Baltimore. It is very lightweight, it is definitely fossilized, and the chambers are thin walled and shallow depth-between 1/8 and 1/4 in wide and seem to be generally hexagonal. Initially I thought wasps nest but the size of the chambers isn't uniform, however I do think perhaps it could be a strange colonial Coral but it isn't calcified. I've never found anything like this in Maryland before and I'm having trouble finding others like it online. Any incite is appreciated, thank you.
  10. Tiny corals?

    Are these two samples corals? The first is 0.5 cm; the second is part of a 2 cm "stalk."
  11. "fat" coral

    I have a lot of coral but none like this one. I don't know whether it's size is the result of the fossil process or coral type. It's 3.5 cm tall; circumference is 12.5 cm.
  12. Beltzville State Park

    The Delaware Valley Paleontological Society got a permit to explore the restricted area at Beltaville Dam in Lehighton, PA today. The spillway for the dam is immense! The 20-50ish foot walls of the spillway are covered with rubble in swaths of hard blue-black and red stone, soft colorful clay stone, and the occasional bit of tan sandstone. All are from the Upper Devonian Mahantango Formation. The sun was shining, the air was warm and the wind was still. Perfect day for prospecting! Everybody spread out along the walls. There was more than ample room for everybody to claim a big spot to explore. I walked along the north wall until the smooth, flat stones started showing texture. I had expected to find very little in the harder material and lots of things in the colorful clay. That’s been my experience on the beach in the adjacent state park*, anyway. Quite the opposite! As soon as I found a promising spot in the hard matrix, I sat down and examined every rock. The trilobites were lurking watching me from all directions. I found eyes from at least 8 animals. Most I kept, just for the sake of counting. A couple I tossed because this was getting silly. One I gave to someone nearby, “So he can keep an eye out for you.” The best was this 2-inch Phacops sp. cephalon. I now officially claim to have the PA State Fossil. I don’t know if I’ll ever be able to figure out if it’s P. rana, but the right genus is close enough for me. Such a cute little froggie face! I found one tiny brachiopod or bivalve among the buggies that still had the whole shell intact, albeit a might smoothed during its time under water. It's not silicified. It's not pyritized. It's still CaCO3 after all these ages. I tested it. I showed it to our trip leader who said that there was coral preserved like this shell further down the wall. Nifty. There were also some very nice, red-stained bryozoa and hash plates. Unfortunately, the hash plates were mostly at the narrow ends of long rocks, arranged 90 degrees from the plane of the layers in the splitting stone. Most I admired and left behind. There are only so many big, mostly-featureless rocks I can store in the house. After a couple hours, I appeared to exhaust my trilobite supply. People had walked past me with some pretty horn corals molds, so I headed towards the clay to see if I could find any. No luck. There was plenty of colorful stone, buy almost nothing as far as fossils, so I kept picking my way across the wall where I could get footing. I kept getting higher and higher until eventually I needed all 4s to navigate in any direction and abandoned my collection bucket. Another quarter mile or so down the wall, I found a good spot to slid tom the spillway floor. And there they were. In a space covering maybe 5 horizontal feet of the wall were rocks littered with preserved coral bodies. Jackpot! I spent at least an hour at the top. I tried to slide down a little and slid all the way to the bottom, unable to climb back up the steep pile of flat pebbles. There was definitely more at the bottom, but the middle eluded me. While poking around for corals, I found a couple of ½” brachiopods with both sides intact and a preserved crinoid stem. I walked across the spillway and back up the other side but found nothing. I somehow totally missed that the rest of the group had left, with just Rick and Steve watching me from a distance. Typical for me to be the last one out. I'll post a link in the comments to my Beltzville album when I finish sorting through my finds and photographing them. *Yes, I know it is illegal to collect fossils in most states' parks. Pennsylvania is an exception.
  13. Hi everyone this is matt again today in the creek I found this cool coral in the creek on 28 mile creek near 28th creek Rd. between Kennedy and ellington here are 3 photos
  14. Coral (2).JPG

    From the album Central Texas Fossils

    Various Coral species including Parasimilia Found in Hays, Blanco and Travis Counties
  15. A possible Coral?

    This rock was found on the beach in Sligo, Ireland. I think is part of a coral fossil but I am not sure,
  16. A possible Coral?

    Found this stone in the beach in Sligo, Ireland. Is this some kind of a coral?
  17. Anyone know what this is?

    Found this is Pennsylvania, I think it's a wasp nest or honeycomb but not sure.
  18. Syringopora ?

    This is from northern Maine. Devonian marine rocks in the Seboomook group of formations I believe. When I collected it my best guess was that it was a bryozoan, but somehow it didn't seem to fit right. I cleaned some of the dust off it recently for another look. The tube shapes and configuration of the molds have me thinking maybe syringopora ? It's all the same colony, just broken up.
  19. hi everyone this is matt again there was one more thing I wanted to show everyone from the hamburg fossil and gem show I got me 4 old antique spanish coins with a square in the middle here is a photo
  20. Hi everyone this is matthew again on saturday 23 2019 I went to the hamburg fossil and gem show. when I went down there I got a very nice ammonite and a nice brittle star fossil the ammonite cost me $30.00 and the brittle star was $125.00 here are some photos of them
  21. Devonian solitary rugose coral

    Hey guys this coral keeps drawing my attention. We have hundreds of horn corals and pretty sure this is one, but it looks different than the others? Do you think it just preserved differently or could it be a less common type of solitary rugose coral? Any thoughts appreciated and thanks for looking!
  22. Hello, here is the next coral colony from the Campanian St. Bartholomä-formation in Styria, Austria (Gosau-group), collected 02/10/2019, west of Kalchberg, point 36. This coral colony is intergrown with limestone. There is a naturally weathered cross section and naturally weathered vertical section (but not much to see there). I have cut and polished one end and preservation seems to be not too bad. However, as usual, am rather clueless. I think, it has external pali, so it could belong to Hydnophoropsis? Many thanks for your help! Franz Bernhard
  23. Fossil coral?

    This is said to be a piece of coral from Guizhou of China. What do you think?
  24. Ordovician Coral or Sponge?

    Came across this fossil today while out enjoying the sun. I've found coral before but the little cavities are usually infilled, this is like swiss cheese, wondering what it is. It feels like a pumice stone in weight and texture. Thanks in advance!
  25. Fossils on Wheels received another generous donation to our education programs this week. TFF member @Herb sent us a box of super cool invertebrates. He sent us a diversity of fossils from the Southern US that cover a wide range of eras. These fossils will be given to students in fossil starter kits and used in hands-on activities. Herb's donation is also awesome because this pushes me to learning a lot more about invertebrate fossils. One of the best parts of teaching kids about natural history through fossil exploration is that I get to learn a lot. Good teachers learn and challenge themselves so they can challenge their students. I do not have a lot of knowledge about these types of animals but I am so excited to start learning. Among the fossils we received were- Mississippian Corals and Brachiopods from Kentucky, Crinoid stems and Silurian sponges from Tennessee, Cretaceous Gastropods from Texas, and Eocene Bivalves from Alabama. Thank you Herb for a generous donation that will get put to good use
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