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Found 925 results

  1. Rugose Coral? New species?

    Here's some of the odd specimens I've collected and cant identify...please help me, its maddening to have so many of the same thing yet can not ID it...14+yes and counting
  2. Rugose Coral? New species?

    Here's some of the odd specimens I've collected and cant identify...please help me, its maddening to have so many of the same thing yet can not ID it...14+yes and counting
  3. Tabulate coral ID - Syringopora or Aulopora?

    The attached photo is a group of Thamnopora corals found in the Devonian Martin formation - dolomites of central Arizona's Verde Valley. There is also a group of tabulate corals that I suspect are Syringopora sp.. but some collection notes by others don't show this genus, but they do show Aulopora sp. as found in the same location. See the small worm-like cluster near the center of the image. Can any of you confirm which genus is in the image?
  4. Sponge?

    Zoom for better detail.
  5. Found in fl yard

    I found this in my yard took it a museum and the guy said it was petrified coral. Just wanted confirmation and a good place to have it authenticated to sale.i live in Panama city, fl maybe 50 yards from salt water. I have better pics.
  6. Found in fl yard

    Was told at a museum that this is petrified coral. Wanted confirmation. Person at museum said it looks like someone just decided to bury their collection in my yard. I live in panama city florida maybe 50 yards from salt water.
  7. POROUS PATTERN WITH CONE SHAPED CORE

    Found in my backyard in southern california. Hard to get a good pic of it, but the center of it is a cone shape. Circular and wide at the top, with the pointy part towards the inner/center.
  8. ANTHOZOA? Looks like an anemone to me

    Found this while digging in my backyard in Southern California. More specifically, Cerritos, which is just a few miles north east of Long Beach. I uncovered a whole layer of interesting rocks, a huge chunk of breccia, shale, sandstone, and even a ~2 in. long quartz, but this one actually looks like a coral to me. I can add close ups if necessary.
  9. Rugose Corals? Mississippian Redwall Limestone

    These fossils are fairly common in the Mississippian redwall limestones of central Arizona. I believe they are rugose corals. Is this correct?
  10. Coral (likely modern)

    I found this piece of coral a long time ago some where on the southern us Atlantic coast probably South Carolina. I’m guessing it’s modern but I would still like to know what kind of coral it is, it’s also fluorescent especially the bottom
  11. Hello everyone, So here we are, back in lock-down so an ideal time to review some finds. Just prior to the latest imprisonment I dashed down to Tidmoor Point near Chesil Beach for the day and grabbed some gravel to look through at home during the long nights. A few interesting items turned up and I wonder if anyone can help ID them please? The first 2 photo's show 3 teeth, the first 2 look to be from the same type of animal, the last evidently something very different. Do you think these were from (small) sharks or some kind of fish, (the divisions on the ruler are in mm). The last 3 photo's look like Merlins hat! At first they looked like teeth but now I'm leaning towards some kind of coral. Once again many thanks for any help you can offer - good luck in your fossil hunting! Best regards Keith
  12. Trip to Big Bay

    The weather is exceptional in southern Ontario, these days. 25 degrees C! That’s 77 degrees Fahrenheit to my US friends and for here in November it is exceptional! We decided it was a great day to go to Big Bay which is situated on Georgian Bay between the Owen Sound and Colpoys Bay a beautiful place down a gravel road; it can be busy in the summer but we knew today it would be quiet. The trip was purposeful because I know it is just full of water washed fossils and I wanted to post pictures of what is there. I wanted to show you all how prolific the Silurian Ocean was. I also included a couple of photos of the beach it’s self. Hope you all enjoy.
  13. coral ??

    i think its a big hunk of coral with a lil pocket of something in it
  14. new to the forum, what's this?

    Hi to forum members. I'm new here. I'm not a fossil hunter but love reading about Earth's deep history and occasionally come across simple fossils. I live in eastern North Carolina, about 40 miles from the Atlantic Ocean. The fossil pictured was found at the site of an old quarry. The pattern looks a bit like coral, but I really don't know. The rock is about 7 inches across. Suggestions about what it might be, and age?
  15. Hello, Last saturday I had a trek in a mountain area in the northen Italy alps and I found this fossil (I'm not actaully 100% sure that it's a fossil, but I don't know what else could it be). It looks like an echinoderm fossil to me, but I'd like to ask your opinion about it. Thanks a lot, have a nice day. Oz
  16. Please help - Coral ID

    Any idea what coral this could be or where I could look it up? The corallites seem to be plocoid to pseudo-ceroid and the columella is trabecular to solid. It was found on land at the Cape Verde Archipelago, but unfortunately I can't give any information about the stratigraphy...
  17. Coral

    Coral from the Suwannee River in Florida at least I’m pretty sure it is. I was hoping someone might know what kind or what time period.
  18. Looks like Coral but I Dunno

    Found along the border south of Phoenix. It looks like some kind of colony.
  19. Coral ID help

    This is an isolated find, mixed in a gravel pediment perched above the Colorado River. So I cannot even guess what formation it was derived from. The first photo looks like the anchor to bedrock. The third photo is the top view.
  20. Post Oak Creek 10-15-2020

    This is from my most recent trip to Post Oak Creek. I found some pretty nice shark teeth and some other random items. I also found several bones sticking out of the creek bed. It is obviously not fossilized but I wasn't sure if it was a modern cow or something older like a bison. Pictures 17 and 18 show were I excavated it from. It was right on the waterline and probably 10-12 feet down from the top of the river. I am planning on going back to excavate the rest to see if I can find the skull, teeth, etc. Also I have a ton of microfossil matrix I am going through. I have already found numerous other micro shark teeth and other oddities I will be posting soon as well. It is amazing how many fossils you can find in just a little bid of small gravel. I would love to hear what you think about the bones as well as pictures 11-16 and anything else interesting you see here. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19.
  21. Horn Coral Cross Section?

    Since this large rock is filled with Bryozoan fossils, I went off in a search to study Bryozoans. I ended up back on this group, reading a post where Rockwood identified a photo as a Horn Coral cross section, and it looked very similar to what I have, LOL! So, I am sticking my neck out there and asking if this might be a cross section of Horn Coral? This is an edge of the large rock, so you are seeing two sides of it. (first shots are looking at it from the side, third photo is looking down from the top) I have photographed it from many angles and have studied it a lot. There seem to be some kind of sections in the center, which is what went "ding, ding, ding" in the previous post that I read on the forum regarding horn coral. If I am wrong, at least I tried to figure it out, and I have learned quite a bit about Bryozoans in the meantime, LOL! This fossil is on a large rock that was found in Pulaski, TN, at the base of a hill/small mountain (rock weighs about 50 pounds or so). I can share (many!) more photos if needed. I will post scaled photos in the comments. Thanks! Ramona
  22. Last month my dad and I took a four-day weekend trip to Western New York to visit some new fossil sites and to collect in the famous Beecher's Trilobite Beds. We had only once before been out to Western New York to collect fossils - a visit to Penn Dixie Fossil Park - so this time around we wanted to try out some different places that we had never collected in before. The trip was a lot of fun and I enjoyed putting my research skills to work in finding new places to visit. I greatly expanded my collection of Silurian and Devonian fossils and found quite a few things on my fossil bucket list. I am excited to hopefully make another trip out there soon and fortunately still have my list of potential stops to make. Thursday On Thursday we woke early and made the 6.5 hour drive towards Western New York. In preparing for the trip I spoke with @fossilcrazy who was kind enough to invite my dad and me to collect from some of the spoils piles on his property from the various fossil collecting trips he has made. I was really excited to explore his pile of Linton Coal as I have very few fish in my collection and even fewer Pennsylvanian marine fossils - one of the consequences of living near Eastern Pennsylvania is that you end up visiting a lot of Late Pennsylvanian Llewellyn Formation plant sites. @fossilcrazy is an amazing fossil collector and an even more incredible member of the fossil collecting community. I cannot say enough about his generosity and hospitality. We were all hoping that my dad and I could find an amphibian or complete fish fossil, but no luck. We found a few isolated Orthacanthus teeth and head spines and some isolated coelacanth scales and bones. Fortunately @fossilcrazy kindly gifted me some representative pieces to add to my collection. These fossils are from the Middle Pennsylvanian Upper Freeport Coal from Linton, Ohio. I highly recommend checking out some of the posts @fossilcrazy has made about his finds from the Linton Coal. They are amazing! Rhabdoderma elegans Here are some close-ups of this beautiful coelacanth head and tail Haplolepis sp. Orthocanthus compressus Teeth and Head Spine Conchostracans Death Plate After visiting with @fossilcrazy we made our way into Buffalo to visit Frank Lloyd Wright's Martin House. My dad is an architect and he really wanted to see the newly restored interior of the house. It is really a quite stunning home.
  23. I first learned about this forum today, and I was able to identify fossils that I had been curious about for a while. I was very happy. I am recently interested in fossils, prehistoric creatures and dinosaurs. I will continue to receive help, and I will do my best to provide a lot of help. There are a lot of stones I picked up by the river in my house, but some of them have holes. How can you distinguish between 'trace fossils' and 'just erosion' holes? (Clockwise 1-2-3-4; stone 1 was washed with water before taking the picture.) (1) Can you guess that these holes or curves are trace fossils? (2) I wonder if this hole is characteristic of a particular fossil. Or could it be a coral or a sponge? Or is it just like basalt? (3) I am not familiar with anatomy, but I am wondering if this is a bone. What do you think? (4) As with the others, there are some holes and'traces' similar. I wonder if this can be viewed as a fossil. thank you. It would be great if you could leave a simple comment.
  24. ID Help - Possible Coral

    This was found on October 9, 2020 in a creek bed in Warrenton, MO. It is about 6cm x 7cm. I am no scientist and I have no idea how to identify what we found. This website was introduced to be by one of the science teachers at the high school where I teach. Any help is appreciated. Thank you.
  25. Possible coral fossil?

    Hello! I unfortunately can't remember the exact location I found this rock but I'm pretty sure it was somewhere in West Virginia. It looks like a type of coral fossil, but the circles are very very small. Sorry for lack of information and thank you in advance!
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