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Found 105 results

  1. Hello there! I was inspired by @markjw to check out the Credit River here in Mississauga, Ontario (Georgian Bay Formation, Upper Ordovician) because where I normally hunt there are typically no corals and I'd love to add a couple to my collection. Consequently, I went out for about an hour this morning before the family got up in order to try my luck, and I'm happy to say that I was successful!!! Based on information provided by @FossilDAWG in other threads here on TFF, I think all of my colonial rugose corals are Favistina calcina - here are photos of three of my specimens: Specimen #1 - side view: Specimen #2 - top and bottom views: Specimen #3 - top and bottom views: more to come...
  2. I visited Etobicoke Creek, and, as usual, the place was packed with fossils. Then I went to Credit River...a park near "The Riverwood Conservancy". At first I was disappointed, but in one place I found 3 little corals that had been packed into a mud path by hiker's boots. Here they are; all approximately 4 cm across.
  3. Paleofavosites asper

    From the album Hamilton, Ontario Fossils

    Paleofavosites asper (d’Orbigny, 1850). Coral squashed on grey shale. Found in the Manitoulin Formation of the Cataract Group on the Niagara Escarpment. Locality is the Devil’s Punchbowl, Stoney Creek, Hamilton, Ontario. Early Silurian.
  4. July 23,2019 Its been so hot working outside all week that today's fossil hunt in 70 degree temps felt cool. It was quiet in the stream (besides the sound of wildlife) when I got there in the AM and stayed that way all day. I didnt want to disturb the scene with me pounding on rocks so I surface collected and covered a large area of the stream. Along the sides of the stream are glacial erratic boulders, stones, and gravel. The tabulate corals (Chonostegites clappi, Favosites winchelli, Favosites sp.) I pictured in this post were found among these glacial rocks. In one gully off the stream I noticed a large boulder of Waterlime. I have found parts of Eurypterids in these displaced Silurian rocks before. Today I found a partial Eurypterid on one of these boulders but had to leave it where I found it. Too big and way too far to haul back. Happy Collecting, Mikeymig
  5. Hi! Here is a trip report on visiting a locality near Carlin, Nevada (one of our early videos). I'm not sure if what we decided to call "octopus beaks" (see 1:44 and image attached) are the real thing and not just fragments of brachiopods. Perhaps, somebody more knowledgeable can weigh in with the right answer. Thanks in advance!
  6. Predation Marks on Hebertella?

    Hi guys so I have this Hebertella occidentalis specimen I collected yesterday from the Credit River at Streetsville, Mississauga, Ontario, which belongs to the Upper Member of the Georgian Bay Formation. Do these look like predation marks? There are also what appears to some crystallized grains inside these marks and I think they could be some sort of calcite. Sorry for the noisy grain of the image, but I hope this will help.
  7. 1930s collection

    I got this box of fossil from auction at the low price of £21. The collection is old and dates between 1933 and 1944 . Some of the collection has labels but sadly others are lost or mixed up. Most of the locations are from Yorkshire but there is also Oxfordshire and the midlands. I purchased this lot because of the small collection of corals. The some of the corals have been cut and polished. I did re-polished most of them because they seamed to have a coating to finish the process. There is also some nice plant material from coal seams it is good to get this material from now in the Uk lost localities . Please if anyone can help me fill in the blanks I have added locations I have the labels too, Robin Hoods Bay, Leeds, Wakefield , Whitby , Buckinghamshire and Midlands. I will do a better list of locations when Mrs R gets home because I can’t read some of the hand writing. I think it is a great little collection. Thanks for looking. Cheers Bobby corals 1) 2) 3) 4) 5) 6) 7) 8)
  8. Yesterday the weather in my area hit above the 20 degrees Celsius so I dared myself to go to Streetsville in Mississauga to visit a fossil site I have not been to in 2 years. I now live in Hamilton, Ontario so travelling to Streetsville was intimidating for me using public transit from Hamilton to Streetsville. I have not been to Streetsville by the Credit River ever since I moved from Etobicoke to Hamilton, Ontario and I miss collecting in this vicinity. But I made it. :)) I took pics of exposure sites as these sites are mentioned in one of the literatures describing the Georgian Bay formation. This site exposes the Georgian Bay formation, Upper Member.
  9. This collecting trip was more of a scouting expedition than an actual dig. After the snow and ice have melted, its fun to get out and see whats newly exposed/uncovered. Today we found the usual cast of characters like horn corals, tabulate corals, brachiopods, gastropods, pelecypods, and trilobites. I was mad at myself for not having faith in a trilobite fossil that I found on this trip. It was barely visible in the rock I found it in and I thought it would be incomplete just on how it looked. I started to remove the matrix (hard limey shale) with a hammer and small chisel. The bug popped out of the rock complete and fell on the floor. The trilobite landed on its glabella and some of its shell broke off. I think I found all the pieces but I should have been more careful. After all these years of collecting I should know better. I promised myself to make up for it and that I would find a killer bug this season with some new sites that I have lined up Thanks and Happy Collecting mikeymig
  10. I am back from my trip to morocco. It is a 14 days trip and I got 4 days for fossil hunting. It was so imagine, fossils are everywhere and even though I won't be able to dig, I still get plenty to bring home. Since my guide doesn't speak good English, I am not be able to ask him must so I need help to identify the fossil. On the first day, my guide took me to a place near Erfoud to search for dinosaur teeth. It is very close to the highway. We found a well that the local people dig to get Spinosaur teeth and bone. My husband went down to one but couldn't find anything because the well is new and it is not deep enough. We didn't want to try the deeper one so we decide to bought some spinosaur teeth from the local people there. This tooth is a little over 4.5 inches and I think there are some prepare but I can't tell how much. I also bought 3 smaller teeth and was giving the broken one which I don't know what it is.
  11. I visited a small Paleozoic (Silurian) coral reef in Indiana the other day. No earth-shattering, jaw-dropping discoveries, but it's an interesting spot with dolomitized fossils. Here's a google earth view of the center of the reef. A nice mollusk, if anyone knows what species, let me know. It shattered when I tried to extract it, but I was able to glue it back together as you can see here. Sphaerexochus romingeri cephalon After extraction.. I believe this is a Platyceras: To be continued..
  12. Fossil hunting in the Ardennes

    Hello All Today and the next five days I'm on a family trip in the Ardennes. I am close to the region around Hotton. This is known for the many invertebrate fossils that can be found here. I went to a quarry first. I had to get permission from the owners but they gave if I didn't break the obvious rules of fossilhunting in an active quarry. The weather was very nice and the fossils numerous. What else does a fossilhunter want? I searched in an the loose rocks and didn't even had to use my hammer. The ground here is littered with fossil corals. In 5 minutes I found about 20 pieces. I have no Idea of the species yet.
  13. Crinoids and corals?

    I found these fossils on Jebel Hafeet, Al Ain, UAE. The second rock looks like there is a criniod in it, but is more possibly a type of sponge. The first rock has quite a few things in it, including some type of coral. I would like to know what these really are.
  14. Help to ID

  15. Help to ID

  16. Help to ID

  17. Help to ID

  18. Help to ID

  19. Help to ID

  20. Help to ID

  21. Help to ID

    Friends, this time I seek the help of a connoisseur of fossil corals, they are from the Neocomiano (Lower Cretaceous), from a town near Tehuacán, in the State of Puebla (Mexico). The scale is in centimeters. I appreciate your help because although I have dedicated myself to reading the scientific literature of the area, I am an amateur, and many of them are very similar. Of those who have an idea, I put their name for them to say. regards
  22. A Devonian coral site in Louisville, Kentucky, USA
  23. Much Wenlock coral

    Corals such as this one I found around the Much Wenlock UK area are a species of Favosites (not sure which one though). In this instance the colony looks to have possibly grown around a crinoid stem. And could almost be described as ‘coral balls’ they are quite common ranging in size from 1cm to over 12 cm in diameter. I thought you might like to see it.
  24. Supplementing the post in “Fossil Hunting Trips” about the Devonian Plabutsch-formation in Styria, Austria (with some background info): http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/90431-some-fossil-hunting-in-the-plabutsch-formation-of-the-palaeozoic-of-graz-styria-austria-devonian-–-eifelian/ I would like to post some more fossil specimens in this thread. More specimens will follow from time to time (hopefully). The first two specimens contain abundant branches of the tabulate coral Striatopora? suessi. Field pics of these specimens are already posted in the hunting trip, but here you can see also their side views, showing the alingment of the individual coral branches. (I don´t know why pics don´t look good here, but if you are zooming in, they are ok).
  25. As there are some polished fossil-rock specimens from this formation in the Christmas auction, I would like to present some background info with (mostly) some field photographs, so I have put this in “Fossil Hunting Trips”. The Palaeozoic of Graz is a thrust sheet within the Eastern Alps, composed of Silurian to Pennsylvanian sediments. It consists of three separate nappes, the most fossiliferous formation is the Plabutsch-formation within the Rannach nappe. This Devonian formation is of Eifelian age (ca. 395 Ma), about 100 m thick and mostly made up of a very dark, gray-blueish to black, fine-grained, thickly bedded limestone. Superficially, it weathers to a medium to light grey color. Geological map of Styria with the Palaeozoic of Graz situated north of Graz. Stratigraphic column of the Rannach nappe of the Palaeozoic of Graz, Plabutsch-formation is Nr. 4. From Hubmann & Gross, 2015. Thicknesses of formations are not to scale! The Plabutsch-formation crops out at various places to the west and north of Graz and more than 100 fossil sites are known within this formation. The most abundant fossils are corals, brachiopods, stromatoporids and crinoid fragments. Other fossils like gastropods, bivalves or trilo-bits are very rare. In a paper from 1975, about 50 coral species are listed, but less than 10 are abundant: Tabulata: Favosites styriacus Penecke, 1894 Pachycanalicula barrandei (Penecke, 1887) Thamnopora boloniensis (Gosselet, 1877) Thamnopora reticulata (Blainville, 1830) Striatiopora? suessi Penecke, 1894 Rugosa: Thamnophyllum stachei Penecke, 1894 Zelophyllia cornuvaccinum (Penecke, 1894) Do you feel that there is something strange with this list? Yes, it is! Most species have their type locality within this formation and were first described by Penecke, except T. boloniensis (T. reticulata was also erected by Penecke as Pachypora orthostachys and later synonymized with an earlier described species). In my opinion, this does not reflect a high degree of endemism, but an urgent need for revision… The most abundant fossil is Favosites styriacus, which can form massive colonies up to 0.5 m in size. Here is an example from Hohe Rannach Mt. (1018 m) north of Graz, photo 05/26/2018, Col-Nr. 4093, length of pocket knife is 9 cm: As most fossils in this formation, it was found in scree and float in a wooded area. Nr. 4093 is waiting near the pocket knife toward the lower right corner… Another Favosites styriacus, north of Fürstenstand Mt. (754 m), northwest of Graz, photo 10/30/2015, not in collection. Tabulae are very well visible, weathering is usually your friend there!
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