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Found 67 results

  1. Coral fossil or just a skeleton?

    Does anyone jnow if this is a coral fossil or just a coral skeleton?
  2. "Flower" corals ID

    Hi, Last weekend, in the limestone rudist-coral reef I'm working on I found this beautiful piece (not fully prepared yet). Upper-Cretaceous (Maastrichtean) strata. I'm aware that corals ID is very difficult, so I shall be well content if family or genus ID is possible. Thanks,
  3. Penn Dixie Partials

    Hello, all! So I am cleaning out my workshop to make room for a lot of new material coming in and to prepare for the upcoming season. I have wayyyyyy too much Penn Dixie material. I have, at this point, committed all of my complete bugs away. But I still have quite literally, TONS, of other material. What I am offering is Edlredgeops rana partials, this includes entire prepped bugs that are missing cephalons, stand alone cephalons, pygidiums, large but broken cephalons, half bugs, etc. (Please note, I am not offering any of these as complete. There is the real chance that some of the unprepped material COULD be complete, but I am not offering them as such. I also have Greenops pygidiums and partials, beat up examples with broken cephalons, etc. I also have a few Bellacartwrightia pygidiums laying around, and perhaps a few broken and partials of them as well. I also have massive quantities of hash plates from the Bay View coral layer, brachipods (Mucrospirifer, Pseudoatrypa, Rhipidomella, Spinatrypa), Spyroceras cephalopod partials, rugose and tablulate corals, clams, and other random bits. I am interested in trading for similar material from other locales. I am not expecting anyone to offer up prime specimens for any of this material, but I would love anyone else's throw-aways that include vertebrate material, plants, small fish, and the like. I am also considering minerals and gems. (Again, throw-aways are all I'm looking for, quantity beats quality on this one.) I will cover shipping domestically in the US, but can't really afford to ship out a ton of international packages this month. (I will still do international, we just might have to work something out.) If anyone is interested, please message me! I want this stuff gone as quickly as possible, it's getting to the point where I can't walk in my workshop anymore! If you let me know what you're interested in I will take photos of some examples, but it would take me a full weekend at least to photograph everything that I have available. This is perfect for anyone wanting to practice prepping as the Windom shale that most of these bits are in is relatively easy to work and there are lots of attractive pieces that will look very nice prepped, just aren't worth the time and effort for me at this point. Cheers!
  4. MASS ID: sponges, corals, etc

    Most come from Illinois, and are as I figure corals and spines; question is what kind, and which? I apologize in advance, but instead of posting 20 threads for each one, I’m going to spam this one with all my sponge, coral, etc inquiries. So please be patient! (Thanks again guys for all your help! I only post the ones I cannot 100% identify via books and internet; unfortunately I gotta snarge ton more yet to come.) Here are items #1-3...
  5. Hi all, Last weekend was an awesome trip back to a site we had not been to in over 10 years. This location offers three geologic formations from Devonian to Pennsylvanian. I put a write up together for all of you on what we found, and the sites, and finally the fossils after we plunged them into the acid bath to extract them! Thanks for looking! Devonian and Pennsylvanian Fossils in the Martin and Naco Limestones Coral Locality at Tonto Creek At the convergence of the Tonto and Horton creeks east of Payson, we find three primary formations, all with some type of fossils. The lowest in the stratagraphic column is the Devonian Martin formation, a pink hued platy limestone with trace fossils and a low diversity of silicified tabulate and rugose corals. Lying directly over is the gray and melted looking Redwall Limestone. Dominated by crinoidal material in the limestones, it contains beds of brown cherts with molds of a huge variety of invertebrates. Also localized beds of oolitic limestone found in the same area contain huge Straparollus gastropods. And finally, overlying the Redwall is the Pennsylvanian Naco formation. Again many crinoids in the limestones which are more angular and reddish stained. Beds of brown/red cherts can be either totally non fossiliferous or contain both molds and casts of corals, sponges and crinoids. This locality within a half mile area contains all three formations and is a great place to spend a few hours hiking in a stunning backdrop of pine trees and flowing rivers! The Martin Limestone Locality: Here I am seen at the Disphyllum coral locality in the pink platy limestones. Dawn finds hordes of Disphyllum tubes lying right on the ground here! Fossils from the Naco near the Power Line road: Here we walked along this road to find large amounts of red cherts, some highly fossiliferous. Up ahead is the Mogollon Rim, the south end of the Colorado Plateau. Bone fragment found in Naco. This type of fossil is very rare - Most of the time we find sharks teeth that are very tiny. But here, a big piece of what is most likely a fish bone in a huge boulder. (Yes, its still there). Now some of you may question how we know this is a bone and not just a piece of petrified wood or something. First, of all, this is a deep water marine environment, with a depth around 200 meters. Bone also does not have the exterior detail of wood. Finally, it easily passed the famous "Lick and stick" test. This is where you lick your finger, and touch the fossil. The porous nature of fossil bone causes your finger to stick like touching a piece of scotch tape, and the surrounding rock will just get wet and not stick. Sharks teeth from this formation do the same thing. Aulopora - such a beautiful coral, this is a colonial tabulate with no septa visible. Side view of Disphyllum colonial rugose shows the branching pipes from a common attachment base. Disphyllum - End view of calice interiors showing septa. Unknown and poorly preserved colonial rugose from the same area. Composita c.f. Composita Subtilita brachiopods in red cherts. These were found loose on the ground. Spirifer brachs too! Disphyllum on the left and Aulopora on the right. The Aulopora was very fragmented, and if we left the limestone in the acid too long, all we would get is a pile of pieces. So as in this specimen, we only dissolved the rocks about half way down to provide a stable base to hold the corals. Even so, you have to be pretty careful on handling them! Thanks for looking. Many more shots including close ups with the microscope can be found here on our web site: http://www.schursastrophotography.com/paleo/Disphyllum022218.html
  6. Lack of snow cover and warmer than average temps allowed me to explore and collect sponges and corals from the Pennsylvanian Naco Formation in central Arizona, north of Payson. Widespread chert of the Beta Member suggests that silicious sponges may have been common. Several have been identified but many more exist. I have seen and collected several undescribed species. Dilliard and Rigby have described several sponges including Chaunactis olsoni which I found in the area: The New Demosponges, Chaunactis olsoni and. Haplistion nacoense, and Associated Sponges from the. Pennsylvanian Naco Formation, Central Arizona. by DILLIARD and RIGBY http://geology.byu.edu/Home/sites/default/files/geo_stud_vol_46_dilliard_rigby.pdf Photo 1a. Detail of undesribed sponge. Marks are 1/16th inch. Any ideas? Photo 2. 3/4 quater view of sponge in photo 1a. Note red 1/3 to 2/3 inch thick pancake-like form of sponge. Photo 4. Top of another similiar sponge. Marks are 1/16th inch. Help me ID 2 corals and one sponge. Photo 3. Coral, Multithecopora?, which has been reported from the Naco many miles to the south. Photo 5. Probably Chaetetes, a side view. Photo 5a. Top of Chaetetes. Photo 6. Horn Coral, Zaphrentis? 1a.docx 2.docx 4.docx 3.docx 5.docx 5a.docx 6.docx
  7. Marvejols fossils

    Hello. 2 years ago i got box with fossils described as Fossiles U.S.W Marvejols. I didn't get any more info about them. For me fauna looks Devonian Frasnian. Most of fossil sites in the area are Mesosoic. First specimen contains 3 different corals.( Alveolites ,Aulopora and Thamnopora ??)
  8. Publication Request

    Hello all Does anyone have access to the following PDF? Klaus, James S.; Meeder, John F.; McNeill, Donald F.; Woodhead, Jon F.; Swart, Peter K. 2017. Expanded Florida reef development during the mid-Pliocene warm period. Global and Planetary Change, Volume 152, May 2017, Pages 27-37 Mike
  9. Hello, I want to put together some pics of some of the reef material that I have found in Streetsville, Mississauga, Ontario on the banks of the Credit River. It is now winter and I am missing the warm days in which I can go and wade in the warm waters of the river for fun. I just want to compile and share some specimens that whose photos I have not shared with. All the fossils belong to the Georgian Bay formation, Upper Member, which is late Ordovician in age. First is the common coral that displays an enormity of growth forms, Favistella alveolata (Goldfuss, 1826).
  10. My beautiful wife scheduled a three night stay at a cabin in a Thousand Trails campground near Lake Texoma. We were to arrive on Sunday and check out on Wednesday. So, I figured that, since I hadn't been fossil hunting in months, I would schedule a trip to central Texas to follow the Texoma trip. I set up a rendezvous point in Fairfield, Texas to meet my dad on that Wednesday, and head off toward Brownwood and Cisco, Texas. I figured that the fossil hunt would begin then. But that's not quite how things played out... My two oldest daughters and I met my wife and youngest daughter in Salado, Texas on Saturday, October 14th. They had left the previous morning to spend a day with my mother-in-law in Waco and Salado. We spent Saturday night in Salado and then parted ways with my mother-in-law on Sunday morning and headed toward Lake Texoma. As we drove through Waco, my wife asked if we wanted to take a detour. She had never been to Dinosaur Valley State Park in Glen Rose, Texas, and she thought the girls would enjoy seeing the dinosaur tracks in the Paluxy River. I got really excited. I hadn't been there since I was a kid, and at that time, the river was high and the tracks were not visible. So we adjusted our GPS to take us to Glen Rose. We pulled in and stopped off to get a map of the park. We then drove straight to the spot where Roland T. Bird made his first discovery. It was amazing. The water was low and gave us a clear view of the trackways in the river. Above you can see both the sauropod and theropod tracks, They are a little obscured by mud, but they are still very visible. We left the R.T. Bird site and went to another place called the Ballroom Track Site, where so many tracks go in so many directions, it was like the theropods were dancing. It was in slightly deeper water, but it was still beautiful! The rippling water was crystal clear and the girls couldn't help but get into the water, even as a cool front brought chilly winds down the river valley. My wife loved it. She told me that Dinosaur Valley State Park was our next camping destination. Before we left, we stopped off by the iconic Tyrannosaurus Rex and Apatosaurus models built for the 1964-65 World's Fair in New York. They were permanently installed at Dinosaur Valley in 1970 at the park's dedication. We left Dinosaur Valley and drove the rest of the way to our cabin at Lake Texoma, arriving just after dark. We settled in and tried to decide what we wanted to do the next day. It was Monday, and we figured there had to be something for the girls to do nearby. We quickly discovered that our options were limited. It had turned too cold for the pool at the campgrounds. The putt-putt at the campground was okay, but the girls quickly tired of it. And most of the other recreational equipment was not well kept, or available. So, we decided to leave the campground to find something for the girls to do. I had mentioned that I would like to check out the Permian site at Waurika, Oklahoma. It was only two hours away, and this was the closest I had ever been to the site. My wife was a bit miffed by the lack of things for the girls to do, so she said "Let's go." I jumped at the chance. I had done no research on the site, other than what I had read about it on TFF. I wish I had consulted the TFF experts before we left, because I had no idea of the best places to look. We focused mainly on the sandy floor and reddish rocks, and found nothing. When we returned to the cabin, I asked where we should have looked. Jesuslover340 informed me that the gray colored exposures were the places to find the best material. So, we came away empty handed, with only one major discovery. My wife wouldn't let me take it home, though... Continued in next post...
  11. Last week I drove out to Kentucky to spend a week with my family. Of course I also hit the fossil beds. The first day I visited the two Mississippian sites- Wax and Leitchfield that I visited last year. Here are some of the highlight finds of that day. First- Wax: Blastoids and bryozoans:
  12. H.A.Nicholson on tabulata

    As is (almost) customary in the 19th century,some bryzoans are thrown in with the corals Pleurodictyum
  13. Recently I was for one week in the Ardennes in Belgium. There I visited different locations where you can find fossils. For example I was in Barvaux and found many brachiopods: http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/77098-mainly-brachiopods-from-barvaux/. I also visited the old Lesse quarry near Resteigne, where you can many different fossils. For instance I found many brachiopods, corals and also some trilobite parts ! The layers belong to the Eifelium, Middle Devon. Too bad that the weather was not that good but I am nonetheless satisfied with my fiends: Here are some pictures of the quarry: Its an old quarry and the nature reclaims the area more and more. So you also see some nice animals ! Now too my finds: Firstly some brachiopods: They are indeed very common there so I found many. Those brachiopods are all Sieberella sp. or? Here a detailed picture of one (3 cm long): And this should be a Spinatrypa sp. or?
  14. Last year Kevin H. gave me some information about a good location for fossils near Barvaux (Thanks @Kevin H. ) Its a construction site where you can find many devonian fossils. The most common fossils are brachiopods but you can also find corals and gastropods ! Too bad that it seems that they not work there anymore ... despite of that you can still find many brachiopods. Firstly some pictures of the site: And there they are ! Its a pity that they are often damaged ! I spent there about 3 hours and found more than 300 brachiopods ! I think more or less all are Cyrtospirifer verneuili ... And here are the biggest ones: The biggest one is about 8 cm long and very massive. Its difficult to find such big ones in a good condition ! This one is a very nice one becuase of the good preservation. Its about 4.5 cm long. Some more brachiopods from other angles: + These three brachiopods look a bit different ... can somebody determine them? I found also some brachiopods where you can see the spiral shaped lophophores ("skeleton") of them... I can post brachiopods the whole day But I also found some corals
  15. Searching in Bergen County NJ

    Just found out that I have to head down to Bergen County today for family and was wondering if there is anywhere to stop on the way or while down there. I know it's short notice but anyone with any info, I'd appreciate it. Thanks
  16. (Note: this was originally posted under fossil trips) Hey there! I'm sorry its been so long since I've posted on here but suffice it to say I need your help. I'm planning a six to seven day fossil hunting trip in Pennsylvania (sometime in mid august) and I need your help verifying that the sites I've picked to visit from Robert Beards guide Rock Hounding Pennsylvania are still accessible to collecting as well as coverable given my time frame. The places I'm looking at hunting are sites 27. Beltzville State Park (Outcrops on shoreline), 28. Lehighton, Lehigh Canal (Former borrow pit and outcrop),30. Deer Lake (Borrow Pit), 33. Suedberg (Outcrop in former borrow pit), 35. Centralia (Former strip mine outcrop), 38. Rockville (Former quarry), 48. Walker Lake (Hillside and unpaved road), 51. PPL Montour Preserve (Hillside, Former borrow pit), 57. Uniontown (Former quarry). Any insights as to whether or not theses sites are still accessible to collecting, weather our not you believe covering all these sites within 6 to 7 days is possible, and any other tips and tidbits of information on the sites, and or planning a large trip like this etc, would be greatly appreciated! When I go I'm planning to take notes and pictures and then, when i get back, write a few essays illustrated with pics that I will post on here! Thank you in advance, and thank you to Fossil-Hound for directing me on were to properly post this! Glenn aka Fossil123
  17. Hey there! I'm sorry its been so long since I've posted on here but suffice it to say I need your help. I'm planning a six to seven day fossil hunting trip in Pennsylvania (sometime in mid august) and I need your help verifying that the sites I've picked to visit from Robert Beards guide Rock Hounding Pennsylvania are still accessible to collecting as well as coverable given my time frame. The places I'm looking at hunting are sites 27. Beltzville State Park (Outcrops on shoreline), 28. Lehighton, Lehigh Canal (Former borrow pit and outcrop),30. Deer Lake (Borrow Pit), 33. Suedberg (Outcrop in former borrow pit), 35. Centralia (Former strip mine outcrop), 38. Rockville (Former quarry), 48. Walker Lake (Hillside and unpaved road), 51. PPL Montour Preserve (Hillside, Former borrow pit), 57. Uniontown (Former quarry). Any insights as to whether or not theses sites are still accessible to collecting, weather our not you believe covering all these sites within 6 to 7 days is possible, and any other tips and tidbits of information on the sites, and or planning a large trip like this etc, would be greatly appreciated! When I go I'm planning to take notes and pictures and then, when i get back, write a few essays illustrated with pics that I will post on here! Thank you in advance, Glenn aka Fossil123
  18. I was barely recovered from the Brechin, Ontario trip the weekend before when I headed out to the Buffalo area, an annual pilgrimage July 4th weekend for the past four years. Usually the highlight of the weekend is the planned meet up with Tim (Fossildude19) to do a bit of fossil collecting together. Others often join us, but this year it was just the two of us. Weather was perfect and we hit our favorite spot; Smokes Creek, a Windom Shale, Moscow Formation, Middle Devonian Hamilton Group site. This is Tim doing what he enjoys most- breaking rocks:
  19. Favistella alveolata

    From the album Georgian Bay Formation Outside of Toronto, Ontario

    Favistella alveolata (Goldfuss, 1826) Found as a loose specimen at an exposure at the Credit River on Streetsville, Mississauga, Ontario. Late Ordovician, Georgian Bay formation. A rugose colonial coral. Coral approximately 10 cm excluding extra matrix.
  20. Mornington Finds

    Hi all! I have recently returned from a quick fossil hunting trip from Fossil beach in Victoria. I believe that I may have found some fossils but I am not certain. I would also appreciate If anyone could give me tips on fossicking at Beaumaris and Mornington, e.g What to look out for and better ways to look for fossils. Thanks, Daniel Photo 1: Possible fossil fish jaw fragment? (Found at Beaumaris) Photo 2: Fossil Coral? (Found at Mornington) Photo 3: Fossil gastropod? (Found at Mornington)
  21. When I found this fossil it has some green algal growth on it as I found it on the grass. The algae did not cover the entire fossil but is there some way I can remove the yellow coating of this fossil? I've been scrubbing it with a brush under running water for a while now and some of the dirt does come off.
  22. Yesterday, after countless trips and exploring at the same old spots on the Credit River in Mississauga, Ont., I finally mustered the courage to go and wade on the water to an isolated exposure out the Georgian Bay Formation at Streetsville, Mississauga. I wanted to collect fossils that were not worn out as these were all I was finding in my old spots. I have been setting my eyes on this exposure from the other side of the Credit River for some time now ever since I started collecting along the Streetsville area and it could possibly harbour fresh material. The temperature of the afternoon was around 16-20 degrees Celsius so the water was not chilly as I was expecting it to be. I crossed the water barefoot with the water reaching up my knees at this tributary that separated the exposure from the main path. The Credit has many tributaries flowing and where the these tributaries converged the river, many exposures can be found along these places. After crossing I reached the other side without slipping on the slimy bottom. The exposure had thin footing for exploration but I was able to walk back and forth without slipping onto the water.
  23. Favistella sp.

    From the album Georgian Bay Formation Outside of Toronto, Ontario

    Favistella sp. (alveolata or calicina?) coral from the Credit River near Streetsville, Mississauga. Georgian Bay Formation, Streetsville Member, late Ordovician. Found as a loose specimen by the banks of the Credit River. This colonial rugose coral is very abundant along the site with many small loose colonies. Some colonies can be found on a limestone matrix. Please click on image sizes to see details of the corallites.
  24. Yesterday on April 24 I decided to go and visit a place in Mississauga, Ontario called Streetsville which used to be a township of its own before being joined to Mississauga to form the City of Mississauga. I took public transportation to get there and it took me about 1.5 hrs to get there. I went to the Credit River near Streetsville and explored the banks. I had trouble finding a natural exposure as all I was finding were banks with worn out rocks and silt. The river's bottom does not have the same clarity as the Humber River in Etobicoke as I could not see the shale bottom of river. All I was seeing at the Credit's bottom were worn out rocks, algae and silt. The river was also wider than the Humber and in some places it seemed deeper as well which made me think twice about crossing to reach this natural exposure I found. The banks mostly had worn rocks but some nice material can be found. I was surprised at the fauna I found. The rocks are still part of the Georgian Bay Formation but the fossils are completely alien to my eyes. They were nothing that I usually encounter at the Humber River or at Mimico Creek. The place was littered with small coral bits and there lots of what appeared to be Tetradium bits. There also many brachiopod hash plates around. This hash plate here has a piece of coral at the bottom along with many brachiopod bits. There were some things familiar to me like that hash plate of bryozoans and I only found one cephalopod fragment. Where I usually hunt cephalopods are very common to find in Mimico Creek and at the Humber River. There were also these odd trace fossils lying around.
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