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Found 43 results

  1. rapp creek hunting

    Went out on a hot and humid morning to the creek, digging and sieving was nasty and the bugs were bad. Found the typical sand tiger spikes, lots broken, and some drum teeth, but surprisingly no angel shark teeth or vertebrae (washed away?) A bunch of white snail-like shells usually find similar bigger ones on the beach. Most interesting was a chunk of turtle shell (from the edge, bigger than usual) and a tooth (I find lots of busted ones, but this is almost intact. About an inch long, dull enamel half way up on both sides (one side cracked); the root is almost square and appears hollow).
  2. rapp creek hunting

    A little under the weather (and having truck trouble) but took a break for a few hours hoping to find more shrimp coprolites after recent thunderstorms. Humid, but not particularly hot, lots of frogs. Despite lots of digging in last week's spot, not much mixed in the gravel, mostly small broken stuff (one vert, one angel shark tooth, some drum teeth). I always wonder if I am 'mining' an area of the stream bed that was picked over 30 years ago. Finally found a mottled tiger shark tooth, relatively rare on that site. I have some small pieces drying but no strong suspicions of shrimp coprolites. Before leaving I hit an older spot which has been good for cowshark teeth. First screening found a broken ecphora, a pretty rootless cowshark tooth and a broken cowshark tooth. On the way out checked two other spots, maybe next week?
  3. 2108294409100-1687.jpg

    From the album Belgium

  4. Hi all, For whatever reason, I never got around to posting this. After a relatively unsuccessful day at Bayfront Park back in 2018, my dad showed me this tooth, unsure of what it was. He said he had found it while sifting in the creek that runs under the bridge near the entrance of the park. I had never really bothered trying around that area because it was so far from any cliff exposures, but I suppose he proved that some of the best finds may be where you least expect them. The second he pulled out this tooth, my jaw dropped. It is a FLAWLESS cow shark symphyseal. I hadn't had a single one in my collection until then. I've never seen a better symphyseal than this one, not in a museum or anywhere online. It's absolutely perfect, with exquisite symmetry and phenomenal preservation. Undoubtedly the best tooth my dad has ever found. Although I was a bit jealous that he found it and not me, I was at the same time ecstatic because all of his finds go towards my collection. This beauty is one of my most prized teeth, as I am yet to see a more perfect specimen. The pictures do not do it justice in the slightest. It was found a while ago, but I thought you all would still like to see it. Enjoy!
  5. rapp creek hunting

    My hip is bothering me, but we've had beautiful weather the last few days so I had to get out. Ended up being a short trip. Most of what I found was broken and small and about half as many teeth as usual, but I tried. Tape is in cm. A three inch ecphora, but missing a tail. Two or three skate stinger pieces. A nice but hard to scan cowshark upper, and pieces, some fin tilly bones, a few angel shark and drum. Lots of animal tracks along the creek but no frogs, crawfish or salamanders, just scud shrimp.
  6. Rapp Creek and Beach hunting

    Out of action for a bit, but figured a good time to post what I have been collecting since coming back from Singapore summer of 2018. Starting with sandtiger shark teeth, since they are the most common here. Really like the little hook cusps which I seldom see on both sides on the biggest teeth. Cusps are most prominent (but often nubs) on the lateral(?) medium sized wider, root teeth. Symphyseal teeth are not that rare (wish they were cowshark!); often I think one is a split tooth until I examine it carefully; the roots are distinctive. The small teeth may include a few that are not sandtiger, but I'm thinking since they are most common, many of the non-descript small teeth probably are sandtiger. Scale shown for all the teeth in first photo is in cm.
  7. Hop 5 03/02/19

    1. Isurus desori: Awesome Mako, just shy of two inches. One of my largest teeth from Bayfront Park. Found within 10 or 15 minutes of stepping foot on the beach. 2. Notorynchus primigenius: Very nice cow shark tooth. Small ding on the first cusp, but mostly complete and a decent size. 3. Cetacean Vertebra: My first whale vert! This lumbar vertebra was completely buried in the sand, with only the very top exposed. 4. Hemipristis serra: Really cool snaggletooth with nice colors and perfect serrations. Could be either an upper or lower, hard to tell. Most likely upper. 5. Cetacean Vertebra: Another whale vert! This one is an atlas vert, and like the first was found almost completely buried. Very much intact, maybe even museum quality. Please cast your vote! The poll ends at 1:00 p.m. EST. Also, if you haven't already, be sure to check out my YouTube video so you can see these fossils as they were found! The link to the video is in my most recent trip report, titled "Bayfront Park 03/02/19: First YouTube Video"
  8. Holy Cow!

    Found this beauty during a business trip to Southern California. My first complete cow shark tooth. My best personal find. Measures just shy of 2” from Capistrano formation.
  9. rapp creek hunting

    Has been about 38 F (~4 C) or less since Sat morning and I was getting cabin fever. The tides are running high for the beaches, east wind blowing in the water. So I decided to go to the creek in pouring cold rain (45F, 7C); the creek was icy cold. Was probably stupid, it was difficult to work some new spots in water high over my ankles and both waterproof shoes eventually filled with water. Both quality and quantity of teeth were low. However I was lucky and found TWO nice cow shark teeth (without roots), a small mako (no serrations) along with the usual sand shark spikes and some small gray shark teeth. No angel shark and few drum teeth? Hopefully will turn up when the water quiets down.
  10. After the Hybodontids, our program starts to transition toward the modern sharks. We introduce lamniform sharks and the cow sharks. We will not be able to spend much time at all on the Cow and Crow Sharks. They only get a brief introduction and a look at the teeth. Squalicorax is an important species for us even though we do not spend a lot of time on it. The students in first few classes we do presentations for will be going home with Squalicorax teeth from Morocco. We would like to spend more time on the Cow sharks eventually but we only have one tooth to show them and we will have to edit content to free up space for them but I will work on that down the road. The primary focus in this section is Scapanorhynchus. The first shark art Carter did was a Goblin and we do give them a lot of time in the presentaton. They look cool and have been around for a long time. We present the kids with a nice assortment of teeth and some cool science. The teeth were important adaptations for catching fish and the snout had the ampullae of Lorenzini for sensing changes in the electro magnetic fields around them. We compare this to the modern hammerhead which we do not cover in the program but gives the kids a sense of how the adaptations of hammerheads work. We also talk about fin structure and being able to tell they were slow swimmers. The extend-o-matic jaw is another adaptation we cover with this species. I am happy with the fossil representations for now though I really want to add more Cow Shark fossils at some point and Anomotodon would also be a good addition. The fossils for the presentation.. Pic 1 Hexanchus andersoni from STH. I know H. andersoni should chronologically fit later but Cow Sharks fit here and this is the only one we have for now. Pic 2- Squalicorax pristodontus from Morocco. This is our largest Squalicorax tooth. The kids will get these teeth to take home so while we do not spend a lot of time on them, the teeth are very important to the program. Pic 3- Scapnorhynchus texanus and Scapanorhynchus puercoensis. Our nice little Goblin Shark display with some of our best teeth. Two of the texanus teeth are over 1.5 inches and the puercoenisis teeth are uncommon I believe and pretty super cool.
  11. Hop 5 01/25/19

    (I will now be using the poll format, so you can actually click your favorite and the poll will keep track of the votes) 1. Carcharocles chubutensis: MY FIRST MEGATOOTH! A bit of damage near the root and a missing bourlette, but a gorgeous tooth nonetheless. The serrations are absolutely killer. It’s about 1 ¾ inches. Colors completely changed when it dried. I. Am. Ecstatic. 2. Carcharias cuspidata: Very large sand tiger with a beautiful hooked double cusp on one shoulder. Excellent preservation, and certainly a necklace quality tooth. 3. Notorynchus primigenius: A perfect little cow shark tooth. Found in the cove within my first five minutes of collecting. Not very big, but in fantastic condition. 4. Isurus desori: Incredible little mako. It is absolutely pristine, and still sharp enough to cut you. Has that beautiful Brownies blue coloration on the enamel. 5. Carcharocles sp.: Oh, what could have been...this is the tip to what was probably a huge Megalodon tooth. Based on the thickness of the tooth, it would have been much larger than the meg that I found. Still a great find! The tip of a monster.
  12. Confirmation on cowshark teeth

    I was revisiting some of the shark teeth I've found on previous adventures in order to make a list/catalog of the vertebrate species present in my collection. I found a few teeth which I believe could come from notorhynchus or hexanchus and I wanted to confirm that with members on the forum. I was looking at some of my teeth from the spoil pits of Aurora, NC and the Peace River, FL. 1. Deep rooted specimen with what looks like what would be the first crown preserved. Found in Aurora. About 2 cm from top to bottom, 1 cm wide. 2. Unsure about this one, initially thought it was a tiger shark, but it's rather long at the base and doesn't have the curved root like your average tiger. Found on the Peace River. About 1.4 cm wide and .75 cm from top to bottom. 3. This is the one I'm least confident about, but the root is very wide. 1.4 cm wide and .8 cm from top to bottom.
  13. Rapp beach trips

    Went back to the beach twice after several days of north winds that should have pushed stuff on the beach. Was surprised that there was still snow on the ground away from the water. The surf was rougher both trips than I expected, lots of icy water in my boots both trips. Low tide was not that low (lunar? or need a decent south west wind?) The water was COLD and also cloudy, guessing stuff like shrimp coprolite "burrows" were further out; didn't find one on either trip. Highlight was today, found a nice cowshark tooth (but rootless), a broken cowshark tooth, and two almost one inch makos. Picked up more small "whale bone" than teeth each trip. Wind dropped at the end of the trip and I could have probably found more, but was tired and my feet were wet and cold, so gave it up.
  14. Worn Cow Shark Symphyseal

    Hi all, This tooth was found of one of my recent hunts along the Calvert Cliffs in Maryland. I found it at Bayfront Park/Brownies Beach. It is approximately one cm in length, relatively flat, and has multiple worn but visible bumps of enamel that could either be large serrations of some shark tooth or cusps of a symphyseal cow shark tooth. I believe it's the latter, but also recognize that it is a rather uncommon find. If it turns out to be a cow shark symphyseal, it would be my first one! Excited to see your takes on this one. I feel somewhat confident with my standing ID, but would love some confirmation. Thanks in advance!
  15. rapp creek hunting

    Finally got out to the creek in the woods. Warm and cloudy, but not many bugs (or frogs). Looked like lots of people had been hunting, but the main creek body was less silted than previously, shells everywhere (in addition to giant tree oysters, scallops, frilly oysters, there were some extra elongated "clams"? ) I had to shovel out lots of broken shells in my spots, and the teeth, as always, were small. Still it was good to get some angel shark teeth and drum teeth again (rare on the beach) and there were a fair amount of tiny teeth. Found one smallish mako/ great white (1" but in perfect shape). Odd in that many teeth were reddish/ pinkish; often I see the tips but not so many teeth that color (guess good for jewelry?) After three hours of digging and sifting, I decided it was time to go, but decided to try a favorite old spot where I have found several cow shark teeth, and voila! first shovelful yielded a beautiful (a bit small) intact cowshrk tooth with root. Good time to stop (probably sore tomorrow). Good relaxing trip!
  16. rapp creek hunting

    Back out to the same productive spot. Unfortunately it "played out" within an hour, but yielded a nice Great White/ Mako tooth, a very nice cowshark tooth, a few more angel shark teeth, and more drum teeth (some from last trip), more teeth, a scute and turtle shell pieces, and a small piece of jaw with two flat-topped teeth.
  17. Rapp creek hunting

    Headed out into the heat. After thunderstorms last night, was hoping some sand would wash away. Mosquitoes and biting flies were bad, and the great white/ mako area had been worked hard by someone else. So tried a second spot downstream, where I've found cow shark teeth in the past. Found two, one weird looking, but cannot imagine what else it could be. Six angel shark teeth (standing in blow up photo), a dozen or so drum pharyngeal teeth, plus lots of sand tiger spikes and bull/dusky shark triangles. A lot of the small teeth are odd to me, but that make reflect them generally being more weathered or broken.
  18. I found these two cow sharks (notorhyncus primigenus, bluntnose seven Gill) yesterday, miocene, Brownies beach. They were on both on a previous tide line within four feet of each other. The colors and size a very similar, so is it possible or likely that the lower and the symphyseal are associated? As in, from the same animal?
  19. rapp creek hunting

    Nice Spring outing, very green, nice balance of frogs, salamanders, nesting birds (in the creek bank?), with poison ivy growing well and more background construction/ farming noise than usual. Not much has changed in the creek bed, could use a good rain to wash out more. The tooth hunting was slow (probably because I wasn't working at it hard enough). Still, came out with a nice intact(?) ecphora, two broken cow shark teeth, four angel shark teeth and a bunch of drum teeth (or facsimiles thereof; don't usually pick them up unless pretty, but it was a slow day). Some stuff in matrix, unusual for the creek but nothing clearly exciting. The sand shark teeth were small and many broken (guess the kids in the area have been picking these). Picked up a lot of bits and pieces (a few of the smaller ones are in the photo; guessing many are turtle= my default for flat pieces that look like but are not seashells). More to sort through. Small stuff to puzzle over.
  20. Yesterday I went over to Bakersfield ( Sharktooth Hill locality) East of the river. Just for kicks, I grabbed a small amount of matrix chunks to see if any small fossils could be found. Fast forward to my prep lab ( kitchen) for a cleaning. I was surprised at the abundance of tiny fossils in there and they have the same coloring as the larger teeth.lots of reds, yellows, sable browns, etc. Tonight I did some sorting and looky what I found. A very small Cow Shark tooth only 6mm long.
  21. On The fossil guy website on Cow Sharks, there is a tiny detail that intrigued me. “There are also some differences between male and female teeth. These differences, however, will not be discussed here.” Well then we better discuss them here! Anybody know what these are? For me the bluntnose sevengill would be more relevant, but for the sake of learning add sex differences in the teeth of any and all Cow shark species. Thanks all!
  22. Hello all! I just took my fifth trip to Brownies beach yesterday the 21 of January. A couple people found some 3 inch megs- but for me it was a slow day until I found a cow shark tooth and the tides rolled in. I’m so thankful to be able to enjoy the fresh air. Thanks for looking!! Because this was my fifth trip, I’m attaching my favorite finds from all five trips so far! Thanks for looking.
  23. Hello, Found this interesting tooth in Bakersfield, in the Round Mountain Silt formation on Dec 24, 2017. To me it looks like a pathological upper tooth from a cow shark (hexanchus). There seems to be a very small inclusion on the side of the tooth (second photo), but hard to say if it was there when the shark lost it. The tooth is about the size of an American penny coin. Any validating comments or ideas are appreciated.
  24. Calvert Cliffs Calendar

    So i mentioned I was going to do a Calvert Cliffs Annual calendar to highlight my best finds from each month. Well I took all the pics and sent it off to the printer they will be ready in a week. This way when i'm too old and senile to hunt anymore I will be able to flip through the old calendars to remember when things were found. So without further ado here is the first of many years to come!! JANUARY FEBRUARY MARCH APRIL MAY JUNE JULY AUGUST SEPTEMBER OCTOBER NOVEMBER DECEMBER COVER
  25. Megalodon vs Cow shark

    Quick fossil trip to the bay today. Found a nice megalodon only to be outdone by finding my largest and nicest cow shark tooth! small video of the action...
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