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Found 4 results

  1. Hi, For people interested in plant fossils, there is an open access 2017 eBook about the paleobotany of Australia online. It is; History of the Australian Vegetation: Cretaceous to Recent Edited by Robert S. Hill, 2017, University of Adelaide Press http://www.oapen.org/search?identifier=628112 http://www.oapen.org/search?keyword=History+of+the+Australian+Vegetation http://www.oapen.org/home Yours, Paul H.
  2. Corbula inaequalis

    This specimen and dozens like it were collected from matrix material deposited in the waters of the Chesapeake Bay by a landslide. It is one of only a few species that consistently survived intact in the matrix samples I collected. Most specimens were single, unbroken valves, but several had both valves together and intact. This specimen was donated to the Delaware Museum of Natural History. Formerly known as Corbula inequalis.
  3. Looking for Cephalopod ID

    I could really, really use some help on this one! I found this 1.5" cephalopod in the Cretaceous MT Laurel sand at the C&D Canal, Delaware City, DE (north side). There are only four cephalopods listed for this site in the Delaware guide, the straight-shelled Bacculites ovatus, Oxybelaoceras (which is heavily ribbed and doubles over on itself tightly in a U shape) and the golden bullets of Belemnitella americana. There are two other cephalopods listed for the canal zone - at different sites- in the Delaware guide, but they are both tightly-coiled.This one was loosely-coiled, probably in a spiral, and lightly ribbed all the way around. Most of the ribbing has broken off of this specimen, but you can just make out how they go all the way around at the upper left edge of the first photo. The closest thing I can find to this is a lightly-ribbed, loosely-coiled Cirroceras conradi. It is listed in the Cretaceous Fossils of New Jersey, through which all the canal formations run, but the only specimens found in NJ were in the Navesink formation. C. conradi also gets smoother on the inside of the coil, at least in the image in the book. I'm not very good at figuring out the text descriptions. The C&D Canal isn't supposed to cut through the Navesink formation, either, but it is as close as I can find. I'm thinking this might be one specimen I should not lose in a drawer, but I have no idea what it is or where to turn once I figure it out. It just isn't supposed to be there!
  4. I inherited a collection of fossils, most of which I collected as a child. In it was this odd piece. All of the others were from central Texas, cretaceous as in Exogyra Ponderosa and ammonites. What is this? Iridescent thin layer with an interior stone, like a bone. 45 cm x 15cm x 10cm.
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