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Found 24 results

  1. MILLIPEDE CRETACEOUS 1.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Diplopoda (Millipede) in Amber Burma Cretaceous Period (95 to 100 million years ago) This piece measures 15 mm long by 15 mm wide by 4 mm thick. Millipede is 8 mm. Millipedes are a group of arthropods that are characterised by having two pairs of jointed legs on most body segments; they are known scientifically as the class Diplopoda, the name being derived from this feature. Each double-legged segment is a result of two single segments fused together. Most millipedes have very elongated cylindrical or flattened bodies with more than 20 segments, while pill millipedes are shorter and can roll into a ball. Although the name "millipede" derives from the Latin for "thousand feet", no known species has 1,000; the record of 750 legs belongs to Illacme plenipes. There are approximately 12,000 named species classified into 16 orders and around 140 families, making Diplopoda the largest class of myriapods, an arthropod group which also includes centipedes and other multi-legged creatures. First appearing in the Silurian period, millipedes are some of the oldest known land animals. Some members of prehistoric groups grew to over 2 m (6 ft 7 in); the largest modern species reach maximum lengths of 27 to 38 cm (11 to 15 in). The longest extant species is the giant African millipede (Archispirostreptus gigas). Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Arthropoda Subphylum: Myriapoda Class: Diplopoda
  2. MILLIPEDE CRETACEOUS 1.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Diplopoda (Millipede) in Amber Burma Cretaceous Period (95 to 100 million years ago) This piece measures 15 mm long by 15 mm wide by 4 mm thick. Millipede is 8 mm. Millipedes are a group of arthropods that are characterised by having two pairs of jointed legs on most body segments; they are known scientifically as the class Diplopoda, the name being derived from this feature. Each double-legged segment is a result of two single segments fused together. Most millipedes have very elongated cylindrical or flattened bodies with more than 20 segments, while pill millipedes are shorter and can roll into a ball. Although the name "millipede" derives from the Latin for "thousand feet", no known species has 1,000; the record of 750 legs belongs to Illacme plenipes. There are approximately 12,000 named species classified into 16 orders and around 140 families, making Diplopoda the largest class of myriapods, an arthropod group which also includes centipedes and other multi-legged creatures. First appearing in the Silurian period, millipedes are some of the oldest known land animals. Some members of prehistoric groups grew to over 2 m (6 ft 7 in); the largest modern species reach maximum lengths of 27 to 38 cm (11 to 15 in). The longest extant species is the giant African millipede (Archispirostreptus gigas). Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Arthropoda Subphylum: Myriapoda Class: Diplopoda
  3. MILLIPEDE CRETACEOUS 1.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Diplopoda (Millipede) in Amber Burma Cretaceous Period (95 to 100 million years ago) This piece measures 15 mm long by 15 mm wide by 4 mm thick. Millipede is 8 mm. Millipedes are a group of arthropods that are characterised by having two pairs of jointed legs on most body segments; they are known scientifically as the class Diplopoda, the name being derived from this feature. Each double-legged segment is a result of two single segments fused together. Most millipedes have very elongated cylindrical or flattened bodies with more than 20 segments, while pill millipedes are shorter and can roll into a ball. Although the name "millipede" derives from the Latin for "thousand feet", no known species has 1,000; the record of 750 legs belongs to Illacme plenipes. There are approximately 12,000 named species classified into 16 orders and around 140 families, making Diplopoda the largest class of myriapods, an arthropod group which also includes centipedes and other multi-legged creatures. First appearing in the Silurian period, millipedes are some of the oldest known land animals. Some members of prehistoric groups grew to over 2 m (6 ft 7 in); the largest modern species reach maximum lengths of 27 to 38 cm (11 to 15 in). The longest extant species is the giant African millipede (Archispirostreptus gigas). Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Arthropoda Subphylum: Myriapoda Class: Diplopoda
  4. Prolylleceras peruvianum Ammonite 1.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Prolylleceras peruvianum Ammonite Huaraz Province Ancash, Peru Cretaceous Period (145-66 million years ago) Slightly compressed and high whorled with radiate to prorsiradiate, straight to flexuous ribs, with ribs continuous across venter or in some flattened on it at early growth stages. Ventrolateral and siphonal clavi subordinate to ribs. No lateral tubercles on primitive morphologies. Outer lateral punctiform to clavate tubercles in evolute species during middle growth, perhaps not disappearing completely on body chamber. Inner lateral punctiform tubercles in most evolute species restricted to young and middle growth stages. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Cephalopoda Subclass: †Ammonoidea Order: †Ammonitida Family: Prolyelliceratidae Genus: Prolylleceras Species: peruvianum
  5. Prolylleceras peruvianum Ammonite 1.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Prolylleceras peruvianum Ammonite Huaraz Province Ancash, Peru Cretaceous Period (145-66 million years ago) Slightly compressed and high whorled with radiate to prorsiradiate, straight to flexuous ribs, with ribs continuous across venter or in some flattened on it at early growth stages. Ventrolateral and siphonal clavi subordinate to ribs. No lateral tubercles on primitive morphologies. Outer lateral punctiform to clavate tubercles in evolute species during middle growth, perhaps not disappearing completely on body chamber. Inner lateral punctiform tubercles in most evolute species restricted to young and middle growth stages. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Cephalopoda Subclass: †Ammonoidea Order: †Ammonitida Family: Prolyelliceratidae Genus: Prolylleceras Species: peruvianum
  6. Prolylleceras peruvianum Ammonite 1.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Prolylleceras peruvianum Ammonite Huaraz Province Ancash, Peru Cretaceous Period (145-66 million years ago) Slightly compressed and high whorled with radiate to prorsiradiate, straight to flexuous ribs, with ribs continuous across venter or in some flattened on it at early growth stages. Ventrolateral and siphonal clavi subordinate to ribs. No lateral tubercles on primitive morphologies. Outer lateral punctiform to clavate tubercles in evolute species during middle growth, perhaps not disappearing completely on body chamber. Inner lateral punctiform tubercles in most evolute species restricted to young and middle growth stages. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Cephalopoda Subclass: †Ammonoidea Order: †Ammonitida Family: Prolyelliceratidae Genus: Prolylleceras Species: peruvianum
  7. Squalicorax Pristodontus 1.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Squalicorax pristodontus tooth Morocco Cretaceous Period (65 - 146 Million years ago) Squalicorax is a genus of extinct lamniform shark known to have lived during the Cretaceous period. These sharks are of medium size, up to 5 m (usually around 2 m) in length. Their bodies were similar to the modern gray sharks, but the shape of the teeth is strikingly similar to that of a tiger shark. The teeth are numerous, relatively small, with a curved crown and serrated, up to 2.5 – 3 cm in height (the only representative of the Mesozoic Lamniformes with serrated teeth). Large numbers of fossil teeth have been found in Europe, North Africa, and North America. Squalicorax was a coastal predator, but also scavenged as evidenced by a Squalicorax tooth found embedded in the metatarsal (foot) bone of a terrestrial hadrosaurid dinosaur that most likely died on land and ended up in the water. Other food sources included turtles, mosasaurs, ichthyodectes, and other bony fishes and sea creatures. Squalicorax pristodontus (Agassiz, 1843) is the largest species, more than 5 m long. From the size of its largest known teeth, it can be estimated that S. pristodontus grew to 5 m (16.5 ft) in length. It lived during the late Campanian to early Maastrichtian of North America, France, the Netherlands, Egypt, Morocco, and Madagascar. The relatively complete remains (vertebrae and fragments of jaws) have been found in marine sediments in North America. It is the species with the largest teeth, these teeth being loosely spaced and relatively very large in comparison with other species. In this genus of sharks studies have shown no precise correlation between the size of the teeth and the length of the body. They could eat relatively large prey and carrion. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Chondrichthyes Order: Lamniformes Family: †Anacoracidae Genus: †Squalicorax Species: †pristodontus
  8. Squalicorax Pristodontus 1.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Squalicorax pristodontus tooth Morocco Cretaceous Period (65 - 146 Million years ago) Squalicorax is a genus of extinct lamniform shark known to have lived during the Cretaceous period. These sharks are of medium size, up to 5 m (usually around 2 m) in length. Their bodies were similar to the modern gray sharks, but the shape of the teeth is strikingly similar to that of a tiger shark. The teeth are numerous, relatively small, with a curved crown and serrated, up to 2.5 – 3 cm in height (the only representative of the Mesozoic Lamniformes with serrated teeth). Large numbers of fossil teeth have been found in Europe, North Africa, and North America. Squalicorax was a coastal predator, but also scavenged as evidenced by a Squalicorax tooth found embedded in the metatarsal (foot) bone of a terrestrial hadrosaurid dinosaur that most likely died on land and ended up in the water. Other food sources included turtles, mosasaurs, ichthyodectes, and other bony fishes and sea creatures. Squalicorax pristodontus (Agassiz, 1843) is the largest species, more than 5 m long. From the size of its largest known teeth, it can be estimated that S. pristodontus grew to 5 m (16.5 ft) in length. It lived during the late Campanian to early Maastrichtian of North America, France, the Netherlands, Egypt, Morocco, and Madagascar. The relatively complete remains (vertebrae and fragments of jaws) have been found in marine sediments in North America. It is the species with the largest teeth, these teeth being loosely spaced and relatively very large in comparison with other species. In this genus of sharks studies have shown no precise correlation between the size of the teeth and the length of the body. They could eat relatively large prey and carrion. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Chondrichthyes Order: Lamniformes Family: †Anacoracidae Genus: †Squalicorax Species: †pristodontus
  9. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Carpopenaeus Callirostris Fossilized Shrimp SITE LOCATION: Hjoula, Byblos, Lebanon TIME PERIOD: Cretaceous Period (65 - 146 Million years ago) Data: Carpopenaeus is an extinct genus of prawn, which existed during the Upper Jurassic and Cretaceous periods. It contains three species. The Decapoda or decapods (literally "ten-footed") are an order of crustaceans within the class Malacostraca, including many familiar groups, such as crayfish, crabs, lobsters, prawns, and shrimp. Most decapods are scavengers. The order is estimated to contain nearly 15,000 species in around 2,700 genera, with around 3,300 fossil species. The Entire specimen measures 3 inches long and 1 cm thick. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Arthropoda Class: Malacostraca Order: Decapoda Family: †Carpopenaeidae Garassino, 1994 Genus: †Carpopenaeus Species: †callirostris
  10. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Carpopenaeus Callirostris Fossilized Shrimp SITE LOCATION: Hjoula, Byblos, Lebanon TIME PERIOD: Cretaceous Period (65 - 146 Million years ago) Data: Carpopenaeus is an extinct genus of prawn, which existed during the Upper Jurassic and Cretaceous periods. It contains three species. The Decapoda or decapods (literally "ten-footed") are an order of crustaceans within the class Malacostraca, including many familiar groups, such as crayfish, crabs, lobsters, prawns, and shrimp. Most decapods are scavengers. The order is estimated to contain nearly 15,000 species in around 2,700 genera, with around 3,300 fossil species. The Entire specimen measures 3 inches long and 1 cm thick. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Arthropoda Class: Malacostraca Order: Decapoda Family: †Carpopenaeidae Garassino, 1994 Genus: †Carpopenaeus Species: †callirostris
  11. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Carpopenaeus Callirostris Fossilized Shrimp SITE LOCATION: Hjoula, Byblos, Lebanon TIME PERIOD: Cretaceous Period (65 - 146 Million years ago) Data: Carpopenaeus is an extinct genus of prawn, which existed during the Upper Jurassic and Cretaceous periods. It contains three species. The Decapoda or decapods (literally "ten-footed") are an order of crustaceans within the class Malacostraca, including many familiar groups, such as crayfish, crabs, lobsters, prawns, and shrimp. Most decapods are scavengers. The order is estimated to contain nearly 15,000 species in around 2,700 genera, with around 3,300 fossil species. The Entire specimen measures 3 inches long and 1 cm thick. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Arthropoda Class: Malacostraca Order: Decapoda Family: †Carpopenaeidae Garassino, 1994 Genus: †Carpopenaeus Species: †callirostris
  12. Spinosaurus aegypticus Tooth.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Spinosaurus aegyptiacus Tooth Fossil SITE LOCATION: North Africa TIME PERIOD: Cretaceous Period (80.5 -66 million years ago) Data: Spinosaurus is a genus of theropod dinosaur which lived in what is now North Africa, from the lower Albian to lower Cenomanian stages of the Cretaceous period, about 112 to 97 million years ago. This genus was first known from Egyptian remains discovered in 1912 and described by German paleontologist Ernst Stromer in 1915. The best known species is S. aegyptiacus from Egypt, although a potential second species S. maroccanus has been recovered from Morocco. Spinosaurus may be the largest of all known carnivorous dinosaurs, even larger than Tyrannosaurus and Giganotosaurus. Estimates published in 2005 and 2007 suggest that it was 12.6 to 18 metres (41 to 59 ft) in length and 7 to 20.9 tonnes (7.7 to 23.0 short tons) in weight. The skull of Spinosaurus was long and narrow like that of a modern crocodilian. Spinosaurus is known to have eaten fish; evidence suggests that it lived both on land and in water like a modern crocodilian. The distinctive spines of Spinosaurus, which were long extensions of the vertebrae, grew to at least 1.65 meters (5.4 ft) long and were likely to have had skin connecting them, forming a sail-like structure, although some authors have suggested that the spines were covered in fat and formed a hump. Multiple functions have been put forward for this structure, including thermoregulation and display. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Dinosauria Order: Saurischia Family: †Spinosauridae Genus: †Spinosaurus Species: †aegyptiacus
  13. Elasmosaur vertebrae 1.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Elasmosaur vertebrae SITE LOCATION: Morocco TIME PERIOD: Cretaceous Period (80.5 -66 million years ago) Data: Elasmosaurus is a genus of plesiosaur lived in North America in the Late Cretaceous period (Campanian stage), 80.5 million years ago. The first specimen was discovered near Fort Wallace, Kansas, and were sent to the American paleontologist Edward Drinker Cope, who named it E. platyurus in 1868. The generic name means "thin-plate reptile", and the specific name platyurus means "flat-tailed". Cope originally reconstructed the skeleton of Elasmosaurus with the skull at the end of the tail, an error which was made light of by the paleontologist Othniel Charles Marsh, and became part of their "Bone Wars" rivalry. Only one incomplete Elasmosaurus skeleton is known, and a single species is recognised today; other species are now considered invalid or have been moved to other genera. Elasmosaurus was 10.3 metres (34 ft) long, and would have had a streamlined body with paddle-like limbs, a short tail, small head, and an extremely long neck. Along with its relative Albertonectes, it was one of the longest-necked animals to have lived, with the largest amount of neck vertebrae known, 72. The skull would have been slender and triangular, with large, fang-like teeth at the front, and smaller teeth towards the back. It had six teeth in each premaxilla of the upper jaw, and may have had 14 teeth in the maxilla ad 19 in the dentary of the lower jaw. Most of the neck vertebrae were compressed sideways, and bore a longitudinal crest or keel along the sides. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Reptilia Order: †Plesiosauria Family: †Elasmosauridae Genus: †Elasmosaurus
  14. Elasmosaur vertebrae 1.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Elasmosaur vertebrae SITE LOCATION: Morocco TIME PERIOD: Cretaceous Period (80.5 -66 million years ago) Data: Elasmosaurus is a genus of plesiosaur lived in North America in the Late Cretaceous period (Campanian stage), 80.5 million years ago. The first specimen was discovered near Fort Wallace, Kansas, and were sent to the American paleontologist Edward Drinker Cope, who named it E. platyurus in 1868. The generic name means "thin-plate reptile", and the specific name platyurus means "flat-tailed". Cope originally reconstructed the skeleton of Elasmosaurus with the skull at the end of the tail, an error which was made light of by the paleontologist Othniel Charles Marsh, and became part of their "Bone Wars" rivalry. Only one incomplete Elasmosaurus skeleton is known, and a single species is recognised today; other species are now considered invalid or have been moved to other genera. Elasmosaurus was 10.3 metres (34 ft) long, and would have had a streamlined body with paddle-like limbs, a short tail, small head, and an extremely long neck. Along with its relative Albertonectes, it was one of the longest-necked animals to have lived, with the largest amount of neck vertebrae known, 72. The skull would have been slender and triangular, with large, fang-like teeth at the front, and smaller teeth towards the back. It had six teeth in each premaxilla of the upper jaw, and may have had 14 teeth in the maxilla ad 19 in the dentary of the lower jaw. Most of the neck vertebrae were compressed sideways, and bore a longitudinal crest or keel along the sides. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Reptilia Order: †Plesiosauria Family: †Elasmosauridae Genus: †Elasmosaurus
  15. Elasmosaur vertebrae 1.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Elasmosaur vertebrae SITE LOCATION: Morocco TIME PERIOD: Cretaceous Period (80.5 -66 million years ago) Data: Elasmosaurus is a genus of plesiosaur lived in North America in the Late Cretaceous period (Campanian stage), 80.5 million years ago. The first specimen was discovered near Fort Wallace, Kansas, and were sent to the American paleontologist Edward Drinker Cope, who named it E. platyurus in 1868. The generic name means "thin-plate reptile", and the specific name platyurus means "flat-tailed". Cope originally reconstructed the skeleton of Elasmosaurus with the skull at the end of the tail, an error which was made light of by the paleontologist Othniel Charles Marsh, and became part of their "Bone Wars" rivalry. Only one incomplete Elasmosaurus skeleton is known, and a single species is recognised today; other species are now considered invalid or have been moved to other genera. Elasmosaurus was 10.3 metres (34 ft) long, and would have had a streamlined body with paddle-like limbs, a short tail, small head, and an extremely long neck. Along with its relative Albertonectes, it was one of the longest-necked animals to have lived, with the largest amount of neck vertebrae known, 72. The skull would have been slender and triangular, with large, fang-like teeth at the front, and smaller teeth towards the back. It had six teeth in each premaxilla of the upper jaw, and may have had 14 teeth in the maxilla ad 19 in the dentary of the lower jaw. Most of the neck vertebrae were compressed sideways, and bore a longitudinal crest or keel along the sides. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Reptilia Order: †Plesiosauria Family: †Elasmosauridae Genus: †Elasmosaurus
  16. Plesiosaur Tooth in Matrix 1.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Plesiosaur Tooth in Matrix SITE LOCATION: Genntour Basin Phosphate Deposits in Khouribga, Morocco TIME PERIOD: Cretaceous Period (80.5 -66 million years ago) Data: The Plesiosauria ( plesios, meaning "near to" and Sauria) or plesiosaurs are an order or clade of Mesozoic marine reptiles (marine Sauropsida), belonging to the Sauropterygia. Plesiosaurs first appeared in the latest Triassic Period, possibly in the Rhaetian stage.They became especially common during the Jurassic Period, thriving until their disappearance due to the Cretaceous–Paleogene extinction event at the end of the Cretaceous Period. They had a worldwide oceanic distribution. Plesiosaurs were among the first fossil reptiles discovered. In the beginning of the nineteenth century, scientists realised how distinctive their build was and they were named as a separate order in 1835. The first plesiosaurian genus, the eponymous Plesiosaurus, was named in 1821. Since then, more than a hundred valid species have been described. In the early twenty-first century, the number of discoveries has increased, leading to an improved understanding of their anatomy, relationships and way of life. Plesiosaurs had a broad flat body and a short tail. Their limbs had evolved into four long flippers, which were powered by strong muscles attached to wide bony plates formed by the shoulder girdle and the pelvis. The flippers made a flying movement through the water. Plesiosaurs breathed air, and bore live young; there are indications that they were warm-blooded. Plesiosaurs showed two main morphological types. Some species, with the "plesiosauromorph" build, had (sometimes extremely) long necks and small heads; these were relatively slow and caught small sea animals. Other species, some of them reaching a length of up to seventeen metres, had the "pliosauromorph" build with a short neck and a large head; these were apex predators, fast hunters of large prey. The two types are related to the traditional strict division of the Plesiosauria into two suborders, the long-necked Plesiosauroidea and the short-neck Pliosauroidea. Modern research, however, indicates that several "long-necked" groups might have had some short-necked members or vice versa. Therefore the purely descriptive terms "plesiosauromorph" and "pliosauromorph" have been introduced, which do not imply a direct relationship. "Plesiosauroidea" and "Pliosauroidea" today have a more limited meaning. The term "plesiosaur" is properly used to refer to the Plesiosauria as a whole, but informally it is sometimes meant to indicate only the long-necked forms, the old Plesiosauroidea. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Reptilia Order: †Plesiosauria Family: †Plesiosauridae Genus: †Plesiosaurus
  17. Plesiosaur Tooth in Matrix 1.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Plesiosaur Tooth in Matrix SITE LOCATION: Genntour Basin Phosphate Deposits in Khouribga, Morocco TIME PERIOD: Cretaceous Period (80.5 -66 million years ago) Data: The Plesiosauria ( plesios, meaning "near to" and Sauria) or plesiosaurs are an order or clade of Mesozoic marine reptiles (marine Sauropsida), belonging to the Sauropterygia. Plesiosaurs first appeared in the latest Triassic Period, possibly in the Rhaetian stage.They became especially common during the Jurassic Period, thriving until their disappearance due to the Cretaceous–Paleogene extinction event at the end of the Cretaceous Period. They had a worldwide oceanic distribution. Plesiosaurs were among the first fossil reptiles discovered. In the beginning of the nineteenth century, scientists realised how distinctive their build was and they were named as a separate order in 1835. The first plesiosaurian genus, the eponymous Plesiosaurus, was named in 1821. Since then, more than a hundred valid species have been described. In the early twenty-first century, the number of discoveries has increased, leading to an improved understanding of their anatomy, relationships and way of life. Plesiosaurs had a broad flat body and a short tail. Their limbs had evolved into four long flippers, which were powered by strong muscles attached to wide bony plates formed by the shoulder girdle and the pelvis. The flippers made a flying movement through the water. Plesiosaurs breathed air, and bore live young; there are indications that they were warm-blooded. Plesiosaurs showed two main morphological types. Some species, with the "plesiosauromorph" build, had (sometimes extremely) long necks and small heads; these were relatively slow and caught small sea animals. Other species, some of them reaching a length of up to seventeen metres, had the "pliosauromorph" build with a short neck and a large head; these were apex predators, fast hunters of large prey. The two types are related to the traditional strict division of the Plesiosauria into two suborders, the long-necked Plesiosauroidea and the short-neck Pliosauroidea. Modern research, however, indicates that several "long-necked" groups might have had some short-necked members or vice versa. Therefore the purely descriptive terms "plesiosauromorph" and "pliosauromorph" have been introduced, which do not imply a direct relationship. "Plesiosauroidea" and "Pliosauroidea" today have a more limited meaning. The term "plesiosaur" is properly used to refer to the Plesiosauria as a whole, but informally it is sometimes meant to indicate only the long-necked forms, the old Plesiosauroidea. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Reptilia Order: †Plesiosauria Family: †Plesiosauridae Genus: †Plesiosaurus
  18. Porocystis globularis a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Porocystis globularis SITE LOCATION: Texas TIME PERIOD: Cretaceous Period (66-145 Million Years ago) Data: Some feel this is an algae; algal fruiting body, some argue Flora vs. fauna. It looks more like a cystoid rather than crinoid. Initially considered belonging to the Bryozoa actually is considered an algal fruiting body. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Chlorophyta Class: Dasycladophyceae Order: Dasycladales Family: incertae sedis Genus: Porocystis Species: globularis
  19. Porocystis globularis a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Porocystis globularis SITE LOCATION: Texas TIME PERIOD: Cretaceous Period (66-145 Million Years ago) Data: Some feel this is an algae; algal fruiting body, some argue Flora vs. fauna. It looks more like a cystoid rather than crinoid. Initially considered belonging to the Bryozoa actually is considered an algal fruiting body. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Chlorophyta Class: Dasycladophyceae Order: Dasycladales Family: incertae sedis Genus: Porocystis Species: globularis
  20. Baculite Fossil Segment Fossil a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Baculite Segment Fossil SITE LOCATION: South Dakota TIME PERIOD: Cretaceous Period (66-145 Million Years ago) Data: Baculites ("walking stick rock") is an extinct genus of cephalopods with a nearly straight shell, included in the heteromorph ammonites. The genus, which lived worldwide throughout most of the Late Cretaceous, was named by Lamarck in 1799. The adult shell of Baculites is generally straight and may be either smooth or with sinuous striae or ribbing that typically slant dorso-ventrally forward. The aperture likewise slopes to the front and has a sinuous margin. The venter is narrowly rounded to acute while the dorsum is more broad. The juvenile shell, found at the apex, is coiled in one or two whorls and described as minute, about a centimeter in diameter. Adult Baculites ranged in size from about seven centimeters (Baculites larsoni) up to two meters in length. As with other ammonites, the shell consisted of a series of camerae, or chambers, that were connected to the animal by a narrow tube called a siphuncle by which gas content and thereby buoyancy could be regulated in the same manner as Nautilus does today. The chambers are separated by walls called septa. The line where each septum meets the outer shell is called the suture or suture line. Like other true ammonites, Baculites have intricate suture patterns on their shells that can be used to identify different species. One notable feature about Baculites is that the males may have been a third to a half the size of the females and may have had much lighter ribbing on the surface of the shell. The shell morphology of Baculites with slanted striations or ribbing, similarly slanted aperture, and more narrowly rounded to acute keel-like venter points to its having had a horizontal orientation in life as an adult. This same type of cross section is found in much earlier nautiloids such as Bassleroceras and Clitendoceras from the Ordovician period, which can be shown to have had a horizontal orientation. In spite of this, some researchers have concluded that Baculites lived in a vertical orientation, head hanging straight down, since lacking an apical counterweight, movement was largely restricted to that direction. More recent research, notably by Gerd Westermann, has reaffirmed that at least some Baculites species in fact lived in a more or less horizontal orientation. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Cephalopoda Order: †Ammonitida Family: †Baculitidae Genus: †Baculites
  21. Baculite Fossil Segment Fossil a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Baculite Segment Fossil SITE LOCATION: South Dakota TIME PERIOD: Cretaceous Period (66-145 Million Years ago) Data: Baculites ("walking stick rock") is an extinct genus of cephalopods with a nearly straight shell, included in the heteromorph ammonites. The genus, which lived worldwide throughout most of the Late Cretaceous, was named by Lamarck in 1799. The adult shell of Baculites is generally straight and may be either smooth or with sinuous striae or ribbing that typically slant dorso-ventrally forward. The aperture likewise slopes to the front and has a sinuous margin. The venter is narrowly rounded to acute while the dorsum is more broad. The juvenile shell, found at the apex, is coiled in one or two whorls and described as minute, about a centimeter in diameter. Adult Baculites ranged in size from about seven centimeters (Baculites larsoni) up to two meters in length. As with other ammonites, the shell consisted of a series of camerae, or chambers, that were connected to the animal by a narrow tube called a siphuncle by which gas content and thereby buoyancy could be regulated in the same manner as Nautilus does today. The chambers are separated by walls called septa. The line where each septum meets the outer shell is called the suture or suture line. Like other true ammonites, Baculites have intricate suture patterns on their shells that can be used to identify different species. One notable feature about Baculites is that the males may have been a third to a half the size of the females and may have had much lighter ribbing on the surface of the shell. The shell morphology of Baculites with slanted striations or ribbing, similarly slanted aperture, and more narrowly rounded to acute keel-like venter points to its having had a horizontal orientation in life as an adult. This same type of cross section is found in much earlier nautiloids such as Bassleroceras and Clitendoceras from the Ordovician period, which can be shown to have had a horizontal orientation. In spite of this, some researchers have concluded that Baculites lived in a vertical orientation, head hanging straight down, since lacking an apical counterweight, movement was largely restricted to that direction. More recent research, notably by Gerd Westermann, has reaffirmed that at least some Baculites species in fact lived in a more or less horizontal orientation. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Cephalopoda Order: †Ammonitida Family: †Baculitidae Genus: †Baculites
  22. is this a ray tooth and scute and also any help on what appears to be a tooth......
  23. i assume bone? big brook nj

    I assume bone and probably cant be id,but any input thanks
  24. Please id possible tooth thank you

    please if you guys could help id thank you....
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