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Found 11 results

  1. Crinoid from Fern Glenn For, Missouri

    Hi everyone, I was out on a collecting trip this weekend around the Fern Glenn Fm, St Louis, Missouri. I came across this which I think is Crinoid related but I've never seen one with the little spikes sticking out. It's about 3/8th inch diameter by about 3/16 inch thick. Can anyone give me any ideas of the species. Thank you
  2. Help iD please

    Hi everyone. I have this specimen I picked up at a Fossil show. It looks to me like crinoid Stem very and a Stern impression. It was provided for auction at southern Illinois fossil show which I paid $1 and was provided from a Fossil club somewhere in Southern Illinois. Please could I find out exactly what it is and if my ID is correct. On the other side is a groove about 1 inch long and also head grooves like Stem impressions. Thank you
  3. When we purchased our home, this large rock was one of many in a rock garden. I have always liked the unusual look of it. There are several brachiopod fragments and what I believe to be crinoid stems and imprints in it. I would like to know which type of rock it is and how the crinoid stem crystallized?
  4. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Crinoid Stem Showing Interior Structure SITE LOCATION: Fort Payne Chert Formation, Alabama TIME PERIOD: Mississippian Period ca 350,000,000 yrs old Data: A crinoid stem. Crinoids are marine animals that make up the class Crinoidea of the echinoderms (phylum Echinodermata). The name comes from the Greek word krinon, "a lily", and eidos, "form". They live in both shallow water and in depths as great as 9,000 meters (30,000 ft). Those crinoids which in their adult form are attached to the sea bottom by a stalk are commonly called sea lilies. The unstalked forms are called feather stars or comatulids. Crinoids are characterised by a mouth on the top surface that is surrounded by feeding arms. They have a U-shaped gut, and their anus is located next to the mouth. Although the basic echinoderm pattern of fivefold symmetry can be recognised, most crinoids have many more than five arms. Crinoids usually have a stem used to attach themselves to a substrate, but many live attached only as juveniles and become free-swimming as adults. There are only about 600 extant crinoid species, but they were much more abundant and diverse in the past. Some thick limestone beds dating to the mid- to late-Paleozoic are almost entirely made up of disarticulated crinoid fragments. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Echinodermata Class: Cridoidea
  5. Thick Crinoid Stem in Matrix.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Thick Crinoid Stem in Matrix Fort Payne Chert Formation, Alabama TIME PERIOD: Mississippian Period ca 350,000,000 yrs old Data: A crinoid stem. Crinoids are marine animals that make up the class Crinoidea of the echinoderms (phylum Echinodermata). The name comes from the Greek word krinon, "a lily", and eidos, "form". They live in both shallow water and in depths as great as 9,000 meters (30,000 ft). Those crinoids which in their adult form are attached to the sea bottom by a stalk are commonly called sea lilies. The unstalked forms are called feather stars or comatulids. Crinoids are characterised by a mouth on the top surface that is surrounded by feeding arms. They have a U-shaped gut, and their anus is located next to the mouth. Although the basic echinoderm pattern of fivefold symmetry can be recognised, most crinoids have many more than five arms. Crinoids usually have a stem used to attach themselves to a substrate, but many live attached only as juveniles and become free-swimming as adults. There are only about 600 extant crinoid species, but they were much more abundant and diverse in the past. Some thick limestone beds dating to the mid- to late-Paleozoic are almost entirely made up of disarticulated crinoid fragments. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Echinodermata Class: Cridoidea
  6. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Crinoid Stem in Matrix Fort Payne Formation, Alabama Mississippian Period ca 325,000,000 yrs old A crinoid stem in matrix, with other stem sections. Crinoids are marine animals that make up the class Crinoidea of the echinoderms (phylum Echinodermata). The name comes from the Greek word krinon, "a lily", and eidos, "form". They live in both shallow water and in depths as great as 9,000 meters (30,000 ft). Those crinoids which in their adult form are attached to the sea bottom by a stalk are commonly called sea lilies. The unstalked forms are called feather stars or comatulids. Crinoids are characterised by a mouth on the top surface that is surrounded by feeding arms. They have a U-shaped gut, and their anus is located next to the mouth. Although the basic echinoderm pattern of fivefold symmetry can be recognised, most crinoids have many more than five arms. Crinoids usually have a stem used to attach themselves to a substrate, but many live attached only as juveniles and become free-swimming as adults. There are only about 600 extant crinoid species, but they were much more abundant and diverse in the past. Some thick limestone beds dating to the mid- to late-Paleozoic are almost entirely made up of disarticulated crinoid fragments. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Echinodermata Class: Cridoidea
  7. I'm not sure what this is

    I'm just not sure what this is.I have a friend that said its a crinoid stem .. but this doesn't look anything at all like a stem that I can see about it. Can someone id this please? I see what appears to be legs on this on both sides. I've found stems before but I've not ever seen this if it is a crinoid stem... ¿¿¿
  8. I was looking through a bunch of Thylacocrinus stem pieces looking for interesting encrusters for tradebait, and ran across something I didn't notice before. These photos are of 2 different stem pieces: My first thought was Constellaria, but (to my knowledge) that only occurs in the Ordovician, and is much larger. These are Middle Devonian (Kashong Fm.), and the whole image is less than 1 cm across, probably around 6 mm (I didn't have a measure handy). Anyone have any thoughts?
  9. Seirocrinus

    From the album Holzmaden

    Detailed image of: http://www.thefossil...94-seirocrinus/
  10. Seirocrinus

    From the album Holzmaden

    A Crinoid stem (Seirocrinus) from Holzmaden.
  11. Mississippian Crinoid Calyx

    I found a real treat, I think. I believe this is a crinoid calyx. It's very light weight, hollow, with maybe a few calcium crystals within. Would u call this matrix mineralized?
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