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Found 10 results

  1. Crinoids in epoxy

    This is more a piece of artwork than a prep job. In my area they excavate Belgian blue hardstone and is used a lot in buildings. This is a durable crinoidic limestone from the early carboniferous ( Tournaisian ). I've colected multiple times in one of those quarries, and in some layers you can find countles crinoid stems. Now I had the idea to use a discarded piece of this crinoidic limestone and make a hole in the middle , I filled up the hole with transparant epoxy in multimple layers and between each layer I droped a few of the crinoid stem's that can be found in the stone. I pollished both sides of the piece so that you could see through the stone and the fossils in the epoxy to create the idea that you can see through the stone and see the fossils in the limestone.
  2. Hello, I’m hoping someone will identify some of the fragments on this hash plate for me. It appears to be mostly crinoid stems? It is from my yard in middle Tennessee.
  3. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Thin Crinoid Stems showing attachment nodes for cirri SITE LOCATION: Fort Payne Chert Formation, Alabama TIME PERIOD: Mississippian Period ca 350,000,000 yrs old Data: A crinoid stem. Crinoids are marine animals that make up the class Crinoidea of the echinoderms (phylum Echinodermata). The name comes from the Greek word krinon, "a lily", and eidos, "form". They live in both shallow water and in depths as great as 9,000 meters (30,000 ft). Those crinoids which in their adult form are attached to the sea bottom by a stalk are commonly called sea lilies. The unstalked forms are called feather stars or comatulids. Crinoids are characterised by a mouth on the top surface that is surrounded by feeding arms. They have a U-shaped gut, and their anus is located next to the mouth. Although the basic echinoderm pattern of fivefold symmetry can be recognised, most crinoids have many more than five arms. Crinoids usually have a stem used to attach themselves to a substrate, but many live attached only as juveniles and become free-swimming as adults. There are only about 600 extant crinoid species, but they were much more abundant and diverse in the past. Some thick limestone beds dating to the mid- to late-Paleozoic are almost entirely made up of disarticulated crinoid fragments. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Echinodermata Class: Cridoidea
  4. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Crinoid Stems (Two views) Fort Payne Formation, Alabama Mississippian Period ca 325,000,000 yrs old A group of crinoid stems. Crinoids are marine animals that make up the class Crinoidea of the echinoderms (phylum Echinodermata). The name comes from the Greek word krinon, "a lily", and eidos, "form". They live in both shallow water and in depths as great as 9,000 meters (30,000 ft). Those crinoids which in their adult form are attached to the sea bottom by a stalk are commonly called sea lilies. The unstalked forms are called feather stars or comatulids. Crinoids are characterised by a mouth on the top surface that is surrounded by feeding arms. They have a U-shaped gut, and their anus is located next to the mouth. Although the basic echinoderm pattern of fivefold symmetry can be recognised, most crinoids have many more than five arms. Crinoids usually have a stem used to attach themselves to a substrate, but many live attached only as juveniles and become free-swimming as adults. There are only about 600 extant crinoid species, but they were much more abundant and diverse in the past. Some thick limestone beds dating to the mid- to late-Paleozoic are almost entirely made up of disarticulated crinoid fragments. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Echinodermata Class: Cridoidea
  5. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Crinoid Stems (Two views) Fort Payne Formation, Alabama Mississippian Period ca 325,000,000 yrs old A group of crinoid stems. Crinoids are marine animals that make up the class Crinoidea of the echinoderms (phylum Echinodermata). The name comes from the Greek word krinon, "a lily", and eidos, "form". They live in both shallow water and in depths as great as 9,000 meters (30,000 ft). Those crinoids which in their adult form are attached to the sea bottom by a stalk are commonly called sea lilies. The unstalked forms are called feather stars or comatulids. Crinoids are characterised by a mouth on the top surface that is surrounded by feeding arms. They have a U-shaped gut, and their anus is located next to the mouth. Although the basic echinoderm pattern of fivefold symmetry can be recognised, most crinoids have many more than five arms. Crinoids usually have a stem used to attach themselves to a substrate, but many live attached only as juveniles and become free-swimming as adults. There are only about 600 extant crinoid species, but they were much more abundant and diverse in the past. Some thick limestone beds dating to the mid- to late-Paleozoic are almost entirely made up of disarticulated crinoid fragments. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Echinodermata Class: Cridoidea
  6. New finds from Heidenheim

    On the 26.12.2016 i was in the quarry Moldenberg near Heidenheim an der Brenz. There you can find fossils from the white jurassic. Besides of this highlight: http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/70839-what-is-this/ I also found many brachiopods, bivalves, crinoid stems, bryozoans ... First some pictures of the quarry: Its was a very cold and dark day so shadefully they are not that nice... Now the "real" quarry: And the view on a part of the city Heidenheim:
  7. I received several small Rugose Coral from member Herb to make microscope thin sections.. This is the first completed slide. There should be at least six or seven more slides in the collection. This slide is from the Pennsylvanian formation in Mineral Wells TX, USA Geologic age: Phanerozoic | Paleozoic There were six fossils in this group. The largest is the subject of this post. This is a slice of the specimen through the centre. This shows the cell structure of the Rugose Coral and the minerals that replaced the soft part of the Coral. A web version of this post may be found here.
  8. My First Fossil

    From the album Mine

    Crinoidea, limestone, found in Arizona
  9. Pennsylvanian Micros From Texas

    Because I now have a semi-reliable and decent microfossil photographing system, I will post on the micros I have that I collected a while ago. These are from the Pennsylvanian, and were collected in Brownwood, Texas. Though it doesn't show up in the pictures the fossils are a pinkish-brown color. Most of the material was made up of three different fossils: fusulinids, bryozoan colonies, and crinoid stems. There were a few broken brachiopod shells in it as well. Here are the fusulinids: Here are the bryozoans: And last are the crinoids: The material was so fossiliferous that in a small bag, I have already found at least two tablespoons of each of these three micros. I haven't even finished going through the bag yet. Oh, and another interesting non-fossil find was a few prickly pear cactus seeds! I don't know why they were in there, but I thought that that was kind of funny.
  10. Partridge Point, Alpena

    I've just started looking for fossils around the Alpena area, where I live recently and thought I'd share a spot I just explored today. I bought my son the book, "Lake Huron Rock Picker's Guide" by Bruce Mueller and Kevin Gauthier and read that Partridge Point is a good place to find fossils. To get there, take US-23 to Partridge Point Road. If you enter on the south part of the road closest to Squaw Bay, it's 1.6 miles to a two-track road going to the beach. Although I drive a Jeep, I decided not to drive down the two-track because there was a very large ice covered puddle that I didn't think I'd make it through. It's just a short walk to the water. My daughter went off looking for a geocache in the area while my son and I went looking for fossils. At first, we went toward Squaw Bay to the south and found lots of limestone, but very few fossils. As we worked our way to the north, toward Alpena, we found that almost every rock contained fossils. We found tons of crinoid stems. I didn't know what those were about two weeks ago, but they were everywhere and easy to recognize. At first I thought my son was showing me part of an old bolt though. We also found some shells, which I believe are called brachiopods and some coral. I didn't find any Petoskey stones though. We picked rocks just up from the water line and also where the old water line was. You can see where the water was before the Lake Huron water level dropped so low about 15 years ago. Everything is flat and then you'll see a small hill or berm. There may be better places to find fossils, but those are the places we found the most.
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