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Found 375 results

  1. Help Id'ing Crawfordsville Crinoid

    Hello, I recently unpacked from an old collection this crinoid specimen from Crawfordsville Indiana. I would appreciate any help identifying species. The slab measures 13 x 14 cm, the detail is 7 x 6 cm. Thank you!
  2. This is my first post in the Fossil ID section - I am SO excited to find this resource! A have found a few very helpful folks in other places, but this group is a huge wealth of information! A bit of background - we moved into a house just outside of the city limits of Huntsville, AL, a couple of months ago. After finding a couple of fossils laying around in the yard, I decided to investigate the wooded area at the back of our property a bit more. Whoa!!! There is a creek bed on the property and the closer you walk to the creek the more rocks you have to walk over. Every single rock I picked up had some kind of fossil in it. The sides of the creek have rocks embedded in them, too. It seems like someone may have looked around a bit in the past (found a small pile of rocks) but many (MANY) of these rocks are in their natural state. Most of them, in fact. It seems overwhelming to me, but I have been delving into understanding the treasures I am finding. I don't understand all of the classification systems, but I found a place online that seems to indicate that we are in the Mississipian Age? The rocks which have been identified so far are all limestone, so I am assuming this one is limestone as well. The soil is VERY red (someone called it ochre red?) and some of it always remains on the rocks after I clean them. The fossils that have been identified so far are fenestella, bryzoan, crinoid. And I think the word fossiliferous was also used? I am a photographer by trade and macro photography is my FAVORITE, so I will post plenty of photos. This particular rock is a very small one compared to most of them. It is also harder than the other ones I have worked with - less "crumbly". The first couple of photos are of the top and the bottom of the rock, to get a general idea of the size and shape of it. The rest of the images are close ups of various areas. Any and all input is appreciated! Is it common to find an area like this where rocks such as this one are very abundant? From what I can tell these are all common fossils, but a great springboard for learning! Hints on how to clean and store the rocks appreciated, too, since there are so very many of them? Thanks!! Ramona
  3. Crinoidal Holdfast?

    Here is a picture of what I believe to be a crinoidal holfast on a brachiopod shell. This is very small (scale on the side are mm's) but I thought it was pretty neat looking. I found this while cleaning some of my material I collected earlier this year from the Haragan Formation (Lower Devonian) near Clarita, Oklahoma. When I first saw it, I thought: "this looks like a little starfish", then I learned to count! So I am assuming this a a holdfast, but I am wondering if anyone can : 1) confirm that; 2) provide any more precise ID; 3) point me to any references that might help. I have gone through Oklahoma Geological Survey Circular 55 on crinoids, but did not see anything like it (it doesn't have much on holdfasts, no surprise). Thanks for any help anyone can offer.
  4. An acquaintance of mine bought this at the Tucson gem and mineral show two years ago. He is now interested in selling and I am interested in buying. The price seems fair but of course the big question....is it real? I may add is it all real, is it a composite of different pieces, or is it a fabrication/replica? The whole piece is close to 15 inches at the tallest point, and close to 13 inches at the widest point. Thank you for your help.
  5. Big Hill (KY) geology and fossil expedition 11-2-2019 video link Kentucky Academy of Science Saturday afternoon activity: Quartz infilling identified by Dr. Frank Ettensohn, expedition host Stylolites identified by Dr. Frank Ettensohn Archimedes bryozoan identified by Mr. Daniel J. Phelps Mr. Phelps describes crinoid, brachiopod (Composita) and modern isopods=pill bugs or rolly pollies Crinoid stem columnals described by Darrell Barnes in rock detritus collection site (Mark Montgomery interacts) Dr. Frank Ettensohn identifies the spine of a crinoid by Darrell Barnes
  6. Real or Fake? Crinoid

    Hello, we asked some of our friends to see if they could find us a nice fossil overseas. It was meant as a surprise for me from my parents, so we couldn't see the fossil beforehand. First of all, they say the fossil is "painted" to bring out its features, this already sounds very fishy. Secondly, the rock it is on looks like an igneous rock, I thought the fossil baring rocks where supposed to be sedimentary. They took the fossil to different stores to verify its authenticity, but few people said it looked fake. I would like to know because it was quite expensive for an ameture fossil collector, and especially for a fake! If it is real, which is doubtable, then is there any way to remove the paint?
  7. I finished prepping the lot of crinoid stems recently. It took quite a while to complete as I was using only an engraver, picks and brushes. I was told later that I could have soaked it in vinegar to remove most of the matrix. Is that true?
  8. still learning

    Sorry I haven't been on the forum in a while since I've been working like crazy. After a 71 hour week last week I took a day off. My new job is a driving job around my local area so I make notes of places to revisit to rockhound ( I also do some while on layover time but its hard not to get dirty!). I went back to one today, It is a Bralier Shale (Devonian) exposure. Here's where I need some help. Are the tube things #3 corals or bryozoans? Any id's on the other things would be appreciated. Scale on all is centimeter.
  9. Again, thank goodness for cameras and closeups!! I thougth this was a large orbitolina when I found it, but noticed that there was an odd pattern on the underside. I just figured it had some strange mishape. But then I was looking through @Uncle Siphuncle's Fossil collecting reports and ran across something that looked very similar - floating crinoid Peocilocrinus but they were from the Paw Paw formation in North Texas and this is from the lower Glen Rose in Central Texas. So I realized i needed to get a better picture and lo and behold....it has interesting pattern on the backside!! I remembered a picture I had seen of a starfish dermal plate or something that had these same striations on it. Can anyone help me ID? @erose or @JohnJ? Thanks for your time!! close up
  10. Complete Crinoid I'd

    I Found this last week on what I believe some call Michigan mud stone? I do not see visible arms and prefer not to disturb it. I also find no ready history of such finds for this S. W. Michigan County. 2 3/8 in or 62 mm long. Bob
  11. Fossil Sites

    Look for places to hunt on hwy 2 from Rockford to Dixo as I'm in area for a day and want to kill time looking for fossils. Any helps would be appreciated. Thanks! Mike. P.s. I'm fine with you want to tag up with me. It'll be nice to have a partner to show me around.
  12. Crinoid stems or something else?

    My fiance' found this in a pile of river gravel. Shes trying to find out if it's a crinoid stem, or a piece of a crinoid or possibly something else. Found in New Haven Missouri .
  13. I bought this along with several other pieces boxed together at a garage sale. The whole piece is 7 inches by nearly 4 inches. The starfish is close to 5 inches longest tip to longest tip. I'm not an expert in any area but it was easy enough for me to distinguish the real ammonites and small trilobites etc. from the few that were enhanced or clearly replicas. I'm a little unsure on this piece, though my gut tells me it is not a genuine fossil. When looking at the photos, it appears the starfish was carved, filled in with a reddish matrix, and then perhaps the figure was pressed into the matrix while it was still wet? Am I right or is this real - or perhaps partly real with enhancements? There is also a small crinoid looking object next to the starfish - photos also included. My guess is the small crinoid may be genuine. Thank you for your input.
  14. Hey guys. I am a new member and currently an 18-year-old freshman college student. I am currently going through basics but as a kid, I loved dinosaurs and prehistoric creatures. I recently have thought about changing my major from biology to paleontology. I am a fossil collector and hope to collect hundreds of examples of prehistoric life. As I said I'm a fossil collector but a novice at it. I know relatively what a given organism is but I want to know, if possible, the species. If they are completely unidentifiable, no worries. I might add that all of these fossils did not have locations of where they were found except the starfish which was found in Morocco. I'm making a log of all my fossils and want to know the genus of each individual one. I have linked a google drive folder with all the images of the ones I would like identified if possible. Feel free to message me with any questions or just to get to know me. I'm open to making friends with fellow lovers of life. Thanks. https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1m0QB8pmy-snZYujwb6Fy06flKsRxQK3E
  15. Hi All! Just got back from a lovely trip to England and had a great hunt in Weymouth. Found this odd thing that I thought was a crinoid Calyx, but I am really not sure. I will eventually clean out the center, but was wondering if anyone might be able to tell me for sure what it is. Any help is appreciated! Thanks!
  16. Help!!! I lost a good reference for IDing Burlington limestone crinoids and blastoids. I spent all last night fruitlessly looking for it. Does anyone have a suggestion for a good reference??? Mike
  17. Hunting near Chattanooga, TN

    Hello everyone, This is my first post here. I live near Chattanooga, TN, and consider myself fortunate to live in this area due to its scenic beauty and recreational opportunities. We've come a long way in the last 30 years, and I would encourage anyone who wants an outdoor adventure to come here and check us out. Now, fall's coming, and with that may come cooler weather, which means a great time for outdoor activities. I would like to go fossil hunting close to home. We're in a pretty geologically diverse area here, though most of the knowledge from my college Historical Geology class taken over 25 years ago seems to have deserted my brain. But we have alot of chert, limestone, sedimentary rock, mountains, rock outcroppings, and the famous Chattanooga Shale formation. There is also the drive up Hwy 111 onto the plateau. One the way up, I've seen more than a few shale outcroppings that appear to have just barely missed turning into coal. So, for those in the know, are there some good fossil hunting areas in the Chattanooga area or within an hour's drive? Finding a trilobite would be a great prize, but I've found small crinoid stem fossils in my gravel driveway. Any suggestions would be appreciated. Thank you, -William
  18. Fossil

    My recent find on my arrowhead huntings.
  19. Trilobite ID

    Hello, I came across this trilobite after I had shale delivered from a local eastern panhandle WV quarry. It was found with several crinoid stems. Any help on ID would be greatly appreciated. Thanks
  20. Turitella and stuff

    Near New Braunfels, Texas, (Comal County US)would be guessing any more specifics on location...scale reads 5.8 pounds measurements 18mm x 11.5mm x 10mm prolly found about a year ago so details are fuzzy but this thing is amazing. Close up of one of the golden sparkly crystals edit- sorry picture stinks had to get new phone and yeah....I will redo later no time no time late for an important date!
  21. Hello, I have many crinoid columnals that I collected in gravel (I suppose it was river/creek gravel collected and sold by a "sand and gravel" company) in Illinois many years ago. I have two questions that may be obvious to more seasoned fossil hunters/students. 1) Exactly how did the crinoids actually grow, meaning, how did the stems' diameter expand horizontally in size as time went on, since the stems were mostly composed of hard calcium carbonate/lime. In other words, it seems that once they are "hardened" or "frozen" into a certain size, how can they get bigger? Was there growth tissue on the OUTSIDE of the stem that kept adding on calcium to the inside, like tree trunks creating wood and bark? (I can understand the growth of whorled type seashells, but I can't get this through my head.) 2) Many of the columnal discs/segments I have found are virtually solid silica, some with a glossy almost pearly luster, I suppose would be classified as flint, chert or chalcedony. I assume from what I've read that this is from replacement of the original calcium with silica over a long period of time. This may seem simple-minded or thinking too deeply, but do researchers claim to understand how the silica could actually have "moved" or migrated into the spaces where the calcium used to be? I can't visualize how this would be possible. Like, one molecule at a time gradually moves through solid rock? Does anyone understand why this seems so hard for me to visualize? Or is this believed to occur because the original calcium actually changes it's molecular characteristics without moving? Any input or comments would be greatly appreciated!
  22. Hello everyone! I found myself in Vermont today, and through much cajoling I convinced my parents to allow a detour to a fossil site a forum member let me know about a year ago. It is from the Crown Point Formation, Ordovician in age. The first time time I was there, about a year ago, I collected a ton of trilobite cross sections. While those are cool, this time I wanted to focus on finding ones worn in a slightly more favorable fashion, and perhaps one worthy of prep. Unfortunately, I didn’t find any worthy of prep, but I did find some decent trilo-bits. Also came home with a Gastropod and a funny piece of pareidolia (450 million year old Mr. Bill?). I didn’t have much space in the car reserved for fossils, so I was sparing in what I picked up. ‘Twas a fun hour or so indeed.
  23. St. Leon IDs

    Here are a few small bits from the Cincinnatian (Upper Ordovician) roadcut near St Leon, IN, that I’m not sure of the IDs. They were all collected from the butter shale trilobite layer of the Liberty Formation. First is what I think may be part of a crinoid? Not positive. Next, I have no idea. Maybe part of a crinoid. A fragment of a conulariid also crossed my mind. Here is a small brachiopod that I picked up thinking it was Zygospira but is definitely not. I’m guessing this trilobit is Flexicalymene, but I know a few other species of trilobites are found here so I wanted to check.
  24. Hi all! I managed to go on 3 large fossil hunting trips this weekend and pulled in easily the BIGGEST haul so far with the most variety as well! The first two pictures were from Mimico creek and the rest were a mix of Humber river and a separate section of Mimico creek. I managed to pull in my second trilobite from the area so that was very exciting! Also pulled a bunch of stuff that I was not able to identify: /\ This was the haul from last Friday night /\ This is the trilobite I found!!! Very excited to have a second one - its been a while since the last one I found /\ This was the full haul for the weekend trip at Mimico and Humber /\ Some Orthoconic Nautiloids as usual. Although it seems that this isn't just the same species I usually find as some of the patterns were much smoother than what I usually find A couple decent looking Crinoid stalks /\ /\ Lots of different shells this time, with a nice range of lined shells as well as 'mussel' looking shells (don't know the scientific names for these ones yet - sorry :/) /\ A close-up of the real nicely defined deathbed of TONS of shells! Unfortunately the hammer I used for cracking bounced off this rock and mashed my thumb in so that wasn't very fun. But its healing up nicely so I'd say it was worth it haha /\ Variety different sizes of coral (if you guys could help me identify which type that would be sweet!) /\ These were the weird ones. I'm not even sure if these are even fossils but I figured I might as well take em just in case - better safe than sorry!! (I am posting these two in identification later!) I was very proud of this haul! Lots of diversity compared to the usual hunt which is nice because I'm kind of getting a little tired of the mountains of Nautiloids we have piling up in the collection Let me know what you guys think of these ones!!! -Em
  25. Presumably, having been tumbled along the robustness of the Knob Creek's quartz bearing country rock of the Hoosier National Forest in the Bartlettsville (North Lawrence Co.) IN area, the tip of the Crown (Calyx) of this large Crinoid appears to have been sheered off at some point to give the observer a view (in crossection) of the inside of calyx which reveals absolutely nothing but Silica replacement of all internal parts. This sample is of the Harrodsburg Formation in the Sanders Group, Lower Middle Mississippian Time.
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