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Found 448 results

  1. Help identifying this calyx

    Earlier this summer, I found this calyx at Partridge Point (Middle Devonian), Alpena, Michigan. I have tried to identify it, but I am stuck. Your thoughts?I have tried to identify it, but I am stuck. Your thoughts?
  2. I am learning to pick apart the items I find in the limestone fossiliferous rocks from my yard, but I see some things here that I am not familiar with. What is the tubular item at the bottom of the photo? And what are the tiny round black things? They look like poop, LOL! One of them is inside of a crinoid fossil, but it may have fallen there? This was found in Madison County, Alabama. I find fossiliferous limestone mostly with fenestellan bryzoan fossils, crinoids, coral, etc. Thanks! Ramona
  3. I clean my fossils with normal soap and water using a toothbrush. But this time i think i broke a piece of a really Nice crinoid stem. Either that or im just overthinking like i have done before. But the question is what matrix is Good for cleaning and whats not. The crinoid was not in any matrix. There was a mix of shale and limestone there. I know shale is not good to clean with water. I got some horn corals that are kinda muddy. No matrix but it wont easily get off the fossil. Well after the crinoid im not sure if i should use soap and water. What other things can i use? Anyways heres the crinoid. And how can u know a old damage from erosion or a fresh damage? Sorry for all the questions and long text
  4. Hi everyone! Today I went on another fossil hunting trip with the fossil club the BVP. https://www.paleontica.org/sites/fossil_site.php?plaats=3&language=en We visited the "La Couvinoise" quarry in Couvin, Belgium. The rocks in this quarry are part of the Hanonet Formation which lies at the boundry of the Eifelian & Givetian. But the layers we searched in today where all Givetian in age (387,7 - 382,7 mya), I mainly searched in the Crinoïd & Brachiopod layer. Although I have to admit that we probably visited the quarry at a bad moment, as the yield was quite poor in the quarry this time according to members who've been there before. Which was quite obvious as I think we only found our first fossil rich rocks after 50 minutes of searching and even then the first hour of finds where few and poor in quality. But after a while of searching I found some good and rich blocks and managed to get some decent Crinoïd stems, Brachiopods and some rugose coral pieces. But the best 3 finds we did during the last 30 minutes of being in the quarry. The 1st one was the only Trilobite I found during the hunt! Trilos are very rare from this quarry and I believe only 1 other member found one before me on this trip. I found a pygidium which is still partially enbedded in rock. At first I wasn't sure whether I was a trilo or a brachiopod but after having a couple of other members checking it out, they all believed it to be trilobite. The excursion leader time was quite amazed by the find as this trilo came from the Crinoïd layer, which is a layer where he believed no trilobite had ever been found. The trilobites are usually found in another part and layer a bit further in the quarry. So yeah I am very pleased with that find! The 2nd best find, was one I didn't find myself but recieved from our Excursion leader Tom, which was a piece of very nice Stromatoporoidea which I wasn't lucky enough to find. The 3rd best find an perhaps my favorite was something that Tom told me to check out. He had discovered the remains of a cave that collapsed during some excavations in the quarry. You could clearly see the remains of dripping stones on the walls and luckily for us, some pieces of those dripping stones where also laying on the ground. So I managed to take a nice piece of them home with me They are encrusted with a layer of dried mud but I am sure they will look gorgeous once they are cleaned! The rings are already clearly visable in some areas. Here are some pictures from inside the quarry. This was the way to the newly excavated plateau which unfortunatly was a complete was of time as not a single fossil could be found in those rocks. After that we went to the other lower parts of the quarry where I mainly worked in a single piece of wall in the Crinoïd layer. I was lucky enough to find a few good fallen blocks and some good places in the wall with some decent Crinoïds and Brachiopods. One of the nice Crinoïds stems I found in the layer. And here is the piece of wall that has some of the dripping stones in it.
  5. The Day of The Echinoderm

    Firstly, a big THANK YOU to @Jeffrey P for hanging out with me for the day! What a knowledgeable, generous, and all around swell guy! If you ever get the opportunity to hunt with Jeff, I highly encourage you to. Jeff and I met at around 8:30 am, and after a quick transfer of his gear to my truck, we were off. We first drove about 45 minutes south to the small town of Wax, to hunt the Upper Mississippian. Specifically to look for blastoids and crinoid calyxes that were known to be found in the area. As it happens, luck was with us! Unfortunately, I didn't take the field pictures that I typically do. Due to the fact that I went swimming with my phone a month or so ago . I am down to using my wife's old phone that I found in the junk drawer (Yes Jeff, it's pink... ). I didn't take it out much to avoid the inevitable drop down the hill side. Especially since it doesn't even have a protective case... Jeff snapped a few pictures. Maybe he will chime in and add them when he is able. For the first few minutes we didn't find much besides crinoid stems, bryozoans, and the deflated or crushed brachiopods common to the site. The main species of brach found in the area doesn't seem to have fared well during the fossilization process. Finding a nice inflated one is a rarity. After a few minutes of adjusting our eyes to spot the small finds located here, we started to pick out the blastoids. Jeff was the first to find one, and gifted it to me as he had already collected a few on his previous trips here. Thanks Jeff for gifting me my first blastoid! Most of the blastoids, while small, were whole and nicely preserved. Here are a few examples. I did happen to find the largest blastoid from the site, and one of the larger ones Jeff had seen from here. Super pumped about this one! Crinoid calyx were also to be found here. We only found a few, but being that these were also a first for me, I was extremely excited to find them! The brachiopods I previously mentioned were abundant, and besides crinoid stems, were the most abundant fossil to be found here. Again, they are almost always deflated. Finding a nice inflated one would be a real treat. These other little Spirifer(?) brachiopods could also be found. Although they were more uncommon that the previous ones. They are very small and delicate. Often crumbling when trying to pick them up. Bivalves could be found here also, but were extremely rare. Jeff was excited to find a couple, but I struck out. Other things that could be found were crinoid stems, the odd solitary rugose coral, and of course the ever present bryozoans. We then headed to a site a few miles down the road in Leitchfield. Stay tuned!
  6. Crinoid (?) Fossil ID Needed

    Found this the other day in Eastern Ontario and I'm not quite sure what it is. I asked on reddit and someone suggested it could possibly be a crinoid holdfast, but I wanted to get a second opinion just to be sure. Ordovician, about 2.5cm in diameter.
  7. While I have been out fossil hunting a bit in the Texas Summertime heat I am still having great fun with the Micro Matrix- it sure is pleasant to sit in the AC and poke about for fossils! I had some great little finds in the Mineral Wells matrix, but i am just amazed by the Bridgeport matrix. Even though it's still Pennsylvanian, it's very different from the MIneral Wells stuff! Different formations and all..... What's really neat about the Bridgeport matrix is firstly - it's bigger, typically. and secondly...it's COLORFUL! Reds and golds and purply browns and oranges. It's really lovely stuff!! Here are some of my favorites from the Jasper Creek formation. : First the Echinoid bits - I love these little "cat ghost" plates. 2 mm Most of the spines were incomplete, but I found a nice base and a nice spine, just not all one piece 7mm base and 1 cm spine A funky Echinoid plate 7 mm So many neat Crinoid fragements - arms, cup fragements, columnals, etc! All of these are aprox 5-8 mm except the first one which is a honking 1.5 cm. ) And this crazy crinoid spine that was broken and was regenerating before it died...hence the "dimple" on the end. Thanks fellow Forum Members for helping with that ID! 1 cm Love this crinoid column...I think it's my favorite. It's so Art Deco.....about 3 million years early. 1 cm Some other nice/ interesting finds Neospirifer Brachiopod 5 mm Not sure what this is...I assume a brachiopod. 5 mm Colorful Bryzoans 4 mm Bryzoan on a Crinoid 8 mm Girtycoelia sponges Each are aprox 5-8 mm Gastropods: Pseudozygopleura 4mm Possilbly a Phymataopleura? Not sure of ID 5 mm Possibly Goniasma? 5mm And then there's this thing......a bryzoan encrusting a sponge! 1 cm
  8. Possible crinoid? We’re new to this!

    Hi there, thanks for your help. My son, eight years old, found this great rock while out on a hike in Central new York. We are trying to identify if it is an imprint, and some basic search is seem to point to a crinoid imprint. Can anyone give us more information about this? Thank you!
  9. No clue what these are

  10. No clue what these are

    Let me know if you know what these are.
  11. It's definitely a..thing?

    Look guys I have a... well its definitely a something? Is it a plant, the top of a crinoid, a broken tooth, a really tiny volcano??? No idea. And as a bonus I have no idea where it came from either. It was given to me ages when I was a kid. So if you've got any ideas on what the heck it might be, I'd love to hear 'em! Thanks!
  12. Hey there, I hope today was as nice for you as it was for me outside here in Henry County, Missouri. On my day off today, I decided to go on another fossil hunt. Today's location is a little arm off of Truman Lake, and is one of my favorite spots to look for crinoids. The water was relatively low right now at this location today also. I decided to take advantage of that fact and look along the bottom by the water line where scraps and eroding peices fall down, and get covered back by water for most of the year. Often times I'll find complete crinoids and blastoids down here if the water is low enough, and one's luck is high. Today was a decent day for this picky fellow. The morning started off a bit cloudy, which was nice because I have a bit of a walk before I can start scouring for fossils on the ground. Soon after starting my trek, this cute little bug landed on my hand. I think it is a mayfly. Bugs can be annoying, though this little guy wasn't. Today was particularly bad with mosquitoes though. Lazy me forgot to bring bug spray. Be prepared for ticks, mosquitoes, and other creepy crawlies when coming out here. After getting to the fossiliferous limestones, I started off by going towards the bottom of the exposure. I tend to squat down sumo style, or look like I'm doing toe touches with my butt sticking in the air a good portion of the day while looking. One's success is often due to experience here, but alot of things are small, dirty, weathered, or just easy to overlook here. It definitely pays to take your time and go low when you look. There is always at least one fisherman or kayaker usually baffled by what I'm doing, today was no different. The first find was an easy to spot crinoid, which was perfect and required no preparation at all. Sometimes its as easy as just picking it off the floor. Very lucky to say the least. All that was needed was cleaning with warm soapy water. Can you spot the crinoid in situ? The second find was just as easy! A hundred feet away or so, this blastoid was just sitting there. Again, this only needed very simple cleaning up. Here is another photo, showing how I found it next to my trusty old Estwing. There are some cherts in the Burlington Formation, as well as the crinoidal limestones already shown. I didn't find too much in the cherty sections today. It always takes scribe and abrasives to prep this material. Sometimes you can whack the chert and the fossil will pop out, but depending how it's situated in the rock and also just dumb luck depends on weather that extraction method is successful. It usually isn't, and it can be dangerous as the chert can splinter out and shoot at high speeds if you hit the rock wrong. I did find a nice Pentremites sp. blastoid though, as well as a nice Composita sp. brachiopod in cherts. It is likely complete, but not one I can just whack. Heres another blastoid, though a different type from the crinoidal limestones that needs prep. It will be much easier to finish. After a good 5 hours out, I decided to return back to my car and head for home. I won't have many opportunities to hunt my beloved Burlington much longer, so I'm trying to make the best of this and go out as often as I can. I tend to be at peace most when I'm out in nature, and finding fossils has taught me more than just about these ancient creatures. It has taught me about my current surrounding environment, the current living creatures here, patience, and more that I probably don't need to ramble off about. Anywho, here's everything I managed to clean up today. Preparation on the blastoids will have to wait until I have more time. Composita sp. brachiopod Azygocrinus rotundus and Globoblastus norwoodi Other crinoidal bits. Another Globoblastus norwoodi (needs abbraided still) Crinoid (probably Aorocrinus parvus, still needs prep) And that ends today's trip, thanks for reading. Enjoy your summer while you still can!
  13. Cyclocrinites in Arizona?

    I'm in Northern Arizona in an area full of crinoid, bryozoan, and brachiopod fossils. Recently I found what I believe might be a cyclocrinite. It's round, about the size of my thumb, and pitted like a golf ball. Its been suggested that this might be a calyx from a crinoid but since the hexagons on my fossil extend inward and not outward, I have my doubts. It looks like this thing was trapped in a pocket when it was fossilized. You can even see some space between the fossil and the material around it. The last picture shows the section of the stack that broke off, revealing the fossil inside. I thought about cracking it open but I'm concerned about damaging the fossil. Any thoughts on what this might be? If its not a cyclocrinite my other theory is that some poor caveman lost his golf ball in a water hazard on a 500 million years ago. I'm new to the forum and you guys are the experts here so any help would be appreciated!
  14. Dictyonema sp, Middle Devonian graptolite

    From the album Fossildude's Middle Devonian Hamilton Group Fossils

    Dictyonema sp. Middle Devonian Hamilton Group, Windom shale, Moscow Fm. Smoke Creek beds, West Seneca, NY. Found July 3rd, 2020

    © 2020 TJones

  15. Hello. I'm working on organizing my collection and was wondering if anyone could help me with some identifications. Thanks for any help. I don't have any info on this one. I think it is a Mucrospirifer brachiopod. Can someone confirm this? Help with the species name would be appreciated. Thanks. These are crinoid stems. I don't have any further information. Does anyone know the species, where they came from, or the approximate age? Thanks. I think this is a dolphin tooth. It was found on the Ernst Ranch in Bakersfield, California. Can anyone help me identify it further? Thanks. Last, here are some fossils I collected when I was young. They were found near Thermopolis, Wyoming. They were found on one of the paleontology digs that the local museum hosts. I think they are orthoconic nautiloids, but I am not sure. 6 year old me was not taking good notes. Thanks for any ID help.
  16. Hey folks: I have a cottage on the Sauble River not far from Lake Huron. I am an English teacher and Chaplain but I have always been interested in the science of the world around me. At the bottom of the river there are rock "shelves" that are fragmented and this sedimentary stone (?) broke away. I flipped it over and saw this shape. There were actually two but I am conscious of file size. My rookie guess is a crinoid stem but better to ask the experts. Thank you in advance! Jon.
  17. Crinoid identification help?

    These fossils were found in Alnif, Morocco and advertised to be from the jurassic period. I need help with an ID.
  18. Mineral Wells Fossil Id

    I was at mineral wells fossil park for the first time recently and was sorting some the finds today. I found 3 fossils that I could use some help IDing. #1 I believe is a Crinoid calyx. #2 is a crinoid but it has a weird growth on the side of the it. #3 also appears to be a Crinoid but it is full of holes. There’s no apparent pattern to them and they are on all sides of it. All holes are roughly uniform in size in shape. I can post more photos of any of them. Thanks for any help.
  19. Bunch of fossils, might buy

    The ones I know are the crinoid plate, knighta, PA fossil fern, dactylioceras, random ammonite, two moroccon trilobites. However, I have no idea what the middle yellow like imprint is nor the two species of black trilobite in shale. And then the two upper left fossils have me clueless. Wanted to know what they are before I consider buying. Thanks again for any help. Again, no location or collection information.
  20. Help with ID

    I picked this up at Salamonie State Park in Huntington County, IN. Someone suggested it might be an icno fossil? 4.5 cm x 1.5 cm. Thx!
  21. Hello! I found this crinoid in Hardin County, KY earlier this morning that I would love to be able to ID further beyond "crinoid" haha. I found it as is (no prepwork or cleaning) in a scree pile of misc Mississippian rocks and so not sure if specifically from Salem limestone, Harrodsburg limestone, Borden formation, St Louis limestone, etc. I've included pics of the front and back of the rock/crinoid. If it helps with ID'ing, the darker portions of the rock seem to be that tar-type limestone (and not surface dirt or soil, etc). In reading the published literature on KY crinoids there seems to be quite a few genera identified from this era and this part of KY and so I would also like to learn from you on how one might narrow down a crinoid's genus. Would also be iinterested in hearing your opinions on if it would help having it prepped out a bit by someone. Thanks in advance for any assistance you could provide!
  22. A Crinoid, but which one?

    It’s a Crinoid column, that’s for sure. Unfortunately I found these in road gravel limestone. It’s not local, I’ve never seen one with the star shape until today. I just happened to see each one while walking today. Top left is 13mm. Bottom right is 16mm. There are 4 stacked, each about 2mm thick. I can get much closer if that helps.
  23. Hello all! Here are some of my my favourite scenery and fossil pictures from the last few weeks! Decided to hit up some new spots way up in the north end of Toronto along the Humber river - which yielded some very nice shells and crinoid segment (instead of the usual nautiloids). I'm in the midst of getting the weird nautiloid section so stay tuned: Lets kick things off with a couple very pretty shells and crinoids from the north end trip: the 7 shells from the left are Ambonychia, with the two black right shells being Pholadomorpha pholadiformis (I believe). Some crinoid segments on the far right These Ambonychia shells were definitely my favourites of the bunch^ When it comes to crinoids, this is about as good as it gets here in Toronto!!!! Almost nobody finds calyxes here, so this is about as good as it gets!
  24. Simple Geode or Geodized Fossil

    A very odd rock found by my wife in Arizona as a child. Exact locality unknown. Lots of textures. There are some pretty long crystals in the cavities. Could this be a geodized fossil? If so, what kind? It doesn’t really look like pictures of geodized cephalopods or crinoids. Thanks!
  25. Two very tiny fossils.

    Hello, these tiny fossils were difficult to photograph, I had to improvise by sellotaping a magnifier to the camera lens, as I do not have anything that can do the equivalent where I am now. I was wondering if one of them is possibly a bit of crinoid? The circular bit seemed to remind me of modern bone. Sorry they are muddy, I'd probably break them if I tried to wash them. Scale is in centimetres, and they were found in Northamptonshire, UK, which is Jurassic. Thanks.
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