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Found 115 results

  1. Lots of ordinary things lately at Etobicoke Creek and Joshua Creek. Of course, when I began hunting in April 2019, I couldn't imagine finding such treasures, but there you have it. At the former location, we seem to have fun finding "How many decent-size orthocone nautiloids can fit on one rock," and the number appears to be 10 or 12 in some cases ! We also seem to be able to find snakes when we lift rocks, which can be disconcerting. Recently I noticed some unpromising "wavy surface" rocks, but they had a layer underneath with branching bryozoan fragments. Turns out, there are lots of them, and some are the largest chunks I've ever seen. So today I was out in the rain, getting muddy. I had to leave lots of great rocks...they were reasonably heavy chunks. Tree roots along the creek had split up the shales, pushed some promising rocks through to the forest floor, and dumped lots of slabs onto the creekbank. When I get some of these rocks cleaned up, I hope to post some pictures. Meanwhile, here is a group of recent finds.
  2. Unique crinoid stem fossil?

    I attended an estate sale last week and the homeowner collected rocks. Sifting through the 50-cent box, I came across this specimen. It's not a complete crinoid, but the size -- and the size variety -- of the stems was particularly enticing. I haven't a clue about where she may have collected it, but the coral, brachiopods and bryozoan fossils in the box look like those I've collected in Michigan.
  3. Hello. I have still been going through boxes of mostly cave mineral from a large estate sale purchase, mostly consisting of cave minerals. The tags that remain are not attached to the pieces and usually scattered among many boxes. This amazing plate I found recently and believe I finally found the label. I just need justification. I haven't found any other plates like this one. It's stunning in person!
  4. Amateur hunter needs help!

    Very much an amateur here. Recently some farmland in east Tulsa was scraped off for a new housing addition. I have found lots of crinoid stems and a few shells and trilobites. But I don’t know what this is that I found today. Can anyone help?
  5. Some of my collection

    Hello gang, As promised this is where I will share specimens from my personal collection, my grandfather's collection, and the collection that was donated to the university I work for. The latter is interesting as it is literally boxes of rock and fossils, with no information and my university does not have a geology or paleontology department. I'll be updating it every so often. Enjoy! NOTE: Some of the donated items have old school "labels" on them. If you see initials or such that you recognize, please PM me, as I am doing my best to properly catalog them properly as part of my job!
  6. Identification Request

    While searching for crinoids a few days ago, I found two items which I thought were especially interesting. Can anyone identify them for me? (Mississippian/Tuscumbia Limestone)
  7. Greetings, all! I am currently writing a thesis involving fossils from the Burlington Limestone near its type section along the Illinois/Iowa border. To demonstrate the diversity of the crinoidal remains from the limestone (over 400 species have been described from the Burlington alone!), I am looking for photographs of articulated crinoids. Do any of you have any that you would like to let me include in my thesis? If possible, I would like high-res images of crinoids identified to genus or species with a scale bar/ruler present in the image as well as the collection/locality info. I can't guarantee that I will use every image posted, but if I use your image, then I will acknowledge you in my acknowledgements and give you credit for the image. Thank you for your time & assistance! -Elasmohunter
  8. From the album Lower Devonian

    Edriocrinus pocilliformis Crinoid Calyx Base Lower Devonian Glenerie Limestone Tristates Group Route 9W Glenerie, N.Y.
  9. Back in January I bought a new 15 drawer cabinet and have slowly been transferring my collection to it. Going through my old finds, some of which have been boxed and/or bagged away I haven't seen for years has been a pleasure and some new gems have turned up that I had overlooked the first time around. There was this Actinodesma erectum, a pteriomorph bivalve which had broken when it was excavated last summer at Cole Hill.
  10. Hunter, A.W., Mitchell, E.G., Casenove, D. and Mayers, C., 2019. Reconstructing the ecology of a Jurassic pseudoplanktonic megaraft colony. bioRxiv, p.566844. https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/566844v1.abstract https://www.biorxiv.org/content/biorxiv/early/2019/03/04/566844.full.pdf Hess, H. 2011, Treatise Online, no. 16, Part T, Revised, Volume 1, Chapter 19: Paleoecology of pelagic crinoids https://www.researchgate.net/publication/272640982_Treatise_Online_no_16_Part_T_Revised_Volume_1_Chapter_19_Paleoecology_of_pelagic_crinoids Other papers are: Röhl, H.J., Schmid-Röhl, A., Oschmann, W., Frimmel, A. and Schwark, L., 2001. The Posidonia Shale (Lower Toarcian) of SW-Germany: an oxygen-depleted ecosystem controlled by sea level and palaeoclimate. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 165(1-2), pp.27-52. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/229329097_Erratum_to_The_Posidonia_Shale_Lower_Toarcian_of_SW-Germany_an_oxygen-depleted_ecosystem_controlled_by_sea_level_and_palaeoclimate https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Annette_Schmid-Roehl Schmid-Röhl, A., Röhl, H.J., Oschmann, W., Frimmel, A. and Schwark, L., 2002. Palaeoenvironmental reconstruction of Lower Toarcian epicontinental black shales (Posidonia Shale, SW Germany): global versus regional control. Geobios, 35(1), pp.13-20. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/251729450_Palaeoenvironmental_reconstruction_of_Lower_Toarcian_epicontinental_black_shales_Posidonia_Shale_SW_Germany_Global_versus_regional_control https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Annette_Schmid-Roehl Yours, Paul H.
  11. Sorry I haven’t been around the forum as much for a couple months now but I’m starting to get some more free time recently. Here’s a quick trip @Earth Chemistry and I did a little bit ago. Let’s start out with what stratigraphy we’re looking at here. I’ve been visiting multiple locations of what is locally known as the Gardison Limestone. Source: http://utahgeology.com/utah-stratigraphic-columns/?var=strat_27 It is from the early Mississippian or Early Carboniferous for our international members.
  12. I am back from my trip to morocco. It is a 14 days trip and I got 4 days for fossil hunting. It was so imagine, fossils are everywhere and even though I won't be able to dig, I still get plenty to bring home. Since my guide doesn't speak good English, I am not be able to ask him must so I need help to identify the fossil. On the first day, my guide took me to a place near Erfoud to search for dinosaur teeth. It is very close to the highway. We found a well that the local people dig to get Spinosaur teeth and bone. My husband went down to one but couldn't find anything because the well is new and it is not deep enough. We didn't want to try the deeper one so we decide to bought some spinosaur teeth from the local people there. This tooth is a little over 4.5 inches and I think there are some prepare but I can't tell how much. I also bought 3 smaller teeth and was giving the broken one which I don't know what it is.
  13. Beach fossil identification

    Hey everyone! I have a great selection of fossils at home but I still lack a great knowledge of my most local fossils. I rarely find more than Devil toenails here in the UK but have come across quite a few on my travels today. Initially they caught my eye because they look like my orthoceras but I also have crinoids that have similar markings. There are thousands on the beach with fresh finds every day. If anyone could confirm what I've found it'd be much appreciated. I assume I have a collection of various plant fossils?
  14. Hi! Previous weekend me and my friend (paleozoic echinoderms researcher) spent in the quarry near Kasimov (Ryazan region, Russia) where upper carboniferous (pennsylvanian) deposits are exposed. This was an opening of the new fossil hunting season. The main target were echinoderms and especially crinoids. The weather was not very comfortable (+6 C and some rain) but perfect for echinoderm hunting. They become contrast and much more visible when wet. Here is some pictures.
  15. ID request of Irish fossils

    according to the geology, the location is a cross of carbiniferous and devonian period. the location (Crookstown, Co Cork Ireland) is at a meeting point of deep marine shelf environment, marine shelf environment and an alluvial plain environment. The later being void of fossils. if someone could confirm or define what these fossils are, I would appreciate it. also can something be done to clean them up? or a way to safely remove the matrices? the first rock contain what I think are crinoids fragments, there are actually a lot of them here. this is a bit bigger, is it a crinoid as well? Finally the last one, I am actually not sure if it is a fossil or just geological. Thank you for your Help Regards
  16. are these blastoids???

    first item first three photos second item next three I can see they are not the same type but what are they? found in gravel load west of Houston Texas from Brazos River
  17. It’s winter and time to explore as many canyons as possible before it gets hot here. As always; in search of exercise, fossils and other items of interest. A visual summary of the ascent of one side canyon and the descent of the another. The entrance to the two canyon loop Today I had to share the trail Ordovician formations with small cave Ordovician staircase walkway in canyon bottom, Silurian cliffs at top of pic As the main canyon ascends, the hiking eventually meets where Ordovician contacts Silurian At the top of this Silurian dry falls is the Devonian but not much of it. This Devonian area is just before the canyon splits into two canyons
  18. What is this Fossil from Lake Erie?

    Any clue what this is? It's about the size of a quarter, but thicker. It was found on a Lake Erie beach in OH (30 minutes west of Cleveland, OH). Most fossils from this area are from Dovinian period. It looks like a bunch of shells stuck in chocolate. Are these crinoids?
  19. Fossils Right Under My Nose

    While @UtahFossilHunter was out for a quick bike ride yesterday, he stumbled across a wash that's been cut by a road. The upper part of the wash above the road is on private land that we do not have permission to be on yet. We had looked at the downstream part of the wash area for fossils before but had not found anything. After some melting of snow and construction, that happened over the last couple days some rocks had been pushed downstream. We decided to look at this wash once again and found these! This is a significant find because it is within 5 miles of my home. Our usual spot is 50 miles from my home so this is great news.
  20. The Ordovician of Oland

    phosphthesi about 36 MB ******************** Phosphatized echinoderm remains from the upper lower Ordovician strata of northern Oland,Sweden preservation,taxonomy and evolution Magnus Svensson Examens arbete i Geologi vid Lunds Universitete n 105/1999 ******************** diacritics omitted("Oeland") Could the bee have any more knees? Nope. characterization:Monograph/thesis. 54 pages excluding bibliography
  21. I have managed to find some fossils I want to preserve such as these ferns and some cordaites. As best as I can read online it seems these should not be cleaned to ensure to not ruin them. Or is that wrong? Is there something to soak them in that won't harm them? Afterwards, what is best to preserve them with? Should they be kept away from sunlight to reduce fading? Basically, would anyone recommend a link or two to read to keep these looking nice. Thank you, Kato ===================== Ferns Cordaite with multi-color staining from different oxidization rates from pyritization???
  22. Fossils in Kentucky

    Hi, I'm visiting my niece who just had a baby, in campbellsville KY. I noticed there are a lot of very ancient fossils in Kentucky. Does anyone have any sites or road cuts to explore? Thanks alot, this is my first post. Stuart
  23. Dear TFF members, I need help with confirming the age of fossils I have found during the trip to the chalk mine in Mielnik. These specimens were found in the slopes and on the road leading to the mine, so a few tens of metres above the chalk deposits. I have read about the Ordovician deposits streching from Białowieża to Mielnik, so maybe they indeed come from this time? The specimens comprise corals, crinoids and brachiopods. I will appreciate your comments/ suggestions.
  24. Crinoid Stems?

    I found this rock in a creek in middle Tennessee. (Mississippian, St. Louis Limestone & Warsaw Limestone) @Bobby Rico Using your iPhone macro lens tips, I was just now able to magnify an area of this rock which I’ve been wanting to know more about for a while. (I wasn’t aware of the zoomed-in magnifying technique, so thanks for posting!) I’m thinking it is a cluster of three crinoid stems?
  25. This all started over a year ago. I was selected as Member of the Month and a couple of TFF members from Texas invited me down to the big state to collect. I primarily collect in my home region, the northeast, but I've taken fossil forays to New Mexico, Kentucky, and Germany and was willing to consider a trip to Texas and the opportunity to visit some classic fossil sites and collect fossils that are outside my usual focus. I began planning this about ten months ago, contacted potential fossil collecting partners and did my own research on fossil sites, geology, and the types of fossils I would likely encounter. I had never been to Texas let alone fossil collected there. From the Forum I knew there was a lot of great hunting. Then there was all of the logistics, what to stay, what to bring. Since I wanted to bring back a lot driving appeared to be my best option, but I hadn't driven that far solo in over thirty years. Timing of my trip; mid-late September, came right after my daughter went away to college and I was in the middle of moving to a new place. So things couldn't have been more hectic. Finally, early in the morning on September 8th I set out. Things went okay until I was in Kentucky. Just as it was turning nightfall, torrential rain hit, traffic was stopped on the interstate for two and a half hours, and the last two hours of the trip I struggled with wet conditions and poor visibility. I finally arrived at my parents' house just after one in the morning. The next day on my way over to my sister's I took a small detour and stopped at an outcrop I was well familiar with in Leitchfield, the Upper Mississippian Glen Dean Formation.
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