Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'crinoids'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
    Tags should be keywords or key phrases. e.g. carcharodon, pliocene, cypresshead formation, florida.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Fossil Discussion
    • General Fossil Discussion
    • Fossil Hunting Trips
    • Fossil ID
    • Is It Real? How to Recognize Fossil Fabrications
    • Partners in Paleontology - Member Contributions to Science
    • Questions & Answers
    • Fossil of the Month
    • Member Collections
    • A Trip to the Museum
    • Paleo Re-creations
    • Collecting Gear
    • Fossil Preparation
    • Member Fossil Trades Bulletin Board
    • Member-to-Member Fossil Sales
    • Fossil News
  • Gallery
  • Fossil Sites
    • Africa
    • Asia
    • Australia - New Zealand
    • Canada
    • Europe
    • Middle East
    • South America
    • United States
  • Fossil Media
    • Members Websites
    • Fossils On The Web
    • Fossil Photography
    • Fossil Literature
    • Documents

Blogs

  • Anson's Blog
  • Mudding Around
  • Nicholas' Blog
  • dinosaur50's Blog
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • Seldom's Blog
  • tracer's tidbits
  • Sacredsin's Blog
  • fossilfacetheprospector's Blog
  • jax world
  • echinoman's Blog
  • Ammonoidea
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • Adventures with a Paddle
  • Caveat emptor
  • -------
  • Fig Rocks' Blog
  • placoderms
  • mosasaurs
  • ozzyrules244's Blog
  • Sir Knightia's Blog
  • Terry Dactyll's Blog
  • shakinchevy2008's Blog
  • MaHa's Blog
  • Stratio's Blog
  • ROOKMANDON's Blog
  • Phoenixflood's Blog
  • Brett Breakin' Rocks' Blog
  • Seattleguy's Blog
  • jkfoam's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Lindsey's Blog
  • marksfossils' Blog
  • ibanda89's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Back of Beyond
  • St. Johns River Shark Teeth/Florida
  • Ameenah's Blog
  • gordon's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • Pennsylvania Perspectives
  • michigantim's Blog
  • michigantim's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • GPeach129's Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • Olenellus' Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • maybe a nest fossil?
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • bear-dog's Blog
  • javidal's Blog
  • Digging America
  • John Sun's Blog
  • John Sun's Blog
  • Ravsiden's Blog
  • Jurassic park
  • The Hunt for Fossils
  • The Fury's Grand Blog
  • julie's ??
  • Hunt'n 'odonts!
  • falcondob's Blog
  • Monkeyfuss' Blog
  • cyndy's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • nola's Blog
  • mercyrcfans88's Blog
  • Emily's PRI Adventure
  • trilobite guy's Blog
  • xenacanthus' Blog
  • barnes' Blog
  • myfossiltrips.blogspot.com
  • HeritageFossils' Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Emily's MotE Adventure
  • farfarawy's Blog
  • Microfossil Mania!
  • A Novice Geologist
  • Southern Comfort
  • Eli's Blog
  • andreas' Blog
  • Recent Collecting Trips
  • retired blog
  • Stocksdale's Blog
  • andreas' Blog test
  • fossilman7's Blog
  • Piranha Blog
  • xonenine's blog
  • xonenine's Blog
  • Fossil collecting and SAFETY
  • Detrius
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Kehbe's Kwips
  • RomanK's Blog
  • Prehistoric Planet Trilogy
  • mikeymig's Blog
  • Western NY Explorer's Blog
  • Regg Cato's Blog
  • VisionXray23's Blog
  • Carcharodontosaurus' Blog
  • What is the largest dragonfly fossil? What are the top contenders?
  • Hihimanu Hale
  • Test Blog
  • jsnrice's blog
  • Lise MacFadden's Poetry Blog
  • BluffCountryFossils Adventure Blog
  • meadow's Blog
  • Makeing The Unlikley Happen
  • KansasFossilHunter's Blog
  • DarrenElliot's Blog
  • jesus' Blog
  • A Mesozoic Mosaic
  • Dinosaur comic
  • Zookeeperfossils
  • Cameronballislife31's Blog
  • My Blog
  • TomKoss' Blog
  • A guide to calcanea and astragali
  • Group Blog Test
  • Paleo Rantings of a Blockhead
  • Dead Dino is Art
  • The Amber Blog
  • TyrannosaurusRex's Facts
  • PaleoWilliam's Blog
  • The Paleo-Tourist
  • The Community Post
  • Lyndon D Agate Johnson's Blog
  • BRobinson7's Blog
  • Eastern NC Trip Reports
  • Toofuntahh's Blog
  • Pterodactyl's Blog
  • A Beginner's Foray into Fossiling
  • Micropaleontology blog
  • Pondering on Dinosaurs
  • Fossil Preparation Blog
  • On Dinosaurs and Media
  • cheney416's fossil story
  • jpc
  • Red-Headed Red-Neck Rock-Hound w/ My Trusty HellHound Cerberus
  • Red Headed
  • Paleo-Profiles
  • Walt's Blog
  • Between A Rock And A Hard Place
  • Rudist digging at "Point 25", St. Bartholomä, Styria, Austria (Campanian, Gosau-group)
  • Prognathodon saturator 101

Calendars

  • Calendar

Categories

  • Annelids
  • Arthropods
    • Crustaceans
    • Insects
    • Trilobites
    • Other Arthropods
  • Brachiopods
  • Cnidarians (Corals, Jellyfish, Conulariids )
    • Corals
    • Jellyfish, Conulariids, etc.
  • Echinoderms
    • Crinoids & Blastoids
    • Echinoids
    • Other Echinoderms
    • Starfish and Brittlestars
  • Forams
  • Graptolites
  • Molluscs
    • Bivalves
    • Cephalopods (Ammonites, Belemnites, Nautiloids)
    • Gastropods
    • Other Molluscs
  • Sponges
  • Bryozoans
  • Other Invertebrates
  • Ichnofossils
  • Plants
  • Chordata
    • Amphibians & Reptiles
    • Birds
    • Dinosaurs
    • Fishes
    • Mammals
    • Sharks & Rays
    • Other Chordates
  • *Pseudofossils ( Inorganic objects , markings, or impressions that resemble fossils.)

Found 124 results

  1. Mother Nature graced us locally with another temperate day so I had time to squeeze in a long exploration into some hidden canyons that comprise a large subset of the local Mississippian formation known as 'Lake Valley' To get to the canyons of interest I walked through Silurian-Devonian exposures but I did not stop to explore for anything. Here was my first view toward the hidden Lake Valley Formation canyons. You can see deformation from the mud mounding. More to follow.
  2. Shell type?

    Hi all, this fossil hash plate is like a super hard gray mud with cracks. Even using a wood rasp to smooth much off. Mostly a trial or training piece. The shell was broken and in layers, with much covered. I have removed a lot of the cover, can I get an I'd, and is it worth continuing? I also see two Brachiapods, and they still some material stuck on the surface. I do not know of a way to dissolve the matrix, to recover the fossils. ultrasonic does nothing.
  3. Hi I was wondering if anyone could help me identify some of the key anatomical features of the calyx of this crinoid (Apiocrinites elegans) and any anatomical features of this brachiopod (specimen unknown). I have trawled and searched but am having limited success so thought there might be a fair few people that would be able to lend a helping hand on here! cheers mark
  4. Fossil has inclusion

    Hi, I pulled this Crinoids fossil hash plate out of a hill today. I may have seen the mystery in Lake Michigan mud stone, but not raised up or nearly as large. Ideas? Thanks. item is 4 in x 2 5/8th x 7/8th thick. unknown item is 1 in long x 1/2 inch wide.
  5. Fossil hash plate,

    Hi, I collected this inland in South West Michigan this week. I see lot's of Crinoidia byrozoans, and what looks like a horn coral. or possibly Evactinopora Bryozoa in limestone. . Please help with I'd, and a better age or time period? Thanks, Bob
  6. It was raining this morning, so my best site was near Yaxley. The fossils really pop there when wet. In one hour of searching I had 13 fragments of ammonite. I thought it was 14, but when washing them realised one was a miffed snail, who is now in the garden. Mostly the ammonites are pyratised, and preserve sutures and ornamentation well. I found 8 crinoid sections, including round ossicles - I normally only find star shaped ones.
  7. I am looking for crinoid sites near BG Ky. I am new here. I found my first ever crinoid in landscape gravel and am obsessed! Hope its OK to ask this?
  8. Found this rock in Highwood, IL, north of Chicago. I used to give this rock not much thought, just assumed I had thin wavy crinoid stem molds. Looking at it closer, I'm not so sure any longer. The stems seem to me to be too neatly lined up, as if the individual stalks had been cemented together when buried. Also, the individual "stems" don't seem to each have their own outer skeleton, unless the white vertical lines contain both of the adjoining crinoid skeletons but just appear as one. What's the likelyhood of that? What do you all think?
  9. Crinoid Fossil Attempt

    Recently, the opportunity presented itself to me to hunt for crinoids in the Burlington Formation of Des Moines County, Iowa. It was not a scheduled trip, but one that occurred because I in the right place but the wrong time. My mistake gave me a full free day to hunt fossils in Iowa (what a bummer!!) , so I headed out to look for some crinoids. The Burlington is so different than any rock formation that I usually hunt. It is made up of 90% crinoidal remains. It must have been a spectacular ocean floor to see!! I envision it to have been an undersea garden. Fossils other than crinoids do show themselves and I did pick up a few. First some brachiopods: A few corals. At least I think the larger one looks like coral. My doubts come due to its thinness. Trilobites are uncommon in the Burlington. This is the first trilo-bit I have ever found.
  10. Lots of ordinary things lately at Etobicoke Creek and Joshua Creek. Of course, when I began hunting in April 2019, I couldn't imagine finding such treasures, but there you have it. At the former location, we seem to have fun finding "How many decent-size orthocone nautiloids can fit on one rock," and the number appears to be 10 or 12 in some cases ! We also seem to be able to find snakes when we lift rocks, which can be disconcerting. Recently I noticed some unpromising "wavy surface" rocks, but they had a layer underneath with branching bryozoan fragments. Turns out, there are lots of them, and some are the largest chunks I've ever seen. So today I was out in the rain, getting muddy. I had to leave lots of great rocks...they were reasonably heavy chunks. Tree roots along the creek had split up the shales, pushed some promising rocks through to the forest floor, and dumped lots of slabs onto the creekbank. When I get some of these rocks cleaned up, I hope to post some pictures. Meanwhile, here is a group of recent finds.
  11. Unique crinoid stem fossil?

    I attended an estate sale last week and the homeowner collected rocks. Sifting through the 50-cent box, I came across this specimen. It's not a complete crinoid, but the size -- and the size variety -- of the stems was particularly enticing. I haven't a clue about where she may have collected it, but the coral, brachiopods and bryozoan fossils in the box look like those I've collected in Michigan.
  12. Hello. I have still been going through boxes of mostly cave mineral from a large estate sale purchase, mostly consisting of cave minerals. The tags that remain are not attached to the pieces and usually scattered among many boxes. This amazing plate I found recently and believe I finally found the label. I just need justification. I haven't found any other plates like this one. It's stunning in person!
  13. Amateur hunter needs help!

    Very much an amateur here. Recently some farmland in east Tulsa was scraped off for a new housing addition. I have found lots of crinoid stems and a few shells and trilobites. But I don’t know what this is that I found today. Can anyone help?
  14. Some of my collection

    Hello gang, As promised this is where I will share specimens from my personal collection, my grandfather's collection, and the collection that was donated to the university I work for. The latter is interesting as it is literally boxes of rock and fossils, with no information and my university does not have a geology or paleontology department. I'll be updating it every so often. Enjoy! NOTE: Some of the donated items have old school "labels" on them. If you see initials or such that you recognize, please PM me, as I am doing my best to properly catalog them properly as part of my job!
  15. Identification Request

    While searching for crinoids a few days ago, I found two items which I thought were especially interesting. Can anyone identify them for me? (Mississippian/Tuscumbia Limestone)
  16. Greetings, all! I am currently writing a thesis involving fossils from the Burlington Limestone near its type section along the Illinois/Iowa border. To demonstrate the diversity of the crinoidal remains from the limestone (over 400 species have been described from the Burlington alone!), I am looking for photographs of articulated crinoids. Do any of you have any that you would like to let me include in my thesis? If possible, I would like high-res images of crinoids identified to genus or species with a scale bar/ruler present in the image as well as the collection/locality info. I can't guarantee that I will use every image posted, but if I use your image, then I will acknowledge you in my acknowledgements and give you credit for the image. Thank you for your time & assistance! -Elasmohunter
  17. From the album Lower Devonian

    Edriocrinus pocilliformis Crinoid Calyx Base Lower Devonian Glenerie Limestone Tristates Group Route 9W Glenerie, N.Y.
  18. Back in January I bought a new 15 drawer cabinet and have slowly been transferring my collection to it. Going through my old finds, some of which have been boxed and/or bagged away I haven't seen for years has been a pleasure and some new gems have turned up that I had overlooked the first time around. There was this Actinodesma erectum, a pteriomorph bivalve which had broken when it was excavated last summer at Cole Hill.
  19. Hunter, A.W., Mitchell, E.G., Casenove, D. and Mayers, C., 2019. Reconstructing the ecology of a Jurassic pseudoplanktonic megaraft colony. bioRxiv, p.566844. https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/566844v1.abstract https://www.biorxiv.org/content/biorxiv/early/2019/03/04/566844.full.pdf Hess, H. 2011, Treatise Online, no. 16, Part T, Revised, Volume 1, Chapter 19: Paleoecology of pelagic crinoids https://www.researchgate.net/publication/272640982_Treatise_Online_no_16_Part_T_Revised_Volume_1_Chapter_19_Paleoecology_of_pelagic_crinoids Other papers are: Röhl, H.J., Schmid-Röhl, A., Oschmann, W., Frimmel, A. and Schwark, L., 2001. The Posidonia Shale (Lower Toarcian) of SW-Germany: an oxygen-depleted ecosystem controlled by sea level and palaeoclimate. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 165(1-2), pp.27-52. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/229329097_Erratum_to_The_Posidonia_Shale_Lower_Toarcian_of_SW-Germany_an_oxygen-depleted_ecosystem_controlled_by_sea_level_and_palaeoclimate https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Annette_Schmid-Roehl Schmid-Röhl, A., Röhl, H.J., Oschmann, W., Frimmel, A. and Schwark, L., 2002. Palaeoenvironmental reconstruction of Lower Toarcian epicontinental black shales (Posidonia Shale, SW Germany): global versus regional control. Geobios, 35(1), pp.13-20. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/251729450_Palaeoenvironmental_reconstruction_of_Lower_Toarcian_epicontinental_black_shales_Posidonia_Shale_SW_Germany_Global_versus_regional_control https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Annette_Schmid-Roehl Yours, Paul H.
  20. Sorry I haven’t been around the forum as much for a couple months now but I’m starting to get some more free time recently. Here’s a quick trip @Earth Chemistry and I did a little bit ago. Let’s start out with what stratigraphy we’re looking at here. I’ve been visiting multiple locations of what is locally known as the Gardison Limestone. Source: http://utahgeology.com/utah-stratigraphic-columns/?var=strat_27 It is from the early Mississippian or Early Carboniferous for our international members.
  21. I am back from my trip to morocco. It is a 14 days trip and I got 4 days for fossil hunting. It was so imagine, fossils are everywhere and even though I won't be able to dig, I still get plenty to bring home. Since my guide doesn't speak good English, I am not be able to ask him must so I need help to identify the fossil. On the first day, my guide took me to a place near Erfoud to search for dinosaur teeth. It is very close to the highway. We found a well that the local people dig to get Spinosaur teeth and bone. My husband went down to one but couldn't find anything because the well is new and it is not deep enough. We didn't want to try the deeper one so we decide to bought some spinosaur teeth from the local people there. This tooth is a little over 4.5 inches and I think there are some prepare but I can't tell how much. I also bought 3 smaller teeth and was giving the broken one which I don't know what it is.
  22. Beach fossil identification

    Hey everyone! I have a great selection of fossils at home but I still lack a great knowledge of my most local fossils. I rarely find more than Devil toenails here in the UK but have come across quite a few on my travels today. Initially they caught my eye because they look like my orthoceras but I also have crinoids that have similar markings. There are thousands on the beach with fresh finds every day. If anyone could confirm what I've found it'd be much appreciated. I assume I have a collection of various plant fossils?
  23. Hi! Previous weekend me and my friend (paleozoic echinoderms researcher) spent in the quarry near Kasimov (Ryazan region, Russia) where upper carboniferous (pennsylvanian) deposits are exposed. This was an opening of the new fossil hunting season. The main target were echinoderms and especially crinoids. The weather was not very comfortable (+6 C and some rain) but perfect for echinoderm hunting. They become contrast and much more visible when wet. Here is some pictures.
  24. ID request of Irish fossils

    according to the geology, the location is a cross of carbiniferous and devonian period. the location (Crookstown, Co Cork Ireland) is at a meeting point of deep marine shelf environment, marine shelf environment and an alluvial plain environment. The later being void of fossils. if someone could confirm or define what these fossils are, I would appreciate it. also can something be done to clean them up? or a way to safely remove the matrices? the first rock contain what I think are crinoids fragments, there are actually a lot of them here. this is a bit bigger, is it a crinoid as well? Finally the last one, I am actually not sure if it is a fossil or just geological. Thank you for your Help Regards
  25. are these blastoids???

    first item first three photos second item next three I can see they are not the same type but what are they? found in gravel load west of Houston Texas from Brazos River
×