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Found 77 results

  1. Crinoid arms?

    Arizona, Redwall limestone, Mooney member. I've found several examples of what look like plants but because they are around crinoids I'm thinking possibly crinoid arms. Anyone know what these are? Thanks
  2. My beautiful wife scheduled a three night stay at a cabin in a Thousand Trails campground near Lake Texoma. We were to arrive on Sunday and check out on Wednesday. So, I figured that, since I hadn't been fossil hunting in months, I would schedule a trip to central Texas to follow the Texoma trip. I set up a rendezvous point in Fairfield, Texas to meet my dad on that Wednesday, and head off toward Brownwood and Cisco, Texas. I figured that the fossil hunt would begin then. But that's not quite how things played out... My two oldest daughters and I met my wife and youngest daughter in Salado, Texas on Saturday, October 14th. They had left the previous morning to spend a day with my mother-in-law in Waco and Salado. We spent Saturday night in Salado and then parted ways with my mother-in-law on Sunday morning and headed toward Lake Texoma. As we drove through Waco, my wife asked if we wanted to take a detour. She had never been to Dinosaur Valley State Park in Glen Rose, Texas, and she thought the girls would enjoy seeing the dinosaur tracks in the Paluxy River. I got really excited. I hadn't been there since I was a kid, and at that time, the river was high and the tracks were not visible. So we adjusted our GPS to take us to Glen Rose. We pulled in and stopped off to get a map of the park. We then drove straight to the spot where Roland T. Bird made his first discovery. It was amazing. The water was low and gave us a clear view of the trackways in the river. Above you can see both the sauropod and theropod tracks, They are a little obscured by mud, but they are still very visible. We left the R.T. Bird site and went to another place called the Ballroom Track Site, where so many tracks go in so many directions, it was like the theropods were dancing. It was in slightly deeper water, but it was still beautiful! The rippling water was crystal clear and the girls couldn't help but get into the water, even as a cool front brought chilly winds down the river valley. My wife loved it. She told me that Dinosaur Valley State Park was our next camping destination. Before we left, we stopped off by the iconic Tyrannosaurus Rex and Apatosaurus models built for the 1964-65 World's Fair in New York. They were permanently installed at Dinosaur Valley in 1970 at the park's dedication. We left Dinosaur Valley and drove the rest of the way to our cabin at Lake Texoma, arriving just after dark. We settled in and tried to decide what we wanted to do the next day. It was Monday, and we figured there had to be something for the girls to do nearby. We quickly discovered that our options were limited. It had turned too cold for the pool at the campgrounds. The putt-putt at the campground was okay, but the girls quickly tired of it. And most of the other recreational equipment was not well kept, or available. So, we decided to leave the campground to find something for the girls to do. I had mentioned that I would like to check out the Permian site at Waurika, Oklahoma. It was only two hours away, and this was the closest I had ever been to the site. My wife was a bit miffed by the lack of things for the girls to do, so she said "Let's go." I jumped at the chance. I had done no research on the site, other than what I had read about it on TFF. I wish I had consulted the TFF experts before we left, because I had no idea of the best places to look. We focused mainly on the sandy floor and reddish rocks, and found nothing. When we returned to the cabin, I asked where we should have looked. Jesuslover340 informed me that the gray colored exposures were the places to find the best material. So, we came away empty handed, with only one major discovery. My wife wouldn't let me take it home, though... Continued in next post...
  3. Keeping fossils outside

    This is probably a rookie question, so I ask for your indulgence. I have several thousand fossils collected over 50 years. I have a couple of hundred that I keep in plastic storage boxes in the house (crinoid stems and segments, bivalves, some horn coral and other corals, the one trilobite that I purchased that is probably a fake). But the rest are outside in a rock garden in the backyard. We're talking about a lot of fossils. The first question is: When you have so many fossils, what do you do with them all? And secondly, I have many fossils found in clay (see images). Will the elements have any negative effect on them? I live in Michigan, so we get lots of rain, snow and freezing temperatures.
  4. Last week I drove out to Kentucky to spend a week with my family. Of course I also hit the fossil beds. The first day I visited the two Mississippian sites- Wax and Leitchfield that I visited last year. Here are some of the highlight finds of that day. First- Wax: Blastoids and bryozoans:
  5. I have three fossils I collected last week in Kentucky during a family visit. The first I know is a partial crinoid head, missing most of the calyx, but what genus/species? It was found near Leitchfield, KY in the Leitchfield Limestone, the Jimmy Dean member. The second, I don't know what it is. It was found in a layer that was rich in crinoid stem pieces. The locality is just north of Elizabethtown , KY. I don't know the formation, but it is certainly Mississippian. The last object I'm not sure is even a fossil though the thing on the bottom is a crinoid stem piece. I don't know if it is attached to the object in question. It was found at the same locality as the second fossil. I would like to thank TFF member Herb for leading me to these two localities. I welcome and all input. Thank you.
  6. My Fossil Finds.

    Here's a nice example of crinoid hash.
  7. From the album Lower Devonian

    Edriocrinus pocilliformis (partial crinoid calyx) Lower Devonian Kalkberg Formation Helderberg Group Route 20 road cut Leesville, NY.
  8. A Short Trip For Jurassic Limestone

    When our Plan A was killed we had to go to Plan B. Plan A was to visit a couple of old mines and sample the mine dumps for pyrite crystals and to try my hand at gold panning some of the tailings a little. This couldn't happen as there was some sort of bike race going up and down the canyon the mines were at the top of. Not wanting to waste the drive over there, we decided to visit the nearby limestone outcrops and viola! Pentacrinus crinoids! More pics
  9. Hey there! I'm sorry its been so long since I've posted on here but suffice it to say I need your help. I'm planning a six to seven day fossil hunting trip in Pennsylvania (sometime in mid august) and I need your help verifying that the sites I've picked to visit from Robert Beards guide Rock Hounding Pennsylvania are still accessible to collecting as well as coverable given my time frame. The places I'm looking at hunting are sites 27. Beltzville State Park (Outcrops on shoreline), 28. Lehighton, Lehigh Canal (Former borrow pit and outcrop),30. Deer Lake (Borrow Pit), 33. Suedberg (Outcrop in former borrow pit), 35. Centralia (Former strip mine outcrop), 38. Rockville (Former quarry), 48. Walker Lake (Hillside and unpaved road), 51. PPL Montour Preserve (Hillside, Former borrow pit), 57. Uniontown (Former quarry). Any insights as to whether or not theses sites are still accessible to collecting, weather our not you believe covering all these sites within 6 to 7 days is possible, and any other tips and tidbits of information on the sites, and or planning a large trip like this etc, would be greatly appreciated! When I go I'm planning to take notes and pictures and then, when i get back, write a few essays illustrated with pics that I will post on here! Thank you in advance, Glenn aka Fossil123
  10. Crinoid stem pieces from Brechin, Ontario

    From the album Ordovician

    Crinoid stem pieces Middle Ordovician Verulam Formation James Dick Quarry Brechin, Ontario
  11. (Note: this was originally posted under fossil trips) Hey there! I'm sorry its been so long since I've posted on here but suffice it to say I need your help. I'm planning a six to seven day fossil hunting trip in Pennsylvania (sometime in mid august) and I need your help verifying that the sites I've picked to visit from Robert Beards guide Rock Hounding Pennsylvania are still accessible to collecting as well as coverable given my time frame. The places I'm looking at hunting are sites 27. Beltzville State Park (Outcrops on shoreline), 28. Lehighton, Lehigh Canal (Former borrow pit and outcrop),30. Deer Lake (Borrow Pit), 33. Suedberg (Outcrop in former borrow pit), 35. Centralia (Former strip mine outcrop), 38. Rockville (Former quarry), 48. Walker Lake (Hillside and unpaved road), 51. PPL Montour Preserve (Hillside, Former borrow pit), 57. Uniontown (Former quarry). Any insights as to whether or not theses sites are still accessible to collecting, weather our not you believe covering all these sites within 6 to 7 days is possible, and any other tips and tidbits of information on the sites, and or planning a large trip like this etc, would be greatly appreciated! When I go I'm planning to take notes and pictures and then, when i get back, write a few essays illustrated with pics that I will post on here! Thank you in advance, and thank you to Fossil-Hound for directing me on were to properly post this! Glenn aka Fossil123
  12. The weekend of June 24th and 25th I participated in an outing with the New York Paleontological Society led by my friend, Ray McKinney to Brechin, Ontario. TFF Member Malcolm led our group into the James Dick quarry where both Bobycaygeon and Verulam Formations are exposed. These are Middle Ordovician from the Trenton Group and contain a wide variety of invertebrate fossil fauna. Also met other TFF members Kevin (Northern Sharks) and Joe (crinus). Most of the quarry is the Bobycaygeon and the very top is the Verulam- only accessible near the entrance, but I got some excellent well preserved matrix plates from there. I spent the second day combing the spoil piles. This first picture is Lake Simco by Beaverton where we stayed. Malcolm in the middle, explaining the quarry geology to NY Paleontological Society members.
  13. Please ID Crinoid Segment Placement

    I recently chiseled this piece out of a Mississippian road cut exposure in north Tn, Fort Payne Formation, with a generous assist from TFF member @Herb. I apologize for lack of proper scale, measuring approximately 6cm x 7cm x 5cm x 10cm. I used a dremel, soaking, and scrapping method to remove as much of the hard limestone, but cannot remove the rest as the dremel bounces off the solid crinoid hash remaining. I am having difficulty with identifying where this would fit on the crinoid unless it is something similar to the proximal stem and branching arms shown on the illustrated figure by Ausich, W., Brett, C., Hess, H., & Simms, M. (1999). Crinoid form and function. Fossil Crinoids. http://paleoinver.materias.gl.fcen.uba.ar/index.php/download_file/view/106/129/ I appreciate the help! Thank you, Leah Bottom Front (for reference) Side Top
  14. Blastoid and crinoid mix up

    I while back I acquired a collection of fossils,minerals, and rocks. They were apparently found at an estate sale before being bought and sold online, hence the prices on the labels (not what I paid for them). It was rather large and confusing, but I managed to figure a lot of it out. One bag, however, has crinoid and blastoid stems and calyxs (calyxi? Calyxese?) and six labels, none attached to the specimens. I was wonder if y'all could help me sort them out, because I'm confused. A few of the labels are just "crinoid stems", is it possible to get a better ID on them? I can take more pictures if needed.
  15. Mississippian Crinoid

    Here's a crinoid I found the other day in the Menard Limestone (Chesterian series). I'm not so sure of what genus it may belong to.
  16. From the album Middle Devonian

    Crinoid species? (5 inch stem piece) Middle Devonian Moscow Formation Windom Shale Hamilton Group Deep Springs Road quarry Lebanon, NY. By far the longest crinoid stem I've seen and collected from central New York. Matrix was weathered and unstable. Fossil was removed in eight pieces and reassembled.
  17. MF 9

    From the album WhodamanHD's Fossil collection.

    Crinoids
  18. Yesterday was a planned get together of TFF member friends at one of my favorite Middle Devonian localities- Deep Springs Road in Madison County southwest of Hamilton. It is the easternmost exposure of the Moscow Formation and the Windom Shale- the same formation exposed at Penn Dixie- but a very different faunal content. Biodiversity is the primary feature of this site and this outing added to an already long species list. This trip was actually a long time in planning. Frank (frank8147), a long time collector in New Jersey's Cretaceous streams, had been expressing to me a desire to visit Upstate New York and try his hand at Paleozoic collecting. He told me he and his girlfriend were planning a trip and once we were able to set a date- which was right on the heels of my own trip to Germany, I decided to invite a few other TFF friends. Tim (fossildude19), Dave (Darktooth), Diane (Mediospirifer), Dom (Dsailor), and Tony (njfossilhunter) were able to make it. Tony and I drove up together. Thanks Tony for all of that driving. Dom and Frank were new to the site. Tim and Dave brought family members and a good time was had by all. A rain shower in the middle of the afternoon drove some away, Diane and her husband, Tony, and I remained and I made most of my best finds late in the day. Here's a few pics: Here is (left to right) Dave, Tim, Tony, and Dave's older son.
  19. Knoxville Tennessee fossils

    Trying to get someone to lead my wife and I in the right direction for a good day of fossil hunting. We live in the Knoxville/Oak Ridge area of East Tennessee. Any directions to good sites would be greatly appreciated. Any good prospects in our area? Thanks guys!!
  20. General Education

    Two questions here, what are general things to look for when deciding whether a fossil is fake or real? Guidance asked for especially when it comes to Moroccan imports, and mosasaur anything, crinoids, and trilobites, as well as pleistocene mammal fossils. The latter question, is there any massive list of information sort of like an identification guide for fossils? I saw this massive list fruitbat had and its very impressive and I shall put it to use, but i feel it's almost a little bit beyond me at certain times, is there any just general all encompassing guide to identification?
  21. Valmeyeran Crinoids

    This may be a long shot, but here are a couple of crinoids I picked up at a roadcut near St. Louis. They aren't in the best condition, but they were a nice surprise. The roadcut exposes a portion of the Valmeyeran series (Mississippian).
  22. Hey Guys, family member are going to meet up at Sodus Point, NY for an outing during June 7 thru June 11. Sodus Point is located on Lake Ontario east of Rochester. Although I know of some fossil hunting locations in upper NY, they are all located around Buffalo. I would like to take my 5 year old niece out on a fossil hunting excursion. She is well on her way to being a rock nut and wants to be the first paleontologist on Mars. Love it. If any of you guys know of some productive sites that would be kid friendly and would be willing to share the location(s) it would be greatly appreciated. If you'd like PM me. I am aware of the Penn Dixie site, but that may be too far to go. Thanks )s
  23. Bryozoan? Coral? One or two species?

    I found several mixed pieces last weekend while out in southwest Virginia; bits that had tumbled down the hillside and into the road. This was along a road that follows the Holston River, in mostly limestone/shale. One piece was filled with crinoids (stems), from tiny to pencil diameter; one had meshy bryozoan pieces and brachiopods, then there was the piece that had this. Please bear with me, I've looked online, and in my books, but since I have no idea what I'm looking for, it complicates things, and I want to learn. In both examples, the coral-looking chamber/pore sections are alongside the mesh/bryozoan-looking sections, so I'm not even sure if I'm looking for one, or two separate, organisms. I'm sure whatever it is, it's probably very common in this area, but if someone could help ID it so I'll know next time, or at least point me in the direction of what I need to research, I'd be grateful. Thank you!
  24. Last week, after checking the weather wunderground numerous times, I decided to drive 3.5 hours from Chicago to St. Paul Stone Quarry. It was the last "open house" day according to the ESCONI website. I arrived at 7:45, the first and only person there. Shortly thereafter, after a brief safety instruction, I followed the manager to the collecting site, heaps and heaps of Waldron shale. Even though I dressed in layers, I still had to take breaks and warm up in the car for a few minutes, but I much rather prefer collecting in cold weather as opposed to hot summer sun with mosquitoes, any day. It didn't take too long to start finding fossils. Here are just a few of my finds: Eospirifer Platystrophia brachiopods with pyrite Platyceras niagarense encrusted with strophomenid, bryozoa and pyrite. front: back: Partial Dalmanitid Trilobite in matrix When prepping, it's really wonderful how the waldron "butter" shale just crumbles apart around the predictable morphology of an enrolled trilobite. The trip just wouldn't seem complete without a short drive east to the Cincinnati Arch roadcuts. I first went to South Gate and found a flexicalymene eroding right out of the cut. It is interesting to see the comparisons here. The trilobite on the left is from St Paul (Silurian) and has beautiful pyritized eyes. The one on the right is from South Gate (Ordovician). Both trilobites have 21 articulated segments; does this make them both the same age as "adults"? Interesting to note the difference in size, being 40 million years apart, same species.. Thanks for looking!
  25. Unknown crinoids from the UK

    Hi everyone, I've no exact location for this crinoid fossils, only just to say they are from the UK. Although there is some obvious crystal on the reverse and around the side if that's any help. Any additional help will be gladly received.
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