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Found 190 results

  1. I hit a new spot in Northeast Texas. This area is a mix or cretaceous and pleistocene. The rooted mosasaur tooth and my first croc tooth made my day. Both are super rare for this area. I also found the largest Enchodus jaw I've found since I started hunting four years ago.
  2. TOOTH?

    Found by a friend in Northern Florida. I thought it was a tooth to maybe Gavialosuchus? What are your thoughts?? Thank You.
  3. Help on Claw ID

    Hello everyone, I found this nice claw in South Dakota over the summer and have yet to find a definitive match for its identity. It's about a centimeter and a half long.
  4. Crocodile Teeth?

    All hello! These teeth, I found in Uzbekistan, Dzharakuduk. Turonian. I have them as teeth of a crocodile. It is correct? Tell me please!
  5. Here is a large crocodile block which I would like to trade in return for an upper Carboniferous British fossil. I found it at Mappleton, which is part of the Holderness coast, UK. This is by quite some distance the best crocodile fossil I have seen from the Holderness coast, and one of the best I have seen from any part of Yorkshire. I collect mainly Carboniferous fossils, and therefore although it is one of the rarest fossils I have in my collection, I have decided I would like to trade it for something Carboniferous. 22 large bones/skutes are visible on the sides, with a few smaller ones. Most of the remains exposed at the sides seem to be skutes, but there are also what appear to be ribs, a large object which may be a skute but I think it’s another type of bone, and what I think may be a limb bone (visible on last photo). As fossils got to the Holderness coast by glaciers, it’s exact geological origin is uncertain, but I strongly suspect it is from the Lias of North Yorkshire. Due to the very large size of the object, I can only trade it within the UK. Thanks, Daniel Wilby
  6. An Eocene summer

    It was a busy summer, and now it is snowing. I got out a few times this summer and here is my report for y'all's enjoyment. Most of my outings were into Wyoming's early Eocene. Way back in the spring I went to a newly discovered mammal site. I showed one jaw here: Here is a view of the site. This is the early Eocene Wind River Fm in central WY. (Wasathcian in age). Lots of land to look at out here, and I have only prospected a wee bit of it. My pack is down thereon the flats... let's see if we can find any fossils down there. OH, look... a mammal jaw. And can you find an additional bonus tooth in there? Right next to this there were a group of crocodile bones. Again... find the bones. I dug around quite a bit to try to find the source of these bones and got totally skunked. I usually get out into the Eocene beds of southwest WY on Labor day, but this year it happened a month late, so here are some pix from the first weekend of October. It starts getting cold at this time of year. The first photo is me at an abandoned oil well site where the oil folks had scraped up a limestone layer in their bulldozing. The layer has bones in it... mostly turtle pieces and lots of very small (and practically un-prepable) fish bones. If you break rocks long enough you will find good stuff. Below are a the best things I found on this visit. For those interested, these things are prepped with ye ole air abrasive under the microscope. Dolomite at about 20 psi. There is potential for the air abrasive to abrade the bones and I am not sure if these teeth got overly air abraded or are suffering form Eocene erosion. It is very slow prep, so I don't focus too much on this layer. First a little croc dentary. Note that the bone runs off the edge of the rock. I spent a long time looking for the rock that contains the rest of this jaw... again, skunked. But this is a good little find. The empty roundish area to the right of the jaw is the impression of a snail. fresh water snails of the genus Physa are the most common fossils. This next bone is the angular bone of a small croc. The angular is one of the bones in the lower jaw. The limestone layer is in the Wasatch Formation. After busting up enough rocks, I went to one of my favorite sites about a half mile away. Also in the Wasatch Fm. This layer sits just above the same limestone layer that I collected at the oil well site. Here I am digging. Note the weather is getting nicer; I have jettisoned the coat. This site is full of small randomly distributed fossils. Again, mostly turtle pieces, but also some good croc material and occasional mammal teeth and jaws. And here is a distant view of the quarry. The limestone with bones is seen as an small cliff just below my backpack. So, let's look at a few fossils. First an emerging soft shelled turtle piece ( a costal plate). That is a dental pick for scale. The digging here is best done slowly so you don't break the bones. You can see other pieces of bones in here. The first photo in the next post is the same turtle piece fully exposed.
  7. Hi, This summer I collected a handful of microfossils from outcrops of the late cretaceous Frenchman formation in southern Saskatchewan. The Frenchman is stratigraphically equivalent to and geographically near the Hell Creek formation, and both represent a more or less equivalent terrestrial environment and time period - that is, a terminal cretaceous swampy river delta. Crocodilians were definitely the most abundant among my finds, as well as plant fossils and nondescript dinosaurian bone fragments, but I'd like to share a few oddballs, as well as a tooth, for identification. First is this thing - it's certainly a piece of a skull, but it's a little too small for me to determine if it's fossilized or not. It could very well be from a modern animal. It may be difficult to make out in the photo, but the side without the tiny holes in it actually has some skull suture lines on its surface, Secondly is this piece, which appears to be a scute of some kind. While I encountered many crocodilian scutes on this trip, this one stood out because of its small size and completeness. I don't have a photo, but the person I was collecting with found a similar one that had what looked like enamel on the smooth side, Finally is this tooth. It's the only tooth we found, and it seems to be from a crocodilian, but I'd like a confirmation and possibly more information if possible, Side view: Lingual view: Facial view: Root: Thanks for your attention. Here's some bonus photos from the trip of a metasequoia pinecone and the K-Pg boundary as seen in the field,
  8. Fish/crocodile skeleton?

    Good afternoon, I found these here today in Travis county, Texas after a good storm rolled through. I commonly find sea urchin fossils, shark teeth, and oysters from this creek. Thanks
  9. Purse Park, MD

    A few hours relaxing and finding teeth.
  10. Croc tooth? Aquia formation

    Hello all, first post on the forums despite joining awhile ago. Last winter I was fortunate enough to have some serious luck at Purse State Park in 2 consecutive trips while I was on break. Thanks to @Williamb55I was able to finally muster some motivation to seek some help to ID what I believe is a Crocodile tooth and Otodus from the Paleocene Epoch. Of course this could be inaccurate but I would love some insight into my find, comments and replies are appreciated. Best, DF
  11. Crocodile Tooth?

    Hi all, Just wanted to ask around and see if anyone had an answer for this. I purchased this tooth, labeled as an extinct crocodile species - Crocodylus/Kentisuchus Spenceri. Upon doing some research, I find myself confused - Wikipedia says that this species has only been found in England, France & Ukraine. My specimen is from Morocco. If it isn’t the species I mentioned, what is it? Specimen is just over an inch long. Thanks, Nate
  12. Need help

    so i went to Orlando Science Center today for the Dino Digs exhibition but in Jurassic Ridge dig pit area i know that there is a Camptosaurus, Camarasaurus, Ceratosaurus and a Stegosaurus, but there is some species and genus of dinosaurs and other animals that i dont know what there like take for example the turtle shell, the alligator crocodile like animal fossil, the ankylosaur like fossil and that bone that i dont know what species does it belong to and that nest that i don't know which dinosaur does it belong to.
  13. Possible horse and crocodile tooth

    Found these two teeth in a creek in north texas. I believe the first may be a partial horse and the second a crocodile? Any help would be appreciated as always.
  14. Finally: croc teeth?

    After years of finding zero crocodile teeth, I found three in one day on spoil piles miles apart. Since they’re new to me, I’m bringing them here for positive ID. Thanks!
  15. Crocodile tooth

    I have this crocodile tooth from Morocco Kem Kem Beds and was hoping if somenone could tell the species
  16. Unknown tooth

    Hi everyone, I’m new here and this is my first ID question post! I’ve found two of these in my searches, but this is the more interesting of the two with its lovely core. Pulled it out of a literal gravel pile near New Bern, NC. Thanks for the help! Frank
  17. Steneosaurus tooth

    From the album Holzmaden

    A 2 cm long Steneosaurus tooth (crocodile) from the lower Jurassic from the quarry Kromer near Holzmaden (Germany). Sadly its a bit damaged. Another picture:
  18. This was found in Big Brook NJ. It looks most similar to this Thoracosaurus neocesariensis scute on: http://www.njfossils.net/crocodile.html Could it be? It is very light and shell-like. About 2cm x 2cm.
  19. Steneosaurus tooth

    From the album Holzmaden

    A 2 cm long Steneosaurus tooth (crocodile) with a belemnite fragment from the lower Jurassic from the quarry Kromer near Holzmaden (Germany). Two detailed pictures: Sadly the tooth is broken and a little piece is missng.
  20. Baby Crocodile?

    Hi there - new here. Found this at Rockaway beach in New York. I don't think it's a fossil but I think it's a bone. My best guess is that it's the middle section of a baby crocodile skull, but I have 0-5% confidence in that, especially considering the location. I was trying to find pictures online, but couldn't find anything with a cross-section, which would be most useful. 2 friends said it's a peach pit, and 1 friend said it's coral, but the symmetry (especially from the sides) makes me think otherwise. But if it is indeed something silly, please excuse my foolishness.
  21. Morocco crocodile????

    This is a “pterosaurs” jaw I got as a gift a little bit ago. It was sold as a pterosaurs jaw with composite teeth the species is Siroccopteryx But Am almost 100% sure that it is wrongly identified it looks like a crocodile jaw maybe. So if someone can help me identify the jaw that would be amazing. It was found in the kem kem beds and is 2.3 inches long
  22. Morocco crocodile????

    This is a “pterosaurs” jaw I got as a gift a little bit ago. It was sold as a pterosaurs jaw with composite teeth the species is Siroccopteryx But Am almost 100% sure that it is wrongly identified it looks like a crocodile jaw maybe. So if someone can help me identify the jaw that would be amazing.
  23. Mosasaurus or Croc

    Found this yesterday while hunting with the family, in Big Brook. Can't tell if it's Croc, Mosasaurus, or something else. I forgot to include a ruler in the pictures, but the fragment is about 5 inches in length. Any help on how to safely remove the green sand stuck to it would be greatly appreciated.
  24. That’s what I see but im not and expert(yet). Any info greatly appreciated thanks!
  25. So, I've been hunting sharks teeth on and off in South Alabama since a young child. Since my two kids have gotten self sufficient, me and the wife have been taking alot of trips to the river to look for teeth. Finding the normal small teeth, for our area, got me to wondering if there were bigger teeth in our area. That led me to some late nights of researching the ins and outs of my area. The area we are close to has alot of Eocene era fossils and I quickly learned the Carcharocles auriculatus was THE SHARK during this time period. So, my goal became to find a complete tooth in my little honey hole. We would spend weekend after weekend at the river with the kids. My 8yo and 3yo right there with us digging and sifting! Both who want nothing more than to become paleontologist when they get older and sit there picking out ray plates, vertebrae, and teeth with excitement growing every time they see something in the sifter. Over the past several weeks, we have dug 100s of teeth and many other cool fossils which I have added to our collection but just chips of the elusive Carcharocles auriculatus teeth were all we were finding. Last night while at church, I was talking with a family about our finds thus far. You could see their kid's eyes lighting up with curiosity and they asked if we could take them sometime. We had originally planned on taking time to do some house stuff but I could tell their kids really wanted to go. We made a plan to meet this morning before the rain. We made the long hike to the hunting grounds and began to dig and sift. One after the other, the kids and their parents were yelling with excitement finding their first teeth! I was digging around getting dirt for them to sift when I felt that unmistakable sound of hitting something solid. I cleaned around the area and I saw a serrated edged tooth. Surely not...not a complete tooth. I carefully cleaned around the area to make sure not to damage it. I couldn't believe my eyes. A full tooth! I began to shake a little with excitement. I pulled it from the earth and showed everyone. This only pumped them up even more. Although this tooth is rare for our area, we kept digging with no luck of finding another one. The rain began to come in so we cut the trip short but I've babied this thing around all day, picking it up to make sure it is real and I wasn't dreaming. I know it's no 4" tooth but for me, it may as well be. It's become an infatuation for me and the family, so much so I have been looking at planning a family vacation around fossil hunting. My 8yo has expressed alot of interest in finding a megalodon tooth. So, if you guys and gals know of a good place I can take the family to do something like this please share! Below are a few pictures of the things we have found over the past few months as well as my Carcharocles auriculatus tooth I found today.
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