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  1. BellamyBlake

    Sarcosuchus or Suchomimus?

    I have here a 1.5" tooth that was sold to me as Sarcosuchus from the Cretaceous of Niger. It's been brought to my attention that this may instead be Suchomimus. After comparing photographs, I believe that Suchomimus is accurate. I'd appreciate more eyes on this. Which one might this be? Thank you, Bellamy
  2. Hi all, I had posted about this tooth years ago and the conclusion back then was that its preservation was too poor for any proper ID. I am hoping that with new information we can at least determine if this is a crocodile or theropod. I discovered today that this tooth preserved some serrations First up, this tooth was acquired from a source with many Mongolian material. He called this an Alioramus tooth but I am not comfortable calling it that yet Secondly, a museum curator (who has handled Mongolian material) examined this tooth in person. He concluded this tooth was
  3. I posted this one alongside a few other teeth, but it didn't get as much traction as I hoped. It's the one I was most curious about, and extremely unusual to me, so I figured posting it individually would be helpful. This is a Moroccan crocodile tooth from Kem Kem. It is serrated, and dagger-shaped, 1.02" long and 0.32" wide. Out of those I have consulted, Troodon proposed Hamadasuchus, though yielded that the dagger-shape is not consistent with those he had seen with those: I've essentially used all of my leads over these few days. If anyone has a different theory, I would
  4. BellamyBlake

    Uzbekistan & Morocco Crocodile Teeth

    I have here two crocodile teeth from the Bissekty Formation of Uzbekistan, and one from Morocco. I'd appreciate any help identifying them. Uzbekistan I 1.28" long, 0.39" wide
  5. BellamyBlake

    Deinosuchus

    I have here a tooth alleged to be Deinosuchus from the Aguja of Brewester County, Texas. It's 1" long. Does it appear to be so? And how would this be differentiated from other crocodile teeth in that formation? Thank you, Bellamy
  6. BellamyBlake

    Sarcosuchus sp?

    I have here two teeth identified as Sarcosuchus sp. from Kem Kem, Morocco. They don't look like any Sarcosuchus teeth I've seen. Many here are more knowledgeable than I am about crocodiles. Based on these views, can they be identified as such? These are two different teeth. The first one is 4.2 cm long and nearly 2 cm across the base. The latter is 7 cm and 2.5 cm across the base. Thank you, Bellamy
  7. Yasmin95

    part vertebra croc?

    I have this piece, crocodile?, which I think is a part of a vertebra?. It looks like the are zygapophyses visable and I think the grove should be the neuralcanal. But I am not sure, con someone shine a light on it? Measurements: 70x60x36mm Thank you
  8. BellamyBlake

    Moroccan Crocodile Tooth

    I have a 1" dagger-shaped tooth from the Kem Kem. I bought it as a crocodile tooth. The way it's shaped I assumed it was a fish fang, but the enamel looks pretty much like a crocodile's. Here are the only photographs I have access to for the time; is it identifiable? Thank you, Bellamy
  9. Hi, this just arrived along with a few other teeth, and I was wondering if it was possible to identify which species it could be. It’s a Crocodile indet. tooth from the Morrison Formation Is all I know. Thank you for any reply’s
  10. DinoFossilsUK

    Help with UK Dinosaur/Reptile Vertebra ID

    I'm trying to help someone ID this vertebra found in Gloucester, UK a few years ago. It's from a Jurassic site and I'm pretty sure it's a theropod vertebra but was wondering if anyone on the forum could help out? I have a theropod tooth from the same place which I might post soon in the hope of narrowing down an ID too. Thanks in advance!
  11. Yasmin95

    Moroccan Jaw

    Guess who's back I have this piece of I think a left lower jaw from either a crocodile or dinosaur. If I look at the toothsockets they are for round teeth, so crocodile (looking at the size Elosuchus?) or spinosaurid. I am leaning more towards a crocodil. Size: 18x6x2cm Thank you
  12. Hello all Up for trade I offer this nice set of Shark tooth Hill teeth from Kern County California. In return for this set, or individual teeth I would like to get crocodile or crocodile-like (alligator, Phytosaurs...) teeth from as many various locations/species as possible. This group of animals is a bit underappreciated I think, but last time I lend some fossils to the local school, there were some crocodile teeth among them and the kids really loved them and that surprised me a bit. Anyway, I hope I can expand my crocodile collection a bit. These teeth a
  13. FF7_Yuffie

    Kem Kem Croc bone

    Hello, This caught my eye. It's sold as a crocodile bone from the Kem Kem beds, but the fact it's hollow makes me think it might actually be theropod. Are croc bones hollow? It is 9 inches by 3.5 by 2.7.
  14. sjaak

    croc tooth

    Hello, Found this tiny tooth of about 1 x 1 cm in marine Jurassic sediment in the Boulonnais. North of France. Could this be a marine crocodile tooth, such as machimosaurus? Regards, Niels
  15. Rycomerford

    UK Marine Reptile Teeth

    Hello all, I've had two teeth in my collection for many years now. I've recently moved and lost the supplied ID labels that came with them. I've taken this as a nice opportunity to see what others may think they are. I believe if memory serves me right the large tooth (Tooth A in photos) was labeled as a Simolestes. Then the smaller tooth tip (Tooth B in photos) labeled as Liopleurodon. I know both were found in the Wicklesham pit in Faringdon, Oxfordshire, UK. Upon some research, I found an article from 2014 with a Dakosaurus tooth discovered to be the largest in the UK at the ti
  16. Hello, this is my first post on the forum so firstly I apologise if I have done anything wrong. I brought these teeth a number of years ago and have only just got round to sorting them out. The first one was listed as Jurassic crocodile tooth and the second as Jurassic Plesiosaur tooth, they both come from the Oxford clay around Peterborough. I would really like to put a species name to these teeth if possible so any help would be greatly appreciated. My initial thoughts were Metriorhynchus for the crocodile tooth and Cryptoclidus for the Plesiosaur but I am a complete amateur and would love s
  17. Merry Christmas to everybody! I am just catching up posting some cool finds from a few short trips I've made recently in Maryland--going back through time--Miocene, Eocene, Paleocene. (In the interest of time, I'm only posting the highlights, not everything I found, and not all of what my kids found.) Miocene-- After some heavy rains I snuck out early on a Friday for a quick solo trip to the Calvert Cliffs. Conditions were actually not great, as the water was still a little muddy and the waves were pretty rough due to blustery winds. After a couple of hours I was not finding much
  18. Here's a third North American Alligatorid named this year, discovered in the Late Cretaceous Atlantic coast, from New Jersey to Mississippi. This follows a post I made on Friday, Dec. 18, concerning two others discovered this year: 3. Deinosuchus schwimmeri A systematic review of the giant alligatoroid Deinosuchus from the Campanian of North America and its implications for the relationships at the root of Crocodylia ABSTRACT: Deinosuchus is a lineage of giant (≥10 m) Late Cretaceous crocodylians from North America. These were the largest semiaquatic predators in
  19. Two new species of Alligatorids were discovered this year, one in Florida, another in Texas. The one from Florida seems to bridge the extinct A. mefferdi, to the extant A. mississippiensis, sharing characteristics of both. 1. Alligator hailensis New early Pleistocene Alligator (Eusuchia: Crocodylia) from Florida bridges a gap in Alligator evolution ABSTRACT: The American Alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) is one of two species of Alligator in the modern world. It is only distantly related to the other extant species (A. sinensis), with much closer relatives known from
  20. Mahnmut

    Simosuchus ct anatomy

    Hello together, I am not entirely sure if the fossil ID section is the right place for this, but I am hoping for information on a fossil specimen, its not one I hold in hands, but a ct scan, and I think I may not post pictures because they are copyrighted. While looking for new inspirations for my model building I took a close look at this wonderful ct scan of a Simosuchus clarki skull. A pugnosed crocodile, how sweet is that? I wonder two things: -how is that bilateral bone called that in many crocodiles protrudes downwards from the skullbase reaching between the ma
  21. pachy-pleuro-whatnot-odon

    Marine reptile tooth ID Lyme Regis

    Hi all, Bought this tooth online a while back. It was sold to me as "Ichthyosaurus platyodon" (which I understand to mean Temnodontosaurus platyodon) from Lyme Regis. Likely found by the seller themselves, as I know they occasionally collect fossils there. However, for the following reasons, I'm not sure about this attribution: Overall, the tooth doesn't look like your typical ichthyosaur tooth to me: It has more of an oval rather than round cross-section It's labolingually flattened Messial and distal carinae run the full length of the cr
  22. FF7_Yuffie

    Croc or Spino

    Hello, I won this last night. Sold as Spino, but I have my doubts cos of how thin it is and the fact it went for a really low price makes me think it is also croc. If someone can take a look, that would be great. If spino, then I gotba bargain. If croc, well, it is still a lower than normal price and will be nice on my crocodile vertebra row. Sorry for screenshot pics, im on phone so cant save directly. It is from Kem Kem basin. 2.16 inch. 216 g in weight. Many thanks
  23. Hi all, I recently took some more interest in crocodile vertebrae, an area that I haven't really touched on before. Now I already knew that the vertebrae of marine crocodiles differ from those of more terrestrial species as Thalattosuchia have platycoelous vertebral centrums, whereas other crocodylomorphs have procoelous vertebrae. Within Thalattosuchia, however, the two major branches superficially (at least) seem to have rather similar "waisted" vertebrae. So, what I was wondering about was how one can tell Metriorhynchid vertebrae apart from Teleosaurid ones. Anyone here that could hel
  24. Haravex

    Kem kem id part iv

    The first one is somthing I cant assign to a family, the closest is this example of therizinosaurid
  25. Hi again. I have another one for you. I think I could tell if it wasn't broken! Found in green mill run. It is 1.5 inches or 3.8 cm. There is a definite ridge on one side. I tried to get a good picture of its location, the cavity seems slightly oval. Thank you again! I really appreciate you all teaching and helping me!
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